US2486758A - Method and apparatus for working sheet material - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for working sheet material Download PDF

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Publication number
US2486758A
US2486758A US19321438A US2486758A US 2486758 A US2486758 A US 2486758A US 19321438 A US19321438 A US 19321438A US 2486758 A US2486758 A US 2486758A
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material
sheet
object
blank
covering
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Fred B Pfeiffer
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Jesse R Crossan
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C51/00Shaping by thermoforming, i.e. shaping sheets or sheet like preforms after heating, e.g. shaping sheets in matched moulds or by deep-drawing; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C51/26Component parts, details or accessories; Auxiliary operations
    • B29C51/266Auxiliary operations after the thermoforming operation
    • B29C51/267Two sheets being thermoformed in separate mould parts and joined together while still in the mould
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65BMACHINES, APPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR, OR METHODS OF, PACKAGING ARTICLES OR MATERIALS; UNPACKING
    • B65B9/00Enclosing successive articles, or quantities of material, e.g. liquids or semiliquids, in flat, folded, or tubular webs of flexible sheet material; Subdividing filled flexible tubes to form packages
    • B65B9/02Enclosing successive articles, or quantities of material between opposed webs

Description

Nov. 1, 1949 F. B. PFEIFFER METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR WORKING SHEET w rwmbow Nov. 1, 1949 F. B. PFEIFFER METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR WORKING SHEET MATERIAL 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Feb. 28, 1938 3 Wu W 2319025. Pfe/f/er villi I New. 1, 1949 F. a. PFEIFFER 2s435?758 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR WORKING SHEET MATERIAL Filed Feb. 28, 1938- Sheets--Sheet 4 aywfzw METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR WORKING SHEET MATERIAL Filed Feb. 28. 1958 Nov. 1, 1949 F. B. PFEIFFER 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 hw wi QNW J m 0 k G R A N0 QM L .Qm. R w Am Nov. 1, 1949 F. B. PFEI FFER 2,486,758

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR WORKING SHEET MATERIAL Filed Feb. 28, 1938 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 A/rPres sure Nov. 1, 1949 F. B. PFEIFFER 2,486,753

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR WORKING SHEET MATERIAL Filed Feb. 28, 1938 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 Patented Nov. 1, [949 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR WORKING SHEET MATERIAL Fred B. Pfeifler, Akron, Ohio, assignor of one-half to Jesse R. Crossan Application February 28, 1938, Serial No. 193,214

19 Claims. 1

This invention relates to methods of coverin objects with sheet materials and to apparatus for practicing such methods. In this specification and in the appended claims, the words cover," covering, wrapping and the like are used in a broad sense to refer not only to packaging operations wherein a, sheet material is wrapped completely around an object, but also to other arts and operations wherein a sheet material forms a part of or in associated with only part of a complete article;

In wrapping or packaging articles of commerce prior to this invention, it has been customary to employ substantially non-stretchable materials such as paper, fabric, foil, and cellulose film known commercially as cellophane. Such materials are cut or Otherwise provided in blank size and shape of area greater than the surface area of the particular article to be wrapped or covered. Suflicient excess material must always be used to enable the edge portions thereof to be relatively lapped.

As is well known, when non-stretchable wrapping material is used to cover a curved surface, it becomes wrinkled as the necessary crowding of the wrapping material takes place. One example of such wrinkling may be seen in the commercial use of holland cloth or the cellulose film known commercially as cellophane" to cover the cemented or tacky side of a blow-out patch used as an automobile tire accessory. Another example of the wrapper and also of the excess of wrapping material over the area to be wrapped when non-stretchable material is used to wrap an article with a curved surface is seen in the common use of paper to wrap oranges. With the prior art material, round or irregular-shaped articles could not be wrapped without wrinkling, and all such objects in addition to those having fiat sides and geometrical symmetry required an amount of wrapping material considerably in excess of the total surface area of such article or articles. In other words the prior art practices have been objectionable for several reasons and it is the object of the present invention to overcome such objections.

An important feature of the invention in its broad aspect is to provide a new and novel method fOrwrapping or covering in whole or in part various articles with a minimum of material and with freedom from wrinkles and the like.

Another feature of the invention is the provision of apparatus in various forms for practicing the novel method.

perature ranges without injuring or otherwise detracting from either its appearance or its other properties. I take advantage of this discovery in practicing my invention by causing the film or sheet, while heated, to conform to the shape and size of article bein wrapped, and preferably I More specifically the invention contemplates stretch or expand the film or sheet very considerably in some instances whereby to effect substantial savings in material as well as to enhance the appearance of the wrapping, to make possible the neat wrapping of any object regardless of its shape. The sheet may be heated over its entire area or over any desired portion of its area dependent upon the requirements of a particular wrapping operation.

