US2385482A - Heel breasting machine - Google Patents

Heel breasting machine Download PDF

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US2385482A
US2385482A US535023A US53502344A US2385482A US 2385482 A US2385482 A US 2385482A US 535023 A US535023 A US 535023A US 53502344 A US53502344 A US 53502344A US 2385482 A US2385482 A US 2385482A
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shoe
gage
heel
knife
slide
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US535023A
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Erastus E Winkley
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D87/00Edge or heel cutters; Machines for trimming the heel breast

Description

E. E, 'wlNKLEY HEEL BREASTING MACHINE 5 sheets-smet 1 vFiled' may 11V, 1944 Inventor .E'rs tusEW/nkl v l l| u. I
ey s Attorney Y septn 2 5, 1945.
'HEEL BREASTINQ MACHINE Filed May 11, 1944 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 x'r-ff* @-4,51
.92o 'afa l V 6 328 )Inventor Fmstus EWi'n/cley.
By hittqrn'ey E. E. wlNKLEY l 'Y 2,385,482 .1
Sept.'25,' 1945. E. E. wlNKLEY HEEL BREASTING MACHINE l 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed May 11 1944 3/8/ z al# septn 2s, 1945., E. E. WINKLEY 2,385,482 HEELl BREASTING MACHINE Filed May 11, v1944 5 sheets-sheet 4 j aos Li' i 2:.; 1 v 'Y y v 23s .230 72% Inventor Emst us5'. Win/dey l.B51 h's Attorney f SePt- 25,1945- E. E. wlNKLEY HEEL BRESTING MACHINE 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed May ll, 1944 Inventor FrastusE'Xfz'nkZey B37 lz 's Attqrney Patented Sept. 25, 1945 HEEL BREASTING MACHINE Erastus E. Winkley, Lynn, Mass., assignor to United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Flemington, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application May 11, 1944, Serial No. 535,023
28 Claims.
This invention relates to shoe machinery and is illustrated as embodied in a heel breastng machine.
In the manufacture of shoes having built-up leather heels, for example, it is common practice after the heel has been attached to the shoe to breast said heel by the use of a reciprocable knife movable heightwise of the heel into engagement with the outsole of the shoe. In breasting the heel, it is desirable that the entire heel breast shall be trimmed clean. It is also important that movement of the breasting knife shall cease upon engagement with the outsole, since it will be apparent that cutting into the outsole not only mars the appearance of the shoe, but weakens the outsole.
Various constructions have been proposed Iwith a view to insuring that the heel .breasting knife during its breasting movement shall cut to, but not into, the outsole. Such prior constructions comprise a gage or position testing member which engages the shank portion of the outsole of the shoe and which is utilized to set an abutment the position of whichgoverns the extent of movement of the knife toward the outsole. The gages of such prior constructions engage portions of the outsole of the shoe which are somewhat remote from the line of engagement of the heel breasting knife with the outsole. Since the shank angle of the outsole varies to a considerable extent in accordance with thesize and/or style of the shoe, it will be apparent that with such an arrangement it is diflicult to control the movement of the knife so that such knife cuts to, but not into, the outsole during its heel breasting operation.
The forward ends of attaching faces of built-up leather heels are usually provided with beveled surfaces which are commonly known as Coburn lips and are disclosed in United States Letters Patent No. l364,217, granted June 7, 1887, on an application filed in the name of G. R. Coburn. In such a construction, the above-mentioned beveled surface of the unbreasted built-up heel attached to the shoe is spaced slightly, but not perceptibly, from the opposed shank portion of the outsole of the shoe, thus forming a slightly open crease. During the heel breasting operation the breast portion of the heel is usually trimmed back to approximately the rear end of the beveled surface which, as stated in said patent, is provided in order to insure against the rear end of the shank of the outsole of the finished shoe being marked by the unbreasted heel during the heel attaching operation.
It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved heel breasting machine of the general type above referred to, having none of the above mentioned drawbacks. With the above object in View and in accordance with a feature of the present invention, the illustrative heel breasting machine comprises means for supporting a shoe, a gage shaped and arranged to occupy a crease, such as that above referred to, formed between an outsole of the shoe and the forward end of the attaching face of an unbreasted heel attached to the shoe, a heel breasting knife, and means operatively associated with the gage for varying the cutting stroke of the knife in accordance with the position of the gage.
In the illustrative machine the shoe is supported upon a jack and is clamped in the usual manner to the jack by means of a presser plate which operates against the pre-finished top-lift of the heel of the shoe, the machine being of the general type disclosed in United States Letters Patent No. 1,080,376, granted December 2, 1913, on an application filed in the name of Ralph C. Simmons. The above-mentioned gage for testing the position of the work has the general shape of a sickle, a tip of the gage which occupies said crease being beveled and corresponding to the tip of the sickle.' The gage has a cylindrical shank, corresponding to the handle of the sickle, pivotally mounted in a vertically movable gage carrying slide. Threaded into the top of the gage slide is an abutment constructed and arranged to be engaged, during downward breasting movement of the knife, by a trip lever carried by a slide to which the knife is secured. Upon the engagement of the trip lever with the abut- K ment, the knife slide is disconnected from an operating slide, which is power driven through ,a one-revolution clutch, thereby causing downward movement of the breasting knife toward the outsole to cease.
The gage, which is free to vtilt approximately 30 upon the gage slide, has a curved arm which extends forward from the cylindrical shank and is arranged at one side of the axis of said shank, the construction being such that the gage is unbalanced and when not in engagement with the work assumes a horizontal position determined by a stop on the gage slide. When the jack upon which the shoe is mounted has been swung to an upright position, the gage slide is lowered,
causing the curvedv arm of the gage to engage the shank portion of the outsole of the shoe, the gage pivoting about the axis of its shank until the tip of the gage has been swung into engagement with the slightly inclined shank portion of the outsole of 'the shoe.
