US2579383A - Electrically heated vest - Google Patents

Electrically heated vest Download PDF

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Publication number
US2579383A
US2579383A US10372949A US2579383A US 2579383 A US2579383 A US 2579383A US 10372949 A US10372949 A US 10372949A US 2579383 A US2579383 A US 2579383A
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Prior art keywords
vest
heating pad
front
portion
pocket
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Expired - Lifetime
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Felix K Goudsmit
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Felix K Goudsmit
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B3/00Ohmic-resistance heating
    • H05B3/20Heating elements having extended surface area substantially in a two-dimensional plane, e.g. plate-heater
    • H05B3/34Heating elements having extended surface area substantially in a two-dimensional plane, e.g. plate-heater flexible, e.g. heating nets or webs
    • H05B3/342Heating elements having extended surface area substantially in a two-dimensional plane, e.g. plate-heater flexible, e.g. heating nets or webs heaters used in textiles
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B2203/00Aspects relating to Ohmic resistive heating covered by group H05B3/00
    • H05B2203/002Heaters using a particular layout for the resistive material or resistive elements
    • H05B2203/003Heaters using a particular layout for the resistive material or resistive elements using serpentine layout
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B2203/00Aspects relating to Ohmic resistive heating covered by group H05B3/00
    • H05B2203/036Heaters specially adapted for garment heating

Description

Dec. 18, 1951 F. K. GouDsMlT ELECTRICALLY. HEATED VEST 2 SPEETS--S-IEET l Filed July 8, 1949 AW mm ND nu W. O G

Z 4.K m

F. K.GOUDSM1T ELECTRICALLY HEATED VEST 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 sees l/ 62 INVENTOR.

FEUX K. GOUDSMIT NIMA/5V Dec. 18, 1951 Filed July 8, 1949 Patented Dec. 18, 195.1

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICEA ELECTRICALLY HEATED VEST Felix K. Goudsmit, Larchmont, N. Y.

Application July 8, 1949, Serial No. 103,729

(Gl. 21B-46) 2 Claims. l

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in electrically heated vests.

More particularly, the present invention proposes the construction of a vest having an electrically operated heating pad mounted in the back thereof predominately to be worn by persons engaged in out-oi-door sports activities during cold weather; such as skiers, golfers, skaters, hunters or persons attending out-of-door sports activities such as football games, soccer matches and skating contests, but which is equally adapted to be worn by householders for added warmth or by persons in hospitals or other places for therapeutic and alleviative purposes; such as the treatment of lumbago and other similar back ailments.

Another object of the present invention proposes forming the vest with a front opening and a closely fitting neck opening in a manner to substantially completely enclose the chest area of the body to retain heat from the heating pad.

A still further object of the present invention proposes mounting the heating pad in the back of the Vest between two layers of cloth-like insulation material in a manner to retain the heat for a greater length of time.

The present invention further proposes positioning the heating pad within a pocket formed in the back of the vest which has a bottom opening closed by a fastening means in a manner so that the heating pad can be removed from the pocket permitting the vest to be cleaned independently of the heating pad and to permit'the heating pad to be removed for replacement or adjustment when required.

A further object of the present invention proposes forming the pad of a plurality of heating elements connected in parallel with a thermostatic control for each of the elements in a manner to break the circuit through the heating elements when the internal temperature of the pad reaches 180 F.

Still another object of the present invention proposes providing the pad with a short cord extended to the exterior of the vest and provided with a plug adapted to be connected with an extension cord which in turn is to be connected with a conventional 110 volt electric circuit in a manner to energize the heating pad and bring the internal temperature of the vest up to 189 F. which temperature will be retained for a period of time by the insulation material after which the temperature must be revived by reconnecting the heating pad with the electric circuit.

A further object of the present invention proposes the formation of a vest embodying the principles of the present invention, but designed primarily for use in the home or hospitals for therapeutic treatments.