By way of example, but without limitations, it is here pointed out that the invention ma be employed in the wrapping 01' covering of cigars, fruits, vegetables, confections, wearing apparel, packaged articles as cigarettes, matches, toilet goods, razor blades, drugs, pencils, hardware and tools. In conjunction with any of the above mentioned or other articles, the film or sheet may be manipulated in various ways as, for example, by drawing or shaping mechanically or by differential fluid pressure. Thus in covering or wrapping confections of the type known as lollipops, a blank of the sheet material is sufficiently softened by heat to greatly increase its extensibility, and in such condition it is held by its edges. The confection can then be pressed endwise against the center of the heat softened sheet causing the same to stretch, and at the same time to envelop snugly the confection so presented. At an appropriate time thereafter the edges of the material may be released and either crimped or otherwise operated upon to secure them about the handle of the confection.

Another feature of the invention resides in the provision of apparatus for practicing the novel method. Thus in a machine for covering lollipops the sheet material may be fed automatically and intermitting from a, supply roll to a position potatoes, oranges, sponges, and the like.

' ing a blank or sheet of the material to an extent sufficient to cover a desired object or part of an object, and then to seal or secure the edge portions of the sheet to enable it to maintain its shape and position upon the object to which it is applied. The sheet material is one which, as previously stated, is normally only slightly stretchable as; for example, a rubber hydrohalide film. Naturally, the selected modification of the method for any particular field of manufacture will be governedpy various factors such as the shape. temperature or weight of the particular object to be covered and by other process steps or handling operations through which such ob ject might normally pass and with which the present method may becombined for greater eiliciency.

One form of the invention, as practiced in covering confections such as lollipops, contemplates holding a blank by its edge portions, applying heat to the blank whereby to soften it sufliciently to render it highly stretchable, and then to press a lollopip against the so-heated blank whereby to deform the central portion thereof and cause it to snugly enfold the confection. The edge portions of the blank may then'be released and crimped to complete the operation,

though obviously the crimping and releasing may be done simultaneously, or in any preferred order. In some instances the lollipops or other articles may be presented to the wrapping position in suiiiciently warm condition to supply all the heat that is necessary to soften the film or sheet, in which case the latter material need not be preheated. Alternatively, the film or sheet need not necessarily be shaped by the confection,

but it may, if desired, be shaped in a mold by differential fluid pressure while its edges are firmly held, as will later be described Still another practice of the invention contemplates the disposition of one of more articles to be wrapped between two sheets or films of the material, and then simultaneously stretching both sheets or films to cause them to follow the shape or shapes of the articles until portions of the opposing sheets meet and fuse together. This may be done with regular shaped bodies such as cigarette packages, razor blades, powder boxes, etc., or with irregular shaped bodies such as In either case, the articles may be wrapped individually or in groups, and in the latter case each article will be completely covered and sealed and may be separated from the others in any desired manner.

The foregoing and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will readily appear from the following description in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein the invention has been shown merely by way of illustration and wherein,

Figure 1 is a side view of one form of machine for practicing the novel method in conjunction with the wrapping of confections;

Figure 2 is an end view thereof;

Figure 3 is a top plan view of the same:

Figure 4 is a detail view of the lower clamping member against which the sheet of wrapping material is held;

Figure 5 is a Vertical transverse sectional view taken approximately on line 5-5 of Fig. 4;

Figure 6 is a detail view of one of the conveyor pulleys;

Figures 7 and 8 are respectively plan and edge views of the upper clamping member for cooperating with that shown in Fig. 4;

Figures 9 and 10 are detail plan views respectively showing, in different positions, the crimping means; v

Figure 11 is a side elevation of the strip or sheet feeding means with the parts in the same relative positions seen in Fig. 2;

Figures 12 is a view similar to Fig. 11 but with the parts in diiferent relative positions;

Figure 13 is a transverse sectional view taken on line l3-I3 of Fig. 12;

Figure 14 is a detail plan view of the sliding channel of the feeding means;

Fig. 15 is a detail side elevation thereof;

Figures 16 to 21 inclusive are diagrammatic views illustrating the successive steps in the operation of the machine's several units;

Figure 22 is a view of the completed confection as wrapped by this novel method;

Figure 23 is a diagrammatic side elevation showing a modification of the practice of the invention;

Figure 24 is a fragmentary vertical longitudinal sectional view of the delivery ends of the platens shown in Fig. 23;

Figure 25 is a fragmentary vertical transverse sectional view taken on line 25-45 of Fig. 23;

Figure 26 is a transverse sectional view through still another form of apparatus for practicing the invention;

Figure 27 is a similar view illustrating a diiferent step in the method; and

Figure 28 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view on line 2828 of Fig. 27.

Figure 29 is a transverse sectional view through another modification of apparatus for practicing the invention.

Figure 30 is a fragmentary view thereof partly in horizontal section and partly in elevation.

Figure 31 is a view taken approximately on line 3l3l of Fig. 29.

Referring particularly to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, it will be seen that the invention as there illustrated is embodied in a machine for wrapping confections of the type known as lollipops. Each confection comprises a stem or handle A having on one end a. piece of candy]; of any ordinary or preferred size and shape. A plurality of these confections are placed successively in a"'series of tubular sockets 30 carried by an endless conveyor belt 3i which runs over and between a pair of pulleys 32 and 33. These pulleys 32 and 33 are respectively mounted for rotation on shafts 34 and 35 supported by spaced bearing blocks 36 and 3! rising from a. base 38. The ends of the sockets 3|! project through the belt, and, in order to accommodate them, the pulleys 32 and 33 are formed with substantially central grooves 39 (see Fig. 6).

