US2377767A - Automatic normalizing mechanism - Google Patents

Automatic normalizing mechanism Download PDF

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US2377767A
US2377767A US2377767DA US2377767A US 2377767 A US2377767 A US 2377767A US 2377767D A US2377767D A US 2377767DA US 2377767 A US2377767 A US 2377767A
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lever
clutch
division
ear
clockwise
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06CDIGITAL COMPUTERS IN WHICH ALL THE COMPUTATION IS EFFECTED MECHANICALLY
    • G06C15/00Computing mechanisms; Actuating devices therefor
    • G06C15/08Multiplying or dividing devices; Devices for computing the exponent or root

Description

June 5, 1945. H. M. DUSTIN ETAL 2,377,767
AUTOMATIC NORMALIZING MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES File d April 7, 1941 12 Shgets-Sheet l o g o 0 AJ/a 5 6 oooo oo 50 w flir 3&5 I
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FIEJ- INVENTORS HOW/4P0 M Own/v HAPULD TAKE/FY ATTORNEYS June 5, 1945. H. M, nus-rm ETAL 2,377,767
AUTOMATIC NQRMALIZING MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Filed April 7, 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS Ham/420 M Own/v Hnpom TAVEPY ATTORNEYS June 5, 1945. H. M. DUSTIN ETAL. 2,377,767
AUTOMATIC NORMALIZING MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Filed April 7, 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTORS H0 w/wo M 0057/ HAPOLD TAM/52v ATTORNEY5 June 5, 1945. H. M. DUSTIN ETAL AUTOMATIC NORMALIZING MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Filed April 7, 1941 Fl[5 E H/wam TAVEQY 12 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTORS H0 WAPD M 01/: 7'//V ATTORNEYb June 5, 1945. H. M. DUSTIN ETAL 2,377,767
AUTOMATIC NORMALIZING MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Filed April '7, 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTORS Hot V4190 M Own/v fl wzp TA VERY ATTORNEY l June 5, 1945. H. M. DUSTIN ETALA 2,377,767
AUTOMATIC NORMALIZING MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Filed April 7, 1941 12 Sheet s-Sheet 6 INVENTORS Hon pp M. 00.5 77/V M42040 7 AVEEY ATTORNEY June 5, 1945. H. M. DUSTIN ETAL 2,377,767
AUTOMATIC NORMALI ZING MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Filed April 7, 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet '7 '9 70 I, A 457 /a4 447 44: w w 4 1 4% 5/ 4w FIE 1E 450 2 446 FIE'IJEL INVENTORS HOW/1P0 M DUST/N HAPOLO 7/] vs?! ATTORNEY June 5, 1945. H. M. DUSTIN ETAL. 2,377,767
AUTOMATIC NORMALIZING MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Filed April '7, 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet 8 FIE 1E v INVENTORS Hon/A120 M 0057/ HAPQD TAVEQY ATTORNEYr' June 5, 1945. H. M. DUSTIN ETAL 2,377,767
AUTOMATIC NORMALIZING MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Filed April 7, 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet 9 INVENTORS Hon A00 M DUST/N HAROLD TAVEEY ATTORNEY June 5, 1945. H. M. DUSTIN ETAL 2,377,767
AUTOMATIC NORMALIZING MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Filed April '7, 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet l0 g kg m% W W 4 V @N A INVLNTORS How/120 M D05 77 HA 20w TA l/EPY ATTORNEYE Jfine 5, 1945. H. M. DUSTlN ETAL AUTOMATIC NORMALIZING MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Filed April 7, 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet 11 INVENTORS HOW/4P0 M 0057/ HApoLp TAms-PY ATTORNEY6 June 5, 1945. H. M. ous'rm ETAL 2,377,767
AUTOMATIC NORMALIZING MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Filed April '7, 1941 12 Sheets-Sheet l2 INVENTORS How/420 M DusrW Hxwozp T/h/A'QY cable to machines Patented June 5, 1945 AUTOMATIC NORMALIZI'NG MECHANISM FOR CALCULATING MACHINES Howard M. Dustin and Calii'., assignors to Harold T. Avery, Oakland, Marcliant Calculating Machine Company, a corporation of California Application April 7, 1941, Serial No. 387,258
' Claims.
The present invention relates to calculating machines of a type adapted to perform automatic calculations, such as automatic division. The particular embodiment of the invention disclosed herein is adapted to the commercially known Marchant calculating machine, the general structure of which is disclosed in the Harold T. Avery Patent Number 2,216,659, issued October 1, 1940; and the tabulator mechanism of which is disclosed and claimed in the Avery Patent Number 2,365,324, issued December 19, 1944. Re!- erence is had to the above patents for a complete disclosure of the calculating machine, including mechanisms not specifically disclosed herein. v
It is to be understood, however, that the invention is not to be regarded as limited to application to machines or mechanisms of the type set forth in the above patents, but is equally applihaving other forms of normalizing mechanisms which clear the registers and/or change the ordinal relationship between the actuating and registering mechanisms.
In calculating machines of the general class disclosed, the dividend is entered into an accumulator register and the carriage is shifted to a selected starting position so as to allow the same to be moved step by step from one ordinal position to the next during the division performance. The divisor is set up in the keyboard and operation of the machine under control of the division control mechanism is initiated by depression of a divsion key.
- terrupted prior to its condition the calculating machine for a subsequent calculation.
A more specific object is to obviate the necescontrolling initiation of operation of the means for clearing the accumulator register and the keyboard, and the means for returning the carriage to a starting position after a division calculation.
A further specific object is to make possible such automatic initiation of the operation of normalizing mechanisms when a computation is incompletion as well as when a computation is completed.