It is a further object of the present invention to construct a novel vest which is effective for its intended purposes, which is simple and durable and which can be manufactured and sold at a reasonable cost.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of an electrically heated vest constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a rear elevational View of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged partial Vertical sectional view taken on the line 3 3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged partial side elevational view looking in the direction of the line 4--4 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is a rear elevational view of the heating pad, per se.

Fig. 6 is a rear perspective view of the electrically heated vest constructed in accordance with a modification of the present invention.

Fig. 'l is a front elevational view of Fig. 6.

Fig. 8 is an enlarged Vertical sectional view of the back portion of the vest taken on the line 8--8 of Fig. 6.

Fig. 9 is an enlarged partial elevational view of the inside of one corner of the rear portion of the vest.

Fig. 10 is a rear elevational view of the heating pad, per se, used in the form of the invention shown in Figs. 6 to 9.

The electrically heated vest, according to the first form of the invention shown in Figs. 1 to 5, includes a vest body 20 having a front portion 2| and a rear portion 22. The vest body 20 is formed with a close fitting V-shaped neck opening 23 which is essential in order that the vest body substantially completely enclose the chest portion of the body to retain heat within the vest body. The front portion 2l of the vest body 20 is formed with a front opening 24 which extends from the neck opening 23 downward to the bottom edge of the vest body and which is closed by means of buttons 25. V

On opposite sides of the front opening 24, the

front portion 2l of the vest body is formed with pockets 26 having top openings closed by means of conventional slide fasteners 21.

The front and back portions of the vest body are comprised of an outer layer 28 of cloth, leather or other similar material and an inner lining layer 29. Between the layers 28 and 29 there are two insulation layers 36 formed of wool 0r the like.

Within the center of the back portion .22 of the vest body "26,' lines of vstitches 3| v are engaged through the layers 28, 29 and 36 dividing oif a pocket 32, see Fig. 3, between the insulation layers 38. Positioned within the pocket 32 there is a conventionally constructed heating pad 33.'

The heating pad 33 is composed of an outer cover 34 of water resistant electrical insulation nia--v terial enclosing a plurality of heating elements 35 connected in parallel across a pair of velectric leads 36. The electric leads 36 are extensions of a short length of electric cord 31 provided at its free end with a receptor plug 38. Mounted in eachof the heating elements 35, intermediate the length thereof, there is a thermostat 39 for breaking the circuit through the heating elements Y when the internal Itemperature of the heating pad 33 reaches. 180 F. Further details ofA the construction of the heating pad will not be given as such details, beyond the temperature at which 4the thermostat 39 shuts off the heating pad, form no part of the present invention and are gen,- erally known bythose skilled in the art.

The bottom corner ofl the back portion 22 of the vest body 26 is formed with 'a tunnel 48, see Fig. 4, which terminates in fan opening 4|, between the adjacent vertical edges of the front portion 2| and the back portion 22, through which the free end of the electric cord31 and the receptor plug 38 are extended. Externally of the vest body 20, the receptor plug 38 is adapted to receive the prongs 42, see Fig. l, of a plug 43 mounted on one end of a length of electric cord 44. The other end of the electric cord 44 is formed with a plug 45 which is adapted to be insertedinto the receptacle of a conventional 110 volt electric circuit for supplying the required electrical current to energize the heating pad 33. When the vest is thoroughly heated, the plug 45fis within drawn from the receptacle and the plug 43 is disconnected from the receptor plug 38 and the cord 44 can be rolled up and stored within one of the pockets 26. The insulation layers 36 will act to retain the heat within the vest body 20 fora period of time varying from one-half `to one full hour depending on the outside temperature, after which the heating pad 33 must be reconnected with the source of electric current for re-heating the vest body.

' The back portion 22 is formed along its bottom with an opening 46 closed by means of conventional slide fasteners 41 for removably retaining the heating pad 33 in position within the pocket 32. When the opening 46 is open, it is possible to-remove the heating pad 33 from the pocket 32 permitting the vest body 2|] to be cleanedindependently of the heating pad or permitting the heating pad 33 to be repaired orreplaced, if

necessary. When removing the heating pad 33 from the pocket 32, it is iirst necessary to draw the cord 31 and the receptor plug 38 into the pocket 32 through the opening 4| and the tunnel 46.

