US2526294A - Dual flow control mechanism for flush tank valves - Google Patents

Dual flow control mechanism for flush tank valves Download PDF

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US2526294A
US2526294A US112710A US11271049A US2526294A US 2526294 A US2526294 A US 2526294A US 112710 A US112710 A US 112710A US 11271049 A US11271049 A US 11271049A US 2526294 A US2526294 A US 2526294A
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lever
tank
valve
float
flush
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Ralph H Stegeman
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Ralph H Stegeman
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E03WATER SUPPLY; SEWERAGE
    • E03DWATER-CLOSETS OR URINALS WITH FLUSHING DEVICES; FLUSHING VALVES THEREFOR
    • E03D1/00Water flushing devices with cisterns ; Setting up a range of flushing devices or water-closets; Combinations of several flushing devices
    • E03D1/02High-level flushing systems
    • E03D1/14Cisterns discharging variable quantities of water also cisterns with bell siphons in combination with flushing valves
    • E03D1/142Cisterns discharging variable quantities of water also cisterns with bell siphons in combination with flushing valves in cisterns with flushing valves
    • E03D1/144Cisterns discharging variable quantities of water also cisterns with bell siphons in combination with flushing valves in cisterns with flushing valves having a single flush outlet and an additional float for delaying the valve closure

Description

Oct 17, 1950 R. H. sTEGEMAN 2,526,294
DUAL FLOW CONTROL MECHANISM FOR FLUSH TANK VALVES Filed Aug, 2v, 1949 s sheets-sheet 1 O fie?. 1. 20
JEYEL LEVEL A IN1/Emol@ QA/.F STEGEMAM By 4,? 7a4/wt v @rra/eMex Oct. 17, 1950 R. H. STEGEMAN 2,526,294
DUAL FLOW CONTROL MECHANISM FOR FLUSH TANK VALVES Filed Aug. 27, 1949 :s sheets-sheet z NVENTOR.
EHI STEGE/IAM Oct. 17, 1950 R. H. s'rEGEMAN DUAL FLow coNTRoL MECHANISM FOR FLUSH TANK VALVES.
Filed Aug. 27, 1 .949 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 IN V EN TOR.
LQLSTEGEMAN,
fa/LZZL,
TTORNEY.
Patented Oct. 17, 1,950
DUAL FLOW CNTROL MECHANISM FR FLUSH TANK VALVES Ralph H. Stegeman, Brea, Calif.
Application August 27, 1949, Serial No. 112,710
8 Claims.
This invention has relation to improvements in ush valves for toilet tanks such as used in the average home and has particular reference to means for controlling the volume of water to `be discharged at each flushing operation. To this end the invention resides in the combinations hereinafter described in detail and preferred forms of the invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, of which:
Fig. 1 is a front sectional elevational view of a flush tank embodying the invention and with the front portion of the tank broken away in order better to illustrate the mechanism within the tank;
Fig. 2 is a fragmentary plan View of a portion of the mechanism of Fig. 1; 1
Figs. 3 and 4. are fragmentary front views of parts of the mechanism of Fig, 2, with parts thereof in different positions of adjustment;
Fig. 5 is a sectional plan view of the device taken substantially on line 5-5 of Fig. 1; y
Fig. 6 is a front sectional elevational view of a somewhat modified form of the invention with l the front wall of the tank broken away;
Fig. '7 is a fragmentary'plan view of a portion of Fig. 6; f
Figs. 8 and 9 illustrate a'further modification of the invention; and Y Fig. 10 is a fragmentary detail View of a portion of the device of Fig. 8 as viewed from the right side thereof.