At the termination of the division performance the carriage is ordinarily either in end position or in some other position than its starting position. Thus, in most cases where a repetitive series of division performances are carried out. the registering mechanism is normalized as for instance, by shifting the carriage to a starting position before beginning each new calculation and clearing any remainder appearing in the accumulator register. Also, the selection mechanism, i. e. the keyboard, in which the divisor is maintained throughout each division performance must be cleared. Heretofore these normalizing operations have usually been accom plished by individually manipulating appropriate clearing and tabulating or shift keys or the like to return the carriage to a starting position and to clear the selection mechanism and accumulator register.
It is therefore the general object of the present invention to reduce the number of manual operations required after one machine calculation to A still more specific object is to insure automatic initiation of the operation of such normalizing means even when the latter ve been adjusted so as to be incapable of manual actuation.
Another object is to provide spring actuated means for conditioning the machine for succeeding calculations, and for delaying initiation of operation of such conditioning means until the termination of the instant calculation.
Another object is to provide spring means energized by the machine during a division performance and released into operation as an incident to termination of the division performance to effect conditioning of the machine for a subsequent performance.
Another object is to selectively render the spring means incapable of being energized during a division performance.
With a machine embodying the present invention it is possible to reduce the amount of time and effort required on the part of the machine operator in conditioning a calculating machine for a problem by reducing the number of com trols which must be manipulated by the operator. For this purpose various machine conditioning mechanisms, such as the accumulator and keyboard clearing mechanisms, as well as the tabulator mechanism, may be automatically initiated at the termination of the division performance so that the operator may direct his attention merely to the noting of the quotient and setting up of the next problem in the keyboard. That is, the carriage will be automatically shifted to a predetermined starting position and the keyboard and accumulatorregister will be cleared to allow the dividend and the divisor of the next problem to be set up on the machine as soon as possible,
The present application also discloses mechanism whereby any of the various machine conditioning mechanisms such as the tabulator and clearing mechanisms may be controlled under a master initiating device with provision for selectively rendering any of those conditioning mechanisms free of operation under control of the master initiating device; which is specifically claimed in the copending Avery application Serial Number 387,259, filed April 7, 1941.
The manner in which the above and other objects of the invention are accomplished will be readily understood on reference to the following specification when read in conJunction with the accompanying drawings wheren:
Figure 1 is a plan view of the right half of a calculating machine embodying the present invention.
Figure 2 is a side view illustrating the setting clutch and controls therefor.
Figure 3 is a side view of the main clutch and controls therefor.
Figure 4 is a side view of the restore clutch and controls therefor.
Figure 5 is a side view of the motor circuit control associated with the main clutch and the setting clutch.
Figures 6 and 7 are side views, illustrating the mechanism for dipping and latching the accumulator register driving gears with the actuator gears.
Figure 7A is a side view of the mechanism for disabling the shift control mechanism during the last operation of the division mechanism before stopping and for reenabling the same Just before the machine comes to a stop.
Figure 8 is a side view illustrating part of the division control mechanism, particularly that utilized in connection with control of the carriage shifting means.
Figure 9 is a side view illustrating the control of the division control member by the division initiatingkey, the relationship between the division control member and the restore clutch mechanism, and the means operable by the accumulator register for tripping the main clutch dog latch.
Figure 10 is a side view illustrating the stop key for interrupting a division performance at any time.
Figure 11 is a side view illustrating the control devices for terminating an automatic division performance.
Figure 12 is a side view with certain elements in section, illustrating the mechanism for initiating return of the carriage to a starting position and for initiating clearance of the accumulator register and keyboard at the termination of a division performance.
Figures 13 and 14 are similar sectional side views of the initiating key mechanisms for the accumulator and counter clearing mechanisms, respectively.
Figure 15 is a detail side view in partial section illustrating means for normally holding the counter clear bail in neutral position.
Figures 16 and 17 are side elevational views illustrating the keyboard clear key and the nonclear key and certain of the mechanisms controlled thereby.
Figure 18 is a detail side view of the means for rocking the latching shaft by the non-clear key to enable latching of the accumulator and/or counter register clear keys.
Figure 19 is a side view illustrating part of the tabulator control mechanism.
Figure 19A is a detail side view of means for preventing automatic clearance of the counter register at the end of a division performance.
Figure 193 is a detail side view of means for preventing tripping of the tabulator mechanism in the event that a tabulated shift is attempted with the carriage in a position to which a depressed tabulator key corresponds.
Figure 20 is a side view illustrating the mechanism for automatically clearing the keyboard at the termination of a division operation.
Figure 21 is a side view of part of the tabulator control mechanism and means operated thereby for rocking the clear bail shaft.
Figure 22 is a side view, partly in section, of the mechanism for clearing the accumulator and counter registers.
Figure 23 is a side view illustrating the linkage for releasing both the accumulator and counter clear links upon depression of the non-clear key.
Figure 24 is a side view of part of the shift control linkage.
Figure 25 is a side view, in section, illustrating an ordinal tabulator key and part of the keyboard mechanism.
General construction Since the machine in which the present invention is embodied in its preferred form is disclosed in detail in the above mentioned Avery Patent Number 2,216,659 only a brief description of the operation of the same will be included herein.
The machine is of the proportional gear selective speed type wherein there is provided a series of gear combinations (not shown) of different gear ratios in each order. The usual banks of keys I00 (Figure 1) are provided, one for each order, to selectively effect connection of one of the gear combinations, depending on the value of a key depressed, to a cyclically operable main clutch 428 (Figure 3) and thereby transmit rotation to a series of ordinally positioned drive gears I" (Figure 6). During actuation, intermeshing gears 213 and 2" supported on rods 210 and I'll, respectively, carried by the carriage and aligned with the various ordinal gears I89 are entrained with these gears to transmit rotation to accumulator dials 219 forming an accumulator register Ill (Figure 1). As disclosed in the above mentioned Avery patent, tens carry mechanism (not shown) of the duplexing type is provided to effect tens transfer.