Incidentally the pulleys may also be formed with flanges for guiding the side edges of the belt and thus maintaining travel of the sockets in a true plane.

Suitable means are provided for advancing the belt 3| intermittently whereby to present the confections successively to a covering mechanism at C. While the belt advancing means may take many other different forms, it has been shown as comprising a cam-and-lever mechanism deriving its power from an electric motor 40 on an extension of the base 38. Through speed reduction gears 4| and 42, the motor 40 drives a shaft 43 which carries a series of cams for synchronous operation of several units including the belt advancing means. For the latter unit, a wedge-type cam 44 on the outer end of a swinging arm 46 is adapted to strike a roller 46 on one end of a laterally slideable bar 41. The other end of the bar 41 is disposed adjacent to the upper reach of the belt 3| and it carries a spring-actuated pawl or dog 48 adapted to engage the inner end of the adjacent socket 36. The bar 41 has limited movement guided by a grooved or slotted bracket 49, the extent of such movement in each direction being equal to the distance between the sockets 30. Thus for each revolution of the shaft 43, the belt 3| is advanced an amount equal to the distance between said sockets. After the cam 44 passes and disengages the roller 46, the bar 41 and associated parts will be returned to original position by a tension spring 50.

As shown in Fig. 1, the belt 3| has sufllcient slack in it to permit its upper reach to be moved up and down for presentation and withdrawal of one of the confections to and from the covering mechanism at C. For this purpose the edges of the belt pass through an elevator carried on the upper end of a rod 52 which is slideably sup ported by a guide 53. The lower end of the rod 52 is formed with a foot portion 54 which engages one end of a bell-crank lever 55 fulcrumed at 56 on the base 38. The other. end of this bell-crank lever 55 carries a roller 51' for engaging the periphery of a rotary cam 58 which is also mounted on the shaft 43. Thus for each revolution of said shaft, the elevator 5! is moved upwardly and downwardly, the upward movement being relatively slow and gradual and the downward movement being much more rapid.

The covering mechanism C comprises a lower fixed die 66 and an upper movable die 6|, both of which are hollow or tubular to permit passage of the candy portion B. The opposing faces of these dies 60 and 6| are adapted to cooperate to clamp between them a suitable blank D of the covering material previously mentioned. The lower die 60 is held by a bracket 62 and the upper die is carried by a forked end of a lever 63 fulcrumed at 64. The other end of the lever 63 is pivotally connected by a link 65 to an arm 66 which is fulcrumed at 61 on the frame of the machine. Intermediate its ends, the arm 66 carries a roller 68 adapted to engage against the periphery of another cam 69, the roller being maintained against said cam by virtue of a tension spring 16 acting on'the arm 66.

Cam 69 is also mounted on shaft 43. Thus for each revolution of shaft 43, the upper die 6| is raised from contact with lower die 60 and again returned to clamping position with said stationary lower die these movements being effected by the contact surface of cam 69 moving roller 68 downwardly the said roller carrying with it arm 66, link 65 and the end of arm 63 pivotally connected to arm 66. This downward motion of said end of arm 63 rocks said arm over its fulcrum 64 raising the forked end which carries the upper die 6 I. As the cam 69 continues its rotation the movement of the members 66, 65, 63 and 61 are reversed the tension spring maintaining the roller 68 in contact with the surface of cam 69 by the upward pull of said spring.

The covering material D of suitable width and thickness is fed from a supply roll 80 supported on a bar 8| which in turn is supported by rack 82 mounted on bracket 62. The material D is manually positioned in the automatic intermittent feeding mechanism of the device which will now be described in detail. A tongue of spring steel or any other suitable material is mounted 0n rod 9| which is supported in the upper end of bracket 92 rising from bracket 62. Said tongue contacts a stationary bottom plate 93 which is held in position by bolts 94 on hollow posts 95 the heads of said bolts being counter sunk so as not to interfere with the covering material D as said coverin material is drawn along the top surface of said bottom plate and under the tongue 90 as it is advanced to the covering mechanism at C. A sliding channel 96 best shown in Figs. 14 and 15 is slideably supported on cross members 91 and between the cut-out sides of the U-shaped guide member 98. The cut-out sides of the member 98 provide spaced upright members 99 which determine the distance member 96 can be moved, a rod or pin I06 being extended beyond the sides of the sliding channel 96 in such manner as to limit the movement of the channel 96 and associated parts. Sliding channel 96 has cut therein a slot IUI through which posts 95 extend. A reclproeating motion is imparted to the sliding member 96 through the movement of arm 66 said arm being actuated as hereinabove described. A bellcrank lever H0 is fulcrumed at 61. One arm of this bell crank H0 carries a pin H2 which is extended into the plane of arm 66 so that as arm 66 moves downwardly it will contact said pin H2 and thereby rock the arm llll on fulcrum at 61, imparting a movement of the upwardly extending arm of the bell crank lever ill! in a direction which may be described as forward. The upper end of lever H0 is pivotally connected with link H3 which link is also pivotally connected with arm H4 which is fulcrumed at 5 on the bracket 62. Intermediate the ends of arm H4 is pivotally attached a rod H6 which is threaded on its other end, the threaded portion carrying spaced nuts II] and H8. The threaded end of the arm H6 is supported in the upwardly extending portion of an angularly-formed clamping plate 9 the said clamping plate H9 being fulcrumed at I20 on the sliding channel 96.

