US2379852A - Production of loop-plush fabric - Google Patents

Production of loop-plush fabric Download PDF

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Publication number
US2379852A
US2379852A US272667A US27266739A US2379852A US 2379852 A US2379852 A US 2379852A US 272667 A US272667 A US 272667A US 27266739 A US27266739 A US 27266739A US 2379852 A US2379852 A US 2379852A
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plush
course
loops
ground
thread
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US272667A
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Nebel Max
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Nebel Max
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B1/00Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B1/02Pile fabrics or articles having similar surface features

Description

July 3, 1945g M, NEBEL 2,379,852
PRODUCTION oF LooP`PLUsH FABRIC Filed May 9. 1959 Patented July 3, 1945 2,379,852 PRODUCTION OF LOOP-PLUSH FABRIC Max Nebel, Chemnitz, Germany; vested in the Alien Property Custodian Application May'll, 1939, Serial No. 272,667 In Germany March 28, 1935 8 Claims.
This invention relates to knitted loop-plush fabric.
In the known kinds of loop-plush fabric the plush loops forming thevelvetlike pile are those sinker loops thatare made longer than the ground fabric sinker loops from a second thread otherwise worked together with the ground fabric. In loop-plush fabric of this known type plush loops may be knit into every sinker loop or provided y only above some of them, for instance every other sinker loop.
These kinds of loop-plush fabric are, however, open to the objection that in the direction of the wales between the sinker wales worked with plush loops spaces appear which are more or less conspicuous, depending on the greater or lesser thickness of the plush thread relative to the ground thread. As there are certain limits to thread thickness in all knitting machines. the plush .thread cannot be made so much thicker than the ground thread to eliminate these open spaces, apart from the fact that the needle mesh in the ground fabric would acquire thereby an undesirable thickness. Furthermore, these open spaces are found also to a less conspicuous degree in the direction of the courses, since the plush loops in each course emerge exactly side by side from the face of the goods at the base of the sinker loops.
It is the object of my invention to overcome these drawbacks of the known loop-plush fabric by tying the plush thread into the basic fabric formed by working in each course two plush threads and two ground threads in such manner that each of the two plush*A threads is alternately worked with a needle mesh of one of the two ground threads to ``1orm a needle mesh. In each course the plush loops are therefore alternately formed of one of the two plush threads and each plush loop has twice the width ofthe sinker loop so` as to. extend from one limb of the ground fabric sinker loop to the other limb of the adjacentfgroundfabric sinker loop across the interposed needle mesh and thus to cross or overlap the adjacent plush loops.
The invention relates to the method of producing this new loop-plush fabric whose essential every sinker loop and which are ldue to the fact that the plush thread is drawn out much longer than the ground thread and must therefore stand much higher tensions and speeds than the ground thread. b
According to the invention, each of the two plush threads of a course is worked only at every second needle into plush loops with the result that the stressing of the plush thread during operation is equal to that of the ground thread. Any thread employed for the ground fabric may therefore serve also as plush threadand the plush "'loops may be much longer than atpresent.
'I'he invention is illustrated in the accompany-v ing drawing by way of example, which shows specimens of loop-plush fabric madeu according feature is that of two plush threads sunk longer 4 than the ground thread in a course one thread is knit with the ground thread into a mesh by every other needle and the other thread by the interposed needles. Since according to the invention the plush loops are made so as to correspond in Width to a double needle division, it becomes possible to eliminate the drawbacks which appear particularly in the knitting of the known loopplush fabric having plush loops provided above to the invention and in which b Figure \1` is a view of a plain knitted fabric having plush loops formed thereon in accordance with one form of the invention;
Figure 2 is a sectional view taken alone the line I--I of Figure 1; and
Figs. 3 and 4 show two kinds of plain fabric in which the ground-thread loops are formed in a special manner and the plush loops are arranged according to the invention.
The ground fabric sho-wn in Fig. 1 is 'of the ordinary plain type and made from the thread l. In each course two plush threads 2 and 3 are alternately knit into plush loops 2a and 3a each of which has twice the width of the sinker loop, i. e., each plush loop is not as in known loop-plush fabrics positioned at the width of the ground fabric sinker loop between the needle meshes but passes from onelimb of the sinker loop across the Y needle meshes to the other limb of the adjacent sinker loop. The limbs of the plush-thread sinker loops above one ground-thread loop alternately consist therefore of two kinds of thread.
As clearly shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the broad plush loops do not lie in one line side by side in the direction of the course but are alternately disn posed once in front and then again in the rear of the two adjacent loops. 'Ihe plush loops occupy therefore in the direction of the course a greater width in space than in single loop plush fabric and lill better the space between the mesh heads, whereby not only the empty spaces or lanes in the direction of the wales are 'omitted but also those extending in the direction of the course are lled up much better than in ordinary 1oop` l plush fabric.
In the fabric shown in Figs. 1 and 2 loops from the ground thread and the two plush threads are other needle, and the other plush thread, also drawn out longer than the ground thread, is formed into a mesh together with the ground thread by the interposed needles. Y
The method of producing the loop-plush fabric shown in Fig. 3 differs in so far as the course is composed of two successively worked partial courses. During the knitting of one partial course ground-thread loops are formed only above every other needle and only one of the two plush threads, after having been drawn out;l longer than the ground thread, is worked by these alternate needles into a mesh together with the ground thread. During the following sinking operation the second partial course is knit in which the ground thread is worked into a mesh by the needles that have not participated in the loop-forming step in the first partial course while the plush thread, also drawn out longer than the ground thread, together with the ground thread is made into a mesh by the needles participating in the loop-forming step in this partial course. These two partial courses shown in Fig. 3 together form a closed course, the only difference compared with the closed course shown in Fig. l being that the needle meshes andtherefore also the plush loops are not arranged in a straight line but are somewhat staggered in the direction of the Wales. "I'his racking results in the known diagonal arrangement of the ground fabric needle meshes, and this ground fabric is therefore usually called diagonal fabric.