The ratios of the various above mentioned gear combinations are such that, for each cycle of operation of the machine, the dials 219 will each be driven at a rate of speed proportionate to the value of the depressed key I00 in line therewith plus an added increment of one tenth of the amount of rotation of the next lower order dial. During subtractive operations the direction of rotation is opposite to that which is effected during additive operation but in either case the speed is the same when the selection is the same. Thus, during each cycle of operation of the main clutch 428 an amount corresponding to the amount set up in the keyboard will be entered additlvely or subtractively into the accumulator register Ill and, through mechanism not shown, the number of cycles of operation of the main clutch in each carriage position will be entered into a counter register 1814 also carried by the carriage so that during division the counter register I814 serves to register the quotient of a problem.
Engagement of the main clutch is eifected by a setting clutch 430 (Figure 2) keyed on a setting control keys such as the division key 910, and the add bar 800 (Figure 1), and when so engaged effects certain preliminary operations incident to the commencement of a calculation under power of the driving motor (not shown) besides causing engagement of the main clutch to effect actuation.
The setting clutch is normally held disengaged by a clutch dog 394 (Figure 2) which is keyed on a rockable shaft SM and is urged clockwise by a spring 522 tensioned between the machine frame and the dog so as to urge its rightmost end, as viewed in Figure 2, into its illustrated position wherein it seats in one of a pair of notches formed in the clutch 430 and holds the clutch disengaged from the motor drive.
To permit operation of the setting clutch by any one of several operation control mechanisms, a depressible operating bar 503 is provided which is supported by a parallel link arrangement comprising a lever 504 pivoted to the machine frame at 508 and a plate 505 pivoted to the frame at 501. A spring 5I0 tensioned between the machine frame-work and the lever 504 normally maintains the bar in its illustrated raised position. A bell crank 5l2 pivoted to the plate 505 at 5I3 is normally held by means of a tension spring 5I8, extending between the bell crank 5I2 and the bar 503, in a position wherein a notch formed on the lower end thereof embraces an ear III on the clutch dog 394 so that upon depression limit this clutch to a single cycle of operationregardless of how long the bar 503 is held depressed.
Rocking of the setting clutch dog 384 effects closing of the motor circuit by virtue of engagement thereof with an car 409 (Figure 5) formed on a lever 398 pinned to a shaft 388. The shaft 388 has a lever 391 pinned thereto (see Figure 22) which, upon being rocked clockwise as by the setting clutch dog 394, engages an ear 384 on a second lever 385 pivoted on the shaft 388 and normally held in its illustrated position by a f lower roller 148 mounted on a lever 148 pivoted spring 392 tensioned between the second lever and the machine frame. The lever 385 is connected through a pin and slot connection 381 with a motor switch operating arm 388 which is effective, upon being rocked from its illustrated position by the arm 385, to close the driving motor circuit.
Main clutch control on the setting shaft I and engages a cam folon theshaft 5M and spring urged into engagement with the cam. An interponent 803 is pivotally mounted at 804 on the lever 148 and is normally held in the position illustrated in Figure 3 by a tension spring 8I3 extending be tween ears formedon the interponent and the lever 148, respectively. The interponent 8|3 has a tip 8I5 which is adapted to engage a notch 8I8 on the main clutch idog'385 and thereby, when the shaft 43I is rotated, rock the dog 395 out from whichever notch in the main clutch 428 it was seated and thereby enable the main clutch to transmit rotation from the motor drive to the actuator mechanism including the gears I89 (Figure 6).
To provide for continued multicyclic operation of the main clutch in certain calculations, as for example division, a latch 832 (Figure 3) is provided which is pinned to a rockable shaft 828 and urged clockwise by spring 833 into engagement with an ear 820 on the clutch dog 395. When the clutch 'dog 395 is rocked clockwise in division and certain other calculations a roller 834 mounted on the upper end of the latch 832 moves into latching engagement with the under edge of ear 820 and thereby holds the main clutch dog 395 from moving into engagement with the main clutch 428.
The main clutch dog 395 also maintains the motor circuit completed during operation of the main clutch 428. Upon rocking of the dog 395 to effect engagement of the main clutch an extension 408 thereon (Figure 5) engages an ear 401 on the aforementioned lever 398 to rock this lever clockwise and thereby rock the switch control arm388 (Figure 22) in the same manner as was described in connection with the control of arm 388 by the setting clutch dog 394 to complete the motor circuit.
It will be noted that the main clutch dog 395 is rocked clockwise to effect engagement of the main clutch before the clutch dog 394 is allowed to seat in one of the notches in the setting clutch 430 so that the lever 388 and shaft 388, and consequently the switch control arm 388, will be held rocked in a position to maintain the motor circuit closed throughout both the setting clutch cycle and the ensuing main clutch cycle or cycles without interruption.
Dipping of accumulator register Upon rotation of the setting shaft 43I and in advance of actuation by the main clutch 428, the various accumulator drive gears 2' (Figure 6) carried by the shiftable carriage 250 (Figure 1) are enmeshed with the aligned actuator drive gears I88, described hereinbefore, this being accomplished by cams, one of which is shown at 814, keyed on the setting shaft 43 I.
The various sets of gears 2H and 213, as well as other elements (not shown) of the accumulator register, are carried on a series of plates 288 all pivoted by means of a rod 282a to the main body or the carriage and all are connected at their rightmost ends, as viewed in Figure 6, to a common bail 289.
The means for raising and lowering the bail 288 to effect engagement and disengagement of the various gears 21I and I89 comprises a pair of links, one of which is shown at 588, slidable over pins 581 on spaced frame plates of the machine. Each link is provided with rollers 588 engaging the bail 288 on opposite sides thereof and is urged upwardly by a spring 589 tensioned between the links and a pin on'the'machine frame. The links III are pivoted at I12 to cam follower levers I'll rockable on a shaft 225, the levers I'll having rollers I13 engaging the cams 574 so that upon rotation of the shaft I, the followers 510 and links "I are moved to positively pull down the ball 2" against, the action of the spring 589.