Referring in the first instance to Fig. l, it is noticed that the numeral I designates a flush tank of conventional shape and proportions into the bottom of which are tted the usual inlet pipe 2 and discharge pipe connection 3. The inlet pipe 2 is shown broken away a short distance above the bottom of the tank but it is to be understood that this pipe rises through the tank and is, at the top thereof, fitted with any commercially well known type of ush valve the operation of which is controlled by a conventional float Il.l Since such float controlled valve is universally used in -ush tanks of'thistype Vand in order not to render the drawing too difcult to read, the valve is merely outlined at 6 in Fig; 5, it being thought suflicient to show that the stem 5 of the float AI extends to such commonly used valve to control the operation thereof7 The outlet connection 3 is, at the top thereof, fitted with a seat I0 on which a valve I I is shown seated, this valve being of the ordinary well known buoyant type. A lug I2 extends laterally from the discharge connection 3 to support thereon an overflow pipe I3 communicating through a opening of the tank. Secured tothe overflowv pipe I3, a distance above the lug I2, is a laterally extending bracket I4, the outer end of which is bifurcated, see Fig. 5, to form at the ends thereof, a bearing for a rod I5. To the end of thisv rod is secured a head I6 which is shapedl to receive therein and tightly to grip the outer `end of an auxiliary float lever I'I. A float I8 is secured to the opposite end of this lever.
Through the front wall of the tank extends a stem 29, see Fig. 2, to the outer end of which is secured the type of operating handle 2l ordinarily employed in ilush tanks of the type herein vcon'- sidered. It is understood that this handle; being' outside the front wall of the tank, would not appear in Figs. 1, 3 and 4, and it is shown in'light, broken outline in these views merely to facilitate this description. kThestem is shown seated for rotation within a bearing forming part of a con` nection 22 by means of which such stem is ordi-y narily supported on the tank. A bracketi is mounted on this connection and itis held by means of a nut 24, engaging screw threads of the connection, clamped rigidly in position thereon'. In the outer end of this bracket is placed .a stud 25, on which the inner end 26 of an arm 21 is rotatably mounted. The outer end'of this arm, which for convenience of description is referred to as the trip lever, is perforated to receivethe hook-shaped upper end of a link 28, the'lower end of which is shaped to form a loop 29 horizontally extending from the link and of a 'size freely to encompass the stem 30 ofthe oat valve I I. Thisstem is seated for vertical sliding move-V ment within the bifurcated head 3| of an arm 32, the inner end of which is shaped to form a band 33 encompassing the overflow pipe"Y I3 and clamped in position thereon by means of a screw 34. This connection from the float valveIl to the trip lever 2l does not differ in principle from the float valve connections of the average flush tanks and functions in like manner. y i
A member 36 is, by a set screw 3l, shown rigidly secured in position on the stem 29 directly below the trip arm 21 and the upper flat surface 35a of this member normally rides against the underside of the trip lever to maintain the'connections yto the flush valve in the position indicated in Fig. l.. It is for convenience of description Vhereinafter referred to as the trip lever cam. A secondmember 4D is rotatably hung on the stem 20 adjacentE the cam and this member serves as a support for a rod y"II which extends downward from the lmernber and isintermediate itsends offset, as in orgies dicated at 42, to form a shelf on which the outer end lla of the float lever comes to rest when it reaches its uppermost position, as indicated in Fig. l. When it is desired completely to flush the tank, it is required to swing the operating lever 2l counter-clockwise into the position indicated in Fig. 3, thereby to withdraw the float Il from its seat and so to open the passage 3 for discharge of water from the tank in the well known conventional manner. It is important to note that during this operation the above mentioned auxiliary float mechanism remains in the position indicated in Fig. l.
Further referring to the drawings, it is noticed that a stud 43 projects sidewise from the member 45 on to the top surface 35a of the member 36 against which this member comes to a stop when the operating lever is swung to flush the tank, as above described. It is furthermore important to note that the pressure of the member against this stud is effective to force the rod el against the end IIa of the float lever I1, thereby to insure continued engagement of the lever with the offset portion d2 during such flushing operation. When, on the other hand, the operating lever is swung in clockwise direction, as indicated in Fig. 4, it is noticed that the upper surface of the member 36 contacts this stud, thereby to cause the member 40 to swing on the stem 20 and so to withdraw the offset portion 42 of the rod from the end of the float lever. Also that, during this movement, the trip lever 21 is again swung upward to withdraw the valve Il from its seat, The outrushing water releases both of the floats for downward movement and this movement continues until a projection 55 of the auxiliary float lever reaches and depresses the float Il sufficiently to cause suction of the outrushing water to seat the float and so to disrupt the discharge long before the water level reaches the low level of conventional complete flushing. As indicated in Fig. 1, this intermediate water level will be located about half way between normal upper and lower levels when the auxiliary float mechanism is proportioned, as indicated in the drawing.
