US2573455A - Electrically heated bed and control device - Google Patents

Electrically heated bed and control device Download PDF

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US2573455A
US2573455A US791957A US79195747A US2573455A US 2573455 A US2573455 A US 2573455A US 791957 A US791957 A US 791957A US 79195747 A US79195747 A US 79195747A US 2573455 A US2573455 A US 2573455A
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heat
canopy
bed
curtain
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Lamont B Koontz
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B1/00Details of electric heating devices
    • H05B1/02Automatic switching arrangements specially adapted to apparatus ; Control of heating devices
    • H05B1/0227Applications
    • H05B1/0252Domestic applications
    • H05B1/0272For heating of fabrics
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C21/00Attachments for beds, e.g. sheet holders, bed-cover holders; Ventilating, cooling or heating means in connection with bedsteads or mattresses
    • A47C21/04Devices for ventilating, cooling or heating
    • A47C21/048Devices for ventilating, cooling or heating for heating
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C29/00Nets for protection against insects in connection with chairs or beds; Bed canopies
    • A47C29/003Bed canopies
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B1/00Details of electric heating devices
    • H05B1/02Automatic switching arrangements specially adapted to apparatus ; Control of heating devices

Description

Oct. 30, 1951 B, KOQNTZ 2,573,455

ELECTRICALLY HEATED BED AND CONTROL DEVICE Filed Dec. 16, 1947 2 SHEETSQSHEET 1 Wow IN-VENTOR Oct. 30, 1951 KQONTZ 2,573,455

ELECTRICALLY HEATED BED AND CONTROL DEVICE Filed Dec. 16, 1947 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 Fig 4 INVENTOR Patented Oct. 30, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,573,455 ELECTRICALLY HEATED BED AND CONTROL DEVICE Lamont B. Koontz, Deer Lodge, Mont. Application December 16, 1947, Serial No. 791,957 Claims. (01. 219 19) One of mans most important and time consuming activities is sleep. Nothing has yet been found or discovered to eliminate the need for sleep and, although much study has been given this problem, little has been done to diminish the amount of sleep necessary or to improve its benefits. Among the necessities fer sound and beneficial sleep are a lack of interruption to said sleep, a freedom of movement, proper tempera ture, humidity and ventilation, a freedom of burdens, such as heavy bed coverings, and an environment conducive to rest and repose.

It has been customary for centuries to sleep under a plurality of covers, temperature control being effected by using more or less of said covers. Serious objections to such regulation include the necessity that sleep be interrupted while adjustments are being made. Further, the covers provide other distractions as well as comprising a burden of weight to be borne by thesleeper.

.Also, restrictions of movement caused by said covers are a detriment to sound sleep. In raising children, the problem or using a proper amount of covering and keeping the covers on the children is a difficult matter at best and usually res'ults in loss of sleep and exposure for both the children and the parents.

It is therefore an object of this invention to improve the quality of sleep so that its benefits may be increased and its time diminished.

It is another object to minimize or eliminate thediflicultles associated with bed coverings by eliminating the need for them, and to make the use of sleeping garments merely concessions to modesty. Closely associated with this is the objcct of permitting ventilation of the entire body, this increasing the benefits of the sleep.

It is a further object to secure adequate air movement over a sleeping person and adequate control or said movement without permitting harmfm drafts.

It is an additional object to provide suitable conditions for a sleeping person by controlling the heat loss from his body by a control of air movement and by controlled radiant heat.

It is also an object to control conditions on the sleeping portion of a bed by automatic control of radiant heat from an extensive source above and spaced from said bed, said source being in substantial registry with said bed.

It is an object to provide a means for keeping a sleeping person comfortable in spite of varying air temperature, air movement and varying temperature of adjacent masses by effectively controlling the supply of heat.

It is another object to provide comfortable sleeping conditions within a bed inclosure "by compensating for changes in air temperature, air movement, temperature changes or ad acent masses and changes in relative humidity by etfeetively contrdllihg the supply of heat. 7

t is another object to provide an inherently safe heating means for a bed structure comprising a heat radiator of substantially the horizontal extent of the bed with which it is used, said radiator being normally operated at moderate and safe temperature.

It is an additional object of this invention to provide a bed having automatically controlled conditions conductive to beneficial sleep wherein the bed structure is acceptable to the aesthetic nature of its users.