The shoe is then swung, together with the jack, until the tip of the gage occupies the crease formed between the shank portion of the outsole of the shoe and the forward end of the attaching face of the heel. The Shoe is positioned lengthwise in the machine in the usual manner during the clamping. of the shoe in the machine with the breast edge of the prefinished top-lift of its heel in alinement with the forward edge of the presser plate. When 'the shoe has been positioned in the machine, a treadle is depressed, causing the presser plate to be lowered with yielding pressure against the top-lift of the heel, as above described. Continued depression of the treadle causes a one-revolution clutch to be tripped, with the result that the knife moves downward, past the forward edge of the presser plate and the breast edge of the prenished top-lift, to breast the heel. rPhe tip of the gage is arranged just to one side ofthe path of movement of the cutting edge of the knife, the trip lever actuating abutment being so positioned by the tip of the gage that downward movement of the knife ceases when its cutting edge has moved to the gage, thereby insuring that the knife shall out downward to, but not into, the outsole during its breasting stroke.
In order to insure against the tip of the gage being hammered against the shank portion of the outsole of the shoe when the `trip lever engages said abutment and thus marring the appearance of said outsole, the gage carrying slide, after the shoe has been positioned in the machine and the position of its outsole tested as abovev explained, is backed'up rigidly against the action of the trip lever by 'ai cam-operated member which is automatically moved to its backing-up position before thetripping of the clutch.
Preparatory to. removing the shoe mounted upon the jack from the machine after the breasting of the heel, the gage is automatically moved to aninoperative position away from the shoe. The gage is lowered by gravity back toits operative, position into engagement with the shank portion of the outsole of the next shoe to be breasted, the gage being released for movement to its lowered operative position in response to moyement of thej ack back to its vertical operating position.
The various features of the invention will be understood and appreciated fromfthe following detailed description read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a perspective View, partly broken away. of the illustrative machine;
Figs. 2 and 3 are front and end views, respectively, partly broken away and partly in section, of the machine;
Fig. 3a is a section on line IIIe-IIIa of Fig. 5;
Fig. 4 is a view similar to a portion of Fig, 3, but showing the work position testing gage in its raised inoperative position;
Figs. 5 and 6 are sections on lines V-V and VILVI, respectively, of Fig. 2;
Fig, 7 is a plan view of mechanism for facilitating the positioning of work in the machine;
Fig, 8- is a perspective view of an unattached built-up leather heel having a Coburn lip; and
Figs. y9 and 10 are perspective and side Views, respectively, showing the heel, after it has been attached to the shoe, in the process of being breasted.
The illustrative machine is described with reference to breasting a built-up leather heel 20 attached to a shoe 22 mounted upon a last 24 (Figs. 3 and 4) and comprises a work support or jack 25 (Figs, 1 and 3) upon which the shoe arranged bottom up is mounted, a clamping or presser plate 28 which is lowered into engagement with the tread end or top-lift 30 of the heel', and a knife 32 which is, moved downward a variable distance past a laterally incurved forward edge 34 (Fig. 9) of the presser plate 28 to breast `the heel. The machine is of the general type disclosed in said Letters Patent No. 1,080,376, the clutch of the machine being practically identical with the clutch of the machine disclosed in United States Letters Patent No 1,597,210, granted August 24, 1926, on an application led in the name of Ralph C. Simmons.
As above explained, the unbreasted built-up leather heel 2G (Fig. 8) has at the forward end of its attaching face a beveled surface or lip S5 which is provided in order to insure that the shank portion 38 (Figs. 9 and l0) of the outsole of the finished shoe, which portion before the heel breasting operation underlies the lip, shall not be marked by said heel 'during the heel attaching c-peration. The lip 3S may be considered part of the cut 0r attaching face 4l) (Fig. 8) of the unbreasted heel 20. It will be apparent (Fig. 10) that after the unbreasted heel has been attached to the shoe there is formed between the shank portion 38 of the outsole of the shoe and the beveled surface 3S of the unbreasted heel a slightly open crease ft2 (Fig. 10), which is hardly perceptible but the width of which has been exaggerated slightly for purposes of illustration. As will be explained later, the crease 42 is utilized to receive a gage or position testing member it forming part of mechanism for varying the :downward extent of the breasting stroke of the knife 32 the arrangement being such that a cutting edge 45 of the knife during its breastingstroke moves downward into engagement with, but not into, the outsole of the shoe. The gage Mi, which has a tapered end or tip constructed and arranged to occupy the. central portion of the crease d2, isfcf arcuate shape as viewed from above (Figs. 'l and 9) andy is provided with a cylindrical shank 4S tting for pivotal movement in a horizontal bore 48, of a bushing 49 secured to a slide 5U vertically movable in guideways 52 of the machine frame '53. Welded to the shank 4S of the gage M at one sideof the slide 50 is a collar 5 4, and mounted upon said shank at the otherthe gage is arranged, approximately horizontal when the machine is idle,'the gage being held by gravity in such position with a shoulder 65 (Figs. 9 and 10) of the collar 5ft in engagement with the pin td. When, as will appear later, the gage 44 is lowered, against the shank portion of the outsole of the shoe 22, the tip of the gage, which tip is in approximate alinement with the axis i, will tilt slightly with relation to the slide 5U about the. axis in accordance with theangle of inclination ofthe shank portion of the outsole of theA shoe. with whichA it is in contact, thereby facilitating the entry offthetipof the gage M into the crease 42.
The gage lil! may be described as sickle-shaped,
the cylindrical shank 46 of the gage corresponding to the handle of the sickle. tending forward from the shank 46 is curved lengthwise of the shoe, as best shown in Figs. 7 and 9, and is arranged at one side of the axis 60, the center of gravity of the gage being offset from said axis so that when the machine is idle the arm will be swung to its approximate horizontal position above referred to.
Threaded intothe gage slide 50 is astop or abutment 66 which, as will appear later, during downward movement of a knife carrying slide 68, hereinafter referred to as the knife slide, in vertical guideways (Figs. 2, 6 and '7) is engaged by a horizontal arm 12 (Figs. l, 2 and 3) of a bellcrank, trip or trip-off lever 14 fulcrumed on a pin 16 (Figs. 2 and 3), which is mounted upon the knifeslide, in order to disconnect, the knife slide from an operating slide 18 (Figs. 3 and 6), thereby' limiting downward movement of the knife slide. The stop 66, togeth'er with the gage slide 50, may be referred to as an abutment.