It is above mentioned that the oat 4 controls the inlet valve to the tank in the conventional manner and the functioning thereof is in no way affected by this novel control mechanism.
It is, however, well to limit the downward movement of this float in order to eliminate the possibility of the descending float colliding with any part of the control mechanism. I have, for this purpose Shown a bracket 38 mounted On the ff perfectly and can be relied upon to continue overflow pipe above the bracket 33. This bracket is. as best shown in Fig. 5. fitted with a laterally projecting stud 39 taking a position directly below the stem 5 of this float to form a stop checking downward movement of the float before any part of the control mechanism is reached.
It is time now to point out that it is possible to obtain similar results by means of a much simpler mechanism such as indicated in Figs. 6 and '7 ofthe drawings. In this case the tank, the outlet from the tank and the valve ii may remain unchanged, except for the fact that the outlet connection is moved a short distance to the left and that it is given a half rotation in order to carry the overflow pipe I3 to the opposite side of the valve. The operating handle 2l and its stem 20 may also remain as above described, but in this case it is found necessary somewhat to modify the parts mounted on this stem to operate the trip lever 50. To this end movement thereof.
a member 5I is rigidly secured in position on the stem 25, as by means of a clamping screw 52 to form a cam, similar to the cam 36, the upper surface of which rests against the underside of the trip lever 50. A second member 53 is hung to rotate on the stem and it is fitted with a downwardly directed tubular extension 54, within which a rod 55 is held rigidly secured Y as by means of a clamping screw 56. This rod is near the lower end thereof, at 51, shown offset to form a stop for the upward movement of a float lever 58. This lever is pivotally hung on the end of a bracket 59 which, in turn, is rigidly clamped in position on the overow pipe S3. A second bracket B6 is clamped in position on this pipe a distance above the bracket 59 and the outer end of this bracket is vertically perforated to form a guide for the valve stem 5l. A link 62 extends from the top of this stem to the end. of the trip lever 55. From the opposite end of the float lever 58 rises a stem 63 to support on the top thereof an auxiliary float 5t. But, eX- cept for the fact that the rod 55 is offset to check upward movement of the lever, the operating lever connections may, if preferred, remain substantially as illustrated in Fig. l.
When it is desired completely to flush the tank, it is merely required to rotate the stem 25 of the operating handle in counter-clockwise direction and the flushing will be accomplished in the conventional manner except that the oat 65 willv remain in its elevated position. When, on the other hand, the stem 25 is rotated in clockwise direction, it is found that the upper surface of the cam member 5I will contact and move a stud 65 of the member 53, thereby to swing the onset portion 51 of the rod 55 away from the end of the noat lever and so permit the latter to swing downward as water discharges from the tank until the projection 55 of this lever strikes the float ll and moves the latter downwardly until it reaches a position where the suction of the out rushing water causes the float to engage its seat and so to disrupt the discharge This lower position of tl e float and oat lever is indicated in dotted outline of Fig. 6 and it is important to note that because the fulcrum of the auxiliary float lever is placed at a point nearer the bottom of the overflow pipe, the lever will engage and inc-ve the valve at the time the water level reaches a position about one-half of the distance between normal upper and lower levels.
