US2420665A - Shoe machine - Google Patents

Shoe machine Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2420665A
US2420665A US584763A US58476345A US2420665A US 2420665 A US2420665 A US 2420665A US 584763 A US584763 A US 584763A US 58476345 A US58476345 A US 58476345A US 2420665 A US2420665 A US 2420665A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
fluid
shoe
cylinder
insole
machine
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US584763A
Inventor
Jorgensen Bernhardt
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
United Shoe Machinery Corp
Original Assignee
United Shoe Machinery Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by United Shoe Machinery Corp filed Critical United Shoe Machinery Corp
Priority to US584763A priority Critical patent/US2420665A/en
Priority claimed from US63762145 external-priority patent/US2508574A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2420665A publication Critical patent/US2420665A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D21/00Lasting machines
    • A43D21/12Lasting machines with lasting clamps, shoe-shaped clamps, pincers, wipers, stretching straps or the like for forming the toe or heel parts of the last

Description

May 20, 1947.
5. JORGENSEN SHOE MACHINE 5 Sheets-Sheet 1' Filed March 26, 1945 1 n 1) en for" Bernhardt Jrgensen May 20, 1947. B. JORGENSEN SHOE MACHINE Filed March 26, 1945 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Wm 5 8 1 P I 6 6 0 z WM gm n 1 I w Bernhardt lygensen May 20, 1947. JORGENSEN 2,420,665
SHOE MACHINE Filed March 26, 1945 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 XII In venfor' Bernhardt Jbrgensen May 20, 1947. B. JORGENSEN 7 2 :SHOE MACHINE Fild March 26, 1945 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 ,'i llllfi))lllllllliigje y 20, 1947- I B. JORGENSEN 2,420,665
SHOE MACHINE Filed March 26, 1945 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 In 0912 fo r Bernhardt Jbrgensen latentecl May 20, 1947 SHOE MACHINE Bernhardt Jorgensen, Marblehead, Mass, assignor to United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Flemington, N. J a corporation of New Jersey Application March 26, 1945, Serial No. 584,763
6 Claims.
This invention relates primarily to machines for use in the manufacture of shoes, although it will be recognized that in some aspects it is not thus limited in its applicability. The invention is herein illustrated as applied to a toe-lasting machine constructed generally as disclosed in United States Letters Patent No. 2,324,509, granted on July 20, 1943, on an application of mine, but modified in some respects as shown in later disclosures of mine including especially Letters Patent No. 2,337,558, granted on December 28, 1943, and No. 2,391,461, granted on December 25, 1945.
It has been proposed heretofore, as disclosed in the last-mentioned Letters Patent; to position shoes in shoe machines such, for example, as the above-mentioned toe-lasting machine by means engaging the insole of each shoe in a hole or indentation previously formed in theinsole in predetermined relation to the edge of the shoe bottom. Means for punching such a hole or indentation in the insole is herein shown as attached to the frame of a toe-lasting machine of the above-mentioned character and operated by power from that machine. The latter is a fluid-operated machine provided with means for maintaining fluid under pressure at a source of supply only intermittently at the times required for the operation of the machine on successive shoes, the pressure at the source being reduced substantially to zero at the end of each cycle of operations of the machine. In order that the insole-punching means may be operated, if desired, when the lasting machine is not in operation, the present invention provides an organization including an accumulator which receives fluid from the above-mentioned source when the fluid is under pressure and stores the fluid for use in thus independently operating the insole-punching means. With" respect to this feature the invention, in its broader aspects, is to be understood as. not limited to insole-punching means or to lasting machines.
The invention will now be more particularly described with reference to the accompanying drawings and thereafter pointed out in the claims.