Means are provided to latch the accumulator register in its lower position during actuation. This means includes latch levers IIl pivoted at 516 to the machine frame and urged by springs 519 into latching engagement with ears I" on the cam follower levers I". When the various plates 268 and the mechanism carried thereby are dipped the ears ill ride over the noses ill of the latch levers Ill and are latched therebeneath, thus retaining the gears I'll in mesh with the actuator gears I" until termination of operation of the main clutch at which time the latches I" will be released as will be described presently.
Referring to Figures 6 and 7, the means for releasing the latches I'll comprises levers Ill pinned on a rockable shaft coaxial with a shaft II I. On one of the levers NO is a stud I" engaged by an arm I" pinned to shaft Ill. Also pinned to shaft SM is an arm I engagedby an ear Ill on an arm 59! pivotally supported on a shaft Ill and provided with an extension adapted to be engaged by a roller 5 carried by a supporting disc 'IOIA which is fixed to a sleeve rotatably mounted on a shaft 9. This sleeve Ill is driven by a separate clutch which is operated only as an incident to termination of main clutch operations and is known as the restore clutch.
When the main clutch dog III is moved to stop and disengage the main clutch I (Figure 5) the restore clutch 1" (Figure 6) to be described hereinafter, starts operation and rotates the disc 100A (Figure 7). Movement of the roller I" rocks the lever It! clockwise to rock the lever 584 and so rock lever "I, which engages the pin 535 on the juxtaposed lever Ill. Lateral extensions 583 on the levers I" engage and rock tails formed on the latches 815 releasing the ears I18 and allowing the springs I", under control of the restore clutch, to return the accumulator register mechanism to an upper position.
The sleeve 594 of the restore clutch 100 carries a cam 598 (Figure 6) which is employed to prevent the carriage from rising too rapidly under the action of the springs 8" whenever the latches 575 are released. The cam Ill is engaged by a cam follower lever 88! fixed to a rockable shaft 800. A pair of arms I" also fixed to the shaft 600 are joined by pin and slot connections In to the links 588 so that the rate of rise of the carriage under the pull of spring I" is no greater than that permitted by rotation of the cam Ill.
Restore clutch The restore clutch 1 (Figures 4 and 6), besides effecting release of the carriage latch levers 515 and controlling the rate of return of the bail 269 and parts of the accumulator register to their upper positions also conditions certain of the division control mechanism, as will appear hereinafter, under the section entitled Division control. The restore clutch is Jointly controlled by the accumulator register dipping mechanism and by the main clutch dog in such a way that whenever the accumulator register is in its lower position and the main clutch dog I" is seated in the notch of the main clutch, the restore clutch will engage and complete one cycle of operation.
The restore clutch is similar in construction to that disclosed in the patent to Friden Number 1,643,710, issued September 27, 1927, and is directly controlled by an extending nose Ill (Figure 4) on a clutch release dog in the form of a bell crank 05 which i freely supported on the shaft "0. An M-shaped lever "I is provided to control the clutch release dog I and has one foot thereof pivotally mounted on the shaft "I. A short arm I04 extending from the lever "I is provided with a tenon on which is positioned a compression spring 108 extending between the armlill and the left arm of the clutch release dog 5.
An arm I22 keyed to the shaft Ill, and thus rocked by dipping movement of the carriage, is connected to the M-shaped lever ll! by a combined compression expansion link unit "I, as disclosed in detail in the above mentioned Avery Patent 2,216,659. The link unit "I is composed of a pair of links H5 and III, the former pivoted at one end thereof on a stud mounted on the arm 122 and the latter link HI pivoted at one end thereof on a stud extending from the lever Ill.
The two links slide relative to each other and have elongated slots at the free ends thereof each slidable over the pivotal studs for the other link. A compression spring H4 is inserted in a pair of coextensive apertures formed in the two links, being positioned over opposed tenons extending from each link, and opposes any attempt to lengthen or shorten the link unit beyond its normal length illustrated in Figure 4.
Now, at the start of a calculation, and as the setting clutch is rotated, the main clutch dog I" is withdrawn from contact with the main clutch and an extension 408 of the dog "I is withdrawn from beneath a latch lever llll pivoted to the machine frame and urged counter-clockwise by a spring H1 tensioned between the latch lever and the machine frame. The latch 10! is therefore rocked counter-clockwise and an ear Ill thereon is rocked into a notch l l 9 formed in the M-shaped member 103 to prevent counter-clockwise movement of lever '03 until the main clutch has been disengaged by reseating of its dog I" in one of the full cycle notches of the clutch I. The lowering of the accumulator register mechanism (Figure 6), however, tends to engage the restore clutch even before the main clutch engages and a second restraining means is provided to prevent this operation.
The left foot of the lever 103 is provided with a shelf over-lying one end of a bell crank III, pivoted on the shaft 6| I, and having a roller 10! at the other end thereof in engagement with a cam I08 keyed on the setting shaft I. On rotation of the setting clutch, therefore, the bell crank 12! is rocked to raise the lever llll and thus insure that the ear H8 of the latch member 10! will be able to engage the notch H8 properly when the main clutch is engaged. As the setting clutch continues through a single cycle of operation the cams 514 (Figure 6) effect dipping of the accumulator register mechanism and, consequently, the shaft 600 is rocked counter-clockwise. Therefore, the arm 12! (Figure 4) keyed to the shaft 600 is lowered and the link unit 123 is lengthened against the opposition of its spring H4. The parts remain so positioned with the spring H4 compressed until the main clutch dog 395 is permitted to reseat in a notch of the clutch I28 whereupon the extension "I thereon strikes the ear I I 0 of the latch lever 10! rocking it clockwise and removing its lug H! from the notch HI of the lever 103. Spring 1 th expands shortening the link unit 1123 and rocking the member 103 counter-clockwise to carry the left leg (Fisure 4) of lever 103 down against the leftwardly extending arm of the bell crank 405 to rock this lever counter-clockwise and remove the nose 102 thereon from engagement with the restore clutch 100, thereby enabling the clutch to become engaged.