The breasting knife 3 2 is clamped against a bar 80 (Fig. 2) of the knife slide 68 by two setscrews 82 (Figs. 2 and 3) threaded into another bar 84 of the slide. The operating slide 18 is movable in vertical guideways 86 (Figs. 6 and '1), which are continuations of the guideways 10, and has pivoted to it at its lower end a connecting rod 88 (Figs. 1 and 3) the lower end of which'is pivoted to a crank 86 (Fig. l) on a drive shaft 02.
Th'e jack 26 comprises an upstanding post 84 having a lower threaded end 96 (Figs. 1 and 3)! keyed against rotation -in a cylindrical recess of a column 88. Mounted on the column 68 and threaded onto the lower end of the post 94 is a hand wheel |00 which may be rotated for initially raising or lowering the post. The column 98 is supported upon a bearing |82 (Fig. 1) mounted in the machine frame 53, swinging movement of the column from a substantially vertical operative position to a forwardly inclined loading position being limited by a shoulder |04 formed on the base of the machine frame. Pivoted to the upper end of the post 94 is a, last supporting" block |66 (Figs. l and 2) which may be swung into different angular positions in a vertical plane by turning a screw |08 (Fig. 1) which is threaded into the post and is engaged by the bottom of the block. The block |06 is provided with a transversely curved dovetail guideway ||0 (Figs. 1, 3 and 4) in which fits a slide |`|2 carrying a last pin |4. Secured to and projecting upwardly and laterally from the post 94 is an arm ||6 (Fig. 1) to which is adjustably secured a rest ||8 for supportingthe toe end of the shoe.
The presser plate 28 has secured to it a guide |20 (Fig. 2) which ts in a guideway |22 in the bottom face of a bracket |24, said plate being set in different adjusted positions lengthwise of said guideway by a wing screw |26 (Figs. 1 and 2) which is threaded into the bracket and passes through an elongated slot |28 (Fig. 2) in the plate. The bracket |24 is pivoted upon a, fulcrum pin |30 carried by a slide |32 (Figs. 1 and 2) which is vertically movable in a guideway |34 (Fig. 2) formed in the machine frame 53 and has a forwardly projecting arm |36 operatively connected through a toggle |38 to one end of a lever |40 pivoted upon a bearing pin- |42 secured to a boss of the machine frame.
The presser plate 28 is normally arranged in a horizontal position, a shoulder of the bracket |24 being held in engagement with a stop screw` |44 (Figs. 1 and 2), adjustably secured to the slide |32, by a spring |46 the forward -end of which is attached to a stud on the bracket and the rear end of which is attached to a stud on the slide. Y
Pivoted to the lever |40 is a two-part block |48 having a vertical bore through which passes a rod |50 operatively connected at its lower end to a clutch tripping treadle |52 (Fig. 1). Threaded onto the rod |50 is a nut |54 (Figs. 2 and 3) which, when the treadle |52 is released, is forced-Y by a strong spring |56 (Fig. 1) against th'e bottom of the block |48 to move the lever to a raised idle position. Mounted upon the rod |50 and interposed between the block |48 and a wing nut |58 (Figs. 1 and 2) threaded onto the upper end of the rod is a spring |60, the arrangement being such that as the rod is lowered, when the treadle |52 is rst depressed, the presser plate 28 is forced with yielding pressure against the prenished top-lift 30 of the heel of the shoe mounted upon the jack 26.
The shoe is positioned lengthwisein the mam chine by swinging the column 88 about the bearing |02 as the presser plate 28 is lowered, the breast edge |62 (Fig. 9) of the preiinished toplift 3c of the heel being aimed Ywith the concave forward edge 34 of the presser plate 28. The construction and arrangement of the machine is such that the trimming knife 32, the cutting edge 45 of which is concave lengthwise as well as heightwise of the shoe, during its downward movement just clears the concave forward edge 34 c-f the presser plate 28 and the breast edge |62 of the prefnished top-lift and continues downward to trim off the portion of the heel extending forward of the path of travel of the knife, as illustrated in Figs. 9 and 10.
The knife slide E8 is moved to its raised starting position, shown in Fig. 3, by the operating slide 18, which, during its upward movement, engages an overhanging flange |66 which is secured by screws |68 to the upper end of the knife slide and comprises a leather facing |10. Mounted upon a pin |12 carried by the operating slide 18 is a block |14 an inner face of which engages a face |16 of the operating slide 18 to insure that the block shall remain fixed to the` slide.
In order that the knife slide 68 shall move' downward in response to downward movement of the operating slide 18, there is provided the above-mentioned bell-crank lever 14, which is normally urged in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 3, against a face |18 of the knife slide by a leaf spring |80. When the machine is idle and duringr downward movement of the knife slide 68, a vertical arm of the bellcrank lever 14 is in engagement with a nat lower surface |82 of the block |14 which, as above stated, is carried by the operating slide 18. Downward movement of the knife slide 68, which is actuated through the bell-crank lever` 14 by the operating slide 18, ceases when said lever has been moved from beneath the block |14 by the abutment 6 6 of the previously set gage slide 50.
The abutment 66 is initially set in different heightwise positions, through mechanism which has been partially described above and lanother mechanism which will appear later, to cause downward movement of the knife 32 to cease when its cutting edge 45 has moved into engagement with the shank portion 38 of the outsole of the shoe. The position of the shoe is tested .Y
causing the tip of the gage 44 to engage, as best shown inY Fig. 10, the shank portion 38 of the outsoleof the shoe underlying the beveled surface 3B (Fig. 8) of the unbreasted heel, the gage being so arranged that during the heel breasting o poration thev knife travels downward to the outsole andiust misses the tip of the gage.