While this simplied construction will function functioning until some parts thereof become so badly worn as to require replacements, it is found to have one serious objection. In examining Fig. '7, it is noticed that the pivotal. point G of the auxiliary float lever is very close to the inner end thereof and comparatively far removed from its outer end, in which the float Ellis supported. The result is that the greater movement of the outer end of the float lever is translated into a much shorter movement of the Vinner end thereof, making it necessary manually to maintain the operating handle in its position after it has swung therod 55 away from the float lever until the inner end thereof has moved upwardly far enough to make sure that, when the operating handle is released to allow the rod to return to its initial position, the inner end of the oat lever will not again slip under the offset portion of the rod, as otherwise complete flushing of the Y of time. handle still is required, it does not possess the moment that I have adopted the preferred form shown in Fig. l, in which the leverage of the auxiliary oat lever I1 is such that the movement of the float I8 causes the inner end ofthe float lever to move below the oiset portion 42 of the trip rod so quickly that it is not necessary to delay release of the operating handle V2l for return of the parts.
The arrangement of Figs. 8 to 10 is added merely to suggest 'a different manner of constructing the auxiliary float elevating mechanism. The mounting and positioning of the overflow pipe v'I3 may remain as in Fig. 7, but the connection from the operating handle 2l to the trip lever 'l0 is, in this case, substantially a duplicate of the arrangement shown in, Fig. 1. Brackets 1I, 12, are clamped in position on the overflow pipe i3 rigidly to support a rod 13 in parallel spaced relation to the pipe. A frame 15 is hung for vertical sliding movement 'on this rod. Itis necessary to retain the bracket unturned on the rod, which latter for this purpose is shown square in cross-section`.- A bracket 'I6 projects sidevviseV from the frame to support an auxiliary oat il by means ofv which the frame is normally maintained in the elevated position indicated in full outline in Fig. 8. v l
An arm 18 extends Vhorizontally from the left side edgeof the frame 'l5 and the end of this arm comes to rest on a shelf 'i9 of a rod 8l) which, in turn, is secured in position within the rotary member 8| of the operating handle stem 20. As
in the device of Fig. l, it is found that a rotation of this stem in counter-clockwise direction vvill resultin complete ushing of the tank without disturbing"r the position of the auxiliary ushing mechanism and that also in this case the cam member 82 contacts the stud 83'to maintain the rod'a pressed against the'end of the arm 18. But when the operating-handle is moved clock- Wise the cam member moves against the stud L83 in the opposite direction to swing the rod 80 away from the end of the arm 18. The frame is now free to descend with the out rushing water to cause a pair of lugs 85, 86 of the frame to depress the float 81 until .the latter, by suction of the discharging water is forced on to its seat.
The mechanism has the advantage over the device of Fig. 7, that the frame 'l5 moves with the speed of the receding water level and that, for
this reason, it is not necessary to delay release of the operating handle for quite as long a period But because a delay in the release of the great advantage of the preferred construction shown in Fig. 1.
Itis seen from the foregoing description that I have provided tank flushingdevices by means of which the amount of water to be discharged may lever to the ush valve and a pivotally hung operating handle'movable in either direction to swing the trip lever to raise the flush valve to flush the tank, said mechanism comprising; a flow control member mounted for vertical movement within the tank, a float urging upward movement of the member, and an element engaging the member normally to maintainY the member in elevated positiomoperation of the handle in one direction to raise the flush valve being effective to move the element thereby to release the member for downward movement with the outflowing water, the-member depressing the flush valve as the water level descends thereby to cause suction of the outrushing water to draw the valve into closed position before complete flushing of the tank is attained.
2. A flow control mechanism for a flush tank having a oat actuated inlet valve, a flush valve, a pivotally hung trip lever, connections from said lever to the flush valve and an operating handle having a stem rotatably xed in kthe tank, the handle being movable in either direction to swing the trip lever to raise the ilush valve to flush the tank, said mechanism comprising; a flow-control member mounted for vertical movement within the tank, a float urging upward movement of the member, and an element hung for rotation on said stem, said element engaging the member normally to' maintain the member in elevated position, operation of the handle in one direction to raise the flush valve being effective to move the element thereby to release the member for downward movement with the Voultflowing water, the member depressing the flush valve as the waterA level descends thereby to cause suction of the outrushing water to draw the valve into closed position before complete ushing of the tank is attained.
