US2487413A - Toy player piano - Google Patents

Toy player piano Download PDF

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US2487413A
US2487413A US739055A US73905547A US2487413A US 2487413 A US2487413 A US 2487413A US 739055 A US739055 A US 739055A US 73905547 A US73905547 A US 73905547A US 2487413 A US2487413 A US 2487413A
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disk
parts
key
piano
striker
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US739055A
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Howard N Barnum
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Howard N Barnum
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H5/00Musical or noise- producing devices for additional toy effects other than acoustical

Description

Nov. 8, 1949 4 Sheets-Sheet l Filed April 3, 1947 il/ r n M m I nl n Miri M) ill w Mx w V fa/mmm ||I| Wriw |l\| 4A IiiH W m HHM: L :I IN1/ M M @www Nov. 8, 1949 H. N. BARNUM 2,437,413

TOY PLAYER PIANO Filed April 3, 1947 4 Shee [2s-Sheet 2 70@ 4f 42 44 @"0 J0 44 M@ w 44%42 4/ "V0 .W #ik #kk wiwi Wk YE@ YE@ fi 415 15 Q3@ J .A

'lc/G d INVENTOR.

Hon/ara /l/ 5er/7am dm M Ncvve 8, 1949 H. N. BARNUM 2,487,413

TOY PLAYER PIANO Filed April 3, 1947 Howard/V 5a/77007 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 MMM Nov. 8, 1949 H. N. BARNUM TOY PLAYER PIANO 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed April 3, 1947 /"G, JNVENTOR,

Howard/V Bama/77 M M MJ" rive/m75 Patented Nov. 8, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE TOY PLAYER PIANO Howard N. Barnum, South Euclid, Ohio Application April 3, 1947` 'Serial No. 739,055 1s claims. (ci. 84-97) This invention relates to toy musical instruments, and has particular reference to a novel miniature player piano.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide, in a toy musical instrument or piano, an improved mechanism for mechanically reproducing a tune or piece of music by an action including the intermittent partial rotation, and alternate bodily oscillation at substantially right angles to the `plane of rotation, of a disk having striker parts or projections arranged according to the-tune to be played, and which, when said disk is so actuated by a crank action or other means, will, through cooperation with plungers or the like incorporated in the sound producing organism, result in the playing of said tune.

Another and related object is to so arrange or distribute the striker parts or projections on the disk, relative to the plungers or the like, as to effect compactness of structure which, in the case of a miniature piano, permits the use of a key:- board of usual length in such instruments, and the employment of a disk of minimum diameter.

Another object of the invention is to provide a toy piano incorporating the aforesaid mechanism and which will especially appeal to children because of its close resemblance to a large piano of corresponding style.

A further object is to provide a. toy musical instrument, particularly in the nature of a miniature player piano, in which disks are employed for actuating the sound producing organism, and which disks are especially convenient of insertion and removal, such operation requiring only the depositing of the disk in a pocket or space provided for the purpose.

A still further object is to provide, in a, toy plano of the above described character, a top sectionthat normally covers the said space or I pocket and that is capable of being swung open,

in substantially the manner of an equivalent part of an ordinary piano, to afford access to said space or pocket.

. l'With the above and other objects in view which will more fully appear as the nature of the invention is better understood, my improvements may be said to consist in the novel construction, combination and arrangement of parts hereinafter described,lillustrated and claimed.

One practical embodiment of the invention is shown in the accompanying drawings, in which: Fig. l is a front elevational view of a toy piano embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan View, on a somewhat larger scale, with the top of the case omitted, showing the keys 'andtheir'actuating plungers;

Fig. 3- is a rear elevational view, partly broken away, of the piano, showing the Way in which the disk is supported for rotation, as well as the means for rotating and oscillating it;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view on line 4 4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 represents a vertical section through the piano on the line 5-5 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 6 is a front elevational view of a type of disk having projections for actuating the plungers of the sound producing organism, being the form shown in the previous views wherein the disk appears;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary iront elevational view of a modified form' of the disk in which voids in the form of radial slots provide clearance for the plungers that are to remain inactive, and which has striker parts that bridge said voids or slots for actuating the plungers required for the playing of a selected tune, and

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary vertical sectional vie of one of the pivoted keys and its actuating plunger, showing the parts in normal position in full lines, and in sound producing position in dotted lines, in which latter position the plunger is engaged by one of the striker parts of the modified form of disk.