The guideways 52 (Figs. 2, 6 and 7) for the gage slidle 58 is formed partly by a U-shaped frame |84 horizontal portions |88 of which t in rabbeted portions of vertical retaining plates |88 secured by screws |88 to the machine frame 53. Secured by screws and dowels |92 (Fig. 2) to the horizontal portions |85 of the U-shaped frame |84 are vertical slide retaining plates |84 which overlap the front face of the gage slide 58. The U-shaped frame is initially set in a fixed position in the rabbeted portions of the retaining plates |88 by a cap screw |88 (Figs. 2 and 6) which is threaded intothe right retaining plate |88 and has surrounding it a spring 88 opposite ends of which occupy recesses formed in the U-shaped frame |84l and the plate, respectively. By adn justing the U-shaped frame |84 as above described, it will be apparent that the tip of the gage 44 may be brought to its proper operative position beneath the cutting edge 45 of the knife 32, the arrangement being such that the central part of the cutting edge of the knife at the lower end of its movement just misses the tip of the gage.
The lower portion of the gage slide 58 is provided with a vertical slot 288, best shown in Figs.. 1 and 2. Mounted upon a fulcrum pin 282 (Figs.
1, 2, 3 and 4) secured in bosses 283 (Figs. l, 2 and f 6) of the gage slide 58 is a pawl 284 having at its upper end a hook-shaped head 288 (Figs. 3 and 4). When the pawl 284 is in its operative position shown in Fig. 3, the head 288 oi the pawl 284 is held against a beveled surface 285 on the slide 58 by a spring 281 opposite endsof whichV occupy recesses in the pawlY and the gage slide, respectively.
Secured by screws 288 (Figs. 2, 3 and 6) to the knife slide 88 is a bar 2'l8 the left end of which, as viewed in Fig. 2, extends downward and then rearward, a coil spring 2|2 (Figs. l and 2) being operatively connected` through a threaded eye bolt 2|4 to the bar 2|!! and being secured at its upper end to the machine frame 53. Upon `downward movement of the knife slide 88 the spring' 2|'2 is elongated, the arrangement being such that when the knife slide 88 is disconnected, as above described, from the operating slide 78', the spring serves to counterbalance somewhat the knife carrying mechanism and to start thev knife slide upward before it is moved to its raised startingV position by the operating slide.
The bar 2|() has at its central upper portiona beveled surface 2|8 (Figs. 2, 3 and 4) and at its central lower portion a beveled surface 218. As the knife 32 travels downward tobreast the heel, the gage slide El?. at such time being in its lowered operative position shown in Figs. 2' and 3', the beveled surface 2| 8 of the bar 2| onthe knife slide 58 engages the head 283 of the pawl 284 and swings the pawl about the fulcrum piny 282 in a counterclockwise direction, as` viewed. in Fig. 3, against the action ofthe spring 28T. When the bar 2 i8 has been :moved below the head 288 of the pawl 284", the pawl moves back to a position in which its head overl-ies the bar.
After the completion ofthe' heel breasti'ng operation, the bar 2|8 of the knife slide 88?, upon up.-
'ward movement of the slide, engagesA a shoulder 2|9 (Fig. 3) of the head 286 of the pawl 284 and thus moves the gage slide 58, together with the gage 44, to its raised position, shown in Fig. 4. When the gage 44 has been raised out of the way, the operator swings the jack 26, together with the shoe which has been operated upon, clockwise (Fig. 1) about the bearing pin |82 to its loading position in which the shoe is removed from the jack.
It is desirable to retain the gage 44 in its raised idle position, shown in Fig. 4, until the jack 28, upon which another shoe has been mounted, has been swung counterclockwise (Fig. l) back to approximately its vertical position. In order to cause the pawl 284 automatically to release the gage slide 58 from the knife slide 83 as the column 98 reaches a vertical position, the following mechanism is provided. The column 98 has secured to it by cap screws 228 (Fig. 1) a bracket 222 (Figs. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6) to which is riveted a block 224 upon the flat upper face of which rests a carrier plate 228 through an elongated horizontal slot 228 (Figs. 1, 2 andy 6) of which passes a screw 238 threaded into the bracket, the carrier plate being rigidly secured to the bracket by the screw. Pivoted upon a shoulder screw 232 (Figs. 2 and 6) secured to the carrier plate 228 is a trip latch 234 (Figs. 2, 3, 4 and 6) which is normally held against a stop pin 238 (Figs. 2 and 6) secured to the plate by a spring 238 one end of which is xed to the lower end of the latch and the other end of which is fixed to the carrier plate.
After the shoe has been placed upon the jack 28 in its loading position, the gage slide 58 then being in its raised position shown in Fig. 4, the jack is swung back, that is, in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in Fig. 1, about the fulcruin bearing |82, causing a beveled face 240 (Figs. 3 and 6) of a pin 242 secured to the latch 234 to engage a beveled surface 244 (Figs. 3, 4 and 8) at the lower end of the pawl 284, with the result that the pawl is swung in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 4, about its fulcrum pin 282 away from the bar 2li), which, as above stated, is secured to the knife slide 88, thus enabling the gage slide 58 to drop. Downward movement of the gage slide 58 is limited by engagement of the gage 44 with the shank portion of the outsole of the shoe mounted upon the jack.
It will bev noted (Fig. 10) that the gage 44 is arranged approximately horizontal and that the arm 6T of the gage upon engaging the shank portionl of the outsole of the shoe will pivot about axis 68 of its shank 48 until the tip of the gage has' b'eenI swung into engagement with said shank. portion. With the gage 44 thus positioned, the jack 26 is moved slightly to the right (Fig, 1) so as toy aline the breast edge |62 (Fig. 9) of the prenished top-lift 38 of the heel with the forward edge 34 of the presser plate 28 and to cause the tip of the gage 44 to occupy the crease 42 formed between they shank portion 38 of the outsole of the shoe and the beveled surface 86 of the unbreasted heel.