3. A ow control mechanism for a flush tank having a oat actuated inlet valve, a flush valve. a pivotally hung triprlever, connections from said lever to the flush valve and an operating handle Y having a stem rotatably xed in the tank, the
handle being movable in either direction to swing the trip lever to raise the flush valve toflush the tank, said mechanism comprising; a flow control member mounted for vertical movement within the tank, a float urging upwardmovement of the member, an element hung for rotation on said stem,` said element engaging the member normally to maintain the member in elevated position,a cam rigid on the stem, operation of the handle in one direction to raise the flush valve causing the cam to move the element thereby to release the member for downward movement with the outflovving water, the member depressing the flush valve as the water level descends thereby to cause suction of the outrushing water to draw the valvev into closed position before complete flushing of the tank is attained.
4. A ow control mechanism for a flush tank having a oat actuated inlet valve, a flush valve, a pivotally hung trip lever, connections from said lever t0 the flush valve and an operating handle having a stem rotatably fixedv in the tank, the handle being movable in either direction to swing the trip lever to raise the flush valve .to flush the tank, said mechanism comprising; a iiow control member mounted for vertical movement within the tank, said member having a projection. laterally extending therefrom, a float urging upward movement of the member, an element hung for rotation on said stem, said element engaging the member.
normally to maintain the member in elevated position, a cam rigidly secured to the stem, operation of the handle in one direction to raise the ush valve being eiTective to turn the cam in the direction toward and to move the element thereby to release the member for downward movement with the outiiowing water, the projection of the member depressing the flush valve as the water level descends thereby to cause suction of the outrushing water to draw the valve into closed position before complete flushing of the tank is attained.
5. A ow control mechanism for a flush tank having a float actuated inlet valve, a ush valve, a pivotally hung trip lever, connections from said lever to the iiush valve and a pivotally hung operating handle movable in either direction to swingv the trip lever to raise the flush valve to flush the tank, said mechanism comprising; a flow control lever mounted for vertical swinging movement within the tank, a float urging upward movement of the lever, and an element engaging the cute;` free end of the lever normally to maintain the member in elevated position,V operation of the handle in one direction toraise the ush valve being effective to move the lelement thereby to release the .lever for downward movement with the outowing water, the member depressing the flush valve as the water level descends thereby to cause suction of the outrushing water to draw the valve into closed position before complete ushing of the tank is obtained.
6. `Aflow control mechanism for a flush tank having aiioat actuated inleU valve, a iiush valve, a pivotally hung trip lever, connections from said lever to the flush valve and an operating handle having a stern rotatably xed in the tank, the handle being movable in either direction to swing the trip lever to raise the flush valve to ush the tank, said mechanism comprising; a ow control lever pivotally mounted for Vertical swinging movement within' the tank, a iioat urging upward movement of the lever, an element hung for rotation on said stem, said element engaging the lever normally to maintain the lever in elevated position, a cam rigid on the stem, operation of the handle in one direction to raise the flush valve causing the cam to move the element thereby to release the lever for downward movement with the outowing water, the lever depressing the ush valve as the water level descends thereby to cause suction of the outrushing waterto draw the valve into closed position before complete ushing of the tank is attained.
'7. A ow control mechanism for a flush tank having a ioat actuated inlet valve, a flush valve, a pivotally hung trip lever, connections from said lever to the flush valve and anY operating handle having a stem rotatably fixed in the tank, the handle being movable in either direction to swing the trip lever to raise the ush valve to flush the tank, said mechanism comprising; a now control member mounted for vertical movement within the tank, a float urging upward movement of the member, an element hung for rotation on said stem, said element engaging the member normally t0 maintain the member in elevated position, a Cam rigid on the stem, operation of the handle in one direction to raise the flush valve causing the cam to move the element thereby to release the member for downward movement with the outlowing water, the member depressing the flush valve as the water level descends thereby to cause suction of the outrushing Water to draw the valve into closed position before complete flushing of the tank is attained, the element being shaped at the bottom thereofv to limit downward movement of the member.