It is a further object to provide the benefits of controlled conditions for sleeping in a structure closely resembling the Well known four-poster bed having a canopy. v

It is also an object of this invention to improve the heat control characteristics of a canopied bed having a curtain by improving the heat reflecting and reradiating properties of said curtain.

It is a further object to provide a curtain for beds of the sort described wherein the surfaces of said curtain are adapted to reflect radiant heat and which has an inner heat insulating portion.

It is an object to provide a heated bed struc ture adapted for use with children wherein the heating portion is inherently safe due to the low intensity of its heating efiect, the relative inaccessibility of current carrying members and the spacing of the heated canopy above the bed.

It is another object to provide a bed heated by radiant means wherein the source of heat may comprise electricity er a heated fluid.

These and other objects will become apparent upon a study of the following specification and the related drawings, wherein;

Figure l is a perspective View, with parts bro= ken away, showing a bed incorporating the present invention.

Figure 2 is an enlarged section view on the line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is an elevation view, with parts broken away and parts in section, of the controller shown in Figure l.

Figure 4 is a schematic view of a modified canopy member and heating apparatus usable with the bed of Figure 1.

Figure 5 is a plan View of the radiator member of Figure 4 showing an arrangement of interior bafiles.

Figure 6 is a view similar to Figure showing a different bafiie arrangement.

Figure 7 is a schematic wiring diagram of the apparatus of Figure 1.

Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 2 but based on a section through the line 8-8 of Figure 5.

Figure 9 is a vertical section of a portion of a modified curtain for the bed of Figure 1.

Figure 10 is similar to Fig. 8 and shows a modified heat exchange surface.

Referring to Figures 1 to 3 of the drawings, bed it) comprises posts I 1 arranged at the corners of the springs and mattress supporting portion I2, the springs, not shown, supporting mattress l3 in the conventional manner. Obviously, mattress I3 may comprise any conventional sleeping platform and may be covered as desired. Further, while springs are conventionally used between the support means and mattress i3, their use or non-use is of no concern to this invention.

Posts II are also used to support canopy in spaced relation above portion l2, canopy l5 having substantially the same horizontal dimensions as said supporting portion. Canopy I5 comprises a. frame It, a heat radiating member l1, an insulating member I8 overlying member 11, and bracket means IQ for attaching members I1 and I8 to frame 16, bracket means l9 being screwed to 16 by screws or the like, not shown. Resistance wires 20, of a material such as Nichrome, are imbedded in member l1 and serve to heat said member when energized. While any suitable synthetic resin, structural plastic, composite construction, or the like, may be used for 11, hard rubber is preferred because of its good electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. Likewise, insulation 18 may comprise any of a large variety of materials but cellular hard rubber is preferred. By suitably bonding members l1 and I8 together, the resulting composite slab 2| is strong and relatively light in weight and needs little, if any, structural reinforcement.

A plurality of holes 22 are provided in slab 21 for ventilation and they are preferably connected ,by conduit means 23 to a suitable fan or blower 24 for insuring a positive circulation of air through the bed space. Blower 24 is of any conventional open construction permitting air to flow through it whether operating or not, and desirably is quiet in operation and operable at a plurality of speeds, a lower or normal speed being adequate for normal ventilation and a higher speed being used to remove excess heat and to increase the heat loss, throughconvection, from a. body lying on said bed. Plural speed fans and blowers are well known in the art and, are of many types, the blower 24, for the purpose of this disclosure, being of the sort in which different speeds are obtained by varying the applied voltage. While the forced circulation of ventilating air is preferred in the present bed structure, excellent results have been obtained by merely providing holes 22 and relying on the inherent tendency of warm air to rise and flow out through said holes.