In the drawings,
Fig. 1 is a view in front elevation of the greater portion of a, toe-lasting machine such as disclosed in the above-mentioned Letters Patent, as modified for purposes of this invention;
Fig. 2 is a plan view on an enlarged scale of the insole-punching mechanism shown in Fig. 1, with the parts in their starting positions;
Fig. 3 shows the insole-punching mechanism in elevation as viewed from the right with reference to Fig. 2;
Fig. 4 is a section on the line IV-IV of Fig. 2;
Fig. 5 shows in elevation a portion of the insole-punching mechanism as viewed from the left with reference to Fig. 2, with the parts in operative relation to a shoe shown in section;
Fig. 6 is a section on the line VI-VI of Fig. 2;
Fig. 7 is a vertical sectional view of the accumulator for storing fluid to operate the insole-punching mechanism, and of parts associated therewith;
Fig. 8 is a plan view of the accumulator and associated parts;
Fig. 9 is a section on the line IX-IX of Fig. 7
Fig. 10 shows partly in section and partly in elevation one of the valve mechanisms of the lasting machine;
v Fig. 11 is a view in front elevation illustrating how the shoe prepared by the insole-punching mechanism is positioned in the lasting machine, the shoe being shown in section;
Fig. 12 is a section on the line XlI-XII of Fig. 6; and v Fig. 13 is a diagrammatic view of the fluidpressure generating and controlling means of the lasting machine with the accumulator associated therewith.
The toe-lasting machine herein shown, as fully disclosed in the previously mentioned Letters Patent, is provided with a plurality of fluid-operated instrumentalities which operate on the shoe in the course of a cycle of power operations of the machine, these instrumentalities including a toe former 2 (Fig. l) which wipes the toe end of the upper heightwise of the last and a pair of wipers 4 (Figs. 1 and 11) which wipe the margin of the toe end of the upper inwardly over an insole on the last into position to be secured to the insole by cement applied to the shoe at a predetermined time in the operation of the machine. As disclosed in Letters Patent No. 2,391,461, the shoe is presented by the operator with the bottom of the forepart of the insole in engagement with a plate 6 provided with a spur 8 which enters a small hole or indentation previously formed in the forepart of the insole to position the shoe lengthwise and laterally. Associated with this spur there may or may not be side gages such as shown in said Letters Patent. Substantially at the beginning of the power operation of the machine the shoe is clamped againstthe plate 6 by the upward movement of a toe rest it). Oper- 3 ative movements are imparted to the toe rest I ll, the toe former 2, the wipers 4, and other operating instrumentalities by cylinder-and-piston devices not herein shown in detail, these devices -being supplied with fluid, preferably oil, under pressure from a manifold [2 (Fig. 13). Admission of the fluid to the different devices and exhaust of the fluid therefrom are controlled by valves some of which are shown at It! in Fig. 13, these valves being controlled, as disclosed especially in Letters Patent No. 2,337,558, by fingers I5 (Fig. 1) mounted on a rotatable drum I8 which is driven by a piston 20 mounted in a cylinder 22. Admission of fluid from the manifold to this cylinder and exhaust of the fluid therefrom are controlled by a valve 24 which is moved initially by the operator to admit the fluid. It will be understood that a cycle of operations of the machine corresponds to one complete revolution of the drum l8.
Fluid is supplied to the manifold 52 from a sump or reservoir 26 by a pump 28 which is continuously driven by an electric motor 30 and forces the fluid through a pipe 3! leading to the manifold. When the machine is not in operation, however, the fluid returns freely from the manifold to the reservoir 26 through a valve 32 without developing any substantial pressure in the manifold. This valve, which is substantially like the valves l4 and 24, is shown in detail in Fig. 10. It is a sleeve valve mounted to slide on a tube 34 which is in communication with the manifold, the tube having therein a partition 36 which divides one end portion thereof from the other. At one side of the partition are a plurality of ports 38 and at the other side thereof a plurality of ports ll). Formed in the valve is an annular chamber 62 through which, when the valve is in its initial position, the ports 38 and 40 are in communication with one another to permit the escape of the fluid from the manifold. To stop such escape of the fluid and thus to cause pressure to be developed in the manifold the valve 32 is moved toward the left (Fig. to cover the ports 33, the excess fluid delivered by the pump then returning to the reservoir 26 past a spring-controlled relief valve 3 (Fig. 13) which controls the pressure in the manifold. As fully disclosed in Letters Patent No. 2,324,509,
this movement of the valve 32 is effected through a treadle-operated rod 64 acting on a lever 46 which is pivoted at 48 and serves to impart the movement to the valve through a swinging arm 59 connected to the valve. The valve is retained in the position to which it is thus moved by means of a latch 52 in engagement with a shoulder 54 on a block 56. At the end of the cycle of operations one of the fingers IE on the drum @l8 acts on an arm 58 connected to the latch 52 to withdraw the latch and release the lever 46, whereupon the valve 32 is returned to its initial position, to cause the pressure in the manifold to fall substantially to zero, by a spring til acting on the arm 59.