The other and [H of the clamping plate H9 is adapted tomove toward and from the forward end of the bottom of channel 96, and in one extreme, it engages against the wrapping material D at that place and holds it to feed it into position between the dies 60 and 6|. That is accomplished while the rod H6 is moving toward the left as viewed in Fig. 2. After a predetermined amount of the sheet material is thus placed in wrapping position, the rod 6 moves in a reverse direction (to the right as viewed in Fig. 2) and as this occurs the nut ill will strike the member 9 and rock it, first disengaging the wrapping material and then moving the channel 96back toward the supply roll. At this time, the spring tongue 90 holds the end of the unused portion of the wrapping material against the fixed plate 93, maintaining proper tension and insuring that the material will be ready for the next feeding movement.

The heating mechanism E is designed to register against the top side of die 6| to provide the heat used in heating of a blank of covering material clamped between the faces of dies 66 and 6|. The said mechanism E comprises an ordinary electric heating element provided with thermostatic control of any ordinary or preferred type and connected to any convenient source of electric current. Mechanism ll: is mounted on a curved arm I36 which is'pivotally supported at one end by bracket l3l mounted on frame position as shown in I32 rising from base 30, carried by the outer end of said arm I30 and connected into the electric current supplied the heating element proper are two cutting wire supports I35 between which is disposed a cutting wire I30 having sufilcient resistance to become hot so that when it contacts the covering material that is bridged between the intermittent feeding mechanism and the clamping members the covering material will be cut in two. A rod I33 with a slot I34 formed therein is pivotally,connected to the curved arm I30 intermediate the ends of said aim'; Cooperating in slot I34 is a guide pin I35 which is fixedly supported in frame I32. The other end of arm I33 carries a roller I31 for engaging the periphery of another rotary cam I38 which is also mounted on the shaft 43. Thus for every revolution of said shaft the rod I33 is givenan upward endwise thrust which elevates the curved arm I30 and permitsthe said arm I30 to again drop downwardly of its own weight until stopped by the contact of element E against member 6|.

Superimposed on the forked end of lever 63 is a crimping mechanism designed to crimp the covering material snugly about the handle of a lollipop after the body of the lollipop has been substantially covered. Referring to Figs. 9 and 10 it will be seen that the crimper mechanism consists of two flat oppositely notched blades I50 and I! pivotally connected at I52. At one end of member I50 there is provided a small hole I53, and in like manner member I5I has formed therein hole I54. For actuating the crimper, a substantially U shaped rod I55 of small diameter extends from a bifurcated top of a lever arm I50 into said holes I53 and I54, the ends of the rod I55 being turned at right angles through said holes forming a. loose fit. The lower end of arm I56 has mounted thereon a roller I51 for engaging the periphery of the rotary cam 69 previously described, said roller being maintained against said cam by virtue of a tension spring I58 acting on the arm I56. Thus it will be seen that for every revolution of shaft 43 the crimping blades I and I5I will be moved toward and from each other. When the crimper is in open Fig. 9 there is sufilcient opening between members I50 and I5I to permit the passage of the heating element E in its course to register adjacent the die BI. When the parts are in crimping position as shown in Fig. 10, the notches in the blades I50 and I5I mutually encircle the lollipop handle just below the confection and gather the excess sheet material into skirt portions S as shown in Fig. 22. In practice it has been found that better results in crimping the cover material about the handle of a lollipop are obtained if a plate I59 is used to keep the cover material away from the scissors like action of the blades of the crimper as they close. The said plate I59 is pivotally attached to member I5I at I10 and said plate has formed in it the slot III. A fixed pin I12 extends from member I50 into said slot Ill and guides the plate I59 on an inward and outward course as the crimper is opened and closed. More positive action of the plate is accomplished by use of the tension spring I13 extending from the plate I59 to the member I5I.

By way of recapitulation, and referring to Figs.

16 to 21, inclusive, it will now be understood that in the first step of operation of the machine just described, a blank of the sheet material is fed in between the separated die members. After the sheet feeding device is retracted, the upper die moves down and clamps the sheet blank between it and the lower die. whereupon the cutting and heating unit is brought into operation to sever the blank from the strip and to soften the same by heat. Next, the lollipop or other article is pushed through the die deforming and stretching the mid-portion of the heated blank which gradually takes shape around the confection. Thereafter the crimping device comes into action to complete the shaping of the blank, said crimping device assisting in freeing the edges of the blank from the dies as the latter separate. The lollipop is then withdrawn from the dies and carried by the conveyor to the point of discharge. Of course, the lollipops may be ejected through the die, if desired, instead of being carried away by the conveyor, and the relative movement between the die and the lollipop may be eiiected by movement of either the lollipop or the die or both. Furthermore the covering material may be heated in numerous ways, either at the die or before it reaches that position.

