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US2345831A - Shoe sole and method of making the same - Google Patents

Shoe sole and method of making the same Download PDF

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Publication number
US2345831A
US2345831A US47754843A US2345831A US 2345831 A US2345831 A US 2345831A US 47754843 A US47754843 A US 47754843A US 2345831 A US2345831 A US 2345831A
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Prior art keywords
wood
layer
sole
shoe
supporting
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Harold L Pierson
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E P Reed & Co
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E P Reed & Co
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/02Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the material
    • A43B13/12Soles with several layers of different materials
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/02Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the material
    • A43B13/08Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the material wood

Description

April 4, 1944.

SHOE SOLE H. L PIERSON AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed March 1, 1943 W000 -E/v0 GRAIN 6 7 7 .2, T A 77 4 I o 5 3m mm w .m j

\ T INVENTOR.

2, Hare/d L. P/erOK) 5 MW.

ATTORNEY.

Patented Apr. 4, 1944 SHOE SOLE AND METHOD MAKING THE SAME Harold L. Pierson, Rochester, N. Y., assignor to E. P. Reed & 00., Rochester, N. Y., a corporate tion of New York Application March 1, 1943, Serial No. 477,548

12 Claims.

This invention relates to a shoe sole and method of making the same and has for its object to afford an economical procedure for manufacturing a durable and practical shoe having an outer sole or tread surface formed of wood.

It has long since been proposed to manufacture shoe soles in part or entirely from wood, but

various difllculties have been encountered among which may be mentioned the stiffness or lack of flexibility of the sole, the problem 'of fastening the sole securely to the shoe upper sothat it will hold, the absence of proper wearing qualities, also the excessive cost of manufacture, and it is a purpose of the present invention to overcome these several objections by the provision of a durable sole that can be produced at a reasonably low cost, one that is characterized by maximum flexibilitxboth lengthwise and transversely of the shoe, and which can be attached to a shoe upper in a manner that insures permanent connection of the wood portions.

Another object of the invention is to afford a shoe sole having a wood tread surface that will give long wear and compare favorably in durability with a leather outer sole, and to attain these ends by utilizing a wood layer with the grain extending perpendicularly to the plane of the layer, thus insuring an intimate cement bond between the wood and the supporting layer, making it possible for the wood to absorb a waterproofing material eifectively, and giving maximum wear.

A further purpose of the invention is to afford a construction embodying a wood tread surface comprising a multiplicity of relatively small wood units permitting their independent movement in relation to each other both lengthwise and transversely of the shoe so as to insure maximum flexibility and yielding of the sole to the movements 01' the foot while at the same time protecting the wood surface against fracture or breakage and attaining the greatest wear possible from a wood sole.

Still another objectof the invention is to make possible a procedure that enables manufacturing a wood sole at a comparatively low cost, thus making it a practical, marketable product that can be merchandised competitively with leather soled shoes, and.which will give a satisfactory performance in actual use.

To these and other ends, the invention consists in the construction and method that will appear clearly from the following description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawing. the novel features being pointed out in the claims following the specification.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a shoe sole made in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the blank from which the sole is made, inc1uding the flexible supporting layer and the wood layer cemented thereto;

Fig. 3 is a similar view of the blank after the wood layer has been routed around its edge to receive a welt;

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the blank after the wood layer has been routed and subsequently cut lengthwise and transversely to provide a multiplicity of separate independently movable wood units;

Fig. 5 is a cross-section on line 5-4 of Fig. 1, showing the sole after the welt has been attached. and :before finishing the exposed surface of the wood tread, and

Fig. 6 is a sectional view on line 6-6 of Fig. 1.

Referring more particularly to the drawing in which like reference numerals refer to the ,same parts throughout the several views, the blank from which the sole is made is preferably formed by cementing together with pyroxylin or any suitable cellulose cement a readily flexible supporting "layer l consisting of a thin leather split or other available material and a wood layer 2, the cement extending over the entire contacting surfaces of the layers, and the wood layer having been cut so that its grain extends perpendicularly to the plane of the layer. Thus the fibers in the wood layer 2 extend in such a direction that their ends are exposed on one side to the,supporting layer I and on the other side to serve as a tread surface and receive wear. By having the grain of the wood extend perpendicularly to the plane of the layer, the cement which attaches the layers i and 2 together is absorbed to a much greater extent by the Wood layer than if the grain of the wood extended'transversely or parallel to the plane of the layer, and thus a much more intimate and tighter bond is attained between the layers, and permanent attachment of the wood to the supporting layer is assured.