In order to' facilitate tilting the shoe to its proper lateralr position. on the jack 28 so as effectively to'- receive the action of the knife 32, the illustrative machine may be provided with centralizing-fingers 248 which are constructed and arrangedv to be engaged: by' the forward upper portions of the sidesof the heel of the shoe. The
7'6 ngers 248'v are geared together for equa-l and opposite movement about fulcrum pins 256 (Figs. 2 and 7) carried by a forward extension of a plate 252 which is secured for heightwise adjustment through screw-and-slot connections 256 t (Fig. 2) to the horizontal portions |86 of the U-shaped frame |84. The lingers 248 are constantly urged together by a spring 256 opposite ends of which are secured to studs 258 on the respective ngers. lMovement of the fingers 268 toward each other is limited by engagement of a screw 266 carried by one of the fingers with a depending abutment 262 (Figs. 1 and 7) carried by the other finger.
As the jack 28 is swung to the right (Fig. l) to remove the work from the machine, the trip latch 234 (Figs. 2, 3, 4 and 6), upon engagement with the lower end of the pawl 264, is swung in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 2, about the shoulder screw 232 so as to pass the pawl. The latch 236 will then swing back to its vertical position against the stop 236 so that it will trip the pawl 264, as above described, when the jack 26 is moved back to its vertical operative po sition.
It will be appreciated that the impact of the arm 12 of the bell-crank lever 14 against the abutment 66 should not be transmitted through the gage 44 against the shank portion of the outsole of the shoe, since such an impact would cause the outsole to be marked. Accordingly, the gage slide 56, after being set in its gaging position as above described, is rigidly backed up at its lower end by a cam follower 264 (Figs. 2, 3 and 5), which, as will appear later, is raised into engagement with the lower end of the slide.
Mounted upon the machine frame 53 are a pair of bearing plates 266, 268, best shown in 5, having opposed recesses forming an opening 216.
The bearing plates 266, 268 are secured to the machine frame 53 through a yoke 212, best shown in Fig. 3a, which engages the rear faces of flanges 214 (Fig. of the machine frame 53 and intO which are threaded cap screws 216 (Figs. 2 and 5) passing through registering bores in the plates, the screws serving to clamp the yoke 212 and the bearing plates 266, 268 securely to the machine frame. J ournaled in alined bushings of the bearing plates 266, 268 is a shaft 216 (Figs. 3, 3a. and 5) extending rearwardly through a U- shaped recess of the yoker212 and having pinned to its rear end a cam pulley 286 provided with a hub portion 282.
Arranged in the opening 216 (Fig. 5) between fthe bearing plates 266, 268 and secured to the shaft 218 is a cam 284 (Figs. 2, 3 and 5) engaged by-the above-mentioned cam follower 266 which is secured to an arm 286 pivoted upon an enlarged cylindrical portion of a shoulder screw 281 (Figs. 2 and 5) threaded into the bearing plate 266. Occupying a circumferential groove 288 (Figs. 3, 3a and 5) in the hub portion 262 of the cam pulley 286 is a coil spring 266 one end of which is secured t the pulley by a screw 262 (Fig. 3a) and the other end of which is secured to the lower end of a depending rod 294 (Figs. 2, 3 and 3a) threaded into the yoke 222, the spring 296, through mechanism hereinafter described, being elongated or tensioned when the jack 26 is moved to its loading position.
When the spring 266 has been tensioned, the cam pulley 286 is in its position shown in Figs. 3, 3a and 5, a lock pin 236 secured to the cam pulley being in engagement with an upstanding lever 298 which is fulcrumed on a cylindrical portion of a shoulder screw 366 threaded into a block 362 secured by screws 304 to the machine frame 53. The lever 298 is constantly urged toward the cam pulley 286 by a spring 365 (Figs. 3 and 5) the upper end of which is connected to the main frame 53 and the lower end of which is connected tothe longer of two plates 366 mounted on the shoulder screw 386 and pinned to the lever.
-As will appeanlater, the treadle rcd |56 of the machine passes between the plates 366 and has secured to it a collar 368 arranged just above the upper edges of the plates the construction and arrangement being such that during the rst part of the downward movement of the treadlerod the lever 298 is moved away from the lock pin 296, thus enabling the coil spring 266 to rotate the cam pulley 286, and therefore the cam 284, in a ccunterclockwise direction, as viewedy in Figs. 2 and 3a, until the cam follower 264 has moved into engagement with the lower face ofthe gage slide 56. In order to limiti movement of the cam 284 in said counterclockwise direction in accordance with the maximum throw of the cam, the bearing plate 266 has secured to it a stop 3i6 (Figs. 2, 3 and 5) which is engaged by a pin 3 |2 carried by the cam.
Loosely mounted upon the forward portion of the shaft 218 is a pulley 3M (Figs. 2, 3 and 5) in a groove 3|6 (Figs. 3 and 5) of which registers one turn of a cable 316, said cable passing over loose pulleys 326, 322, best shown in Figs. 2 and 5, mounted for rotation upon shoulder screws 324, 281, respectively, and having its right end secured by a screw 326 to a lug 328 (Figs. 1, 2 and 5) adjustably secured to the bracket 222. In order to retain the cable 3|8 lin timed relation with the pulley 3M, the cable is secured in the groove 3|6 of the pulley by a screw-321. The
`left end of the cable 3|8 is secured to the upper end of a tensioning spring 329 (Figs. 1 and 2) 'the lower end of which is secured'to a rod 336 threaded into the underside of the bearing plate When the shoe has been positioned in the machine with the' crease 42 (Fig. 10), which is formed between the beveled surface 36 of the unbreasted heel and the shank portion 38 of the outsole of the shoe, occupied by the tip of the gage 44, the operator depresses the treadle |52. During the iirst part of the downward movement of the treadle rod I 56 the presser plate 28 is lowered with clamping pressure against the preiinished top-lift 36, the jack 26 during the lowering of the presser plate being swung slightly lengthwise of the shoe to insure that the breast face |62 of the prenished top-lift shall be in alinement with the forward edge 34 of the presser plate. Further downward movement of the treadle rod |56 causes the collar 368 (Figs. 3 and 5) on the rod to swing the lever 298 in a clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 3, about the shoulder screw 366, with the result that the cocked cam pulley 286 is released and rotates under the action of the coil spring 266 in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Figs. 2 and 3a, until the cam 284 has moved the cam follower 264 into engagement with the lower end of the gage slide 56. 'I'he cam follower 254 is retained against the slide by the spring 296 operating through the above-described mechanism. The slope of the cam 284 is such that upon engagement of the abutment 66 by the bell-crank trip lever 14 the gage slide 56 will not be moved downward, thereby insuring against the gage 44 being forced with marking the heel breasting operation Upon continued downward movementl of the treadle rod |50 the clutch of the machine is tripped, the operating slide 78 (Fig. 1) being moved downward and moving with it the knife slide 68 to cause the heel of the shoe to be breasted. The knife slide B8 moves downward together With the operating slide '18 until the arm 12 of the bellcrank tripV lever 'M engages the abutment B6, whereupon the lever is swung in a clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 3, from beneath the block |14 carried by the operating slide, with the result that downward movement of the knife slide, and therefore the knife 32, ceases. The operating slide 'I8 continues through its cycle and during its upward movement engages the leather facing |19 of the overhanging flange IB secured to the upper portion of the knife slide 68 to raise said slide to its starting position shown in Fig. 3. During the upward movement of the knife slide 68 the bell-crank lever 14 moves back to its starting position beneath the block |14 (Fig,Y 3) and the gage slide is moved to its raised inoperative position, shown. in Fig 4.