Operation of the restore clutch, thus initiated, causes the latches 515 (Figure 6) to be released in the manner disclosed in connection with Figure 7 and controls the rate of rise of the links 556 through the cam 596, as previously described, enabling the springs 559 to rock the shaft 800 and arm 122 (Figure 4). This movement of arm 122 tends to compress the spring 114 which, being stronger than the spring 105, transmits a rocking movement to the link 123 and lever 103 .to compress the'spring 105 until the nose 102 of the restore clutch dog 405 can reenter into an aperture of the housing of the restore clutch 100, whereupon the restore clutch becomes disengaged and the mechanisms are brought to rest in the position illustrated in Figure 4.
The restore clutch dog 405, when moved counter-clockwise to effect engagement of the restore clutch 100, causes the motor circuit to be closed. This is accomplished by the leftwardly extending arm of the dog 405 (see Figures 4 and which engages the ear 401 on the lever 396 and rocks the shaft 306, levers 391 and 385, and the motor circuit switch arm 398 in the same manner as does the main clutch dog 395. To insure that the motor circuit is held closed throughout the period in which the accumulator register is held dipped, a lever l60l (Figure 22) is keyed to the shaft 600 and has an ear I602 which, when the accumulator is dipped and the shaft 600 (Figure 22) rocked counter-clockwise, engages the ear 394 of lever 395 to insure that the switch arm 308 maintains the motor circuit closed.
Division control As disclosed in detail in the above mentioned Avery Patent 2,216,659, division is performed by setting up the dividend in the accumulator register 318, as by the usual adding operation, and then setting up the divisor in the keyboard, and depressing the division/initiating key 910 (Figures 1 and 11). The machine thereupon carries out automatically the operation of dividing the divisor into the dividend and registering the quotient in the counter register I814 carried by the shiftable carriage 250. The operation consists of successive subtractions of the divisor from those digits of the dividend which are registered in orders of the carriage aligned with the portion of the selecting mechanism containing the divisor, and which may b/e called the "effective dividend. As the carriage is automatically shifted to the left. additional dividend digits in the accumulator register are successively brought into alignment with the part of the actuator mechanism con trolled by the portion of the keyboard upon which the divisor is set until the carriage reaches its leftmost position. Since the construction and operation of the division control mechanism is described in detail in the above Avery Patent Number 2,216,659 only that part thereof which coacts with the mechanism of the present invention will be described herein.
The division initiating key 910 (Figure 11) is mounted on a key stem 911 supported by a pair of parallel levers 912 and 913 pivotally mounted on the machine frame. A roller 914 on the bottom end of the key stem 91! normally lies in front of a division control member 915 (see Figure 9). The member 915 is pivotally mounted on a shaft 915 and is urged clockwise by a strong spring 911 tensioned between an arm formed on the member 915 and a pin on the machine frame-work.
When the division key is depressed the roller 914 passes beneath the face 918 on the lever 915 allowing the spring 911 to rock the member 915 clockwise until a roller 919 at the top of the member 915 strikes the main operating bar 503 (Figure 2) and, as described hereinbefore, depresses the bar to effect engagement of the setting clutch 430. As the key 910 is depressed to its lowermost position against the action of a tension spring (not shown) an extension 980 (Figure 11) on the lever 913 is brought into alignment with a notch 98! on a latch 982, at which time the latch 982 is rocked by a tension spring 983, until this notch engages the extension 980 on the lever 913 to maintain the division key 910 depressed.
The setting clutch 430 (Figure 2), upon being initiated into operation by the division control member 915, will effect operation of the main clutch 429 (Figure 3), as previously disclosed, and the spring 593 will become active to hold the latch 532 in latching engagement with the main clutch dog 395 to enable multicyclic operation of the, main clutch. The actuator mechanism including the gears I89 (Figure 6) are conditioned to operate in a subtractive direction by the depression of the division by 910 (in a manner not shown) so that the divisor set up on the keyboard will be subtracted one or more times from the dividend appearing in the accumulator register.
During rotation of the active accumulator register dials 219 (Figure9) a snail cam 28! connected to each of the dials will be rotated in a clockwise direction, and a cam follower 315 pivoted on the rod 212 and following its respective cam by means of a roller 3| 0 will depress a shelf formed on a sensing lever 9M pivotally supported at 902, thus rocking the lever 901 clockwise. A foot 905 on one or more of the levers 90l is normally engaged during division by a sensing bail 901 pivoted at 942 to the machine frame and urged clockwise by a spring 944 tensioned between the machine frame and an arm on the bail 901. A link 2H5 is connected between an arm on the bail 901 and a lever 2H8 pivoted at 2H9 to the machine frame. The lever 2| I8 is connected through a pin and slot connection to an arm 2120 pinned on a shaft 2l2i.
Referring to Figure 3, a bell crank 2013, also pinned on the shaft 2I2l, has a leftwardly extending arm underlying an ear 2l24 of the main clutch dog latch 832, so as to engage and rock the latch 632 out from under the main clutch dog 395 upon tripping of the bail 901 by the 2,216,659, when the remainder in the accumulator dials is reduced to approximately one-half of the divisor, the cam 291 in the controlling order of the accumulator will have forced its cam follower M5 and, consequently the corresponding sensing lever to a position wherein the foot 909 on the sensing lever 90i passes above the rightwardly extending finger of the bail 901, permitting the spring 944 to rock the bail 901 clockwise and effect release of the latch 002 (Figure 3) to stop the main clutch.
It will be recalled that the main clutch dog 395 (Figures 4 and 5), when rocked home by its spring 6I2, will trip the latch "I and allow the now extended link unit 120 to contract and rock the lever 100 and the restore clutch dog 405 counter-clockwise and enable engagement of the restore clutch.