To provide the insole with the small hole or indentation to receive the spur 8 of the lasting machine, there is supported on an arm 62 fast on the right-hand side of the frame of the machine near the front thereof what is herein termed insole-punching mechanism. This mechanism includes a casting M on the front end portion of which are pivotally mounted two rolls 66 (Figs. 1, 2 and 6) arranged to engage the bottom face of the forepart of the insole in locations spaced apart widthwise of the shoe when the shoe is presented thereto bottom upward by the operator. A third roll 58 is pivotally mounted on a plate 79 secured to the lower face of the casting 64 and is arranged to engage the insole in a location nearer the toe end thereof than the rolls 68 and substantially midway between the sides of the toe. The three rolls thus serve as a shoe rest and facilitate movement of the shoe in a. toeward direction after the operator has presented the shoe against them. Such movement of the shoe is limited by engagement of its toe-end face with an arm 12 which serves as an end gage for the shoe and serves also another purpose hereinafter described. urther to position the shoe laterally and angularly in proper relation to a punch hereinafter described for punching the hole in the insole, there are provided two pairs of side gages l4 and 76 comprising respectively arms l8 and 89 arranged to extend lengthwise of the hoe and pivotally mounted on studs 32 on the casting (3 The two gages M are arranged to act on the shoe at the opposite sides of the forepart in the vicinity of its ball portion, and the two gages "it are arranged to act thereon at the opposite sides of its toe portion. Each arm '58 carries a stud 8 on which is pivotally mounted a small block 86 faced with leather or other appropriate material 88 for contact with the shoe, the block being movable about the tud 84 short distances limited by its contact with the arm F8 to permit it to adjust itself to the shoe. Each arm at has fast thereon a block 93 (Fig. 4) faced with leather 92 or other material and provided with an upwardly extending stem 84 secured to the arm by a nut 95. Integra1 with the arms 73 are arms 93 (Fig. 12) extending inwardly .toward each other and connected together by gear teeth so that the arms 18 will swing equal distances in unison toward or from the shoe. Similarly the arms 89 have integral therewith inwardly extending arms 98 connected together by gear teeth so that the arms 86 also will swing equal distances in unison toward or from the shoe. Mounted in one 01'' the arms 96 is a plunger l0!) (Fig. 6) pressed by a spring Ml against one face of the casting G4, the spring tending to swing the two arms 78 outwardly away from each other. Similarly a spring Hi2 controlling a plunger I03 (Fig. 12) mounted in one of the arms 98 tends to swing the two arms in outward directions. Also integral with one of the arms 18 is a third arm I53 provided with a roll I06 in engagement with the outer end of a piston E98 movably mounted in one end of a cylinder I it formed in the casting E i. Another similar piston I08 movably mounted in the other end of the cylinder H8 is engaged on its outer end by a roll I I2 supported by an arm 5M which is integral with one of the arms 83. Each piston N38 is provided on its outer end with a flange l 16 arranged to engage the casting 6 1 to limit inward movement of the piston in the cylinder lifi. It will, therefore, be evident that the flanges H6 limit the outward swinging movements of the gage arms 18 and 80 under the influence of the springs [El and I02. For adjusting the arms 78 toward or from each other the arm IE6 is provided with an eccentric stud H8 on which the roll I is mounted, and similarly the roll H2 is mounted on an eccentric stud 128 (Fig. 4) on the arm H4 for adjusting the arms 85 toward or from each other.