While the invention has just been described with reference to wrapping a confection it can, of course, be used with equal advantage for wrapping or covering in whole or in part many other specific articles. For example: cigars, fruit's, vegetablesand the like, may be individually covered by this novel method. Packaged articles such as cigarettes, matches, toilet goods, razor blades, drugs, pencils, hardware and the like may also be wrapped.

As has been previously stated the invention can be used with equal advantage for wrapping or covering other specific articles. One such modification of the invention is illustrated in Figs. 23 to 25 inclusive wherein the covering of irregular and odd shaped articles as potatoes is shown diagrammatically. It is to be understood,

4 however, that this form of the invention is not l'mited to use on or for potatoes, but contem plates many other articles of. natural growth or of manufacture.

In practicing this form of my invention, potatoes 300 are placed between two sheets 30I and 302 of substantial width of covering material such as previously referred to hereinabove as being of the type disclosed in the Calvert Patent No. 1,989,632.

The sheet 30I may be drawn or otherwise fed from a roll 303 or other suitable source, and it is led under a guide roll 304 and onto an endless conveyor belt 305 which runs over pulleys 306 and 391. Either or both of these pulleys may be driven in any suitable manner and at any appropriate speed. As the sheet 30I is carried on the upper reach of the conveyor belt, the potatoes 300 (or other articles being wrapped) are placed upon it either manually or automatically and in relatively spaced sequence. As the motion of the sheet 30I and the potatoes 300 continues, they pass under another guide roll 308 at wh'ch place the sheet 302 is laid down on top of the potatoes, said sheet 302 being drawn or otherwise fed from a roll 309 or other suitable source. The so-assembled sheets and potatoes are then passed from the conveyor belt 305 and into a suitable heating and uniting device. While its form mayvary, the heating and uniting device shown diagrammatically in the drawings, comprises a lower platen 3I0 and an upper platen 3i I, said platens being spaced apart sufficiently to permit ready passage of the materials. Heat may be applied to the platens in any desired manner, as by circulation of hot water through jackets 3I2 and 3I3.

and 3|! through which blasts of air pass from chambers 3|0 and 3| 9, which in turn may be supplied with compressed air from any suitable source. These blasts of air impinge against the lower and upper surfaces respectively of the heated sheets 30| and 302 with sufiicient force to shape said sheets snugly about or against the individual potatoes, and portions of said sheets coming into contact with each other in the spaces between the potatoes. v,If desired, the air flowing through the ports 3|6 and 3|'| may be heated to further facilitate the union of the sheets 30| and 302 at their various points of mutual contact.

From the foregoing, it will be evident that the potatoes (or other objects to be covered) may be very easily and quickly disposed between two sheets of the desired wrapping material. The operation is continuous, and as it progresses, the sheets are heated sufficiently to soften their surfaces, and eventually said sheets are shaped about the individual articles, sealing each one and leaving them all connected together by merged or fused portions of the sheets. After leaving the delivery ends of the platens, the so-connected materials may be taken away by a conveyor 320, from which they may be removed, separated, inspected, or otherwise handled preparatory to packing and shipping.

Still another example of the invention is illustrated in Figures 26 to 28, inclusive, wherein two tubular cooperating members, 500 and 50|, have secured in their open cooperating ends fine mesh screens, 502 and 503, in approximately the shape of the object to be covered. At the closed ends of said members 500 and 50| are ports 504 and 505, said ports communicating with pressure and vacuum tanks by means of three-Way valves 506 and 501. Blanks of covering material, 5|0 and 5| I, of the type or nature previously mentioned, or any other suitable material, are applied over the faces of members 500 and 50| and are held there by rings, 5| 2 and 5|3. In the edges of members 500 and 50| are formed depressions, 5|4 and 5|5 aligned with a vacuum tube, 5|6, which is suspended between the open faces of members 500 and 50|, and extends only slightly beyond the edges of the said members. A heating element, 5|0, is adapted to be moved in between the blanks, 5|0 and 5| to heat said blanks and then to be removed, and the members, 500 and 50|, are adapted to be moved toward each other until the contact. The vacuum thru valves 50'! and 509 is designed to create a vacuum within the members 500 and 50|, and the pressure line thru said valves is designed to build up pressure in members 500 and 50|. The operation of this form of the invention is as follows: The blanks 5|0 and 5 of covering material are placed in position over the open ends of members 500 and 50|, where they are held by the rings 5|2 and 5|3 provided for that purpose. With the members 500 and 50| slightly spaced apart as in Fig. 26, the heating element is placed between the blanks to heat them after which the heating element is withdrawn and the vacuum valves opened causing the blanks to be drawn back against the screens forming receiving cavities. for the article to be covered. Next, the article to be covered is placed between the cavities and the members 500 and 50| are moved toward each other, which movement catches the article within the cavities and the movement is continued until the edges of the members 500 and 50|, with the cover material between them, contact, which results in sealing or fusing the two blanks together except over the vacuum tube 5|6, and this tube extends into the space between the covered article and the cover. The vacuum line 5|6 is in operation as the cover blanks come together and thereby extract the air from between the cover and the covered object. Next, the small tube 5| 6 is withdrawn and the small hole it leaves may be closed and sealed in any desired manner. Next, the pressure valve is opened and the members 500 and 50| are moved away from each other until the covered article is ejected, the pressure pressing the covering material firmly against the object being covered.