After the heel has been breasted, the treadle |52 is released, whereupon the lever 298 (Figs. 3 and 5) is again forced by the spring 305 against the cam pulley 280, and the presser plate 28 is moved to its raised position away from the heel 2G of the shoe 22.
The operator then swings the jack 26 to its loading position, causing the cable-operated pulley 3| 4 to rotate clockwise, as viewed in Fig. 2, against the action of the cable tensioning spring 329. The pulley 3 I 4 has secured to it a rearwardly projecting stud 332 (Fig. 5), which, during the above-mentioned clockwise rotation of the pulley 3M, engages a forward extension of the pin 3|2 carried by the cam 284, thereby causing said cam, together with the cam pulley 280, to be rotated clockwise, as viewed in Fig. 2, against the action of the coil spring 29l. As the cam pulley 280 is thus rotated, its rearwardly extending lock pin 296 engages the under face 334 (Fig. 3) of the lever 298, causing said lever to be swung away from the cam pulley.
VWhen the jack 26 is in its loading position the lock pin 296 has been rotated to a position in` which it is slightly spaced from the lever 298, which, at that time, has moved behind the lock pin into engagement with the cam pulley 280.
After the shoe, the heel of which has been breasted, has been removed from the jack 26 and another shoe has been placed thereon, the jack is moved back to its vertical operative position. The operator, as above described, then moves the shoe to its proper lengthwise position in the machine as he first depresses the treadle |52, further downward movement of the treadle causing the cocked cam pulley 280 to be released. Upon further depression of the treadle |52 the clutch of the machine is tripped to breast the heel.
Having described my. invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the pressure against the outsole of the shoe during,
2. In a heel breasting machine, means for supporting a shoe, a heel breasting knife mounted for reciprocation, a work positioning gage having a tip constructed and arranged to be positioned approximately in the path of reciprocation of the knife, and means operatively associated with the gage for limiting the breasting movement of the knife when it arrives at the tip of said gage.
3. In a heel breasting machine, a support for a shoe having a heel, a breasting knife movable heightwise of the heel, a gage constructed and arranged to be positioned between an outsole of the shoe and the forward end of the attaching face of said heel, a clamp movable against the tread end of the heel and co-operating with the support to secure the shoe against movement, and means operatively connected to said gage for limiting the breasting movement of said knife in accordance with the position of said gage.
4. In a heel breasting machine, means for positioning a shoe having a heel, a breasting knife movable heightwise of said heel, a gage constructed and arranged to occupy a space between an outsole of the shoe and the forward end of the attaching face of said heel, and mechanism for limiting the breasting movement of the knife, said mechanism being operable at a predetermined portion of the breasting movement of said knife in accordance with the position of said gage.
5. In a heel breasting machine, means for positioning and clamping a shoe, a heel breasting knife, a swivelled gage for testing the position of the shoe, and means operatively connected to the gage for varying the breasting stroke of said knife in accordance with the setting of said gage.
6. In a heel breasting machine, a support for a shoe having an unbreasted heel, a reciprocatory breasting knife, a reciprocatory abutment, a shoe positioned testing member which is mounted upon said abutment for pivotal movement about an axis, said member being unbalanced about said axis, a stop for limiting movement of said member about said axis in one direction, and means for causing the knife to move variable distances in accordance with th'e position of the abutment.
'7. In a heel breasting machine, a support for a ShOe having an unbreasted heel, a reciprocatory breasting knife, a reciprocatory abutment, a shoe position testing member having a gaging tip which is movable heightwise of the sh'oe together with the abutment and is tiltable upon said abutment about an axis which is disposed at approximately right angles to the path of movement of the abutment and is arranged approximately in the path of reciprocation of said knife, said tip being arranged approximately in said axis irrespective of the angular position of the testing member on the abutment, and means operable at a particular portion of the breasting stroke of the knife in accordance with the position of said abutment for causing the breasting movement of the knife to cease when a cutting edge of the knife arrives at a position approximately in engagement with the tip of the gage.
8. In a heel breasting machine, a support for a shoe having an unbreasted heel, a reciprocatory breasting knife, a movable abutment, a position testing member which is mounted upon the abutment for pivotal movement about an axis and which has an arm arranged outside said axis and terminating in a gaging tip lying approximately in said axis, said abutment being'movable heightwise of the shoe to cause said arm to engage the shank portion of the outsole of the shoe to tilt the arm as the shoe is positioned in order to facilitate the registration of a crease between the outsole and the forward end ofthe attaching face of th'e heel With said tip, and means for causing the knife to move variable distances during its breasting strokes in accordance with different positions of the abutment.