From the above description it will be evident that the two gages 14 are operated by one of the pistons I08 and the two gages 16 by the other piston, each pair of gages being thus movable independently of the other pair of fluid admitted to the cylinder I II] in the common chamber between the pistons so that all the gages are moved as far as required properly to centralize the shoe between them. Operating fluid is conducted to the cylinder IIII through a-pipe I22 from an accumulator I24 (Fig. '7) which includes a casting I25 supported on the side frame of the lasting machine below the insole-punching mechanism, the accumulator being charged with fluid from the source of supply of the lasting machine as hereinafter more particularly described. Admission of fluid from the accumulator to the pipe I22 is controlled by a valve I26 mounted in a chamber I28 at one end of the accumulator casting I25. This valve is essentially of the same construction as the previously mentioned valve 32 (Fig. That is, it is a sleeve valve slidingly mounted on a tube I39 which is divided by a partition I32, one end of the tube communicating with the accumulator and the other end with the pipe I22. When the valve is in its initialposition, as shown in Fig. '7, the accumulator is not in communication with the cylinder III] and the latter is open to exhaust through the pipe I22 and ports 132 in the tube I38, these ports communicating with the chamber I28 from the upper portion of which the fluid is returned to the reservoir 25 through a pipe 2%. Movement of the valve I26 toward the left (Fig. '7) opens communication through an annular chamber I38 in the valve between the ports I34 and other ports Idfl in the tube I38, thus admitting fluid from the accumulator to the pipe I22. Such movement of the valve is effected through a lever I42 (Figs. 7 and 9) pivotally mounted on a stud I l l which is supported by a lug I45 extending downwardly into the chamber I28 from a cover plate I48 over the chamber, this lug supporting also a splash shield Ml positioned over the ports I34. At its lower end the lever is provided with a pin I553 extending into a groove I52 in the valve. The valve is held normally in its initial position by a spring IM in engagement at one end with a washer I56 which bears on a lug I58 extending upwardly from the cover plate I48 and in engagement at its other end with a block I62 pivotally mounted on the upper arm of the lever I22 which extends through a slot in the cover plate. A rod I62 is pivotally mounted on the lug I58 and extends through the spring and the block Hill. The upper end of the lever M2 is connected by a link Hi l to the armature M68 of a solenoid Hi8 supported on the top of the casting I25. Accordingly, when the electrical circuit of the solenoid is closed the lever I2 is operated to move the valve I26 into position to admit fluid from the accumulator to the pipe I22. Such closing of the electrical circuit is effected by the pressure of the toe-end face of the shoe against the previously mentioned arm l2 (Fig. 6) when the shoe is presented by the operator to the insolepunching mechanism. ihis arm is pivotally mounted on a pin I18 on the casting t4 and is controlled by a spring I'I-2 which is positioned between a lug lid on the hub portion of the arm and a portion of the casting B4 and tends to swing the arm in a clockwise direction with reference to Fig. 6. Movement of the arm in this direction is limited by its engagement-with an edge face Ilt of the casting 64. In this manner the normal position of the arm is determined. Pivotally mounted at I89 on the lower end of 6 the arm is a block I82 which is further controlled as hereinafter described and has adjustably secured to its lower face a plate I84. One edge of this plate is arranged to engage a knob I86 fastened to a switch member I88 which extends intoa'switch box I92 on the casting 64 and by inward movement against the resistance of a spring (not shown) is arranged to close the electrical circuit of the solenoid. The switch, not shown in detail, is one of a well-known type requiring only a very short movement of the switch member I88 to close the circuit. Movement of the arm I2 by the shoe is limited by a screw IQI which is threaded in the lug I'M and is arranged to engage the casting '64. Accordingly the arm is effective not only as a switchclosing member but also as an end gage for the shoe to determine the distance from the end of the toe of the hole punched in the insole.
To form the hole or indentation in the insole there is provided a punch I92 (Figs. 5 and 6) comprising a pin vertically movable in a bore in the casting G4 and having a conically pointed lower end for engagement with the insole. On the upper end of the pin is formed a plunger I94 movable downwardly in another bore in the casting against the resistance of a return spring I96. The plunger ld l is engaged on its upper end by a hardened contact piece I93 carried by a member 209 which is pivotally mounted on a pin 202 on the casting fi l. The member 220 is provided with two downwardly extending fingers 264 between which is a pin 22% fast on the casting 62 for limiting movements of the member in opposite directions by engagement with the fingers. As the parts are shown in Fig. 6, the member 209 is held by the spring I98 in the position determined by engagement of the pin with one of the fingers, the punch I92 being retracted above the insole of any shoe presented to the machine. When the punch is operated to punch the hole in the insole its movement is limited by engagement of the pin 2% with the other finger 204 of the member 220, its movement being only suflicient to punch the hole part way through the insole, as illustrated in Fig. 5.