Similar reference numerals designate corresponding parts throughout the several views.

In carrying the present invention into effect, it is proposed to provide a casing which includes opposite side walls II) and II, respectively, a pivoted back wall I2 that constitutes the sounding board, a top I3, and a key board I4, the latter extending horizontally across the front of the piano and connected securely to the side walls I 0 and II. These side walls and top are preferably shaped to simulate an upright piano of usual style, and it is particularly important to do so as it enhances its esthetic characteristics in child appeal. While only one octave of keys I5 is employed in the piano illustrated in the drawings in order to insure compactness and minimize cost, it should be understood that additional ones may be added within reasonable limits without affecting the merits of the invention. A front, vertical wall I6 is inset from the front plane of the piano and is suitably attached at its ends to the side walls I0 and Il, and adjacent its lower edge to a bottom I1. The front wall IB terminates at its upper edge slightly below the horizontal plane of the key board I4. By this arrangement of the walls, suiilcient space is provided to accommodate the various operating parts of the sound producing organism.

One of the more important features of the inlvention resides in the use of a substantially iiat with a plurality of peripheral notches 2l, equally spaced apart, and through which, by cooperation with mechanism later to be described, the disk may be rotated with an intermittent or step by step movement.

As shown more clearly in Figs. 1, 2`, 3 nd 5,

this disk I9 is suitably supported on. theback"- wall I2 for rotation about an axis slightly to one side of the longitudinal center of the bank of keys I5. Positioned on the rear upper portion of the back wall I2, in parallel spaced relation thereto, is a fiat memberA 25, which, with said wall, and blocks 21 and 28-that are disposed between said wall and the end portions of said member, denne the space or pocket for the disk I9f. Said disk is sustained, and biased toward the block 28, by an inclined support 29 that is carried.` bythe back wall I2'. It will be obvious, therefore, that the disk I9 mayA bey inserted into this space or pocket andremoved therefrom as desired, and when positioned in the space or pocket, it is free to rotate. With the arrangement describe-d,v itis not necessary to provide a pivotal support for the disk', which greatly facilitates and simplifies the emplacement and removal of the disk.

The sound producing equipment includes a heavy metal' bar 3-3 that is positioned along the lower inner portion of the back wall I2 and securely connected to thev latter by a plurality of bolts 34. Said bar is provided with round eXten-Y sions 35 projecting in an axial direction from its upper forward corners. The extensions 35 are pivotally mounted' in aligned bearings 36y on the side walls I0 and II, thereby to afford pivotal movement of the assembly including said bar and the back wall i2. Due to the fact that said bearings 36' are well forward of the' plane of the back wall, said assembly is biased by gravity to swing in a rearward direction, but is normally re'- tained in a forward slightly inclined position by a stop 31 on the side wall II (Fig. 3).

The bar 33 is provided with a plurality of musical tone rods 38 which have their lower ends rigidly embedded in the bar and rise therefrom in parallel spaced relation to the back wall I2. There are eight such rods in the present instance, graduated in' length to produce the tones of a musical scale. These rods are spaced apart similarly to the spacing of the keys I 5, each rod being about central of a key.

The keys I-5 are, as usual, in transverse alignment, and are pivoted for individual movement on a shaft 39 that is supported by and between the side walls IU and I'I, the end portions of said shaft beyond the bank of keys, passing through blocks` 4I. Tubular spacer members 42 may be disposed on the shaft between the end keys of the bank and the blocks 4I. The keys may be considered, for the purpose of description, as arranged in two groups of four keys each, located on different sides of. thev center of the piano. Suitable means are provided for effecting the pivotal movement of each key and as this means is identical for each group, a detailed. description is formed with an open-ing 5I.

of one should therefore suffice. The keys I5 in the left-hand group will be explained.

A sheet metal strap 43 extends down one side, across the bottom, and up the other side of each key I5, about midway the length of the key, in a position to receive through apertures thereof the shaft 39. This provides durable metal bearings for the key. At one side the strap is extended above the key and thence laterally in one direction or the other to provide a bell crank lever Mi. The bell crank 44 of the first or left hand key of the left hand group, as the parts are Viewed in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, projects to the right across said key in parallel spaced relation thereto, almost the width of the key. The bell crank 44 of the second key also projects to the right a shorter distance across the key in parallel spaced relation to the upper surface. The bell crank of the third key projects to the left and overhangls the second keyr a short distance, while the bell:` crank of the fourth key extends to the left across the third key for nearly the Width thereof. The straps and' bell cranks of the right hand group of keys are identical with those of the left hand'v group, only they arel reversed, and. they are designated i3a and 44a, respectively. The bell` cranks lid and 4ta are normally in transverse alignment along and above-the shaft 39 and each The openings 5l of the bell cranks of each. group are substantially equally spaced apart, and due to the formation and arrangement of the bell. cranks, they are quite close together.

