US2484517A - Heating apparatus - Google Patents

Heating apparatus Download PDF

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US2484517A
US2484517A US604631A US60463145A US2484517A US 2484517 A US2484517 A US 2484517A US 604631 A US604631 A US 604631A US 60463145 A US60463145 A US 60463145A US 2484517 A US2484517 A US 2484517A
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chamber
pipe
strands
heat
radiator
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US604631A
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Logsdon Clyde
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Logsdon Clyde
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60HARRANGEMENTS OF HEATING, COOLING, VENTILATING OR OTHER AIR-TREATING DEVICES SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR PASSENGER OR GOODS SPACES OF VEHICLES
    • B60H1/00Heating, cooling or ventilating [HVAC] devices
    • B60H1/02Heating, cooling or ventilating [HVAC] devices the heat being derived from the propulsion plant
    • B60H1/025Heating, cooling or ventilating [HVAC] devices the heat being derived from the propulsion plant from both the cooling liquid and the exhaust gases of the propulsion plant

Description

Oct. 11, 1949. c. LOGSDON HEATING APPARATUS Filed Jilly 12, 1945 v 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Clyde Logsdan,
Oct. 11, 1949. c, LOGSDON 2,484,517
' HEATING APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 12, 1945 Patented Oct. 11, 1949 UNITED STATES OFFICE HEATING APPARATUS Clyde Logsdon, Carthage, Moiv Application July 12, 1945;, .Serial*No.-604,631
3 Claims. 1
The invention relates to heating apparatus, and has for its principal object the provision of improved means for the conservation and utilization of heat in products of combustion'which usually has been permitted to go to waste. While for purposes of disclosure the accompanying drawings illustrate examples of the application oftthe principles of the invention to a domestic heating plant, and'to the utilization of waste heat in the exhaust gases of an internal cornbustion engine for the heating of the interior of an automobile, it will be readily appreciated by those skilled in the art that the invention is by no means limited to such uses, but that with relatively little change in the details of construction and arrangements of parts the apparatus may be readily employed, for example; for heating the cabin and/or d'e-icing the wings of an airplane, etc.
In the said drawings:
Figure 1 is a vertical sectional view, partly in elevation, illustrating a typical form of the invention applied to the chimney flue of a domestic heating plant;
Fig. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view on the plane indicated by the line 2-2 of Fig. 1,.looking in the direction of the arrows;
Fig. 3 is an elevational' view, partly in section, showing a modified form of the invention, adapted for the heating of an automobile;
Fig. 4 is an enlarged sectional-elevational view, showing the principal parts of this form more in detail; and
Fig. 5 is across sectional view on the plane indicated by the line 5-5 of Fig. 4,.loking down.
Referring more particularly to Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings, indicates a chimney of brick or masonry work, provided with a metallic or other lining 6, and adapted to receive the smoke and gaseous products of combustion from a stove. furnace or other primary heating apparatus (not shown) through a smoke pipe 1.
Disposed within the pipe I is a plurality of strands 8 of a good heat conducting material, such for example as copper wires, and these strands extend into the flue 5 where they are wrapped around a vertical pipe or conduit 9, likewise of a good heat conducting material. Heat conducting strands Hi, similar to the strands 8,
are disposed within the pipe 9, which communiz,
cates at its upper end with a slightly inclined transverse chamber II extending across the flue 5. This chamber also contains heat conducting strands I2, and is entered at one end by a pipe I3 likewise containing heat conducting strands I I. The pipe Iaextends downwardly, either outside-or inside the chimney 5, and its lower end is connected to heat exchanging box or chamber I5 which may be set in the floor 16' of the room or other enclosure to be heated.
A pipe I'I extends from the other end of the chamber 1 I, through the wall of the chimney '5, and is provided with a suitable check valve I8 for controlling the admission of air into the said chamber.
The lower end of the pipe or conduit 9 is provided with a horizontal extension I9 containing a suitable checkvalve 20, and this extension runs through a wall of the flue and communicates with the housing 21 of a float valve 22'. Water is supplied to the valve housing 2| by a pipe 23 leading from any appropriate supply, such for example as a reservoir 24.
A drain pipe 2B leads from the box or chamber I5 and is provided with a suitableche'ck valve 21. The flue maybe provided with a damper, comprising a pair of hinged leaves 28 which straddle the chamber II, as will be clear fromFig. 2;:and are adapted to be lowered from the full' lineto the dotted line positions shown, and vice versa, by a chain 29 passing through a conduit an extending through a wall of the flue.
At' the start of operation of the apparatus, the intersticesbetween-the strands I 'Il, I2 and- I- i are of course filled with air. The floatvalve 2i! main tains suiiicient water in the valve housing'to keep the pipe I9 filled, and the check valve? 2-!) permits a determined quantity to enter thelower part of pipe 9. As the combustion products pass through the smoke pipe Ito the flue 5, the strands the-- come heated thereby and transfer such heat to the pipefl and the "strands II! therein. This pipe, as well as the-chamber II and the strands G 2 therein, may also absorb some heat directly the combustion products; and since the strands I4 in pipe I3 are in contact with or constitute continuations of the strands I2, they too wil'l become heated by conduction. The heated pipe 9 and strands H! heat the air and water in the pipe, expandingtheformer and vaporizingrthe latter, thus setting up a pressure in thepipe' ll, chamber H and pipe I3 which closes t encheck' valves I8 and 2-0. Thesevalves will thus preventiescapeof the heated air and vapor through thepipes I!v and I9 and a flow will be set up down the .pipe [3V to the heat exchanger box or radiator l5, where the heat from both the strands I4 and the air and vapor will be transferred to "the airzin the room or other space to be heated. From the: box 15, the air andvapor (and any condensateirom the latter) will escape through :drain 265x3116 check valve "21 As suoh escape iszzcompleted', the
valve 21 closes and a slight negative pressure is established in the system, whereby the check valves [8 and 20 will again open, permitting a fresh charge of air and water to be introduced, whereupon the operation as above described will be repeated.