In the illustrated embodiment just described, the

object is spherical, as an orange, out the invention is not limited in this respect since other objects and other shapes may be operated upon with equal success.

In Figs. 29, 30 and 31 there is illustrated another form of machine particularly adapted for covering lollipops but with principles capable of use in similarly covering other specific articles. In this form a pair of cooperating members such as rolls GM and 602 are mounted for simultaneous rotation in opposite directions. These members have their surfaces formed with cavities 603 and 604 of size and shape corresponding with, but slightly larger than, the confection 600 which is to be covered. The members may be driven in any suitable manner as by gears 605 and 606 and may be journaled in bearings of any desired form. Strips 60'! and 608 of rubber hydrochloride film or other selected material are respectively applied to the rolls GM and 602 in such manner that said strips are brought together and pressed together. The strips 601 and 600 may be slightly narrower than the rolls GM and 602 but wider than the cavities 603 and 604. At an appropriate point in the operation of the device and before the strips are actually brought together the lollipop 600, or other article being covered, is positioned between the strips either manually or automatically as desired. The arrangement is such that with the progressive rotation of the members GM and 602 the confection 600 becomes positioned between the strips of covering material in such manner as to register with the opposing cavities 603 and 604. As this occurs the covering material is stretched to conform to the shape of the confection and as the movement continues the edge portions of the strips and the intermediate portions between the successive confections are sealed together by pressure and heat.

In order to supply the strips of the covering material they may be fed from supply rolls or the like through or between feed rolls 609 and 6|0 to surface heating drums 6H and thence to the rolls EDI and 602. The drums 6 are mounted for rotation preferably in synchronism with the rolls GM and 602 and may be heated internally by hot water or electric heating elements as may be preferable. The degree of heating is, of course, dependent upon the properties of the selected wrapping material and by way of example it is here noted that "Pliofilm should be heated to within the range of to F. By having the feed rolls 60B and 6H! relatively cool the strips may be drawn from the source of supply without undue or premature stretching. If desired additional heat may be supplied to the rolls Gill and 602 as by circulation of a heating fluid in or through central chambers 6i: such fluid being supplied through a tube or pipe SIS fitted with swivel joints Gil.

At one edge each or the rolls 6M and 602 is formed notches SIS which extend into the cavities 803 and 604 and provide clearance for the confection handle 6 l 6. Obviously as the machine operates the corresponding portions of the covering material are shaped to fit snugly around these handles 6i6 giving a moistm'e proof seal and neat appearance.

From the foregoing it will be evident that a multiplicity of articles can easily and quickly be covered by continuous operation of the machine, such articles with their covers emerging from the machine in strip form and capable of being severed individually or in groups.

From the foregoing it will be evident that I have provided novel method stepsand apparatus for covering various articles in whole or in part. In practicing the invention, the covering material is stretched, eflecting economy and resulting in improved appearance, free from If necically described and illustrated, and the right is herein reserved to make such changes as fall within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit oi the invention.

What I claim is:

1. In the method or covering an object with a stretchable thermoplastic sheet material, the steps of providing a single blank of the sheet material of an area substantially less than the surface of the object to be covered, supporting and clamping said blank at its edges, moving the object forcibly against the central portion of the blank whereby to stretch the sheet material a substantial amount and cause it to wound the object, releasing the clamped edges of the blank, and then operating upon the edge portions of the blank to complete covering the object.

2. In the method of covering an object with a stretchable sheet of thermoplastic material, the steps of providing a blank of sheet material of an area substantially less than the surface of the object to be covered, supporting and clamping said blank at intervals at its edges, pressing a heated object against the blank whereby to increase the stretchability of the sheet material by the application of the heat of the said object to said sheet material and to cause the sheet material to surround the object, releasing the clamped edge portions 01' the blank, and then operating upon the edge portions of said blank to complete covering of the object.

3. A method of wrapping which includes the steps of heating a sheet of rubber hydrochloride to increase its stretchability, stretching the sheet about the article to be wrapped by pressing the The invention is susceptible of 12 edges or the sheet to secure it about the article, and fusing the gathered edges.

4. A method of wrapping which includes the steps of heating a sheet 01' rubber hydrochloride to increase its stretchability, stretching the sheet while in a heated condition about the article to be wrapped by pressing the article against the sheet, gathering together the edges of the sheet to secure it about the article, and fusing the gathered edges.

5. A method of packaging which includes the steps of heating a film of rubber hydrohalide until the same acquires a high degree of elasticity, and stretching the same in contact with the surface of an article to be wrapped therein.

6. An apparatus of the character described, including means for advancing a web of thermoplastic sheet material, means for heating predetermined portions of said material, means for forming pocket-like extensions in said heated portions to partially enclose the articles to be wrapped, and means for drawing together portions of the web on opposite sides of the articles to close and seal said pocket-like extensions around the articles.