9. In a heel breasting machine, means for supporting a shoe, a knife mounted for reciprocation to breast a heel of the shoe, an abutment, a sickle-shaped gage having a shank portion which' is pivotally mounted upon the abutment and a tip which is constructed and arranged to occupy a crease formed between an outsole of the shoe and the forward end of the attaching face of the unbreasted heel and is in approximate alinement with the pivotal axis of said shank portion,-
means for limiting pivotal movement of the gage about said axis, and means movable in response to movement of the knife and constructed and arranged to engage said abutment for limiting breasting movement of the knife in accordance with the position of said gage.
10. In a heel breasting machine, means for positioning and clamping a shoe having a heel, a heel breasting knife movable heightwise of said heel, a movable abutment, a gage for testing the position of the rear end of the shank portion of an outsole of the shoe, said gage being pivotally connected to the abutment, and knife operating mechanism, said abutment being constructed and arranged to be engaged by portions of' said knife operating mechanism to limit the breasting movement of the knife in accordance with the position of said abutment, said gage being so constructed and arranged that its work testing portion remains in approximately the same location relative to the abutment in different angular positions of the gage on said abutment.
11. In a heel breasting machine, means for supporting a shoe having an unbreasted heel, a
reciprocatory knife for breasting said heel, a movable abutment the position of which regulates the extent of reciprocation of the knife, and a sickle-shaped gage having a cylindrical shank movable together with the abutment and pivotally movable about the axis of its shank with relation to the abutment, said gage having a tip which is in approximate alinement with the axis of the shank and is constructed and arranged to occupy a crease between the shank of the outsole of the shoe and the forward end of the attaching face of the unbreasted heel attached to the shoe, said gage having its center of gravity offset from said axis to cause the gage to swing about said axis to an inoperative position with relation to the abutment when not in engagement with the work, said gage being swung about said axis under pressure of the work to cause the gage to tilt in accordance with the shank angle of the outsole of the shoe, thereby facilitating the registration of said crease with the tip of the gage.
12. In a heel breasting machine, a support for a shoe which is mounted upon a last and to which an unbreasted heel is attached, said support being tiltable laterally in order to tilt the shoe laterally, a pair of yieldable members constructed and arranged to be engaged by the forward upper side portions of the heel to facilitate tilting the shoe laterally to a desired position, and a presser plate co-operating with the support to clamp the shoe in the machine.
13. In a heel breasting machine, a support for a shoe having an unbreasted heel, a gage constructed and arranged to engage the extreme rear end of the shank portion of an outsole of the shoe, a clamp constructed and arranged to engage the tread end of the heel and to co-operate with the support in positioning the shoe and holding it against movement, a knife, means, comprising trip-off mechanism, for operating said knife to breast said heel, an abutment movable in response to movement of said gage, said abutment being constructed and arranged to operate said trip-off mechanism for limiting the breasting movement of the knife in accordance with the position of said abutment, and means for positively holding said abutment against movement as said trip-ofi mechanism is forced against the saine, thereby insuring against the gage marring the outsole of the shoe.
14. In a heel breasting machine, means for supporting against movement a shoe having a built-up heel, a knife for removing material from the breast of the heel, a testing member constructed and arranged to occupy a crease formed between the forward end of the attaching face of the heel and the shank of an outsole of the shoe, an abutment operatively connected to said testing member, means responsive to movement of the knife and constructed and arranged to engage said abutment for limiting'the breasting stroke of the knife when said knife has moved into engagement with the outsole 4of the shoe, and means for holding the abutment against movement under pressure of the second-named means to insure against the testing member marking the outsole.
15. In a heel breasting machine, means for securing in position a shoe which is mounted upon a last and has a built-up heel, a movable knife for removing material from the breast of said heel, a gage constructed and arranged to occupy a crease formed between the forward end of the attaching face of the heel and an outsole of the shoe, a slide upon which said gage is pivotally mounted, said gage having a Work-engaging portion in alinement with its axis of pivotal movement upon the slide, an abutment mounted upon said slide, means responsive to movement of the knife for engaging said abutment to limit breasting movement of the knife in accordance with the position of the gage, and a member movable into engagement with the slide to insure against displacement of said slide when said abutment is engaged by the last-named means.
16. In a heel breasting machine, means for supporting and clamping a shoe having a builtup heel, a knife movable toward the support to remove material from the breast of the heel,A a testing member constructed and arranged to occupy a crease formed between the forward end of the attaching face of the heel and an outsole of the shoe, said member being mounted for pivotal movement about an axis which extends substantially along its work-engaging face, and means for moving the testing member together with and relatively to the knife,
17. In a heel breasting machine, means for supporting and clamping a shoe, a breasting knife movable heightwise of a built-up heel of the shoe to remove material from the breast of said heel, power operated means for moving said knife, mechanism for actuating said knife operating means, a gage movable into engagement with an outsole of the shoe for testing the position of said outsole, means operatively connected to said gage for limiting the breasting movement of the knife in accordance with the setting of said gage, mechanically operated means for moving the gage a substantial distance away from the outsole of the shoe after the heel has been breasted, preparatory to removing the shoe from the machine, and means independent of said ac- Y tuating mechanism for releasing the gage to permit it to move by gravity into engagement with the outsole of the shoe prior to the operation of the knife.
18. In a heel breasting machine, a movable support for a shoe, means co-operating with the support to clamp the shoe in the machine, a knife movable heightwise of a built-up heel attached to the shoe to remove material from the breast of said heel, a gage for testing the position of the outsole of the shoe, mechanically operated means for moving the gage a substantial distance away from the outsole of the shoe after the heel has been breasted, preparatory to removing the shoe from the machine, and mechanism responsive to movement of the shoe support for releasing the mechanically operated means when the support has been moved to a predetermined position, said gage when released being free to move into engagement with the outsole of the shoe.