8. A flow control mechanism for a ush tank having a oat actuated inlet valve, a flush valve, a pivotally hung trip lever, connections from said lever to the ilush valve and an operating handle having a stem rotatably fixed in the tank, the handle being movable in either direction to swing the trip lever to raise the flush valve to ush the tank, said mechanism comprising; a flow control lever pivotally mounted for vertical swinging movement within the tank, a float urging upward movement of the lever, an element hung for rotation on said stem, said element engaging the lever normally to maintain the lever in elevated position, a cam rigid on the stem, operation of the handle in one direction to raise the iush valve causing the cam to move the element thereby to release the lever for downward movement with the outiiowing Water, the lever depressing the flush valve as the water level descends thereby to cause suction of the outrushing water to draw the valve into closed position before complete flushing of the tank is attained.
` RALPH H. STEGEMAN.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,586,655 Cook June l, 1926 1,899,281 Dollinger Dec. 6, 1932 1,963,211 Patterson June 19, 1934 2,001,390 Lester May 14, 1935 2,106,916 Morkisch Feb, l, 1938
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Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2602934A (en) * 1950-09-28 1952-07-15 Mccormack Water saving device for flush tanks
US2615174A (en) * 1950-05-26 1952-10-28 Barling Leslie Clement Float-operated mechanism
US2626400A (en) * 1950-10-24 1953-01-27 Castellano James Flushing valve for toilet tanks
US2645780A (en) * 1950-11-24 1953-07-21 Hans V Becker Water saving flush tank
US2674744A (en) * 1952-09-02 1954-04-13 Delmas J White Dual control for flush tank valves
US2686921A (en) * 1951-09-18 1954-08-24 Benjamin T Ezzell Toilet flushing apparatus
US2690567A (en) * 1952-09-30 1954-10-05 Edward H Quebbeman Flush mechanism
US2744261A (en) * 1954-04-23 1956-05-08 Eugene M Gram Toilet flush control
US2754522A (en) * 1953-08-31 1956-07-17 Melvin L Earsley Ball valve for flush tanks
US3091775A (en) * 1962-03-23 1963-06-04 Hyr Products Inc Dual stroke toilet flush valve
US3156930A (en) * 1963-10-28 1964-11-17 Clayton J Moulton Water saver for flush tank toilets
US3380077A (en) * 1965-10-05 1968-04-30 Ogden H. Armstrong Double flushing valve
US3745591A (en) * 1971-05-05 1973-07-17 W Girten Toilet flushing mechanism
US3787902A (en) * 1971-12-06 1974-01-29 Combs J Mc Flush tank water-regulating attachment
US3823425A (en) * 1973-05-07 1974-07-16 R Coffman Toilet tank discharge control for selectively discharging variable amounts of water
US3936889A (en) * 1974-08-13 1976-02-10 The Raymond Lee Organization, Inc. Toilet flush mechanism
US4017912A (en) * 1975-11-05 1977-04-19 Young Sr Daniel J Meterable water closet
US4017914A (en) * 1975-11-05 1977-04-19 Young Sr Daniel J Water closet metering device
US4117556A (en) * 1976-05-28 1978-10-03 Eleonore Josephine Semler Flush water conserver
US4191050A (en) * 1978-10-18 1980-03-04 Rogers Corporation Liquid level indicating floats
US4240167A (en) * 1978-09-01 1980-12-23 Gilliland Elbert G Flush valve control apparatus
US4392260A (en) * 1982-07-06 1983-07-12 Bensen Court M Flushing apparatus with selective quantity control
US4455694A (en) * 1982-07-19 1984-06-26 Dymon Thaddeus S Clip-on attachment for conserving water during the flushing of a toilet
US4811432A (en) * 1987-06-29 1989-03-14 Harris John L Flush tank water saver
