US2334534A - Teletypewriter - Google Patents

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US2334534A
US2334534A US467567A US46756742A US2334534A US 2334534 A US2334534 A US 2334534A US 467567 A US467567 A US 467567A US 46756742 A US46756742 A US 46756742A US 2334534 A US2334534 A US 2334534A
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cam
character
case
code
lever
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US467567A
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Kenneth E Ballweg
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AT&T Corp
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American Telephone and Telegraph Co Inc
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L21/00Apparatus or local circuits for mosaic printer telegraph systems
    • H04L21/04Apparatus or local circuits for mosaic printer telegraph systems at the receiving end

Description

Nov. 16, 1943. K. E. BALLWEG 2,334,534
' TELETYPEWRITER y Filed Deo. 2, 1942 4 sheets-sheet 1 Nav. 16, 1943. K, E, BALLWEG 2,334,534
TELETYPEWRITER f l Filed Dec. 2, i942 `4 sheets-sheet 2 Dpt Selector Start .Stop Cam -6178 .SpaceZever perating Cain-CD7 `Slant-Stop Zy cam CD6 5ba/lling Ey Cam -CD- End Haze JP,
Y'zmting .Zi'ey Cam- CD5 Fawctm Cam-B6 Space Function, Chin-5617 Blank,
Character Spacing (izm- 6177 INVENTOR Nov. 16, 1943. v
K. AE. BALLWEG TELETYPEWRITER Fiied nec. 2, 1942 Central .Roller Eeleases -Stm-t fly/nube Nd 1 Jhantz'ngZ o. 1 SIKCloses- 0.2 gnensJVaZ CR Set Sequence lf Operatzbns .2 KClases :270.3 pens No.3 6.3. 'et
170.3 61K. Clases -lV 4 Opens -lVa 4 GR Set Y 276. 4- .S KClases -JV 5 @pens -2V5 CB 'et W15 lfloses -5tart -top Shunt Keg @vens .Selector hmsl'ngage C'ode'ars Selector Cam, Epgages Selectwn Zey or l Fal/ation lever Function az'l perates ot Jelectorelese Qveraas Uwensat 217% C (uses akes One Revolution ar II'ow-Oat Operaties Character Spacz'nglever @ovales ase Irans er ATTORNEY Patented Nov. 1 6, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENT oFElcE 'rEnEmEwm'rEa Kenneth E. Ballweg, Portland, Oreg., assgnor to American Telephone and Telegraph Company, a corporation of New York ppncaunn December z, i942, semi No. 461.567
(ci. 11s-3o) 17 Claims.
. This invention relates to teletypewriters andV particularly to an improved form of teletypewriter in which, instead of using separate teletype bars or other typing devices for each letter or character, the letters or characters are all formed from a single printing block.
One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a teletypewriter unit having under certain conditions the following advantages: (1) simplified design at a favorable production cost; (2) high operating speed; (3) suitability forl use in systems designed for and .employing the present type of machines; .(4) capability of performing all functions of present types of machines; and (5) adaptability to mass production.
In order to accomplish these results the teletypewriter of the present invention is designed to operate upon the principle of electro-chemical action upon specially treatedpaper. It is well known that by passing an electrical current from one electrode through suitably prepared paper to another electrode, a discoloration will occur at the point on the paper where the current passes. By making the circular area of the electrode suiliciently small at its point of contact with the paper, a small dot can be produced thereon. y
From this it follows that if a number of insulated electrodes are grouped together in such a manner that their ends are all in contact with the pape`r, various patterns can be produced upon it by selectively energizing particular combinations of electrodes. A block of electrodes of this type can be used to produce all of the letters of the alphabet and other characters ordinarily used in printing telegraphy. a
In itsslmplest form the printing -block may consist of a large number of fine gauge wires suspended in an insulating plastic medium. That portion of the block which is in the position of contact with the paper is called the face and the opposite side is referred to as the terminal side. The ends of the wires on the face of the block constitute the electrodes. The electrical conductors used in the process of selecting the electrodes are connected to the terminals of the block appearing on its terminal side. The block face is of substantially the same size as that of the character to be formed on the paper. Preferably the terminal side of the block may be made of larger size to facilitate connections to the terminals projecting from it.
While any desired number of electrodes may be provided in the block it has been found by experiment that thirty-six dot forming electrodes give good results. Less than this number would decrease the legibility of the characters, while a larger number will give characters with a. higher grade of definition. The printing block, of course, displaces the type basket and associated parts used in present day teletypewriters.
The mechanism for selecting the proper dot positions and energizing them is somewhat more complicated than the printing block but is simpler than that used with existing teletypewriters employing type bars or type wheels for printing; 'I'he receiving mechanism -for performing these selectionsmust be capable of receiving standard line signals, which consist usually of five impulses of the Baudot code for character determination, preceded by a starting impulse and followed by a so-called stopping impulse. To enable use of the printer of the present invention in systems employing this code, the receiving mechanism consists of two main parts, an "interpreting unit"and a dot selector unit. Both of these units are mounted on and are driven by a main shaft which may in turn be driven by a synchronous motor.