To further control the ventilation of the presentbed structure, and for other reasons which will appear, a suitable curtain or curtains 30 are hung from canopy l5 and extend to within a few inches of the floor, or at least as low as supporting portion l2. This curtain, or curtains, extends entirely around the bed so that it, canopy l5 and mattress 13 substantially enclose the usable space 31 .of the bed. Curtain 30 is slidably attached by hooks 32 to a peripheral angle iron member 33 so that the curtain or curtains may readily be pushed aside when desired. Curtain 30, for most conditions, should be relatively impervious to air and should have a smooth, heat reflective inner surface. Because the smoothness of the surface has considerable effect on the heat reflective abilities of the curtain material, a bright metallic finish appears to be most suitable but a smooth surfaced synthetic resin material, or a resin sized material, is also good. A satin quilted curtain has also been used with good results, the insulating value of the quilted construction minimizing the heat transmission through the curtain and tending to cause the inner surface of the curtain to re-radiate absorbed heat. Another feasible curtain construction is illustrated in Fig. 9 and comprises an inner sheet 31, horizontally disposed spacing cords 38 sewed or cemented to sheet 31, and an outer sheet 39. With this construction, cords 38 serve to space sheets 31 and 39 apart to form air spaces between the sheets, and said cords also act to prevent convection currents in said air spaces. While the above curtain constructions are considered best for general use, a rather porous material may be used in the summer or in rather warm rooms, if desired.

Whatever form of curtain is used, it is preferred that a reasonably tight construction be used between the curtain and the canopy to insure that the ventilating air will flow through the major portion of space 31. For this reason, a suitable sealing flap 40 is attached to said ourtain 30 and coacts with member 33 to seal this connection. Obviously, this is only one of several constructions that may be used at this point.

Because the total length of curtain 30 is considerably more than the peripheral distance around portion 12, the curtain hangs in a manner resulting in its horizontal section being of an irregular undulating shape, the innermost ex-s tremes of the undulations contacting supporting portion I2, and the more remote portions of the curtain being spaced from l2 sufficiently to form air passages through which air may flow into space 31 to replace that leaving through holes 22. Obviously, if a headboard or the like extends from portion 12 to frame 16, curtain 30 need not extend around such a headboard.

A heat emitting control device 42, as shown in Figure 3, is suspended within space 3| and is used to control the energization of heater wires 20 and blower 24. This device comprises an outer shell 43, an annular partition member 44, a heater 45, a spiral bimetal 46 arranged between partition 44 and shell 43, a knob 41 for adjusting one end of bimetal 46, and a switch blade 48 operated between spaced contacts 69 and 9| by the other end of the bimetal. With a device of this sort, heater 45 is constantly and uniformly energized sufficiently to bring shell 43 up to a temperature of about -100 degrees F., heater 45 warming air in the center of partition 44, which tends to rise and establish convection currents around the partition 44, heat being lost through shell 43. With a uniform supply of heat, the temperature of the air circulating over bimetal 46 is determined by the heat loss from shell 43 which is a function of the surrounding air temperature, air motion and radiant heat or temperature of adjacent masses. For a fuller description of a control device of this sort, reference is made to my Patent 2,423,781, issued July 8, 1941.

Because of the sensitive nature ofcontrol devices such as 42, it is generally preferable to control load currents by relays which are controlled in turn by the control device. Thus, in Fig. 7, relay 5| is used to control the energization of heater 20 and relay 52 controls the energizetion of blower 24. A transformer 51 having a primary winding 58 and a secondary winding 59 is used as a source of low voltage current for the control circuits, primary winding 58 being connected to line wires 54 and 55 by wires 6| and 62, respectively. Relays 5| and 52, as well as other accessory equipment, are conveniently located in a suitable box 53 (Fig. 1) from which line wires 5455 extend.

In operation, with line wires 54-55 energized, heater 45 of control device 42 is energized by the circuit: secondary winding 59, wire 64, ballast resistor 65, wire 56, heater 45 and wire 61 back to secondary winding 59. With device 42 losing heat at a higher than normal rate, due to conditions of air temperature, air motion and radiant-heat which would make the human occupant of: the bed feel cool, switch 48 is moved into engagement with contact 69 by bimetal 46 and relay 5| is energized by the circuit: secondary winding 59, wire I0, winding I2 ofrelay 5|, Wire 73, contact 55, switch blade 48, wire I4 and secondary winding 59. With winding I2 energized, heater 20. is energized by the circuit; line wire 54, wire I5, relay switch blade 76, contact 71-, wire I8, heater wire 20, wire I9, contact 80, relay switch blade 8|, and wire 82 to line wire 55. Blower 24 is also energized to run at a low speed bythe circuit; line wire 54, wire 84 wire 85, resistor 86, wire 81, blower 24 and wire 88 back to line wire 55.

With heater wire 29 energized, one or more of the conditions of air temperature, air motion or radiant heat is sufiiciently changed to reduce the heat loss from device 42 and cause switch 48 to disengage contact 58, thus breaking the circuit-to relay 5| and deenergizing heater 25. Under normal conditions, heater 25 will then be alternately energized and deenergizedsufficiently to maintain the heat loss from 42 at the rate found de-' sirable for comfort.