Referring particularly to Fig. 5, each key- I5 is provided. withv a hangerv 52. Said hanger is rigid with the key and is disposed in perpendicular relation. thereto. A. resilient member Fill` is carried by the wall I6: and acts asa silent stop to limit the forwardv swinging movement of the hanger.

A. s-ir'nplef and efficient hammer supporting means is employed and preferably consists of superimposed layers of cardboard or the like and a. suit'- able fabric, adhesively connected together to provide ay composite strip 55.. This strip isrelatively long and has its upperA end portion secured to the inner face of thehanger` 52l by fastening means 5t. The aforesaid layerl of cardboard. or the like is severed transversely at 5l below said fastening means 56 to afford a hinge action, and the lower end oi the strip 55V extends below the free end of the hanger. A circular hammer 58 of wood or other suitable material is rigidly connected to the lower end of. said strip. Itis obvious, therefore, that upon depression of the key I5 against a resilient silent stop 59on the key board I4, said key will be rocked about its pivot constituted of the shaft 39,1and move the hanger 52 to the rear, causing the hammer 58 to be swung" in a corresponding. direction, As the key is stopped as aforesaid, the strip 55, being hinged- Iy mounted on the hanger 52', continues to move under its own inertia and strikes: its respective tone bar 38, from` which it'- immediately` drops away so as not to dampen the vibrationY of the tone bar, which would interfere with its clear tone. It is understood, of course, that each key is a part of an assembly like the one above described, and that each such assembly'is associated with one of the tone bars38.

To operate these several key assembles, I provide a like number of identical plungers 60. The rear ends of the plungers are shown as enlarged and as guided within holes` in the back wall I2, While the front ends ofi the plungers are turned downwardly and projected through the holes 50 of the bell cranks 44.

It follows from what has been said that there are two groups of four plungers each, and that they are substantially equally spaced apart transversely of the piano by reason of the spacing of the holes 50 of said bell cranks.

Now, when a disk I9 is placed within the space or pocket provided for its reception, it will dispose the striker parts or projections 20 of the disk in operative relation to the plungers 60. The striker parts or projections 20 are arranged in arcs or circles concentric with the axis of the disk, those intended for cooperation with the plungers 60 of the right hand group being intermediate the arcs or circles in which are arranged the striker parts or projections that are intended for cooperation with the plungers of the left hand group. By this arrangement, which accounts for the previously explained fact that the axis of rotation of the disk is slightly to one side of the center of the key bank, a more compact structure is made posssible, as well as the use of disks of minimum diameter, for the reason that all of the plungers do not have to be on the same side of the center of rotation of the disk.

When the back wall is in its rear position against the stop 3'I, the rear ends of the plungers 60 repose within the holes in the back wall provided for their accommodation, as best shown in Fig. 5; but when said wall is swung forwardly by mechanism yet to be described, the plungers extend a substantial distance into the disk receiving space or pocket. Consequently, if a striker part or projection 2li of the disk is in line with a plunger at the time the wall I2 is swung forwardly, such part or projection will engage the plunger and urge it forwardly thereby to rock the corresponding key assembly, through the medium of its bell crank 44, to swing the corresponding hammer 58 against the appropriate tone bary 38. It is apparent, therefore, that, by alternate intermittent rotation and oscillation of the disk, different striker parts or projections will be brought into alignment with certain of the plungers and through them actuate the sound producing organism to cause the tune to be played which corresponds to the arrangement of striker parts or projections on the particular disk that is being used.