The interpreting unit may consist of a series of cam disks. Certain of these disks are 4character determining disks controlling selecting keys or switches, and in cooperation with selecting code bars, determine the character to be printed. Others of these disks are function de-v termining disks and are selected to. control mechanismsproducing the so-called functions, such as line feed, carriagereturn, spacing, etc. Still other of these cams are not selectively operated, but selectively receive and distribute the received impulses o f each code combination, thereby controlling the selection of the character and function determining disks.
The dot selector unitbconsists of a lightweight cylinder made of insulating material. It is mounted to be freely rotated on the main shaft by a spring wound up by the shaft, so `that when released it completes its rotation at a speed higher than that of the shaft. Along the surface of this cylinder in lines parallel to its axis, rows of commutator bars may be mounted, a row of bars corresponding to each of the characters to be printed. For the usual alphabet of twentysix characters, if both upper case and lower case characters are to be printed, fifty-two rows of commutator bars would be required. For punctuation marks and other symbols additional rows of bars may be'necessary.. A number of wiper brushes are so arranged that theyl may make contact with the-rows'of commutator-bars, one
wiper corresponding to each of the points or dots of the printing block. These wipers may be selectivel operated by making contact with the live co utator bars in a selected row, and thus the electrodes of the printing block may be selectively activated to print any desired character.
Further features ofthe invention will be clear from the following detailed description, when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a plan view of the receiving mechanism, including the interpreting unit and dot selector unit; Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the interpreting unit; Fig". 3 is a Derspec' tive view of parts of the interpreting unit; Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the function bars of the interpreting unit; Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the commutator ring employed in connection with the dot selector unit; Figs. 6, 7 and 8 are schematic representations of certain of the cam disks and associated elements; Fig. 9 is a perspective view of the printing block; Fig. 10 is a schematic showing of the face of the printing block with certain electrodes energized to represent several different characters; Fig. 11 is a schematic layout of the arrangement of the electrodes in the printing block; Fig. 12 is a diagram or chart showing the sequences of operations of the interpreting unit and dot selector unit; and Fig. 13 is a diagram showing the electrical connections of the interpreting unit and dot selector unit. In the various drawings the various elements and parts are for .the most part shown schematically and symbolically without regard to dimensions and, in certain instances, without regard to the exact form and relative positions of the elements.
Printing block As already stated, the -printing block (which is shown-at PB in Fig. 9) may consist of thirtysix electrodes which are shown on the face of the printing block as black dots. Each of these electrodes is electrically connected to a terminal at the back of the block, the terminals being indicated in Fig. 9 as wires projecting from the back of the block. The electrodes may be laid out on the face' of the block in the conguration shown in Fig. 11 in six rows of six electrodes each. By selectively energizing certain of the electrodes various characters may be represented. .For example, in Fig. 10the energized electrodes are shown as black dots and non-energized electrodes as small circles. The four arrangements indicated in Fig. 10 represent the characters B, N, 3 and 5. It will be understood, of course, that in actual practice the printing block and elecassasss A ssn, and the shunt keys sx1 to am. naman.-
operating to' shunt the windings of the impulse magnets Mi to Ms, inclusive. Normally the startstop shunt key BK. is open so that the start-stop magnet SSM is bridged across the line, the windings of the several impulse magnets being shunted out by the corresponding shunt keys 8K1 to SKs, inclusive. Upon receiving the start impulse the release of the start-stop magnet armature permits the assembly of cam disks of the interpreting unit to start revolving.
This is accomplished as shown in Fig. l by means of a start-stop trip-oft latch SSL connected to the armature of the start-stop magnet SSM so that when the armature is released the latch SSL swings about its pivot to disengage a release latch RL (see Figs. l and 2) from a pro- Jection 2l on a control roller frame 22 which is pivoted to standards 2l and 24. The frame 22 is U-shaped and between the ends of the arms of the U it carries a control roller or bar 25 which normally rests against the edges of the selector cams to prevent the disks carrying said cams from rotating. When the trip-off latch SSL releases the control roller frame 22, the roller or bar 25 will be free to move vertically to release the cams.
The cam disks of the interpreting unit are arranged in three general groups. At the left in Figs. 1 are shown in order from left to right cam disks CD1 to CDs, which operate their switches or keys, however, in reverse order, disk CD1 opening its key SKs first and disk CD1 opening the key SK1 last. The impulse magnet shunt keys SK to SKi distribute to the corresponding magnets Ms to M1 the five impulses of the Baudot code trodes may be very much smaller than herein illustrated.
Interpreting unit The interpreting unit and the dot selecting unit and associated parts are shown in Fig. 1, the former being also shown in Fig. 2. Reference should also be made to Figs. 3 to 8, inclusive, and Fig. 13 for further illustration of some of the parts.