The movement of the member 202 to operate the punch I92 is effected by mechanism which will now be described. Pivotally connected by a pin 268 to this member is a block 2H] to which is rigidly connected a rearwardly extending rod 2I2, the block and the rod being parts of a selfcontained hammer unit 2I3. The rod 2I2 extends through a cylinder 2 It provided with a roll 2I6 which rests on a flat face 2I8 formed on a portion of the casting 84. This face accordingly supports the hammer unit against the force of gravity. Surrounding the rod 2I2 inside of the cylinder 2M is a spring 225). Mounted on the rod is a washer 222 which is seated against inwardly extending flanges 224 (Fig. 2) of the cylinder 2M and itself provides a seat for one end of the spring. The other end of the spring is engaged by a washer 225 also mountedin the cylinder 2M and confined on the rod 2I2 by a nut 228. A narrow rearwardly extending portion 232 (Fi 2) of the block 2IIl lies in a vertical slot in the front end of the cylinder 2M between the flanges 224 to permit relative movements of the block and the cylinder in directions lengthwise of the cylinder while preventing the cylinder from turning relatively to the block. It will be evident that the spring 220 by its pressure on the washer 222 tends to move the cylinder forwardly toward the block, and by the spring the cylinder is thus held normally in a relation to the block determined by engagement of portions of the block with the front end face of the cylinder, as illustrated in Fig. 2. Pivotally mounted on a pin 232 (Fig. 6) on the casting 64 is a lever 234 on the upper end of which is secured a hardened wear plate 236 arranged to engage the edge of a similar plate 238 secured to the cylinder 2I4. Also mounted on the upper end of the lever 234 i a roll 240 engaged :by one end of a piston 2&2 movably mounted in 3. cylinder 244 formed in the casting 64. The piston carries a screw 246 which by engagement with the inner end wall of the cylinder limits the inward movement of the piston in the cylinder. Mounted in the lower end portion of the lever 234 is a plunger 248 which engages one face of the casting 64 and is controlled by a spring 250. This spring, therefore, tends to swing the lever 234 in a counterclockwise direction with reference to Fig. 6 and to move the piston 242 to its limit of inward movement determined by the screw 246. Operating fluid is admitted to the inner end of the cylinder 244 from the previously mentioned cylinder I I through a passage 22?. By the action of the fluid the piston 242 is forced outwardly and swings the lever 234 in a clockwise direction as far as permitted by engagement of the lower end of the lever with that face of the casting 64 which is engaged by the plunger 248. In the course of this movement of the lever the plate 236 by engagement with the plate 238 first imparts to the cylinder 2I4 lengthwise movement in a direction away from the block 2! 6 and thereby compresses the spring 220 through the action of the washer 222 on the spring, this movement of the cylinder not being of sufficient extent to cause the rearwardly extending portion 230 of the block 2H1 to be withdrawn from the slot in the cylinder. Prior to the completion of the movement of the lever 234 the plate 236 slips downwardly past the edge of the plate 238, thus releasing the cylinder 2I4, whereupon the spring 220 impels the cylinder suddenly in the reverse direction until its front end strikes against the block 2H3. By its-momentum the cylinder thus acts as a hammer to swing the member 260 and thereby to impart operative downward movement to the punch I92 against the resistance of the spring I 96, the movement of the member 268 being limited by the pin 266 as hereinbefore described. The passage 252.connecting the cylinder H6 to the cylinder 244 is a restricted passage such as to retard the flow of the fluid to the cylinder 244 and thereby to insure that the gages I4 and 16 will properly position the shoe before the punch is operated. In the return of the parts to starting positions the hammer unit is lifted by the engagement of the plate 236 with the plate 238 to permit the return of the lever 234.