After the layers I and 2 are attached in the manner described, the sole blank is cut-to the desired contour by a suitable die as usual in shoe manufacturing. following which the wood layer 2 is routed around its edge to afford the channel 3 which receives a welt that will be described presently.

After formation of the channel 3, the wood layer 2 is subjected to a cutting operation to provide two series of parallel cuts indicated by 4 and 5 respectively which in the present instance are at right angles to each other, and extend through or almost entirely through the wood layer to afford a multiplicity of square or other substantially equal-sided relatively small wood units arranged both transversely and lengthwise of the oleand movable independently of each other in both such directions.

The wood layer 2 is prefer-ably die-cut in any suitable die-cutting machine for the purpose, such operation being made possible by the fact that the grain of the wood layer extends perpendicularly to the plane of the layer that the die-cutting knives will readily penetrate through or almost entirely through the wood layer. In order to protect the supporting layer, it is preferable to cut the wood layer not entirely through. leaving a slight uncut portion which when the sole is shaped to secure it to the upper and the shoe put in service, readily give way owing to the direction of the grain of the wood and permits separation of the wood units so that each wood square or other separate unit is indiv'idually carried by the flexible supporting layer and will yield with it in any direction.

This arrangement permits maximum flexibility of the sole and also provides wood units of such size that they are not likely to break or fracture in actual service but will continue to wear as individual units and as an entire tread until the fibers of the wood unit are ,worn through. It will be understood that the cuts in the wood layer may be such as to provide wood units of different configuration such as oblong, diamond-shaped, circular, or otherwise, as long as there are separate relatively small wood units of such size as to have movement independently of each other both lengthwise and transversely of the sole and not be subject to breakage.

It has been found preferable to rout the wood layer around its edge before subjecting it to the die-cutting operation so as to obviate any tendency of the wood to chip or break at the edge during the cutting, and in order to protect the edge of the wood layer and prevent it from chipping or breaking in use, a welt 6 is applied in the channel 3 extending entirely around the edge of the sole on both sides to the heel portion.

The welt 6 is preferably of leather or may be of other material and is secured in place in the channel preferably by stitching 1 extending through the welt, the wood layer 2, and the flexible supporting layer l. The channel 3 formed in the wood layer is preferably somewhat deeper than the thickness of the welt 6 so that after the welt is secured in place, the exposed surface of the wood layer 2 can be ground off and polished to give a finished, smooth tread surface without contacting or damaging the welt 6, such finishing operation reducing the thickness of the wood adjacent the channel to approximately the same thickness as the welt.

In order to prevent the wood layer from swelling or being affected by moisture, it is suitably treated by brushing 0r spraying on its surface or otherwise applying any waterproofing material such as linseed oil. This can be done either before cementing the wood layer to the supporting layer, or after the cutting operation on the wood layer before applying the welt, or after the welt is attached, and the waterproofing material quickly and thoroughly penetrates the wood layer in shoe manufacturing processes, and th flexible supporting layer I cemented or otherwise attached to the inner sole and upper of the shoe.

While the invention has been described with reference to the particular structure shown, it is not,- confined to the details herein disclosed, and this application is intended to cover such modifications or changes in construction or procedure as may come within th purposes of the invention or the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. The method of making a shoe sole which includes cementing a wood layer to a flexible supporting layer with the fibers of the wood extending perpendicularly I to the plane of I the layer, and cutting the wood layer in diflerent directions to produce a multiplicity of separate, substantially equal-sided relatively small wood units that are independently movable both lengthwise and transversely of the sole.

2. The method of making a shoe sole which includes cementing a wood layer to a flexible supporting layer with the fibers of the wood extending perpendicularly to the plane of the layer, routing the wood layer to form a channel around its edge, cutting the wood layer in diiierent dia welt in said channel.

.3. The method of making a shoe sole which includes cementing a wood layer to a flexible supporting layer with the fibers of the wood extending perpendicularly to the plane of the layer, and die-cutting the wood layer along two series of parallel lines extending at angles to each other to produce a multiplicity of separate, substantially equal-sided relatively small wood units that are independently movable both lengthwise and transversely of the sole.