I shall now describe the mechanism for rotating the disk and oscillating the back wall I2, or, more accurately, the assembly of which it forms a part. Supported for rotation in bearings in the front wall I6 and back wall I2, at about the transverse center of the piano, is a shaft 65 which has a crank 66 secured to its forward end. To the rear end of the shaft is fastened a cross arm S'I which has a forwardly extending nger 68 at one end, and a cam engaging part or roller 69 at the other. The finger 68 is intended for engagement within the peripheral notches 2l of the disk I 9, while the part or roller 69 cooperates with a cam member 'Ill on the wall I2. Said cam member is desirably made of rubber or the like to insure quiet operation. A spring I2 that surrounds the shaft 65 and is compressed between the crank 66 and the front wall I6, retains the shaft in a forward position with the cross arm 61 adjacent the wall I2 during the oscillatory movements of said wall, the spring being of such strength as to accomplish this purpose while, at the same time, permitting the relatively heavy assembly including the wall I2 to gravitate rearwardly against the stop 31. f

I have already explained how the intermittent rotation and alternate oscillation of the disk actuates the sound producing organism to play a tune according to the arrangement of the strikerv parts or projections of the disk, and it will now be seen that this operation of the disk results.

from a turning of the crank 66. When the shaft' 65 is rotated by means of the crank 66, the ringer 68 will enter a peripheral notch of the disk and" projections in line with a plunger 60, the part or roller 59 will override the cam 'ID and swing the' back wall I2 and disk I9 forwardly to cause said striker part or projection to push the plunger forwardly and operate the corresponding key as' sembly. Thus, by continually rotating the crank;l the tune represented by the particular disk will be played.

In the form of the disk illustrated in Fig. 6, the

words and music are printed upon or otherwisev applied to the front face of the disk, as shown in Fig. 6, where a musical staff occupies an annular space adjacent the edge of the disk, with the words arranged below thenotes on the staff in conjunction with which they are to be sung.

Consequently a child, playing the piano, may sing the song that is being played, thus becoming morefamiliar with the notes and words. By dropping the disk into the space or pocket with the musical clef at the top, the disk will be positioned for the starting of the tune when the crank is rotated.

If the disk I S is made of plastic or the like, thevprojections 20 may be cast thereon; or if made of metal, they may be struck from the face of the disk, either as bosses, or as lugs partially severedy from the material of the disk and turned up.

In Fig. 7 I have shown a disk Illa wherein striker parts 2l]a are formed by portions of the disk that bridge radial slots 'I5 which ordinarily permit the passage, through the plane of the disk, of the enlarged rear ends of the plungers 60a, shown in Fig. 8. Here the back wall I2a is provided with openings 5Ua, the same as in the previously described form accommodation of the rear ends of the plungers 60a, while the member 252t that is carried by the vback wall has openings through which the rearV ends of the plungers may extend when the back wall is swung forwardly. In this arrangement;

as illustrated in the drawings, the words have been omitted from the disk. However, by makl.ing the disk larger; or, by moving the voids or slots nearer to the center of the disk, and correspondingly shifting the position of the plungersy 60a, both music and words may be included, as

in the iirst described form.

Having thus described my invention, what Iy claim is:

1. In a musical instrument, the combination parts arranged thereon according t0 a tune to be played and in circles substantially concentricl with the axis of rotation of the disk, means sup-. porting the disk in operative relation to said acltuators, for rotation about said axis in a plane.

wherein the aforesaid striker parts escape the actuators, and for to-and-fro movement at substantially right angles to its plane of rotation so as to cause the striker parts to engage and operate the actuators, the actuators coinciding in of the invention, for the' 3. The combination of elements recited by claim l, wherein the actuators are arranged in substantially horizontal alignment andv are separated into two groups: that lie, respectively, on opposite sides of. ther axis` of rotation of the disk and insubstantially the horizontal plane of said axis; and wherein the striker parts that are intended fior cooperation. with the actuators ofthe L respective groups occupy alternate circles.

4'. The combination of elements recited by claim` 1, wherein the 'disk' bears a musical staff that*` extends substantially circumferentially of the disk,. and. notes are associated with said staff. representing the tune produced by Virtue of the arrangement ofthe strikerl parts of the disk, the stair and notes bearing such relation to said striker partsA thatA the notes are in readablev positionwhen the musical tones corresponding to the notes are sounded.

5.. The combination ofV elements recitedl by claim 1, wherein the disk bearsk the 'Words of a song,- the tune`of which is produced by virtue of thearrangement-of the striker parts of said disk, the words bearing a'gi'ven relation. to said striker parts so that the: words are in readable position when the` musical notes corresponding thereto are sounded.