Should, for any reason, the heat loss from 42:. decrease due to conditions which would cause the human occupant of thebed to become too warm, switch blade 45 will be moved by bimetal 46 intoengagement with contact 9|, thus energizing relay 52 by thecircuit; secondary wind-- ing 59, Wire- 45, wire 92, winding 53. of relay- 52-, wire 54, contact 9|, switch blade48, wire-"I4 and secondary winding 59.

While the above-description has been in-terms of electric heaters, it is readily apparent that heat may be provided by other means, such-as circulating fluid. In Figure 4, member II'I com-- prises a radiator member having fluid-passages therein extending between an inlet pipe l30 and outlet pipes I3I, and member II 8 comprises insulation as in the previous description. Radiator member H1 is preferably constructed of metal andmay be generally fiat, assuggested by Figures 1 and 2 or may be slightly curved, assuggested Passages- I22 for ventilation area in Figure 8.

Energizing windin 93 of relay 52-pulls switch blade 95 intoengage- 5 provided as before and, of course, may be connected by conduit mean to a blower if desired. To prevent leakage of liquid from radiator mem-" ber II'I, the passages I22 are formed through suitable conduits I33, as shown in Fig 8. Further, the lower surface of II "I may be corrugated, if desired, as shown in Fig. 10, to both stiffen the member and to increase its radiating surface. The fluid passages through II'I may be tortuous, due to bafiies I35 arranged as shown in. Fig 5, or may be more direct with distribution effected by orifices I36 in bafiies I31, as shown in Fig. 6, these examples being illustrative only.

The heat exchange fluid in the modification of Fig. 4 is caused to circulate by the thermo-siphon principle but a circulator HI may be used if found necessary. Also, other conventional accessory equipment commonly used with circulating fluid heating systems, not shown, may be provided for the present sired. Outlet pipes I-3I connect with a return pipe I-4I which connects through circulator III to one port of a three way valve I42, another passage of the valve connecting with pipe I43 which leads to the inlet of heat exchanger I44. The outlet of heat exchanger I44 connects to pipe I38, thus forming a circulating path including radiator member IIl, pipes I31, pipe I4I, circulator I'TI' (if used), valve I4 2, pipe I 45, heat exchanger I44 and pipe I58 back to II-I. Heat exchanger I44 is also connected in fluid flow relation with the domestic hot Water system of the house,- not shown, pipe I45 being connected to the hot" water pipe of the system and pipe I46 being connected to the bottom portion of the hot water tank of said system. Obviously, I44 may be directly heated if desired.

Whilevarious arrangements are feasible for controlling thetemperature of the water cir'-- cu'l'ate'd through ill, a good system comprises a Icy-pass I48 extending from the remaining port of thethree way valve to-pipe I35, thus by-passin'g" heat exchanger I44. Valve I42 is adjustable fromthepositionshown in which all liquid passes through heatexchanger- I44'to an opposite position in which no liquid passes through I44" and all* flow is through by-pass M8. Valve I42 is operated by a conventional slow acting geared reversible motor having an operating arm I50 connected-to the operating arm I5I of valve I4'7 by-a link I52.

Valve I42 is-controlled from a device 42 in a manner generally similar to the operation previously described. With line wires E54 and 555 preferably at a low voltage, heater 45 is energized by the circuit: wire I54, wire I65, ballast resistor 65, wire IGI, heater 45 and wire I62 back to-wire I55. Assuming that conditions are such that 42' is losing heat at a higher than normal rate and switch blade 48 engages Contact 69,- motor I49 is energized in a manner to drive armdirection of operation drives valve I42 in a direction to close the by-pass port and to direct all flow through pipe I43.

circulating system, if de- If a lessened rate of heat. loss from 42 causes blade 48 to disengage contact. 69 while valve I42 is at an intermediate position,. that position will be maintained until device 42 calls for further adjustment of said valve. Should the rate of heat loss from42 decrease sufficiently to cause blade 48 to engage 9|, motor- I49'-W-il1 then be energized by the circuit: wire I; wire I 63 blade 48, contact 9 I, wire I56, motor 149", wire Hi5 and Wire I54. This circuit energrass motor [49 in a manner to drivearm 150 in a counterclockwise direction and thus adjusts valve H32 in a manner to close ofi the port to pipe I43 and open the port for by-pass I48, thus diminishing the'heat supplied to the circulating liquid.