During the restore clutch cycle and while the accumulator register is being raised, a link 040 (Figure 9) is moved to the left by a cam 040 driven by the restore clutch 100. A lever 041 pivoted on the shaft 010 and pivotally connected to the link 040 is' rocked counter-clockwise. This lever 041 has a notched bell crank I042 pivotally mounted thereon and adapted to engage an ear I021 extending from the division control member 015. A second bell crank I044, freely mounted on the shaft 010, has one end thereof provided with an elongated slot embracing a pin I040 on the bell crank I042. A spring I045 tensioned between the other end of the bell crank I044 and the frame holds the bell crank I 042 in position to engage the extension ear I021 during the first part of the movement of the cam 040 (providing the division control member 015 has been rocked clockwise of its illustrated position by spring 011), but causes the bell crank I042 to be rocked counter-clockwise relative to the lever 041 upon continued movement of the cam 040 (if the member 015 is maintained in its illustrated position) so as to override and miss the ear I021.
The division control member 015 is plvotally connected at I005 to a link I054 (Figures 8, 9, and 12) urged counter-clockwise relative to the member 015 by a tension spring I054a extending between the link and the member 015. Link I 054 has a shoulder I055 adapted to engage an ear I056 on a bell crank I051 pivoted on a pin 0 and normally held in its illustrated position by a tension spring I004 extending between the bell crank and the machine frame. An ear I050 (see also Figure 2) on the bell crank I051 overlies the setting clutch operating bar 500. When the member 015 is first rocked clockwise upon depression of the division key 010, the link I054 is carried thereby to allow the shoulder I055 to drop to a position behind the ear I 050 on the bell crank I051. Now, upon the succeeding restore clutch cycle, the cam 040 (Figure 9) causes the member 015 to be rocked counter-clockwise back to its original position and during this time the shoulder I 055 of the link I054 engages the ear I058 to rock the bell crank I051 clockwise against the action of the spring I004, causing the ear I050 to depress the setting clutch operating bar 500 (Figure 2) and initiate a "corrective cycle as described in detail in the above mentioned Avery Patent Number 2,216,650, to correct for an overstroke if such has occurred. Means (not shown) are provided to release the link I 054 from engagement with the ear I050 of the bell crank I051 during the succeeding setting clutch cycle so as to allow the parts to return to their illustrated position.
When the division control member 015 is rocked counter-clockwise by the action of the restore cam 040, link 040, lever 041, and the bell crank I042, it is retained in a leftward position by'a latch lever I050 (Figure 0) which is pivoted at the left thereof (in a manner not shown) to the machine frame and is spring pressed downward to engage an ear I052 on the division control member. After completion of the corrective cycle and during the subsequent carriage shift the latch I050 is released, as will be described presentlv, to allow the spring 011 to again rock the division control member 015 clockwise so as to initiate a new division operation in the new carriage position. It should be noted that the division key 010 (Figure 11) is still maintained in a depressed position at this time by the latch 002 and will, therefore, not interfere with the clockwise rocking movement of the division control member 015.
Carriage shift control in division A complete disclosure of the carriage shifting mechanism and controls therefor will be found in the aforementioned Avery patent, but will be briefly outlined herein to illustrate the connection thereof with the mechanism of the present invention.
Shifting of the carriage to the right or to the left is effected under motor power by rocking a control lever I000 (Figure 24) about its pivot IO0I to one side or the other of its illustrated neutral position so as to engage one or the other of two ratchet discs I000 and I005 of a reversibly operable planetary carriage shifting mechanism. The control member I 000 is connected through a resilient connection I010 to a link I014 pivoted on a member I015 rockable on a shaft I010 and is normally held in its neutral position by a centralizer lever I4I0 pivoted at I4Ila to the machine frame and urged counter-clockwise by a centralizer spring I400 tensioned between a machine frame stud HM and an ear I402 on the centralizer lever I4I0. The centralizer I 4I0 has 'an ear I4I0 thereon engaging the lever I015 above the shaft I010 and also has an adjustable projection I4I0 secured thereon and engaging the lever I015 below the shaft I010.
An ear I004 (see also Figure 8) is adapted to be engaged by a hook formed on a floating dog I000 pivoted on a lever I000 which is also pivoted on the shaft I010.
When the division key 010 (Figure 9) is depressed, an ear 01Ia thereon engages the leftmost end of the dog I000 and rocks the same counterclockwise until it hooks the ear I004. A floating shift control lever I011 i pivoted at I010 to the lever I 000 and the leftmost end thereof, as viewed in Figure 8, is weighted so that it tends to rock counter-clockwise about its pivot I010.
At the end of a division operation in a partic ular carriage position, the floating carriage shift control lever I011 is moved to the left, as viewed in Figures 6 and 8, to initiate a carriage shift to the left. During the division operation in a certain carriage position an ear I005 on one of the cam followers 510 is moved to the right of its position illustrated in Figures 6 and 8 by virtue of the dipping movement imparted to the links 550 by the cam followers 510 when rocked by the cams 514 so that the weighted left end of the lever I011 will rock the lever counter-clockwise until the notch I000 formed by a shoulder I005 on the right hand edge thereof embraces the ear I000. Now, as the final restore clutch cycle ensues, enabling the springs 500 to lift the links 500 and rock .the cam followers 510 counter-clockwise, the floating lever I011 is shifted to the left by the ear I000 and the dog I000 is likewise shifted to the l ft through the action of the lever I000. Since the dog I000 is at this time hooked over the ear I004 (Figures 8 and 24) of the shift link I014, the shift control memb'er I000 will be rocked to engage the ratchet wheel I305 of the planetary carriage shift mechanism to effect a leftward shift of the carriage.
It should be understood that the above carriage shifting operation takes place at theend of the final restore clutch operation in each carriage position following the restorative cycle instead of at the end of the first restore clutch operation. This is effected by reason of the fact that the division control member 915 is allowed to be held in a clockwise position by its spring 911 (in which case the roller I065 thereon engages the under surface I318 of the shift control lever I311 to hold the same rocked to position the notch I390 thereof below the path of movement of the ear I386) until'after the restore clutch has operated sufiiciently to allow the cam follower lever 510 to be rocked counter-clockwise and thereby move the ear I386 to substantially its illustrated position wherein it cannot engage the notch I390 and shift the floating lever I311, During the restore clutch cycle following the restorative cycle, however, the division control member 915, being latched in its counter-clockwise rocked position by the latch I050, is ineffectiv to prevent initiation of the carriage shift.