In the modified form of the vest shown in Figs. 6 to 10, there is a vest body 56 having a front portion 5| and a back portion 52. The front i portion 5| is separate of the back portion 52 and is in the form of a panel to extend across the back of the wearer. The back portion 52 is shaped to cover the lumbar region of the human back and is comprised of an outer layer 53 and an inner or lining layer 54. The outer layer 53 is formed of leather, cloth or other similar material and the lining layer 54 is preferably of cloth material.

VVinsulation layers 55 vfor.

Between the layers 53 and 54 there is a pair of .ing between them a pocket 56, se Fig. 8, vfor containing a heating pad 51. The top and side edges of the layers 53, 54 and 55 are secured together by lines of .stitches 58, see Fig. 8.

, 59 for4 the pocket 56 closed by slide fasteners forcing piece 15.

' The bottom edges ofthe layers 53, 54 and 55 are freeof each other forming a bottom opening which is arranged to be 66. When the slide fasteners 68 are open, the heating pad 51 can be removed from the pocket 56 through the bottom opening 59.

As in the previous form of the invention, the heating pad`51 is comprised of an outer cover 6| of moisture resistant electric insulation material, which encloses a plurality of heating elements 62, see Fig. l0, connected in parallel across a pair of electric` leads 63 which continue from `the bottom corner of the heating pad 51 as a long electric cord 64. The electric cord 64 iseX- tended from the interior of the pocket 56 through an enlarged hole 65 formed in the lining layer 54 and adjacent insulation layer 55, see Fig. 9. At its free end, the long electric cord 64 is provided with a plug 66, see Fig. 6, which is adapted to be inserted into the receptacle of a conventional volt electric circuit, as described in connection with the iirst form of the invention. Mounted in each of the electric heating elements 62 there is :a thermostat 61, of conventionalconstruction, for breaking the circuit through the heating elements when the internal tempera'- ture of the heating pad reaches F.

A pair of belt members 68 having their rear ends connected to the rear face of the bottom corners of the back portion 52 and have their free ends projected across the front face of the front portion 5|. The free ends of the belt member 68 are projected through loops 69 mounted on the front face of the front portion 5|. The free end of one of the belt members 68 is provided with a buckle 10 having a tongue 1| selectively-engageable with complementary holes formed in the free end of the other belt member 68 for adjustably connecting the belt members 68about the wearers waist. l

A pair of shoulder straps I ends connected to the top portions of the belt members 68 and their front ends attached to the top of the front portion 5|, to extend over the shoulders of the wearer. In order to insure maximum snugness of the back portion 52 against the lumbar region of the back of the wearer, aV pair of straps 14 having their inner ends secured to the top of the back portion 52 beneath a rein- The outer ends of the straps 14 carry clamps 16, of any known design, by which those outer ends are adjustably connected with the shoulder straps 13 intermediate of their ends permitting the attachment of the outer ends of the straps 14 to be adjusted to lit diilerent sized persons.

It is thought that the operation of the form of the invention shown in Figs. 6 to 10 will be apparent when considered in connection with the description of the rst form of the invention and,

13 having their rear therefore, a detailed explanation of the operation of the modified form of the invention is believed to be unnecessary.

W'hile I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise constructions herein disclosed and the right is reserved to all changes and modications coming within the scope of the invention as dened in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:

1. An electrically heated vest, comprising a front portion and a separate back portion, a pocket formed within said back portion and naving a bottom opening, an electric heating' pad enclosed within said pocket, means closing the bottom opening of said pocket, said back member having its sides converged upward to a reduced top portion, horizontal belt members having their rear ends connected to the bottom corners of said back portion, means for connecting together the free front ends of said belt members in iront ci said front portion, shoulder straps having their front ends secured to the top of said front portion and their rear ends connected to said belt mem bers closely adjacent said back portion, and straps having their inner ends connected to the reduced top portion of said back portion and their outer ends connected to said shoulder straps intermediate of their ends.