The above described control system for varying the water temperature is only suggestive for it is clear that other known temperature changing systems may equally well be used. Further, while no blower control has been shown in Fig. 4, this may be provided by an extra contact 9! similar to 9| controlling a relay as in Fig. '7, or by other suitable means. I

This application is a continuation in part of my copending application Serial No. 478,581, filed March 9, 1943, and now abandoned.

Because a study of the present disclosure will show that many substitutions and equivalents are useable in the practice of the present invention, the scope of this invention is to be determined only by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A bed of the four poster type including a mattress supporting portion, a canopy supported by the posts or the bed, said canopy being of substantially the same horizontal extent as said mattress supporting portion and in spaced relation to said portion, said canopy including an outer curtain supporting flange and a heat radiating slab substantially coextensive with said canopy, said slab comprising a lower member having heater wires imbedded therein and having an upper heat insulating portion, ventilating holes through said slab, a blower, conduit means connecting said holes to said blower, curtain means supported by said flange and arranged to enclose the space between said supporting portion and said canopy, said curtain hanging at least as low as said supporting portion, said ourtain being arranged to provide at least one air.

passage between said curtain and said supporting portion, sealing means for preventing air flow between said curtain and said canopy, an electric circuit for energizing the wires embedded in said heater slab, another electric circuit for energizing said blower, and electric circuit controlling means for controlling said circuits, said controlling means including apparatus responsive to the air temperature, air motion and radiant heat in the space between said canopy and said supporting portion.

2. A bed having posts, a spring and mattress supporting portion attached to said posts, a canopy member supported by said posts in spaced relation to said supporting portion, said canopy being of substantially the same horizontal extent as said supporting portion, said canopy including a lower heater member and an upper insulating structure, ventilating openings through said canopy, a curtain extending between said canopy and said supporting portion and substantially enclosing the space between said canopy and said supporting portion, energy supply means for said heater member, energy control means for said supply, and condition responsive means located in the space between. said canopy and said supporting portion and connected in controlling relation with said energy control means, said condition responsive means including heat emitting thermostatic means.

3. A bed having supporting means for a matress, a canopy member for said bed, structural means for positioning said canopy member in an 8 v appreciably spaced relation above said supporting means, said canopy member including a heat radiator for radiating heat downwardly toward said supporting portion, a curtain extending be,- tween said canopy and said supporting portion and arranged to enclose the space between said canopy and said supporting portion, said curtain having a heat reflective inner surface, ventilating air passages around said supporting means, ventilating air passages communicating with the upper portion of said enclosed space, means for increasing the temperature of said radiator, and controlling means for said radiator including apparatus responsive to the air motion, air temperature and radiant heat within said enclosed space.

- 4'. A bedstructure comprising a sleeping platform, a canopy member above and in spaced relation to said platform, ventilating openings in said canopy, the under side of said canopy comprising a heat radiating member, means for raising the temperature of said member, means for regulating said temperature raising means, and apparatus responsive to the air temperature, air motion and radiant heat effects within the space between said platform and said canopy connected in controlling relation to said regulating means.

5. A bed structure comprising a sleeping platform, a canopy member supported above and in spaced relation to said platform, said canopy member comprising a heat radiating slab of substantially the same extent as said canopy, means enclosing the sides of the space bounded by said platform and said canopy member, ventilating openings in said canopy member, means for inducing air flow upwardly through said openings, and means responsive to air temperature, air motion and radiant heat conditions within said enclosed space for controlling the rate of operation of said air flow inducing means.

6. A curtain for a heated bed structure of the sort having a canopy spaced above the sleeping portion, said curtain having an inner side and comprising soft and flexible spaced sheets .of material, the innermost sheet of material having a smooth heat reflective inner surface, vertically spaced horizontally extending soft and flexible spacer means arranged between said sheets of material, attachment means arranged along the inner side and upper portion of said curtain to facilitate attachment of the curtain to a canopy, and sealing flap means arranged along the inner side and upper portion of said curtain and extending away from said curtain in a manner to effect a seal between said curtain and a canopy to which the curtain may be attached.