As above stated, the strands l4 tend to transfer heat from the chamber H to the box or radiator l5 by conduction. If these conductors were surrounded by air or water at the normal atmospheric temperature of the room or space to be heated, such fluid would absorb heat from the strands l4 and due to the convective currents set up in the fluid, transfer of the heat downwardly to the box I 5 would be materially retarded if not entirely prevented. However, by the present arrangement, since the conductors [4 are surrounded throughout their length by the heated air and vapor, which move downwardly through the pipe I3 by reason of the pressure developed in the system, undue extraction of heat from the lower portions of the conductors is prevented, and as a result such lower portions may become substantially as hot as the upper portions and/or the strands I 2 in chamber H. The downwardly moving heated fluids of course also transfer heat to the box or radiator iii.
In the form of the invention shown in Figs. 3-5, the same essential elements are present, although structurally modified in some cases to adapt them to this particular use. The motor 35 of the vehicle is provided with the usual exhaust manifold 1' and exhaust pipe 5' which respectively correspond in function to the smoke pipe 7 and the flue 5 of the preceding form. The interior of the manifold is provided with strands or strips 8 of good heat conducting material, which have one of their ends secured by good heat transferring connections to a member I l, which may be conveniently introduced into the exhaust line at the flanged coupling usually provided between the manifold 1' and exhaust pipe 5, as will be readily understood from Figs. 3 and 4.
The block member H is provided with one or more passages or chambers Ila in which strands l2 of good heat conducting material are disposed, in contact with or constituting continuations of similar conductors M which pass through a pipe l3 [5, which may be contained within a housing |5a mounted on the dash of the vehicle. The passages Ila of the member H are connected by a pipe 9', controlled by a check valve to the housing 2|, of a float controlled valve, to which housing water is supplied from the cooling system of the motor by a pipe 23. Air is supplied to the heating system by a pipe l1 controlled by a check valve l8, and a drain pipe 26 controlled by a check valve 27' provides for discharge of the condensate, in this instance back to the float valve housing 2 i A fan 36 may be mounted in the heater casing l5a, as is customary in devices of this character.
The operation of this form of the invention is substantially the same'as that of the preceding form, except of course that the source of heat is the exhaust gases from the motor 35 rather than the products of combustion from a domestic heating plant.
From the foregoing it will be clear that the functioning of the present apparatus is not dependent upon the source of heat, or upon the space or device to be heated and therefore, as above indicated, within the scope of the appended to a box or radiator chamber claims it may find ready and obvious applications other than the two specifically described.
What is claimed is:
1. In apparatus for utilizing waste heat in products of combustion, the combination with a passage through which the combustion products move, of a chamber disposed in conjunction with such passage to be heated by the combustion products therein; a radiator; a conduit connecting said radiator and chamber; metallic strands of high heat conductivity disposed in and extending throughout said chamber, conduit and radiator; means including a check valve for admitting air to the chamber and conduit; means including a check valve connected to the chamber for intermittently supplying water thereto for conversion into low pressure vapor, whereby to set up a flow of heated fluids through the chamber, conduit and radiator in intimate contact with the metallic strands therein; and means including a check valve connected to the radiator for discharging the fluids therefrom and setting up a slight negative pressure in the system to introduce additional air and water thereinto.
2. In apparatus for utilizing waste heat in products of combustion, the combination with a passage through which the combustion products move, of a chamber disposed in heat exchanging relation to said passage whereby to be heated by said products; metallic strands of high heat conductivity disposed in the passage exteriorly of the chamber and in heat transferring contact with a portion thereof to assist in heating it; a radiator; a conduit connecting said radiator and chamber; metallic strands of high heat conductivity disposed in and extending throughout said chamber, conduit and radiator; means including a check valve for admitting air to the chamber and conduit; means including a check valve connected to the chamber for intermittently supplying water thereto for conversion into low pressure vapor, whereby to set up a flow of heated fluids through the chamber, conduit and radiator in intimate contact with the metallic strands therein; and means including a check valve connected to the radiator for discharging the fluids therefrom and setting up a slight negative pressure in the system whereby to introduce additional air and water thereinto.
3. In apparatus for utilizing waste heat in products of combustion, the combination with a passage through which the combustion products move, of a chamber disposed in heat exchanging relation to said passage for heating by the combustion products therein; a radiator; a conduit connecting said radiator and chamber; metallic strands of high heat conductivity disposed in and extending throughout said chamber, conduit and radiator; means including a check valve connected to the chamber for admitting air thereto; a water reservoir having connections with the chamber; a float valve in said connections for intermittently admitting water from the reservoir to the chamber for conversion into low pressure vapor, whereby to set up a flow of heated fluids through the chamber, conduit and radiator in intimate contact with the metallic strands therein; and means including a check valve connected to the radiator for discharging the fluids therefrom and setting up a slight negative pressure in the system whereby to introduce additional air and water thereinto.
CLYDE LOGSDON.
(References on following page) 5 REFERENCES CITED g The following references are of record in the 1314:1324 file of this patent: 2,271,131
UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 Number Name Date Number 166,461 Houghton Aug. 10, 1875 22,028 447,330 King Mar. 3, 1891 Name Date Armstrong Dec. 23, 1902 McLachlan Sept. 2, 1919 Price Jan. 2'7, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Great Britain 1901
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2492326A1 (en) * 1980-10-21 1982-04-23 Delery Marc Seat heating system for air-cooled IC engine vehicle - uses cooling air to heat finned heat exchanger having electrically driven fan blowing fresh air through fins