4. The method of making a shoe sole which includes cementing a wood layer to a flexible supporting layer with the fibers of the wood extending perpendicularly to the plane of the layer, routing the wood layer to form a channel around its edge, die-cutting the wood layer along two series of parallel lines extending at angles to each other to produce a multiplicity of separate, substantially equal-sided relatively small wood units that are independently movable both lengthwise and transversely of the sole, and securing a welt in said channel.

5. The method of making a shoe sole which includes cementing a wood layer to a flexible supporting layer with the fibers of the wood extending perpendicularly to the plane of the layer. cutting the wood layer in difierent directions to produce a multiplicity of separate, substantially equal-sided relatively small wood units that are independently movable both lengthwise and trans versely of the sole, and applying a waterproofing material to the wood layer.

6. The method of making a shoe sole which includes cementing a wood layer to a flexible supporting layer with the fibers of the wood extending perpendicularly to the plane of the layer, routing the wood layer to form a channel around its edge, die-cutting the wood layer along two series of parallel lines extending at angles to each other to produce a multiplicity of separate, substantially equal-sided relatively small wood units that are independently movable both lengthwise and transversely of the sole, securing a welt in said channel, and applying a waterproofing material to the wood layer.

7. A shoe sole including a flexible supporting layer and a wood layer cemented thereto and comprising a multiplicity of separate, substantially equal-sided relatively small wood units arranged both lengthwise and transversely of the sole and movable independently of each other in both directions, the wood layer having its grain extending perpendicularly to the plane of the layer.

8. A shoe sole including a flexible supporting layer and a wood layer cemented thereto and having its grain extending perpendicularly to the plane of the layer, the wood layer having two series 01' spaced, parallel cuts extending therethrough and arranged at angles to each other, the wood layer being provided around its edge with a channel, and a welt secured in said channel.

9. A shoe sole including a flexible supporting layer and awood layer cemented thereto and comprising a multiplicity of substantially equalsided relatively small wood units arranged both lengthwise and transversely of the sole and movable independently of each other in both directions, the wood layer having its grain extending perpendicularly to the plane of the layer.

10. A shoe sole including a flexible supporting layer and a multiplicity of separate, substantially equal-sided relatively small wood units cemented thereto with the grain of the wood extending perpendicularly to the plane of the supporting layer, said wood units being arranged both lengthwise and transversely of the sole and movable independently of each other in both directions.

11. A shoe sole including a flexible supporting layer, a multiplicity oi separate,substantially equal-sided relatively small wood units cemented thereto with the grain of the wood extending perpendicularly to the plane of the supporting layer, said wood units being arranged both lengthwise and transversely of the sole and movable independently of each other in both directions, and a waterproofing material applied to the wood units.

12. A shoe sole including a flexible supporting layer and a wood layer cemented thereto and having its grain extending perpendicularly to the plane of the layer, the wood layer having two series of spaced, parallel cuts extending therethrough and arranged at angles to each other, the wood layer being provided around its edge with a channel, a welt secured in said channel, and a waterproofing material applied to the wood layer.

HAROLD L. PIERSON.

US2345831A 1943-03-01 1943-03-01 Shoe sole and method of making the same Expired - Lifetime US2345831A (en)