Pivotally connected at its lower end to the previously mentioned block I82 (Fig. 6) is a rod 254 which extends upwardly through an opening in a rearwardly extending arm 256 of the member 260, and confined on this rod by nut 258 is a washer 260 having a lower curved face engaging a similar face on the arm. It will be evident that when the member 260 is moved as above described to operate the punch the arm 256 is swung in an upward direction, and through the connection between this arm and the block I82 the block also is swung upwardly and carries the plate I84 away from the knob I86 on the switch member I88. In response to such releas of the switch member the electrical circuit of the solenoid I68 is broken, whereupon the valve I26 is returned to its initial position by the spring I54, thereby releasing the fluid from the cylinder III) and from the cylinder 244 connected thereto. This permits the gages 14 and 16 to be swung away from the shoe by the springs which control them and permits the piston 242 and the lever 234 to be returned by the spring 250. It will be understood that when the shoe is removed the arm 12 is returned by the spring I12, thus permitting the plate I84 again to be moved downwardly into operative relation to the knob I86 by the block I82. To insure such return of the plate and the block there is mounted in the arm 12 a spring-pressed plunger 262 in engagement with the top face of the block.
The accumulator I24 from which the fluid is obtained for operating the insole-punching mechanism includes a piston 264 movably mounted in a cylindrical chamber 266 in the casting I25. This piston i controlled by a spring 268 which abuts at its outer end against a plate 210 held in fixed relation to the casting I25 by screws 212. The outer end of the spring is centralized relatively to the plate 210 by a circular plate 214 which is positioned within the spring and is provided with a projection 216 extending into an opening in the plate 210. It will be understood that th piston 264 is movable outwardly in the chamber 266 against the resistance of the spring by the pressure of the fluid admitted to the chamber. The fluid for thus charging the accumulator is conducted to the chamber 266 from the source of supply of the lasting machine through a pipe 218 which, as shown in Fig. 13, is tapped into the pipe 3i leading from the pump 28 to the manifold I2. In the pipe 218 is a check valve 286 which prevents any return flow of the fluid from the accumulator. It will be understood that the accumulator is thus charged at any time when the manifold I2 contains fluid under pressure greater than the pressure of the fluid in the accumulator, and that when the pressure in the manifold is reduced to zero at the end of a cycle of operations of the lastin machine th accumulator remains charged so that the insolepunching mechanism may be operated, if occasion requires, when the lasting machine is idle. Preferably the capacity of the accumulator is such that the insole-punching mechanism may thus be operated three or four times without any recharging of the accumulator, although ordinarily it need b operated only once to prepare the first shoe for presentation to the lasting machine prior to the starting of that machine. Thereafter the insole-punching mechanism will ordinarily be used to prepare a shoe for presentation to the lasting machine while the latter is operating on a shoe previously prepared. To prevent the piston 264 from blocking the opening from the pipe 218 to the chamber 266 there is secured to the piston a plate 282 having an annular extension 284 of smaller diameter than the piston for engaging the end wall of the chamber 266 to limit the inward movement of the piston, this plate serving also to hold in place packing 236 for preventing leakage of the fluid. Any of the fluid that may escape past the piston is received in an annular groove 288 in the casting I25 and is conducted from this groove back to the reservoir 26 through a pipe 298.
The manner of operation of the construction described will now be briefly summarized. Before presenting the first shoe to the lasting machine the operator presents it to the insole-punching mechanism, the accumulator E24 being already charged with fluid under pressure. The operator thus presents the shoe to the insolepunching mechanism with the bottom of the forepart of the insole in engagement with the rolls (it and iiii and pushes the shoe lengthwise against the end gage member i2. The pressure of the end face of the shoe against this member operates the switch member 588 to close the electrical circuit of the solenoid i558, whereupon the solenoid operates the valve I26 to admit fluid from the accumulator to the pipe l2?! leading to the cylinder MB. The pressure of the fluid in this cylinder then moves the pistons Hit in outward directions and thereby swings the pairs of side gages i l and It inwardly to position the shoe between them relatively to the punch I92, as illus trated in Fig. 12. At the same time fluid passes from the cylinder l H! to the cylinder 244 through the restricted passage 252 for imparting outward movement to the piston 2&2. The movement of this piston swings the lever 234 to retract the cylinder 2M- against the resistance of the spring 225 through engagement of the plate 235 with the plate 238, the cylinder being released to the action of the spring when the plate 236 is moved far enough to disengage it from the plate 238. The spring then operates the cylinder 214 as a hammer which by impact on the block 2H1 swings the member 2% to impart operative movement to the punch 692, the movement of the punch being limited