6. In a musical instrument, the combination with a series of sound. producing organisms, and' aplurality of actuators for eiecting the operation of said organisms; of a disk having striker parts arrangedy thereon according to a tune to be played and in circles substantially concentric with the axis of. rotation of the disk, means peripherally supporting thel disk for rotation aboutY said axis in a. plane wherein the aforesaid striker .parts escape the actuators and for to-and-fro movement at substantially right angles to its plane of rotation and in operative relation to said actuators so. as to cause the striker parts to engage and operate the actuators, the actuators coinciding in.

position with said circles. when the diskv is supported by said means, and mechanism cooperating with circumferentially spaced peripheral portions of. the disk for imparting step-b-y-step rotation tothe disk, said mechanism acting also `to impart to-and-iro movements to the disk that alternate with the step-by-step rotative movements' thereof.

7. Ina musical instrument, a revolvable disk having-striker parts arranged in circles of dinerent radii, a device adapted to support said disk for rotation and having a plurality of guides coinciding with the different circles for registration with successive striker parts as the disk is revolved; said device being pivotally mounted on an axis extending substantially parallel with the plane of the disk to thereby aiiord oscillating movement of the device at right angles to said plane; means for effectingv intermittent revolution of said disk to register diierent striker parts with said guides and for imparti-ng alternate oscillating movementto said.. device; and plungersv in said guideswitlr which the striker parts ony said disk come into contact wheny said' device is. moved in. one direction, and a sound producing organism actuated by said plungers to render a.

of different radii, the combination with such a.

disk, of andevice adapted to support the disk for rotation, a plurality of elements coinciding in. position with said circles and arranged for registration with successive striker parts as the disky is revolved, the plane of rotation of the disk when. supported by the aforesaid` devicev being such that said .striker parts escape. operative engagement: with said elements, said device being mounted fory to-and-fro .movement at substantially right an- :gles to the plane of the disk so as tov cause thev striker parts to engage and operate the'r elements,- and means for eiecting intermittent rotation of said disk to register different striker parts with certain ones of said elements and alternately im-v wherein said pocket is dened by said guides andA a bottom support, and between and upon which, respectively, the disk. is guided and supported: for rotation.

11. In a. toy player pianoY adapted to be operated by a revolvable disk having striker parts arranged in circles of different radii, the ccmbination with said disk, of a device adapted to supportA the disk for rotation and having openings coinciding with saidr circles whereby to align successive striker parts with said openings as the disk is rotated, said device being pivotally mounted for oscillating movement about an axis ex:- tending substantially parallel to the plane of the disk, continuously rotatable means for effecting intermittent partial rotation of said disk to align different striker parts With said openings and for alternately imparting oscillating movement to said device; plungers disposed adjacent the open-'1 ings and actuated by the striker parts of the disk when the devicel is moved in one direction, and operative connections between said plungers and the keys of the piano.

12. In a toy player piano ,a bank of keys, a series of hammers, one hammer operatively connected to each key, a disk having striker parts arranged in circles of dii'erent radii, a device adapted to support the disk for rotation and hav-- ing openings coinciding with the different circles for registering successive striker parts with said openings as the disk is revolved, a sound bar secured to the lower portion of said device, tone rods of graduated lengths secured at their lower ends to said sound bar and projecting upwardly in closely spaced relation to said device and in operative relation to the aforesaid hammers, said device being pivotally mounted for oscillating movement about an axis extending substantiaiiy parallel with the plane of the disk, means for effecting intermittent rotation of said to register different striker parts with the openings and for alternately imparting oscillating movement to said device, actuators disposed adjacent" the striker parts on the disk when the device is swung in one direction, and operative connections between said actuators and the keys of the piano.

13. In a toy player piano, a casing including' end walls, and parts extending between and connecting together said end walls, a bank of keys and associated hammers pivotally supported within the casing, each hammer being operatively connected to a key, an assembly including a back wall and a relatively heavy sound bar extending along the bottom of the back wall and secured to the inner side thereof, pivotal connections between said assembly and the end walls in the region of the front of said sound bar, whereby said assembly tends to overbalance rearwardly, a stop limiting the rearward movement of said assembly, means on the rear side of the back wall for peripherally supporting a disk for rotation in a plane substantially parallel to that of the back wall, a disk adapted to be supported by said means and having striker parts arranged in circular courses of different radii that are substantially concentric with the axis of rotation of the disk, the back wall having guide means that coincide with the aforesaid courses, actuators sustained by said guide means in operative relation to the striker parts of the disk, said actuators having operative connection with the keys, and means for imparting intermittent partial rotation to the disk and alternate oscillatory movement to said assembly.