7. A heated bed comprising, in combination, a horizontal portion adapted to be slept thereon, an upper canopy member spaced from said portion and in substantial registry therewith, said canopy member including an under heat radiating surface of substantially the extent of said portion, means for causing said surface to radiate heat, means jointly responsive to air temperature, air motion and the temperature of adjacent masses, said responsive means being located between said portion and said member, means for connecting said responsive means in controlling relation to said causing means, and means for effecting a pended from said canopy member and substantially enclosing the space between said canopy member and the bed proper, said curtain contacting said bed proper at spaced points, means supplying said member with energy to cause said under surface to radiate heat, and controller means within the space enclosed by said member, said curtain and the bed proper arranged to control said energy, said controller means within said space being jointly responsive to a plurality of factors including radiant heat which affect heat loss from a heat generating body.

9. In combination, a bed, a substantially horizontal member spaced an appreciable distance above and in substantial registry with said bed, means enclosing the space between said bed and said member, means for supplying heat to said space, condition responsive means within said space jointly responsive to air temperature, air motion and the temperature of adjacent masses, and means connecting said condition responsive means in controlling relation to said supplying means.

10. In combination, a bed, a canopy above said bed, curtain means substantially enclosing the space between said canopy and said bed, means radiating heat within said space, passages through which air may flow through said space, circulating means for varying the rate of flow of air through said space, and condition responsive means within said space jointly responsive to air temperature, air motion and the temperature of adjacent masses, said control means being connected to control said means radiating heat and said circulating means.

11. A canopy member for a bed, said member having substantially the same horizontal dimensions as the bed with which it is intended to be used, said member comprising a lower portion having an underside heat radiating surface and including means for heating said surface, an insulating portion above and attached to said lower portion for minimizing heat flow upwardly from said lower portion, a peripheral frame for said member, said frame constituting supporting means for said lower and insulating portions of said canopy member, and registering passages through said lower portion and said insulating portion for permitting air to flow therethrough.

12. In a bed structure, in combination, a body supporting portion, a heat radiating means spaced above said supporting portion, flexible curtain means for substantially enclosing the space between said supporting portion and said radiating means for restricting horizontal air movement through said space, and means jointly responsive to the conditions of radiant heat, air temperature and air motion within said space for controlling said heat radiating means.

13, In combination with a bed having a body supporting portion, a canopy member spaced above said bed and including a heat radiating surface of substantial extent arranged to radiate toward said supporting portion, means for supplying energy to said member for causing said surface to radiate heat, and control means connected in controlling relation to said supplying means, said control means being arranged to respond to conditions within the space between said canopy member and said supporting portion and including a heat emitting thermostatic means of the sort affected by a plurality of the same conditions which affect the rate of heat loss from a human body.

14. A heated bed comprising, in combination, a sleeping platform, a canopy in spaced relation above and in substantial registry with said platform, said canopy including an extensive radiant heat means directed toward said platform, means for controlling said radiant heat means, ventilating openings in said canopy, vertically arranged curtain means suspended by its upper portion from said canopy and arranged to enclose the space between said canopy and platform, said curtain means comprising an inner sheet of material having a relatively smooth heat reflecting surface, an outer sheet of material, vertically spaced horizontally extending flexible v spacer means arranged between said sheets of material, said curtain means being flexible enough to hang freely and extensive enough to hang in undulating folds, and sealing means arranged between the upper portion of said curtain means and said canopy to minimize air flow between said canopy and the upper portion of said curtain means.

15. In combination with a bed having a body supporting portion, a canopy member spaced above said bed and including an underside heat radiating surface of substantial extent, means for supplying energy to said member to cause said surface to radiate heat, and control means connected in controlling relation to said supplying means, said control means including means jointly responsive to the air temperature between said supporting portion and said canopy and to a condition indicative of the radiant heat from said radiating surface.

LAMONT B. KOONTZ.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 665,243 Luria Jan. 1, 1901 882,714 Proctor Mar. 24, 1908 924,040 Collins June 8, 1909 1,334,302 Hicks Mar. 23, 1920 1,669,683 Temple et a1 May 15, 1928 1,813,001 Tolley July 7, 1931 1,956,323 Gregg Apr. 24, 1934 1,983,617 Ladon Dec. 11, 1934 2,093,834 Gaugler Sept. 21, 1937 2,165,970 Jaspers July 11, 1939 2,221,310 Gazelle Nov. 12, 1940 2,251,585 Finck Aug. 5, 1941 2,358,081 Marick Sept. 12, 1944 2,423,781 Koontz July 8, 1947 2,504,146 Mossin Apr. 18, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 878,404 France Oct. 12, 1942 OTHER REFERENCES Ser. No. 317,610, Mossin (A. P. 0.), published May 25, 1943.