by engagement of the pin 205 with one of the fingers 253%. The punch thus forms a hole or indentation in the bottom of the insole without passing entirely through it, as illustrated in Fig. 5. As the punch is thus operated the arm 256 of the member Elli! acts through the rod 254 to swing the block I82 upwardly and thus to release the switch member !83, thereby breaking the electrical circuit of the solenoid. The valve i255 is then returned by the spring 554 to its initial position, closing the outlet from the accumulator and opening the ports l'ct to the chamber I28 to permit exhaust of. fluid from the cylinders Mil and 244. The side gages are then returned. by the springs Hit and ma, moving the pistons lQB inwardly in the cylinder l ill as far as permitted by their flanges H5, and the piston M2 is returned by the spring 25!! through the lever 234, the hammer unit 2!? being lifted by this lever to permit the plate 236 to pass the plate 238. Immediately after its ope-ration the punch is returned by the spring 5% which imparts corresponding return movement, limited by the pin to the member 25 E! and to the hammer unit. The return of the member 2% permits the plate Hi l to resume its initial relation to the switch member E38 upon return of the gage member it by the spring l'lZ when the operator removes the shoe. The operator then presents the shoe to the lasting machine in position for the spur 8 (Fig. 11) of that machine to enter'the indentation in the insole and starts the operation of that machine. In the course of the operation of the lasting machine the accumulator is again fully charged with fluid passing through the pipe 218 from the pressure source of that machine, return flow of the fluid from the accumulator being prevented by the check valve 285%. will ordinarily present each shoe, after the first one, to the insole-punching mechanism while the lasting machine is operating on a shoe previously operated on by that mechanism, but the charge of fluid maintained in the accumulator permits The operator 10 the use of the insole-punching mechanism at any time.
While the insole-punching mechanism is herein shown as operating on a shoe which has already been partially lasted, as is appropriate in-view of its attachment to a toe-lasting machine to prepare shoes for immediate presentation to that machine, it will be understood that such mechanism might be used for punching holes in insoles mounted on lasts prior to the mounting of uppers on the lasts.
Novel features of the insole-punching mechanism herein shown and described are claimed in a divisional application, Serial No. 637,621, filed on December 28, 1945.
Having described the invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:
1. In a shoe machine, the combination with fluid-operated means for operating on shoes including uppers and insoles mounted on lasts, a source of supply of operating fluid, and means for maintaining the fluid under pressure at said source only intermittently at the times required for operating on successive shoes, of additional fluid-operated means for forming an indentation in the insole of each shoe for use thereafter in positioning the shoe relatively to said first-named means, and an accumulator arranged to receive fluid from said source when the fluid is under pressure and to store the fluid for use in operating said additional means.
2. In a shoe machine, the combination with fluid-operated means for operating on shoes including uppers and insoles mounted on lasts each in cycle of operations of the machine, a source of fluid under pressure for operating said fluidoperated means, and means for reducing the pressure at said source substantially to zero at the end of each cycle, of additional fluid-operated means for forming an indentation in the insole of each shoe independently of said cycle of operations for use thereafter in positioning the shoe relatively to said first-named means, and an accumulator arranged to receive fluid from said source when the fluid is under pressure and to store the fluid for use in thus independently operating said additional means.
3. In a shoe machine, the combination with fluid-operated means for operating on shoes ineluding uppers and insoles mounted on lasts each in a cycle of operations of the machine, a continuously driven pump for supplying fluid under pressure to operate said means, and a valve for automatically reducing the pressure of the fluid delivered by said pump substantially to zero at the end of each cycle, of additional fluid-operated means for forming an indentation in the insole of each shoe independently of said cycle of operations for use thereafter in positioning the shoe relatively to said first-named means, an accumulator arranged to receive fluid delivered by said pump when the fluid is under pressure and to store the fluid for use in thus independently operating said additional means, and a check valve arranged to permit passage of the fluid to the accumulator but to prevent return flow of the fluid.
4. In a shoemachine, the combination with fluid-operated means for operating on shoes each in a cycle of operations of the machine, a source of supply of operating fluid, and means for maintaining the fluid under pressure at said source only intermittently at the times required for operating on successive shoes, of additional fluid-operated means for independently performing another operation on each shoe, and an accumulator arranged to receive fluid from said source when the fluid is under pressure and to store the fluid for use in thus independently operating said additional means regardless of pressure conditions at said source.