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US166461A (en) * 1875-08-10 Improvement in smoke-flues and heating-drums
US447330A (en) * 1891-03-03 Steam heating apparatus
GB190122028A (en) * 1901-11-01 1902-09-11 William Meischke-Smith Improved Means of Cooling Cylinders of Internal Combustion Motors.
US716361A (en) * 1902-03-04 1902-12-23 Automatic Heating Company Process of regulating heating system.
US1314824A (en) * 1919-09-02 Lachlan
US2271131A (en) * 1939-05-01 1942-01-27 Sirius Corp Waste heat boiler for aircraft

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US166461A (en) * 1875-08-10 Improvement in smoke-flues and heating-drums
US447330A (en) * 1891-03-03 Steam heating apparatus
US1314824A (en) * 1919-09-02 Lachlan
GB190122028A (en) * 1901-11-01 1902-09-11 William Meischke-Smith Improved Means of Cooling Cylinders of Internal Combustion Motors.
US716361A (en) * 1902-03-04 1902-12-23 Automatic Heating Company Process of regulating heating system.
US2271131A (en) * 1939-05-01 1942-01-27 Sirius Corp Waste heat boiler for aircraft

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2492326A1 (en) * 1980-10-21 1982-04-23 Delery Marc Seat heating system for air-cooled IC engine vehicle - uses cooling air to heat finned heat exchanger having electrically driven fan blowing fresh air through fins

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