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Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2419629A (en) * 1944-10-04 1947-04-29 Beckwith Mfg Co Midsole construction for shoes
US4638576A (en) * 1985-04-24 1987-01-27 Converse Inc. Athletic shoe with external counter and cushion assembly
US4779361A (en) * 1987-07-23 1988-10-25 Sam Kinsaul Flex limiting shoe sole
WO1991005491A1 (en) * 1989-10-20 1991-05-02 Ellis Frampton E Iii Shoe sole structures which are siped to provide natural deformation paralleling the foot
WO1991019429A1 (en) * 1990-06-18 1991-12-26 Ellis Frampton E Iii Shoe sole structures
US5384973A (en) * 1992-12-11 1995-01-31 Nike, Inc. Sole with articulated forefoot
US5425184A (en) * 1993-03-29 1995-06-20 Nike, Inc. Athletic shoe with rearfoot strike zone
US5625964A (en) * 1993-03-29 1997-05-06 Nike, Inc. Athletic shoe with rearfoot strike zone
US6115945A (en) * 1990-02-08 2000-09-12 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures with deformation sipes
US6591519B1 (en) 1989-08-30 2003-07-15 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures
US6609312B1 (en) 1990-01-24 2003-08-26 Anatomic Research Inc. Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US6662470B2 (en) 1989-08-30 2003-12-16 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoes sole structures
US6668470B2 (en) 1988-09-02 2003-12-30 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer side surfaces
US6708424B1 (en) 1988-07-15 2004-03-23 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe with naturally contoured sole
US20040250447A1 (en) * 1990-01-24 2004-12-16 Ellis Frampton E. Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US6877254B2 (en) 1988-07-15 2005-04-12 Anatomic Research, Inc. Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plane
US20050241183A1 (en) * 1990-01-10 2005-11-03 Ellis Frampton E Iii Shoe sole structures
US20060032086A1 (en) * 1988-09-02 2006-02-16 Ellis Frampton E Iii Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer surfaces
US7127834B2 (en) 1988-07-15 2006-10-31 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US20070227043A1 (en) * 2003-08-06 2007-10-04 Hinten Deborah J Customized orthopedic shoe soles
US7287341B2 (en) 1989-10-03 2007-10-30 Anatomic Research, Inc. Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plane
US20080022556A1 (en) * 1992-08-10 2008-01-31 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures
US20080083140A1 (en) * 2004-11-22 2008-04-10 Ellis Frampton E Devices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US20090199429A1 (en) * 2004-11-22 2009-08-13 Ellis Frampton E Devices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US20100269271A1 (en) * 2009-04-23 2010-10-28 Namkook Kim Method of Manufacturing Footwear Having Sipes
US8256147B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2012-09-04 Frampton E. Eliis Devices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US8670246B2 (en) 2007-11-21 2014-03-11 Frampton E. Ellis Computers including an undiced semiconductor wafer with Faraday Cages and internal flexibility sipes
US8732230B2 (en) 1996-11-29 2014-05-20 Frampton Erroll Ellis, Iii Computers and microchips with a side protected by an internal hardware firewall and an unprotected side connected to a network