5. In a fluid-operated machine, the combination with fluid-operated means for operating on workpieces, a source of supply of operating fluid, and means for maintaining the fluid under pressure at said source only intermittently at the times required for operating on successive workpieces, of additional fluid-operated means for independently performing another operation on each workpiece with the latter in a difierent position than when operated on by said first-named means, and. an accumulator arranged to receive fluid under pressure from said source and to store the fluid for use in thus independently operating said additional means regardless of pressure conditions at said source.
6. In a fluid-operated machine, the combination with fluid-operated means for operating on workpieces each in a cycle of operations of the 12 machine, a source of supply of fluid under pressure for operating said fluid-operated means, and means for reducing the pressure at said source substantially to zero at the end of each cycle, of additional fluid-operated means for performing another operation on each workpiece independently of said cycle of operations with the workpiece in a different position than when operated on by said first-named means, and an accumulator arranged to receive fluid from said source when the fluid is under pressure and to store the fluid for use in thus independently operating said additional means regardless of pressure conditions at said source.
BERNHARDT JORGENSEN.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS Certificate of Correction Patent No. 2,420,665. May 20, 1947.
BERNHARDT JORGENSEN It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Column 5, line 2, for the Words of fluid read by fluid; and that the said Letters Patent should be read With this Sgrection therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Signed and sealed this 23rd day of March, A. D. 1948.
THOMAS F. MURPHY,
Assistant Gammz'ssioner of Patents.
US584763A 1945-03-26 1945-03-26 Shoe machine Expired - Lifetime US2420665A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US584763A US2420665A (en) 1945-03-26 1945-03-26 Shoe machine

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US584763A US2420665A (en) 1945-03-26 1945-03-26 Shoe machine
US63762145 US2508574A (en) 1945-03-26 1945-12-28 Edge-guided point marker for insoles

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2420665A true US2420665A (en) 1947-05-20

Family

ID=24338688

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US584763A Expired - Lifetime US2420665A (en) 1945-03-26 1945-03-26 Shoe machine

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2420665A (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3079618A (en) * 1961-09-14 1963-03-05 Jacob S Kamborian Method of preparing a shoe for lasting
US3172652A (en) * 1961-10-27 1965-03-09 Western Electric Co Work-holding device

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2170035A (en) * 1937-11-09 1939-08-22 United Shoe Machinery Corp Lasting machine
US2355344A (en) * 1942-01-12 1944-08-08 George F Wales Sheet material punching apparatus

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2170035A (en) * 1937-11-09 1939-08-22 United Shoe Machinery Corp Lasting machine
US2355344A (en) * 1942-01-12 1944-08-08 George F Wales Sheet material punching apparatus

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3079618A (en) * 1961-09-14 1963-03-05 Jacob S Kamborian Method of preparing a shoe for lasting
US3172652A (en) * 1961-10-27 1965-03-09 Western Electric Co Work-holding device

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2324510A (en) Cement-applying mechanism
US2423454A (en) Lasting machine
US2420665A (en) Shoe machine
US2356756A (en) Machine for pressing soles upon shoe bottoms
US2387331A (en) Lasting machine
US2291631A (en) Insole-punching machine
US2143881A (en) Shoe machine
US2301205A (en) Machine for pressing soles upon shoe bottoms
US2541132A (en) Hydraulic jack for shoe machines
US2558847A (en) Machine for applying pressure to shoe bottoms
US2080036A (en) Machine for applying pressure to shoe bottoms
US1843232A (en) Lasting machine
US2244067A (en) Machine for shaping uppers over lasts
US2596169A (en) Lasting machine
US2254369A (en) Machine for shaping uppers over lasts
US2293244A (en) Machine for fastening uppers to insoles
US2332677A (en) Insertion of fastenings
US2508574A (en) Edge-guided point marker for insoles
US2450969A (en) Pressure mechanism
US2175474A (en) Machine for applying pressure to shoes
US2080035A (en) Machine for pressing soles on shoes
US2097576A (en) Machine for operating on shoes
US2173980A (en) Lasting machine
US2480926A (en) Machine for shaping prewelt shoe uppers
US2337093A (en) Machine for applying pressure to shoe bottoms