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Cited By (12)

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US3062946A (en) * 1957-04-19 1962-11-06 Jet Heet Inc Methods and apparatus for manufacture of thermal blankets
US3600728A (en) * 1969-08-13 1971-08-24 Augustus B Kinzel Bed-making and temperature-changing device
US4069527A (en) * 1976-09-22 1978-01-24 Harris William C Protective bed canopy
WO1982003164A1 (en) * 1981-03-19 1982-09-30 Jose De Andrade Costa Warm circulating air ambient for beds
US4820903A (en) * 1987-02-06 1989-04-11 Goro Ishida Closed type heating apparatus
US20070057077A1 (en) * 2005-09-14 2007-03-15 Industrial Technology Research Institute Environment controlling system and method thereof
WO2011091526A1 (en) * 2010-02-01 2011-08-04 Afzaal Mustafa Multiple usage of ac for bed and other confined areas in addition to its conventional usage through moving mechanism and by creating the bed enclosure and other areas as required
US8122539B1 (en) * 2009-06-22 2012-02-28 Osvaldo Miranda Climate control and entertainment enclosure
DE102010037212A1 (en) * 2010-08-30 2012-03-01 Shih-Hsien YU Method for saving energy of air-conditioning system i.e. 2000-British thermal unit type air-conditioning system, during sleeping, involves arranging interior apparatus above small spacing regions to form small air-conditioning space region
EP2603743A4 (en) * 2010-08-11 2017-02-15 Close Comfort Pty Ltd Localised personal air conditioning
WO2018200787A3 (en) * 2017-04-27 2018-12-06 UHV Technologies, Inc. Air conditioning system for a reduced space area of a room
US10548764B2 (en) * 2016-08-22 2020-02-04 MAZ Medical LLC Cooling bed system

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US1813001A (en) * 1928-11-26 1931-07-07 American Steel Products Co Electrically heated brooder
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US2165970A (en) * 1932-04-27 1939-07-11 Jaspers Bernhard Electric heating system operating by heat radiation
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US2251585A (en) * 1938-03-19 1941-08-05 Joseph L Finck Wall construction
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Cited By (14)

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US3062946A (en) * 1957-04-19 1962-11-06 Jet Heet Inc Methods and apparatus for manufacture of thermal blankets
US3600728A (en) * 1969-08-13 1971-08-24 Augustus B Kinzel Bed-making and temperature-changing device
US4069527A (en) * 1976-09-22 1978-01-24 Harris William C Protective bed canopy
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US4820903A (en) * 1987-02-06 1989-04-11 Goro Ishida Closed type heating apparatus
US7764180B2 (en) * 2005-09-14 2010-07-27 Industrial Technology Research Institute Environment controlling system and method thereof
US20070057077A1 (en) * 2005-09-14 2007-03-15 Industrial Technology Research Institute Environment controlling system and method thereof
US8122539B1 (en) * 2009-06-22 2012-02-28 Osvaldo Miranda Climate control and entertainment enclosure
WO2011091526A1 (en) * 2010-02-01 2011-08-04 Afzaal Mustafa Multiple usage of ac for bed and other confined areas in addition to its conventional usage through moving mechanism and by creating the bed enclosure and other areas as required
EP2603743A4 (en) * 2010-08-11 2017-02-15 Close Comfort Pty Ltd Localised personal air conditioning
DE102010037212A1 (en) * 2010-08-30 2012-03-01 Shih-Hsien YU Method for saving energy of air-conditioning system i.e. 2000-British thermal unit type air-conditioning system, during sleeping, involves arranging interior apparatus above small spacing regions to form small air-conditioning space region
DE102010037212B4 (en) * 2010-08-30 2012-07-05 Shih-Hsien YU Device for saving energy of an air conditioner while sleeping
US10548764B2 (en) * 2016-08-22 2020-02-04 MAZ Medical LLC Cooling bed system
WO2018200787A3 (en) * 2017-04-27 2018-12-06 UHV Technologies, Inc. Air conditioning system for a reduced space area of a room

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