2. An electrically heated vest, comprising a front portion and a separate back portion, a

pocket formed within said back portion and having a bottom opening, an electric heating pad enclosed within said pocket, means closing the bottom opening of said pocket, said back member having its sides converged upward to a reduced top portion, horizontal belt members having their rear ends connected to the bottom corners of said back portion, means for connecting together the free front ends of said belt members in front of said front portion, shoulder straps having their front ends secured to the top of said front portion and their rear ends connected to said belt members closely adjacent said back portion, and straps having their inner ends connected to the reduced top portion of said back portion and their outer ends connected to said shoulder straps intermediate of their ends, said outer ends of said last mentioned straps being adjustably connected to the shoulder straps by means of clamps.

FELIX K. GOUDSMIT.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:I

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,691,472 Graham et al. Nov. 13, 1928 1,736,590 Graham et al Nov. 19, 1929 2,021,458 Macy Nov. 19, 1935 2,277,772 Marick Mar. 31, 1942 2,287,915 Taylor June 30, 1942 2,329,766 Jacobsen Sept. 21, 1943 2,339,409 Joy et al. Jan. 18, 1944 2,401,360 Lobl June 4, 1946 2,456,468 Theodore Dec. 14, 1948 2,458,119 Van Daam Jan. 4, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 154,814 Great Britain Dec. 9, 1920 365,103 Italy Nov. 23, 1938 546,812 Great Britain July 30, 1942