7. A method of wrapping an article in a single sheet of heat-stretchable material, including the steps of heating the sheet to render it suiiiciently stretchable, stretching the sheet about the article to be wrapped by pressing the article against the sheet, gathering together the marginal portions of the sheet to secure it about the article, and fusing the gathered portions.

8. A method of wrapping an object, including the steps of heating a single blank of heatstretchable and heat-scalable sheet material to impart to it the requisite stretchable and sealable properties, and completely enclosing the object in that single blank by stretching the blank to increase its area and by bringing portions of the blank into direct sealing contact to confine it about the object.

9. A method of wrapping an object, including the steps of heating a single blank of heatstretchable and heat-sealable sheet material to said blank at its marginal portions, heating the blank to impart to it the requisite stretchable and scalable properties, stretching the blank while so anchored by pressing the object directly against it, and then gathering together into direct sealing contact the marginal portion of the blank to confine it about the object.

11. A method of wrapping an object, including the steps of heating a single blank of heatstretchable sheet material to render it sufliciently stretchable, and completely enclosing the object in that single blank by stretching the blank to increase its area and by securing directly together portions of the blank to confine it about the object.

12. A method of wrapping an object, including the steps of providing a blank of heat-stretch able sheet material, anchoring said blank at its marginal portions, heating the blank to render it sufliciently stretchable, stretching the blank article against the sheet, gathering together the while so anchored by pressing the object directly against it, and then securing directly together the marginal portions of the blank to confine it about the object.

13. A method of packaging which includes the steps of heating a single film of rubber hydrohalide until the same becomes readily stretchable, stretching the film in contact with the surface of the object to be wrapped, and then sealing the film in its stretched condition about the object to form a removable wrapper which completely encloses the object.

14. A method of packaging which includes the steps of heating a single film of thermostretchable wrapping material until the same becomes readily stretchable, stretching the heated film in contact with the surface of the object to be wrapped, and then sealing the film in its stretched condition about the object to form a removable wrapper which completely encloses the object.

15. A wrapping machine comprising, in combination, means for anchoring a blank 01 heatstretchable sheet material at its marginal portions, means for heating the blank to render it readily stretchable, means for pressing the object to be wrapped against the heated blank while so anchored to form an open-ended wrapper which will partially enclose the object, means for gathering together the marginal portions of the blank to close the open end of the wrapper and thereby cause it to completely enclose the object, and mechanism for operating the aforesaid means in proper synchronism during each cycle of operation of the machine.

16. A method of wrapping an object in a temporary protective film to form an openable package, including the steps of heating a sufiicient quantity of a rubber hydrochloride sheet material to make up a complete wrapper which will entirely enclose the object, stretching the heated material to increase its area and conform it to the shape of the object, and securing the stretchshaped material while it is still elastic about the object to form the complete wrapper solely by bringing portions of the wrapper into heat-sealing contact.

17. The method of wrapping an article in a film composed essentially of a rubber hydrochloride, which comprises heating at least a portion of the film to render it highly elastic, stretching the heated portion of the film to make it fit the article, and then while the film is still elastic applying it in stretch-shaped condition to the object and securing it thereon in such stretchshaped condition.

18. A method of wrapping an object in a temporary protective film to form an openable package, including the steps of heating a sufilcient quantity of a rubber hydrochloride sheet material to make up a complete wrapper which will entirely enclose the object, stretching the heated material all at one and the same time to increase its area and conform it to the shape of the object, and securing the stretch-shaped material while it is still elastic about the object all at one and the same time to form the complete wrapper.

19. A method of wrapping an object in a temporary protective film to form an openable package, including the steps of heating all at one and the same time a suflicient quantity of a rubber hydrochloride sheet material to make up a complete wrapper which will entirely enclose the object, stretching the heated material all at one and the same time to increase its area and conform it to the shape of the object, and securing the stretchshaped material while it is still elastic about the object all at one and the same time to form the complete wrapper.

FRED B. PF'EIFFER.

EEFERENCES crrnp The following references are of record in the tile 0! this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 669,331 Thurber Mar. 5, 1901 867,176 Warwick Sept. 24, 1907 1,126,719 Dearborn Feb. 2, 1915 1,244,676 Wilcox Oct. 30, 1917 1,481,866 Heist Jan. 29, 1924 1,514,183 Steele et a1. Nov. 4, 1924 1,583,381 Zimmerman May 4, 1926 1,856,694 De Correvant May 3, 1932 1,895,899 Schaub Jan. 31, 1933 1,925,509 Staud et al. Sept. 5, 1933 1,970,396 Scherer Aug. 14, 1934 1,976,329 Copeman Oct. 9, 1934 1,989,632 Calvert Jan. 29, 1935 2,001,074 Stout et al. May 14, 1935 2,071,300 Gammeter Feb. 6, 1937 2,072,837 Helm Mar. 2, 1937 2,075,178 Copeman Mar. 30, 1937 2,083,617 Salfisberg June 15, 1937 2,090,257 Hunter Aug. 17, 1937 2,103,386 Salfisberg Dec. 28, 1937 2,113,636 Vogt Apr. 12, 1938 2,135,751 Harmon Nov. 8, 1938 2,141,318 Salflsberg Dec. 27, 1938 2,168,651 McCoy Aug. 8, 1939 2,327,170 Calvert Aug. 17, 1943