The loop-plush fabric shown in Fig. 3 possesses the same arrangement of the plush loops as the fabric shown in Fig. l, with the difference, however, that owing to the knitting of a closed course from twopartial courses the needle meshes in the course and wales are displaced relative to one another. The plush loops like those shown in Fig. 1 have twice the Width of the sinker loops and passing over the adjacent plush loops cross the needle meshes.
The method of producing loop-plush fabric as shown in Fig. 4 is practically the same as the one described with reference to Fig. 3 except that after the Working of a course from two partial courses during the knitting of the first partial course of the next course first those needles form loops 'again which in the preceding course have been operative in this respect during the working of the second partial course. Figs. 3 and 4 show these needles in cross section, the needles forming loops 5 being designated 5a and those forming loops 6 being designated 6a. If therefore the loops 6, by the operation of every other needle of the row, have been made into a partial course and the second partial course has been formed of the loops 5 by the interposed needles, the needles will form partial or full courses in the production of the loop-plush fabric shown in Fig. 4 in the following order:
Third course:
lst part. course: Needles 6Lai form the loops 6 and plush loops 2a. i 2nd part. course: Needles 5a form the loops 5 and plush loops 3, etc.
1st part. course: Needles 6a form the loops 6` and plush loops 2a.
2nd part. course: Needles 5a form the loops 5` and plush loops 3,
AThird course:
lst part. course: Needles 6a form and plush loops 2a.
2nd part. course: Needles 5a form loops 5 with plush loops 3a, etc.
the loops 6 This method of producing the ground fabric is known per se, and it is further known that when the needles are operated in the first manner the needle meshes of two partial courses unite to form a' course in which the needle meshes lie in al straight line as in the fabric shown in Fig. 4, whereas if the needles are operated in the second order the two partial courses remain drawn out in the direction of the wales, as shown in Fig. 3.
The method can be applied by known means on knitting frames and machines. Y
VI claim:
1. That method of producing a plush fabric from two ground threads and two plush threads,
which comprises Working one of said ground threads together with one of said plush threads at alternate wales to form a partial coursethen working together the other of said ground and plush threads at the intervening wales to complete the course, and sinking in the respective plush threads of both of said partial courses during the working thereof so as to form longer loops therein than in the associated ground thread, whereby a ground thread loop and an associated plush thread loop will be floated over each wale in said course.
2. That method of producing a plush fabric from two ground threads and two plush threads, which comprises working one 'of said ground threads together with one of said plush threads at alternate wales to'form a partial course, then working together the other of said ground and plush threads at the intervening wales to complete the course, sinking in the respective plush threads of both of said partial courses during the Working thereof so as to form longer loops therein than in the associated ground thread, whereby a -ground thread loop and an associated plush thread loop will be floated over each Wale in said course, and then repeating the working of said partial courses in the order named at said alternate and Vintervening wales respectively. Y
3. That method of producing a plush fabric from two ground threads and two plush threads, which comprises the knitting of one of said ground threads together with one of said plush threads at alternate wales to form a partial course, then knitting together the other of said ground and plush threads at the intervening D wales to complete the course, sinking in the respective plush threads of both of said partial courses during the knitting thereof so as to form longer loops therein than in the associated ground thread, whereby a ground thread loopand an associated plush thread loop will be oated over each wale in said course, and then repeating the knitting of said partial courses in the order named at said intervening and alternate wales respectively.
4. 'I'hat method of producing a plush `fabric from two ground threads and two plush threads,
which comprises the knitting of one of said ground threads together with one of said plush threads at alternate wales to form a partial course, then knitting together theother of said ground and plush "threads at the intervening wales into a parallel partial course spaced from said rst partial course a walewise distance less i than the length of a knitted loop to thereby com" plete the course, and sinking in the respective plush threads of both of said partial courses during the knitting thereof so as to form longer loops therein than in the associated ground thread, whereby the ground thread loops and associated elongated plush thread loops of each partial course will be floated over the limbs of the knitted loops of the other partial course.
v5. That method of producing a plush fabric from two ground threads and two plush threads, 'which comprises the knitting of one of said ground threads together with one of said plush threads at alternate wales to form a partial i,
course, then knitting together the other of said ground and plush threads at the intervening wales into a parallel partial course spaced from said ilrst partial course a walewise distance less than the length of a knitted loop to thereby complete the course, sinking in the respective plush threads of both of said partial courses during the knitting thereof so as to form longer` loops therein than in the associated ground thread, whereby the ground thread loops and associated elongated plush thread loops of each partial course will be oa-ted over the limbs of the knitted loops of the other partial course, and then repeating in the order named said steps of knitting a partial course at alternate wales and a spaced parallel partial course at the intervening wales,
6. A plush fabric comprising two pairs of threads, each pair including a ground thread and a plush thread and both pairs being knitted into every course; one of said pairs being knitted into alternate wales 4and floated across intervening wales in alternate courses, and being knitted into i intervening Wales and floated across alternate wales in intervening courses; and the other of said pairs being knitted into intervening wales and `iloated 'across alternate wales in alternate courses, e and being knitted into alternate wales and floated i across intervening wales in intervening courses,
the floated portions of said plush threads being l substantially longer than t said ground threads. I
7. A plush fabric comprising two` pairs of threads, each course comprising two partial courses and each pair including a ground thread and a plush thread; one of said pairs forming the rst partial course and being knitted into alternate wales and floated across intervening wales in alternate courses, and being knitted into intervening wales and floated across alternate wales inA intervening courses; and the other of said pairs e floated portions of forming the second partial course and beingV MAX NEBEL.
US272667A 1935-03-28 1939-05-09 Production of loop-plush fabric Expired - Lifetime US2379852A (en)