US4872473A (en) * 1988-03-30 1989-10-10 Michael Agostino Dual float valve control for regular and douglas type valve
US4941214A (en) * 1989-01-04 1990-07-17 Harris John L Flush tank water saver
US5205000A (en) * 1992-03-03 1993-04-27 Xia Frank Z Dual water-level toilet flushing apparatus
US5206960A (en) * 1991-10-11 1993-05-04 Robert L. Hooshley Dual flush toilet control mechanism
US5243713A (en) * 1991-10-30 1993-09-14 More Robert O Dual mode water saving flush mechanism

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1586655A (en) * 1925-04-13 1926-06-01 John W Cook Closet-valve structure
US1890281A (en) * 1931-09-28 1932-12-06 Lewis L Dollinger Valve
US1963211A (en) * 1933-02-15 1934-06-19 Harry W Patterson Flushing tank
US2001390A (en) * 1934-07-07 1935-05-14 Warren A Lester Flushing valve mechanism
US2106916A (en) * 1937-01-21 1938-02-01 Erwin F Morkisch Flush valve control

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1586655A (en) * 1925-04-13 1926-06-01 John W Cook Closet-valve structure
US1890281A (en) * 1931-09-28 1932-12-06 Lewis L Dollinger Valve
US1963211A (en) * 1933-02-15 1934-06-19 Harry W Patterson Flushing tank
US2001390A (en) * 1934-07-07 1935-05-14 Warren A Lester Flushing valve mechanism
US2106916A (en) * 1937-01-21 1938-02-01 Erwin F Morkisch Flush valve control

Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2615174A (en) * 1950-05-26 1952-10-28 Barling Leslie Clement Float-operated mechanism
US2602934A (en) * 1950-09-28 1952-07-15 Mccormack Water saving device for flush tanks
US2626400A (en) * 1950-10-24 1953-01-27 Castellano James Flushing valve for toilet tanks
US2645780A (en) * 1950-11-24 1953-07-21 Hans V Becker Water saving flush tank
US2686921A (en) * 1951-09-18 1954-08-24 Benjamin T Ezzell Toilet flushing apparatus
US2674744A (en) * 1952-09-02 1954-04-13 Delmas J White Dual control for flush tank valves
US2690567A (en) * 1952-09-30 1954-10-05 Edward H Quebbeman Flush mechanism
US2754522A (en) * 1953-08-31 1956-07-17 Melvin L Earsley Ball valve for flush tanks
US2744261A (en) * 1954-04-23 1956-05-08 Eugene M Gram Toilet flush control
US3091775A (en) * 1962-03-23 1963-06-04 Hyr Products Inc Dual stroke toilet flush valve
US3156930A (en) * 1963-10-28 1964-11-17 Clayton J Moulton Water saver for flush tank toilets
US3380077A (en) * 1965-10-05 1968-04-30 Ogden H. Armstrong Double flushing valve
US3745591A (en) * 1971-05-05 1973-07-17 W Girten Toilet flushing mechanism
US3787902A (en) * 1971-12-06 1974-01-29 Combs J Mc Flush tank water-regulating attachment
US3823425A (en) * 1973-05-07 1974-07-16 R Coffman Toilet tank discharge control for selectively discharging variable amounts of water
US3936889A (en) * 1974-08-13 1976-02-10 The Raymond Lee Organization, Inc. Toilet flush mechanism
US4017912A (en) * 1975-11-05 1977-04-19 Young Sr Daniel J Meterable water closet
US4017914A (en) * 1975-11-05 1977-04-19 Young Sr Daniel J Water closet metering device
US4117556A (en) * 1976-05-28 1978-10-03 Eleonore Josephine Semler Flush water conserver
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US4941214A (en) * 1989-01-04 1990-07-17 Harris John L Flush tank water saver
US5206960A (en) * 1991-10-11 1993-05-04 Robert L. Hooshley Dual flush toilet control mechanism
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US5205000A (en) * 1992-03-03 1993-04-27 Xia Frank Z Dual water-level toilet flushing apparatus

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