US2486758A 1938-02-28 1938-02-28 Method and apparatus for working sheet material Expired - Lifetime US2486758A (en)

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US2486760A US2486760A (en) 1938-02-28 1946-04-27 Method of packaging
US2486759A US2486759A (en) 1938-02-28 1946-04-27 Packaging method and apparatus

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US2597986A (en) * 1950-04-10 1952-05-27 Scherer Corp R P Method for making containers
US2656658A (en) * 1951-02-07 1953-10-27 John P Grady Bagmaking and filling machine
US2705857A (en) * 1953-07-28 1955-04-12 F & F Lab Inc Method of and apparatus for making wrapped candy suckers
US2712208A (en) * 1949-10-22 1955-07-05 Goodyear Tire & Rubber Method and apparatus for wrapping
US2736150A (en) * 1952-02-28 1956-02-28 Packaging apparatus
US2931148A (en) * 1957-06-10 1960-04-05 Texas Us Chem Co Method of wrapping tacky polymer as shipping package and apparatus therefor
US3000152A (en) * 1956-09-27 1961-09-19 Downie Gerald Methods of and means for packing commodities
DE1123612B (en) * 1957-06-22 1962-02-08 Vera Delnon Geb Kasalova Apparatus for packaging goods in fully enclosed, air-tight bags
US3052012A (en) * 1953-02-05 1962-09-04 Leonard E Ravich Methods of making contamintant-proof electrical circuit components
US3264115A (en) * 1962-07-10 1966-08-02 Harry E Davis Safety lollipop
US4520613A (en) * 1980-07-18 1985-06-04 Eurobeva Engineering Trust Method and machine for the packaging of articles with a stretchable foil
US20080034715A1 (en) * 2002-04-18 2008-02-14 Cfs Weert B.V. Machine for packaging products

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US2135751A (en) * 1935-12-13 1938-11-08 Du Pont Machine for packaging tooth brushes
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US867176A (en) * 1906-11-24 1907-09-24 George T Warwick Machine for wrapping oranges and other spherical objects.
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US1976329A (en) * 1932-04-08 1934-10-09 Copeman Lab Co Waterproof and punctureproof paper
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US2083617A (en) * 1934-10-18 1937-06-15 Ivers Lee Co Packaging machine
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US2075178A (en) * 1934-12-03 1937-03-30 Copeman Lab Co Dispensing device for sheet rubber deposited from an aqueous dispersion of rubber and the process of forming and using same
US2103386A (en) * 1935-05-24 1937-12-28 Ivers Lee Co Color packaging
US2113636A (en) * 1935-11-15 1938-04-12 Owens Illinois Glass Co Method and apparatus for forming packages
US2135751A (en) * 1935-12-13 1938-11-08 Du Pont Machine for packaging tooth brushes
US2071300A (en) * 1936-03-10 1937-02-16 Susan G Gammeter Method of preserving perishable food products
US2168651A (en) * 1936-06-30 1939-08-08 Thomas A Mccoy Packaging process and medium
US2327170A (en) * 1941-10-14 1943-08-17 Wingfoot Corp Method of making rubber hydrochloride sheets and wrapping articles therein

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2712208A (en) * 1949-10-22 1955-07-05 Goodyear Tire & Rubber Method and apparatus for wrapping
US2597986A (en) * 1950-04-10 1952-05-27 Scherer Corp R P Method for making containers
US2656658A (en) * 1951-02-07 1953-10-27 John P Grady Bagmaking and filling machine
US2736150A (en) * 1952-02-28 1956-02-28 Packaging apparatus
US3052012A (en) * 1953-02-05 1962-09-04 Leonard E Ravich Methods of making contamintant-proof electrical circuit components
US2705857A (en) * 1953-07-28 1955-04-12 F & F Lab Inc Method of and apparatus for making wrapped candy suckers
US3000152A (en) * 1956-09-27 1961-09-19 Downie Gerald Methods of and means for packing commodities
US2931148A (en) * 1957-06-10 1960-04-05 Texas Us Chem Co Method of wrapping tacky polymer as shipping package and apparatus therefor
DE1123612B (en) * 1957-06-22 1962-02-08 Vera Delnon Geb Kasalova Apparatus for packaging goods in fully enclosed, air-tight bags
US3264115A (en) * 1962-07-10 1966-08-02 Harry E Davis Safety lollipop
US4520613A (en) * 1980-07-18 1985-06-04 Eurobeva Engineering Trust Method and machine for the packaging of articles with a stretchable foil
US20080034715A1 (en) * 2002-04-18 2008-02-14 Cfs Weert B.V. Machine for packaging products
US7454886B2 (en) * 2002-04-18 2008-11-25 Cfs Weert B.V. Machine for packaging products

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