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2710527A (en) * 1952-06-21 1955-06-14 Supreme Knitting Machine Co In Method and machine for making knitted loop fabric
US2715824A (en) * 1952-12-17 1955-08-23 Stanley G Kranss Terry loop knitting machine and process
US3255615A (en) * 1963-02-27 1966-06-14 Schwartz Alvin Warp knit fabric with looped yarn surface
US3349575A (en) * 1963-02-27 1967-10-31 Schwartz Alvin Warp knit fabric with looped yarn surface
US3874197A (en) * 1968-12-24 1975-04-01 Mayer & Cie Maschinenfabrik Machine and method for the circular knitting of plush goods
US4554801A (en) * 1982-08-13 1985-11-26 Glenoit Mills, Inc. Pile fabric method and apparatus
US4732015A (en) * 1985-10-23 1988-03-22 American Doubloon Corporation Knitted article
FR2616160A1 (en) * 1987-06-05 1988-12-09 Chomarat Textiles Plastiques Plain velour knit obtained on a circular loom with picked up stitches
US5186025A (en) * 1989-08-23 1993-02-16 Sipra Patententwicklungs-Und Beteiligungsgesellschaft Mbh Plush or pile knitted fabric and circular knitting machine for the production thereof
US20180266023A1 (en) * 2017-03-15 2018-09-20 Medi Gmbh & Co. Kg Knitted article
US10973268B2 (en) * 2016-08-25 2021-04-13 Nike, Inc. Garment with zoned insulation and variable air permeability

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2710527A (en) * 1952-06-21 1955-06-14 Supreme Knitting Machine Co In Method and machine for making knitted loop fabric
US2715824A (en) * 1952-12-17 1955-08-23 Stanley G Kranss Terry loop knitting machine and process
US3255615A (en) * 1963-02-27 1966-06-14 Schwartz Alvin Warp knit fabric with looped yarn surface
US3349575A (en) * 1963-02-27 1967-10-31 Schwartz Alvin Warp knit fabric with looped yarn surface
US3874197A (en) * 1968-12-24 1975-04-01 Mayer & Cie Maschinenfabrik Machine and method for the circular knitting of plush goods
US4554801A (en) * 1982-08-13 1985-11-26 Glenoit Mills, Inc. Pile fabric method and apparatus
US4732015A (en) * 1985-10-23 1988-03-22 American Doubloon Corporation Knitted article
FR2616160A1 (en) * 1987-06-05 1988-12-09 Chomarat Textiles Plastiques Plain velour knit obtained on a circular loom with picked up stitches
US5186025A (en) * 1989-08-23 1993-02-16 Sipra Patententwicklungs-Und Beteiligungsgesellschaft Mbh Plush or pile knitted fabric and circular knitting machine for the production thereof
US10973268B2 (en) * 2016-08-25 2021-04-13 Nike, Inc. Garment with zoned insulation and variable air permeability
US20180266023A1 (en) * 2017-03-15 2018-09-20 Medi Gmbh & Co. Kg Knitted article

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