14. A toy player piano according to claim 13, wherein the disk is provided with substantially equally spaced apart peripheral driving portions, and the means for rotating the disk and oscillating said assembly consists of a shaft rotatably supported at its forward end by a part of the casing and at its rear end by the back wall, the shaft extending forwardly beyond said part of the casing and rearwardly beyond said back wall, a crank or its equivalent secured to the front end of the shaft, and a cross arm fastened to the rear end of the shaft and havingat one end a part for cooperation with the driving portions of the disk and at its other end a cam engaging element, and a cam on the back wall in the path of said cam engaging element.

15. A toy player piano according to claim 13, wherein the disk supporting means includes side guides between which the disk is adapted to be disposed, and a cross member extending from one side guide to the other in substantially paral lel spaced relation to the back wall, and a support carried by the rear side of the back wall on which the disk rests.

16. In a toy player piano, a casing including end Walls, a top wall and a front wall; a closure hingedly connected to the rear edge of the top wall and adapted to be swung between a closed position in the plane of said top wall and an open position overlying the top wall, an assembly including a back wall pivotally connected to the end walls on an axis parallel with the back wall and forwardly thereof, a relatively heavy sound bar secured to the inner side of the back wall adjacent its lower edge, tone rods carried by and rising from the sound bar and graduated in length to produce different tones, a bank'of keys pivotally supported in the casing, hammers operatively connected to the keys and disposed in operative relation to the tone rods, a number of disks, each characterized by a plurality of striker parts arranged according to the tune to be played by said disk and in circular courses of different radii, means incorporated in said assembly and so related to the back wall as to provide an upwardly opening pocket in which a disk may be deposited when the aforesaid closure is in open position and wherein the disk will be supported with its upper portion exposed above the top of the piano, and means for imparting to a disk deposited in said pocket intermittent partial rotation, and for alternately oscillating said assembly, guide means incorporated in the assembly that coincide with the aforesaid circular courses, actuators movably sustained by said guide means in a position to be engaged by said striker parts as the disk is rotated, and operative connections between said actuators and the keys.

17. The combination defined by claim 16, wherein the musical score of the tune to be played by each disk is carried by and extends circumferentially of the front surface of the disk adjacent the periphery thereof.

18. In a toy piano according to claim 16, wherein each disk is provided with substantially equally spaced peripheral driving parts, and the mechanism for rotating the disk and imparting oscillatory movement to said assemby consists of a shaft extending fore and aft through the casing and rotatably supported near its ends by the front and back walls of the casing, a crank secured to the front end of the shaft, a coil spring surrounding the shaft and interposed between the crank and the front wall of the casing, a member fastened to the rear end of the shaft and including a nger for cooperation with the driving parts of the disk, a cam engaging element incorporated in said member, and a cam on the back wall that is intermittently engaged by said element as the shaft is rotated.

HOWARD N. BARNUM.

REFERENCES CITED The following references le of this patent:

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3476004A (en) * 1965-10-22 1969-11-04 Leon D Rosen Music device
US3863539A (en) * 1972-08-28 1975-02-04 Mattel Inc Changeable music box toy
US3982459A (en) * 1974-02-25 1976-09-28 Tomy Kogyo Co., Inc. Toy musical vehicle
FR2413736A1 (en) * 1977-12-28 1979-07-27 Tomy Kogyo Co Musical instrument toy
US5451178A (en) * 1992-03-26 1995-09-19 Sony Corporation Auditory playing device

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE258723C (en) *
US1565439A (en) * 1925-12-15 Musical i

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE258723C (en) *
US1565439A (en) * 1925-12-15 Musical i

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3476004A (en) * 1965-10-22 1969-11-04 Leon D Rosen Music device
US3863539A (en) * 1972-08-28 1975-02-04 Mattel Inc Changeable music box toy
US3982459A (en) * 1974-02-25 1976-09-28 Tomy Kogyo Co., Inc. Toy musical vehicle
FR2413736A1 (en) * 1977-12-28 1979-07-27 Tomy Kogyo Co Musical instrument toy
US4185533A (en) * 1977-12-28 1980-01-29 Tomy Kogyo Co., Inc. Toy musical instrument
US5451178A (en) * 1992-03-26 1995-09-19 Sony Corporation Auditory playing device

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