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Cited By (44)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2627018A (en) * 1951-05-07 1953-01-27 Robert B Duren Therapeutic heater
US2697775A (en) * 1953-03-06 1954-12-21 Lewis F Schleifer Electric comforter and blanket
US2869551A (en) * 1957-01-28 1959-01-20 Douglas G Chandler Electrical therapeutic jacket
US2961526A (en) * 1958-01-21 1960-11-22 Northern Electric Co Electric heating appliance
US3020376A (en) * 1956-12-31 1962-02-06 Libbey Owens Ford Glass Co Laminated plastic articles and method of making the same
US3084241A (en) * 1961-02-08 1963-04-02 Genevieve C Carrona Electrically heated garment
US3108175A (en) * 1961-12-18 1963-10-22 Essex Wire Corp Electrically heated fabrics
US3173419A (en) * 1962-07-10 1965-03-16 Dubilier William Relaxer device
US3443067A (en) * 1966-12-07 1969-05-06 Burton D Morgan Electric towel assembly
US3452362A (en) * 1967-04-12 1969-07-01 Us Army Torso armor carrier
US3778590A (en) * 1971-06-02 1973-12-11 Kohkoku Chemical Ind Co Suit for keeping warmth in water
US3839621A (en) * 1972-08-11 1974-10-01 H Hariu Body heating device
US4061897A (en) * 1976-01-23 1977-12-06 Audrae Thykeson Heating pad
US4314144A (en) * 1979-10-29 1982-02-02 Eaton Corporation Thermostat mounting arrangement for electric heating appliance
US4346277A (en) * 1979-10-29 1982-08-24 Eaton Corporation Packaged electrical heating element
US4827102A (en) * 1988-06-08 1989-05-02 Baker Michael E Heating system
US4927366A (en) * 1989-09-08 1990-05-22 Environwear, Inc. Fused electrical connector with sewing wings
US5008517A (en) * 1989-09-08 1991-04-16 Environwear, Inc. Electrically heated form-fitting fabric assembly
US5032705A (en) * 1989-09-08 1991-07-16 Environwear, Inc. Electrically heated garment
US5101515A (en) * 1991-03-27 1992-04-07 Holt Patricia A Jacket pack
US5471767A (en) * 1994-06-02 1995-12-05 Nu-Stuf, Inc. Body warming device
US5893991A (en) * 1996-09-24 1999-04-13 Newell; Bertha L. Battery operated heating system for a vest or a jacket
US5977517A (en) * 1998-07-09 1999-11-02 Grosjean; Douglas Martin Electrically heated vest
US6145551A (en) * 1997-09-22 2000-11-14 Georgia Tech Research Corp. Full-fashioned weaving process for production of a woven garment with intelligence capability
US6315009B1 (en) 1998-05-13 2001-11-13 Georgia Tech Research Corp. Full-fashioned garment with sleeves having intelligence capability
FR2813854A1 (en) * 2000-09-14 2002-03-15 Nebor Emmanuel Bilala Heated life jacket has sealed cavity between rigid inner and outer walls containing floats and heat sources
US6381482B1 (en) 1998-05-13 2002-04-30 Georgia Tech Research Corp. Fabric or garment with integrated flexible information infrastructure
US6474367B1 (en) 1998-09-21 2002-11-05 Georgia Tech Research Corp. Full-fashioned garment in a fabric and optionally having intelligence capability
US20040002239A1 (en) * 2002-06-28 2004-01-01 George Marmaropoulos Mechanism for electrically connecting an electronic device to a garment
US6687523B1 (en) 1997-09-22 2004-02-03 Georgia Tech Research Corp. Fabric or garment with integrated flexible information infrastructure for monitoring vital signs of infants
US6970731B1 (en) 1998-09-21 2005-11-29 Georgia Tech Research Corp. Fabric-based sensor for monitoring vital signs
US20060059597A1 (en) * 2004-09-20 2006-03-23 Larocco Caroline L Foldable, decorative adult bib
US7100211B2 (en) * 2003-04-21 2006-09-05 Bruffett Lynda L Bib having an internal pocket for storing items
US7299964B2 (en) 2004-01-15 2007-11-27 Georgia Tech Research Corp. Method and apparatus to create electrical junctions for information routing in textile structures
US20080116189A1 (en) * 2006-11-22 2008-05-22 Products Of Tomorrow, Inc. Heated garment
US20090032523A1 (en) * 2007-07-31 2009-02-05 Jill Youngblood Conformable heating pad
US20100212062A1 (en) * 2005-04-26 2010-08-26 Sperian Protective Apparel, Ltd. Protective garment comprising at least one tapered pocket
US20110000009A1 (en) * 2009-07-02 2011-01-06 Culpepper E Alan External pocket for a protective suit
US20110186558A1 (en) * 2010-02-03 2011-08-04 Stephanie Campbell Heating device having hanging portion
US20120046719A1 (en) * 2010-08-20 2012-02-23 Gene Stuffel Therapeutic heated pocket
US8316465B1 (en) 2009-08-31 2012-11-27 Neil Jenney Apparel system
US20130007945A1 (en) * 2011-07-08 2013-01-10 Kevin Krondahl Heated Face Mask
US8648280B1 (en) 2010-12-15 2014-02-11 Renee S. DeWitt Electrically-heated wearable blanket with auto shut-off switch
US20160135517A1 (en) * 2014-07-07 2016-05-19 Mark Silverberg Temperature regulating garment

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB154814A (en) * 1920-01-09 1920-12-09 Antonangelo Negromanti Improvements in and relating to electrically heated garments
US1691472A (en) * 1925-06-25 1928-11-13 Graham Electrically-heated garment
US1736590A (en) * 1927-05-09 1929-11-19 Walter D Graham Electrically-heated belt and the like
US2021458A (en) * 1933-09-11 1935-11-19 Barnett W Macy Electrical heating pad
US2277772A (en) * 1941-03-08 1942-03-31 Us Rubber Co Electricallly heated wearing apparel
US2287915A (en) * 1940-03-04 1942-06-30 Taylor Eric Hardman Electrically heated clothing and equipment
GB546812A (en) * 1940-08-13 1942-07-30 Us Rubber Co Improvements in electrically heated wearing apparel
US2329766A (en) * 1942-04-27 1943-09-21 Jacobsen Walter Electrically heated flying suit
US2339409A (en) * 1942-01-28 1944-01-18 Colvinex Corp Electrically heated shoulder pad
US2401360A (en) * 1943-10-19 1946-06-04 Lobl Frederick Heating pad
US2456468A (en) * 1945-12-29 1948-12-14 Bobrich Mfg Corp Electrically heated comfortable
US2458119A (en) * 1943-02-20 1949-01-04 Gerrit Van Daam Electrically heated wearing apparel

Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB154814A (en) * 1920-01-09 1920-12-09 Antonangelo Negromanti Improvements in and relating to electrically heated garments
US1691472A (en) * 1925-06-25 1928-11-13 Graham Electrically-heated garment
US1736590A (en) * 1927-05-09 1929-11-19 Walter D Graham Electrically-heated belt and the like
US2021458A (en) * 1933-09-11 1935-11-19 Barnett W Macy Electrical heating pad
US2287915A (en) * 1940-03-04 1942-06-30 Taylor Eric Hardman Electrically heated clothing and equipment
GB546812A (en) * 1940-08-13 1942-07-30 Us Rubber Co Improvements in electrically heated wearing apparel
US2277772A (en) * 1941-03-08 1942-03-31 Us Rubber Co Electricallly heated wearing apparel
US2339409A (en) * 1942-01-28 1944-01-18 Colvinex Corp Electrically heated shoulder pad
US2329766A (en) * 1942-04-27 1943-09-21 Jacobsen Walter Electrically heated flying suit
US2458119A (en) * 1943-02-20 1949-01-04 Gerrit Van Daam Electrically heated wearing apparel
US2401360A (en) * 1943-10-19 1946-06-04 Lobl Frederick Heating pad
US2456468A (en) * 1945-12-29 1948-12-14 Bobrich Mfg Corp Electrically heated comfortable