19. In a heel breasting machine, a support for a shoe having a built-up heel, aclamp co-operating with the support to secure the shoe in position, a movable gage for testing the position of the shoe, an abutment movable into different operative positions in accordance with the position of the gage, a knife movable to breast the heel of the shoe, a connection through which the knife is operated, said connection being movable into engagement with said abutment for causing the b-reasting movement of said knife to cease in accordance with the position of the abutment, a member for backing up the abutment against pressure exerted by said connection, means for mechanically moving the gage a substantial distance away from an outsole of the shoe, preparatory to removing the shoe from the machine, and means responsive to movement of the support for disconnecting the gage from said means in order to permit said gage to move by gravity into engagement with the outsole of the next shoe to be operated upon in the machine.
20. In a heel breasting machine, a support for a shoe having an unbreasted heel, a presser member co-operable with the support to hold the shoe in position to be operated upon, a heel breasting knife movable toward an outsole of the shoe to trim material from the breast of the heel, means for operating the knife, mechanism for limiting the movement of the knife when it engages said outsole to insure against said knife penetrating the outsole, said mechanism comprising a position testing gage constructed and arranged to engage the rear end of the shank portion of the outsole of the shoe, and means for moving said gage to an inoperative position away from the shoe, preparatory to removing the shoe from the machine, said gage being movable, independently of movement of the knife, by gravity to its operative position in engagement with the outsole of the shoe.
21. In a heel breasting machine, a support for a shoe, a member associated with the support to secure the shoe in a position to be operate-d upon, a breasting knife movable toward and away from said support, a gage for testing the position of the shoe, means movable in response to movement of said gage for limiting movement of the knife toward the support, means for moving the gage from its testing position to an inoperative position a substantial distance away from the support, said support being movable to and from a loading position, and means responsive to movement of the support for causing the gage to move into engagement with the shoe.
22. In a heel breasting machine, means for positioning a shoe having an unbreasted built-up heel, a breasting knife movable heightwise of the heel, a gage for testing the position of the rear end of the shank portion of an outsole of the shoe, means associated with the gage for limiting movement of the knife toward the outsole of the shoe in accordance with the position of said gage, means for moving the gage to an inoperative position away from the shoe, the heel of which has been breasted, in response to retractive movement of the knife, and means independent of movement of the knife for causing the gage to move relatively to the knife to an operative position against the shank portion of the outsole of the shoe next to be operated upon.
23. In a heel breasting machine, a support for a shoe having a built-up heel, a breasting knife movable heightwise of the heel, means movable into an operative position in engagement with an outso-le of the shoe for limiting breasting movement of the knife, mechanism responsive to movement of the knife for moving said means to an inoperative position away from the support, and mechanism responsive to movement of the support for enabling said means to move into its operative position,
24. In a heel breasting machine, a support for a shoe, means for clamping the shoe against movement upon the support, a gage movable into engagement with an outsole of the shoe, a knife movable heightwise of a built-up heel attached to the shoe to breast said heel, means comprising a stop operatively connected to the gage for limiting breasting movement of the knife upon its engagement with said outsole, means responsive to movement of the knife away from the outsole for moving said gage to an inoperative position away from the shoe support and for temporarily retaining it in said position, said support being movable to and from a loading position, and means responsive to movement of the support from its loading position to its operative position for permitting the gage to be moved into engagement with the outsole of the shoe.
25. In a heel breasting machine, means for securing a shoe in position, said means comprising a jack movable from an operative position, in which a built-up heel of the shoe is breasted, to a loading position in which the shoe is removed from the jack preparatory to operating upon another shoe, a knife mounted for movement to breast the heel of the shoe, a slide to which the knife is secured and which carries a trip-off drive member, a gage for testing the position of the shoe, an abutment for carrying said gage, said abutment being constructed and arranged to be engaged by the trip-off drive member during the breasting movement of the knife to limit said movement, means responsive to movement of the jack for backing up said abutment in order to insure against movement of the abutment when it is engaged by the trip-off drive member, and means for securing the abutment to the knife slide to cause the gage to move to an inoperative position a substantial distance away from an outsole of the shoe preparatory to moving the jack to its loading position.
26. In a heel breasting machine, means for securing a shoe in position, said means comprising a jack movable from an operative position in which a built-up heel of the shoe is breasted to a, loading position in which the shoe is removed from the jack preparatory to operating upon another shoe, a knife mounted for movement to breast the heel of the shoe, a slide to which the knife is secured and which carries a trip-orf drive member, a gage for testing the position of the shoe, an abutment carrying said gage, said abutment being constructed and arranged to be engaged by the trip-off drive member during the breasting movement of the knife to limit said movement, means responsive to movement of the jack for backing up said abutment in order to r curing a shoe in position, said means comprising a jack movable from an operative position in which a built-up heel of the shoe is breasted to a loading position in which the shoe is removed from the jack preparatory to operating upon another shoe, a knife mounted for movement to breast the heel of 'the shoe, a slide to which the knife is secured and which carries a trip-off drive member, a gage for testing the position of the shoe, an abutment carrying said gage, said abutment being constructed and arranged to be engaged by the trip-oli drive member during the breasting movement of the knife to limit said movement, a cam, a spring for operating said cam, a follower responsive to movement of said cam, and means responsive to movement of the jack for causing the release of the cam, thereby enabling the cam operated by the spring to force the follower against said abutment to back up the abutment against movement when it is engaged by the trip-off drive member.
28. In a heel breasting machine, means for securing a shoe in position, a reciprocatory knife slide and a reciprocatory operating slide, a gage for testing the position of the shoe, an abutment operatively connected to said gage, a block se` cured to the operating slide and having a flat face, and a bell-crank lever pvoted to the knife slide and normally having a flat face of one of its arms in engagement with the flat face of said block to cause the knife slide to reciprocate with the operating slide, said bell-crank lever having another arm which during the reciprocation 0i the knife slide engages said abutment, causing said flat face of the bell-crank lever to move away from the flat face of the block to cause reciprocatory movement of the knife slide, and, therefore, movement of the knife, to cease.
ERASTUS E. WINKLEY.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2534343A (en) * 1949-07-28 1950-12-19 United Shoe Machinery Corp Heel-breasting machine

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2534343A (en) * 1949-07-28 1950-12-19 United Shoe Machinery Corp Heel-breasting machine

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