Cited By (58)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2419629A (en) * 1944-10-04 1947-04-29 Beckwith Mfg Co Midsole construction for shoes
US4638576A (en) * 1985-04-24 1987-01-27 Converse Inc. Athletic shoe with external counter and cushion assembly
US4779361A (en) * 1987-07-23 1988-10-25 Sam Kinsaul Flex limiting shoe sole
US6877254B2 (en) 1988-07-15 2005-04-12 Anatomic Research, Inc. Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plane
US6708424B1 (en) 1988-07-15 2004-03-23 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe with naturally contoured sole
US7127834B2 (en) 1988-07-15 2006-10-31 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US7093379B2 (en) 1988-09-02 2006-08-22 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer side surfaces
US20060032086A1 (en) * 1988-09-02 2006-02-16 Ellis Frampton E Iii Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer surfaces
US6668470B2 (en) 1988-09-02 2003-12-30 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer side surfaces
US20040134096A1 (en) * 1989-08-30 2004-07-15 Ellis Frampton E. Shoes sole structures
US6729046B2 (en) 1989-08-30 2004-05-04 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures
US6591519B1 (en) 1989-08-30 2003-07-15 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures
US7168185B2 (en) 1989-08-30 2007-01-30 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoes sole structures
US6662470B2 (en) 1989-08-30 2003-12-16 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoes sole structures
US7287341B2 (en) 1989-10-03 2007-10-30 Anatomic Research, Inc. Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plane
WO1991005491A1 (en) * 1989-10-20 1991-05-02 Ellis Frampton E Iii Shoe sole structures which are siped to provide natural deformation paralleling the foot
US20050241183A1 (en) * 1990-01-10 2005-11-03 Ellis Frampton E Iii Shoe sole structures
US7334356B2 (en) 1990-01-10 2008-02-26 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures
US7174658B2 (en) 1990-01-10 2007-02-13 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures
US20040250447A1 (en) * 1990-01-24 2004-12-16 Ellis Frampton E. Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US6609312B1 (en) 1990-01-24 2003-08-26 Anatomic Research Inc. Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US6748674B2 (en) 1990-01-24 2004-06-15 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US7082697B2 (en) 1990-01-24 2006-08-01 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US6115945A (en) * 1990-02-08 2000-09-12 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures with deformation sipes
US6763616B2 (en) 1990-06-18 2004-07-20 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures
US6295744B1 (en) * 1990-06-18 2001-10-02 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures
WO1991019429A1 (en) * 1990-06-18 1991-12-26 Ellis Frampton E Iii Shoe sole structures
US7546699B2 (en) 1992-08-10 2009-06-16 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures
US20080022556A1 (en) * 1992-08-10 2008-01-31 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures
US7647710B2 (en) 1992-08-10 2010-01-19 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures
US5384973A (en) * 1992-12-11 1995-01-31 Nike, Inc. Sole with articulated forefoot
US6055746A (en) * 1993-03-29 2000-05-02 Nike, Inc. Athletic shoe with rearfoot strike zone
US5425184A (en) * 1993-03-29 1995-06-20 Nike, Inc. Athletic shoe with rearfoot strike zone
US5625964A (en) * 1993-03-29 1997-05-06 Nike, Inc. Athletic shoe with rearfoot strike zone
US8732230B2 (en) 1996-11-29 2014-05-20 Frampton Erroll Ellis, Iii Computers and microchips with a side protected by an internal hardware firewall and an unprotected side connected to a network
US20070227043A1 (en) * 2003-08-06 2007-10-04 Hinten Deborah J Customized orthopedic shoe soles
US8561323B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2013-10-22 Frampton E. Ellis Footwear devices with an outer bladder and a foamed plastic internal structure separated by an internal flexibility sipe
US9642411B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2017-05-09 Frampton E. Ellis Surgically implantable device enclosed in two bladders configured to slide relative to each other and including a faraday cage
US8141276B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2012-03-27 Frampton E. Ellis Devices with an internal flexibility slit, including for footwear
US8205356B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2012-06-26 Frampton E. Ellis Devices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US8256147B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2012-09-04 Frampton E. Eliis Devices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US8291618B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2012-10-23 Frampton E. Ellis Devices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US9339074B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2016-05-17 Frampton E. Ellis Microprocessor control of bladders in footwear soles with internal flexibility sipes
US8494324B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2013-07-23 Frampton E. Ellis Wire cable for electronic devices, including a core surrounded by two layers configured to slide relative to each other
US20090199429A1 (en) * 2004-11-22 2009-08-13 Ellis Frampton E Devices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US8567095B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2013-10-29 Frampton E. Ellis Footwear or orthotic inserts with inner and outer bladders separated by an internal sipe including a media
US9271538B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2016-03-01 Frampton E. Ellis Microprocessor control of magnetorheological liquid in footwear with bladders and internal flexibility sipes
US20080083140A1 (en) * 2004-11-22 2008-04-10 Ellis Frampton E Devices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US8732868B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2014-05-27 Frampton E. Ellis Helmet and/or a helmet liner with at least one internal flexibility sipe with an attachment to control and absorb the impact of torsional or shear forces
US8873914B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2014-10-28 Frampton E. Ellis Footwear sole sections including bladders with internal flexibility sipes therebetween and an attachment between sipe surfaces
US8925117B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2015-01-06 Frampton E. Ellis Clothing and apparel with internal flexibility sipes and at least one attachment between surfaces defining a sipe
US8959804B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2015-02-24 Frampton E. Ellis Footwear sole sections including bladders with internal flexibility sipes therebetween and an attachment between sipe surfaces
US9107475B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2015-08-18 Frampton E. Ellis Microprocessor control of bladders in footwear soles with internal flexibility sipes
US9681696B2 (en) 2004-11-22 2017-06-20 Frampton E. Ellis Helmet and/or a helmet liner including an electronic control system controlling the flow resistance of a magnetorheological liquid in compartments
US9568946B2 (en) 2007-11-21 2017-02-14 Frampton E. Ellis Microchip with faraday cages and internal flexibility sipes
US8670246B2 (en) 2007-11-21 2014-03-11 Frampton E. Ellis Computers including an undiced semiconductor wafer with Faraday Cages and internal flexibility sipes
US8393028B2 (en) * 2009-04-23 2013-03-12 Nike, Inc. Method of manufacturing footwear having sipes
US20100269271A1 (en) * 2009-04-23 2010-10-28 Namkook Kim Method of Manufacturing Footwear Having Sipes

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