Cited By (51)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2627018A (en) * 1951-05-07 1953-01-27 Robert B Duren Therapeutic heater
US2697775A (en) * 1953-03-06 1954-12-21 Lewis F Schleifer Electric comforter and blanket
US3020376A (en) * 1956-12-31 1962-02-06 Libbey Owens Ford Glass Co Laminated plastic articles and method of making the same
US2869551A (en) * 1957-01-28 1959-01-20 Douglas G Chandler Electrical therapeutic jacket
US2961526A (en) * 1958-01-21 1960-11-22 Northern Electric Co Electric heating appliance
US3084241A (en) * 1961-02-08 1963-04-02 Genevieve C Carrona Electrically heated garment
US3108175A (en) * 1961-12-18 1963-10-22 Essex Wire Corp Electrically heated fabrics
US3173419A (en) * 1962-07-10 1965-03-16 Dubilier William Relaxer device
US3443067A (en) * 1966-12-07 1969-05-06 Burton D Morgan Electric towel assembly
US3452362A (en) * 1967-04-12 1969-07-01 Us Army Torso armor carrier
US3778590A (en) * 1971-06-02 1973-12-11 Kohkoku Chemical Ind Co Suit for keeping warmth in water
US3839621A (en) * 1972-08-11 1974-10-01 H Hariu Body heating device
US4061897A (en) * 1976-01-23 1977-12-06 Audrae Thykeson Heating pad
US4314144A (en) * 1979-10-29 1982-02-02 Eaton Corporation Thermostat mounting arrangement for electric heating appliance
US4346277A (en) * 1979-10-29 1982-08-24 Eaton Corporation Packaged electrical heating element
US4827102A (en) * 1988-06-08 1989-05-02 Baker Michael E Heating system
US4927366A (en) * 1989-09-08 1990-05-22 Environwear, Inc. Fused electrical connector with sewing wings
US5008517A (en) * 1989-09-08 1991-04-16 Environwear, Inc. Electrically heated form-fitting fabric assembly
US5032705A (en) * 1989-09-08 1991-07-16 Environwear, Inc. Electrically heated garment
US5101515A (en) * 1991-03-27 1992-04-07 Holt Patricia A Jacket pack
US5471767A (en) * 1994-06-02 1995-12-05 Nu-Stuf, Inc. Body warming device
US5893991A (en) * 1996-09-24 1999-04-13 Newell; Bertha L. Battery operated heating system for a vest or a jacket
US6687523B1 (en) 1997-09-22 2004-02-03 Georgia Tech Research Corp. Fabric or garment with integrated flexible information infrastructure for monitoring vital signs of infants
US6145551A (en) * 1997-09-22 2000-11-14 Georgia Tech Research Corp. Full-fashioned weaving process for production of a woven garment with intelligence capability
US6315009B1 (en) 1998-05-13 2001-11-13 Georgia Tech Research Corp. Full-fashioned garment with sleeves having intelligence capability
US6381482B1 (en) 1998-05-13 2002-04-30 Georgia Tech Research Corp. Fabric or garment with integrated flexible information infrastructure
US5977517A (en) * 1998-07-09 1999-11-02 Grosjean; Douglas Martin Electrically heated vest
US6474367B1 (en) 1998-09-21 2002-11-05 Georgia Tech Research Corp. Full-fashioned garment in a fabric and optionally having intelligence capability
US6970731B1 (en) 1998-09-21 2005-11-29 Georgia Tech Research Corp. Fabric-based sensor for monitoring vital signs
FR2813854A1 (en) * 2000-09-14 2002-03-15 Nebor Emmanuel Bilala Heated life jacket has sealed cavity between rigid inner and outer walls containing floats and heat sources
US20040002239A1 (en) * 2002-06-28 2004-01-01 George Marmaropoulos Mechanism for electrically connecting an electronic device to a garment
US6854988B2 (en) * 2002-06-28 2005-02-15 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Mechanism for electrically connecting an electronic device to a garment
US7100211B2 (en) * 2003-04-21 2006-09-05 Bruffett Lynda L Bib having an internal pocket for storing items
US7299964B2 (en) 2004-01-15 2007-11-27 Georgia Tech Research Corp. Method and apparatus to create electrical junctions for information routing in textile structures
US20080083481A1 (en) * 2004-01-15 2008-04-10 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Method and Apparatus to Create Electrical Junctions for Information Routing in Textile Structures
US20060059597A1 (en) * 2004-09-20 2006-03-23 Larocco Caroline L Foldable, decorative adult bib
US7269855B2 (en) * 2004-09-20 2007-09-18 Larocco Caroline L Foldable, decorative adult bib
US8490219B2 (en) * 2005-04-26 2013-07-23 Honeywell International Inc. Protective garment comprising at least one tapered pocket
US20100212062A1 (en) * 2005-04-26 2010-08-26 Sperian Protective Apparel, Ltd. Protective garment comprising at least one tapered pocket
US20080116189A1 (en) * 2006-11-22 2008-05-22 Products Of Tomorrow, Inc. Heated garment
US7816628B2 (en) 2006-11-22 2010-10-19 Products Of Tomorrow, Inc. Heated garment
US20090032523A1 (en) * 2007-07-31 2009-02-05 Jill Youngblood Conformable heating pad
US20110000009A1 (en) * 2009-07-02 2011-01-06 Culpepper E Alan External pocket for a protective suit
US8316465B1 (en) 2009-08-31 2012-11-27 Neil Jenney Apparel system
US20110186558A1 (en) * 2010-02-03 2011-08-04 Stephanie Campbell Heating device having hanging portion
US20120046719A1 (en) * 2010-08-20 2012-02-23 Gene Stuffel Therapeutic heated pocket
US8721700B2 (en) * 2010-08-20 2014-05-13 Gene Stuffel Therapeutic heated pocket
US8648280B1 (en) 2010-12-15 2014-02-11 Renee S. DeWitt Electrically-heated wearable blanket with auto shut-off switch
US20130007945A1 (en) * 2011-07-08 2013-01-10 Kevin Krondahl Heated Face Mask
US9980526B2 (en) * 2014-07-07 2018-05-29 Mark Silverberg Temperature regulating garment
US20160135517A1 (en) * 2014-07-07 2016-05-19 Mark Silverberg Temperature regulating garment

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