During the initial shift cycle one of a pair of rollers I363 (Figure 8) placed diametrically opposite each other on a disc I382, which is rotated by a shaft I33I connected to the planetary shift mechanism, rocks a lever I355 pivoted to the frame stud I35I against the action of a, spring I359, and a pin I356 on this lever engages and rocks a bell crank I381 pivoted to the machine frame at I388. A shelf I389 extending from the bell crank underlies the latch I050 and the leftmost end of the link I311 so that the lever I311 will be rocked from engagement with the ear I 386 to limit the shift operation to one step, and the latch I050 will be raised to release the division control member 915 which will then be free to rock toward the right to initiate the division operation in the new carriage order.
During the carriage shifting operation, the motor circuit is held closed by the shift centralizing arm I (Figures 8 and 24). The lower end of centralizer lever MM is connected by a pivot pin II to link I4I2 (see also Figure 22) which is also connected by a pivot pin 403 to a bell crank 402 pivotally supported by the machine frame and, in turn, connected by means of a link 404 to the combined interlock and motor circuit operating lever 391 pinned on the shaft 386. Thus, as the centralizer lever IMO is rocked clockwise by the lever I380, regardless of which direction this latter lever is rocked, the link I4I2 will be pulled to the left effecting a clockwise rocking movement of the lever 391 which engages and rocks the lever 385 to operate the motor circuit arm 388 and close the motor circuit.
Termination of operation in division The above repetitive tour of operations is repeated in each successive carriage position until the carriage reaches its leftmost position when further operation of the carriage shifting mechanism is prevented and the machine is bought to a standstill. As the carriage moves into its leftmost position, a projection I510 (Figure 11) carried by the right hand carriage plate 250a strikes the under surface of an inclined cam face I51I formed on the lever I512 so as to rock the lever counter-clockwise against the action of a tension spring I513 extending between the lever I512 and the machine frame.
During division operation, with the carriage in its leftmost position, the division key will be unlatched and permitted to rise. A leftwardly extending arm of the lever I512 underlies an ear I081 on the upper end of a bell crank I068 pivoted at I089 to the division key latch 982. When the lever I512 is rocked counter-clockwise by the carriage, the bell crank I068 is rocked by a spring I010, extending between the bell crank and part of the division key latch 982 to hook a leftward extension thereof around the ear I058 of the bell crank I051 (Figures 11 and 12). This bell crank, it will be recalled, is rocked by the link I054, connected to the division control member 915, during the first restore cycle in each order for the. purpose of initiating a corrective setting clutch cycle. If the end of the bell crank I068 be hooked over the extension I056during such rocking, the bell crank I068 will be pulled to the left rocking the latch lever 982 counter-clockwise about its supporting shaft I222 to release the lateral extension 980 of the lever 913 and permit the division key 910 to be raised by a suitable spring (not shown).
A division operation may be terminated at the conclusion-of operation in any carriage position by a single depression of the stop key 985 leaving a quotient digit in that order accurately registered, or it may be terminated at once by two successive depressions of the same key which may possibly leave an inaccurate quotient digit in the counter. The stop key 985 (Figure 10) is slidably supported upon pins extending from the machine frame and is provided with an offset 988 which overlies a lever I015 pivoted to the frame and connected by a pin and slot connection with a. lever I018 pivoted on a shaft I088 and connected by means of a sleeve I016a (Figure 11) with abell crank I011 which is normally urged in a clockwise direction by a tension spring I018 extending between the bell crank I011 and the machine frame. Upon depression of the stop key 985 the bell crank I011 is rocked in a counterclockwise direction and a link I019 pivotally connected thereto and normally urged upwardly by a spring I080, extending between a pin on the machine frame and the link I019, is moved to the right. The link I019 carries a shelf I084 engageable with a tail I086 of the division key latch 982 and is limited in its upward travel under tension of spring I080 by an ear I085 formed on a lever I081. The lever I081 is pivoted on the shaft I222 which carries the division key latch 982, and has but a limited swinging movement relative to this latch so that for the present purpose it may be considered as an integral part of the latch. Upon depression of the stop key 985 the link I019 is moved to the right carrying its shelf I084 against the lower end of the tail I086 of the division key latch 982. This swings the division key latch 982 counter-clockwise releasing the division key to rise slightly until its roller 914 (Figure 9) engages the underside 918 of the division control member 915.
Being released from the latch 982, the division key 910 is permitted to rise as soon as the divisioh control member 915 has been moved to the position in which it is shown in Figure 8. This occurs during the next cycle of operation of the restore clutch and the roller 914 of the division key stem is then brought into blocking relation with the member 915 preventing operative movement thereof. As the division key rises, roller 914 thereon first moves in front of member 915 and then raises ear I098 (Figure 8) on the latch member I050 to release member 915 from the latch,
leaving it restrained by roller I14 alone and ready for operation upon depression of the key.
A second depression of the stop key after the latch 982 has been tripped also moves the link I019 to the right. It will be recalled, however, that upon the first depression of the stop key the latch 382 was moved in a counter-clockwise direction. Thus, the lever I001 was swung up wardly and its ear I085 permitted the link I018 to rise under the action of its spring I080. This rise of the link I 010 is sufncient to cause its right hand end to engage an ear 2I20 on an extension of a lever 2I I1 fixed to the shaft 526 upon the second depression of stop key 305.
Referring to Figure 3, it will be recalled that the latch 632 is also fixed to the shaft 625 so that movement of this shaft by the link I013 will effect release of the main clutch dog 305 and thus immediately arrest operation of the main clutch, and a restore clutch operation will ensue.
The mechanism which is operated by the restore clutch for normally causing engagement of the shift clutch at the end of the operation in each order is disabled by the rise of the division key so as to not interfer with the operation of the automatic clearance and return shift mechanism described hereinafter.
A lever I255 (Figure 7A) is fixed to the same shaft I256 which carries the lever I028 (Figure 11) connected to the division key linkage 060 and 913 described hereinbefore. The lever I255 carries a latch I24I (Figure 7A) which is urged counter-clockwise about its pivot stud I253 by a spring I243, so that upon depression of the division key and consequent clockwise rocking of shaft I256 and lever I255, the latch I24I is moved toward the right from above an ear I244 formed on an arm I229 of a bail assembly freely pivoted on the shaft I222, and the spring rocks the left end of the latch I24I down and immediately to the right of the ear I244. This bail assembly of which the arm I229 is a part is urged clockwise about the shaft I222 (Figure 7A) by a spring I235 its movement in that direction being limited by engagement of an arm I223 of the bail assembly with an ear I240 on a member of the addition mechanism not shown. An ear I230 is formed on a second arm I22I of the aforesaid bail assembly and underlies a lever I23I, freely pivoted on a stud I232, and provided with a portion I233 underlying the left end of the shift control link I311 (see also Figure 6).
The arrangement of the above described mechansim is such that when the division key is released and permitted to rise upon depression of the stop key or operation of the end position mechanism described hereinbefore, the shaft I255 and lever I255 are rocked counter-clockwise. The left end of latch I24I lies substantially against the right side of ear I244 at this time so that upon counter-clockwise rocking of shaft I256, the latch pushes ear I244 toward the left and rocks the bail assembly counter-clockwise. The resulting upward movement of the ear I230 rocks the lever I23I upwardly, whereupon the lug I233 on the latter lever engages the lower surface of the shift control lever I311 and rocks the same upwardly or clockwise about its pivot stud I 310 (Figure 6). This moves the right end of the shift control lever down and out of the path of the ear I388, so that leftward movement of the latter during the restore clutch cycle will not be effective to actuate the shift control link I311.
Since the link I311 must be freed so as to 15 permit operation thereof for controlling the shift mechanism in other calculations, the above mechanism is adjusted to permit return of the link I311 to active position soon after the ear I306 has passed above and past the shoulder I305 on the right end of link I311.
This release is effected during the restore clutch cycle following the rise of the division key, this usually being referred to as the "second restore clutch cycle which controls the operation of the following mechanism. As described in the Avery Patent Number 2,216,659, a lever I246 (Figure 7A) is rocked counter-clockwise under control of the l restore clutch cam 596 (Figure 6) and the linkage including link I1I3. Lever I240 carries an interponent I241 (Figure 7A) which, upon such counter-clockwise rocking of lever I240, moves upwardly, whereupon a shoulder I240 of the interponent engages an ear I25I on the latch I2 and rocks the latter upwardly to the position shown, to release the ear I244 from restraint of the latch and to permit return of the bail assembly and lever I23I to the position shown. During the latter part of the upward movement of the interponent after the latch I24I has released ear I244, a portion of the interponent engages the shaft I222 and rocks the interponent counterclockwise about its pivot stud thereby removing the shoulder I248 from beneath ear HM and releasing latch I24I for downward movement under urge of the spring I243 until blocked in the position shown by ear I244.
During each restore clutch cycle the cam 535 actuates the lever I246 as described above, but so long as the division key is in depressed position, the shaft I256 and lever I255 (Figure 7A) are held in their extreme clockwise position and latch I24I stands in a position down and to the right of that in which it is shown, therefore upward movement of the interponent I241 is ineffective throughout all restore clutch cycles in a division calculation except the one following the release of the division key. The interponent is also ineffective in the "first restore clutch cycle in which the division key is released since release of the key is timed to occur subsequent to the upward movement of the interponent.
When the division key rises following restoration of the division control lever 315 (Figure 9) by operation of the restore clutch through what is known as first restore cycle, the shaft I258 is rocked counter-clockwise and latch I2 is moved leftwardly against ear I 244 to rock arm I229 and thereby disable the shift control lever I311 as described in detail hereinbefore, so that no shift operation will be initiated by operation of the restore clutch during what is known as the second restore cycle. The cam 596 (Figure 6) which normally initiates a shift operation by controlling the movement of ear I305 and the shift control lever I311 also controls the rocking movement of the lever I246 and the mechanism for reenabling the lever I311. The timing of the movement of these two mechanisms is such that before the interponent I241 moves the latch I24! upwardly far enough to release ear I244, the ear I303 (Figure 6) moves over the top of the shoulder I385 of the shift control link I311. After such movement the shift disabling mechanism described in detail above is released from restraint of the latch I24! and returns to the position shown to reenable the shift control link I311 so that it may subsequently initiate an automatic shifting operation as described hereinbefore.
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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2546893A (en) * 1951-03-27 Hilder
US2572921A (en) * 1951-10-30 Operation control means
US2572920A (en) * 1951-10-30 Operation control means
US2710405A (en) * 1955-06-07 Lundquist
US2721698A (en) * 1955-10-25 Tabulation control means
US2902124A (en) * 1953-03-10 1959-09-01 Olivetti & Co Spa Operating mechanism for power driven business machines
US2949229A (en) * 1960-08-16 gubelmann
US3350006A (en) * 1967-10-31 Calculating machine

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2546893A (en) * 1951-03-27 Hilder
US2572921A (en) * 1951-10-30 Operation control means
US2572920A (en) * 1951-10-30 Operation control means
US2710405A (en) * 1955-06-07 Lundquist
US2721698A (en) * 1955-10-25 Tabulation control means
US2949229A (en) * 1960-08-16 gubelmann
US3350006A (en) * 1967-10-31 Calculating machine
US2902124A (en) * 1953-03-10 1959-09-01 Olivetti & Co Spa Operating mechanism for power driven business machines

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