In receiving a line signal the start or open. circuit impulse releases the armature of a startstop magnet shown at SSM in Figs. 1 and 13. The winding of this magnet, as shown in Fig. 13, is in series with thewindings of the five code bar magnets designated M1, M2, Ma, M4 and Ms in Figs. l and 13. The windings of each of these six magnets are arranged to be shunted by shunt keys, the shunt key SK. shown in Figs. 1 and 13 being arranged to shunt the winding of magnet which follow the start impulse. To the right of these disks cam CDs operates the start-stop shunt key SKaclosing said key before key SKs opens, and opening it after key SKs closes. These six cams are followed by additional cams CD1, CDs and CD9 which, respectively, operate the character spacing mechanism of the printer, the release mechanism for the dot selector unit, and the code bar throwout lever TOL, as will be described later.
All nine of these disks are free to rotate on the main shaft MS but are mechanically so related that when they rotate they rotate together. Normally these nine disks do not rotate with the shaft since they are coupled together and mechanically attached to a blank disk BD, which in turn is arranged to rotate with a cam disk CD10. The latter cam is prevented from rotation by the engagement of the control roller or bar 25 with the edge of its cam until said bar is released by the start signal. The purpose of the cam disk CD10 is to control the universal key UK, as will be described later.
In actual practice the ten cam disks C1 to C10. inclusive, and the blank disk BD may be made either of separate disks, pinned or otherwise secured together, or they may be formed of a solid block of material with its surfaces suitably cut to form the desired cam surfaces. A suitable disk of friction material may be interposed as shown in Fig. l, between the end plate EF1 (which is fixed to and rotates' with the main shaft MS) and the cam block or group CD1 to CD10, inclusive. 'I'his frictional arrangement permits 'the cam block or group CD1 to CD10, inclusive, to remain stationary when the cam CD10 is held by the control roller or bar 25, even though the end plate EF1 rotates continuously. When, however, the control bar 25 is released by the deenergization of the start-stop magnet SSM in response to the starting impulsel as already described, the ten disks under discussion will rotate with the end plate EF1 due to the frictional engagement therewith. 'I'he end plate EF1 is, of course, spring pressed against the insulating disk and the block of ten cam disks above described.
The proper operation of the start-stop shunt key SK. and the impulse magnet shunt keys 8K1 to SKs, inclusive, is obtained by cutting recessed cam surfaces in the cam disks CD1 to CD6, inclusive. These recessed cam surfaces are so related to each other that normally the lug or other cam operated element carried by the start-stop key SK; will lie in the cam recess of disk CDe and hence the start-stop contact will be opened. As the cam disk CDs rotates in a counter clockwise direction key SK. is closed and the cam recess in the cam disk CD comes into play and permits the shunt key SKs to open. Upon further rotation the key SKs is closed and the cam recess in the disk CD4 permits the shunt key SK4 to open. As the rotation continues, the succeeding shunt keys SKs, SKz and SK1 are successively operated to open and then close. These operations take place during a rotation through about 260 degrees, as is indicated by the chart shown in Fig. 12. The successive operation of the shunt keys S'Ks to SK1 causes the selective operation of the corresponding impulse magnets M5 to M1, inclusive, depending upon whether the Baudot code impulses distributed by the shunt keys SKS to SK1 are marking or spacing impulses.
Letter determining cam disks The second group of cam disks consists of the character determining disks CD11, CD11, CDC, etc., all of which are cut alike and each of which has a single projecting cam, as is clearly shown in Figs. 2 and 8. 'I'he purpose of these projecting cams will appear later. Bearing in mind that rotation is counter-clockwise, normally the forward edge of each projecting cam rests against the control roller or bar 25 so that the disks are prevented from rotating. One cam disk is provided for each letter of the alphabet. Where punctuation marks and other symbols are included as lower case symbols, additional disks, corresponding in number to the punctuation marks or other characters to be printed the lower case or letters group, will be Aprovided unless no capital letters are arranged for, in which case the uppe case or figures position will be used for punctuation marks, numerals, etc.
These character determining disks are mounted upon the main shaft MS but are free therefrom and are separated from each other by friction washers as shown in Fig. 1. Consequently, when the disks are held by the control roller 25 they will remain stationary and will not rotate with the main shaft MS. When the control roller 25 is released, however, the frictional engagement between the disks and the end plates EP1 and EPz will cause them to rotate together. They continue rotating with the main Ashaft MS until their cams corne into engagement with the code bars, whereupon, as will be described later, they are held from further rotation until the code bars are released. The particular letters cam disk which is selected by a received code combination will be free to continue its rotation, however, due to the friction between its sides and the adjacent friction disks. 'Ihe friction disks are arranged to rotate with the main shaft MS at all times by being keyed or otherwis secured thereto.
Code bars In order to control the selection of a particular This enables the code bars as a group to be swung away from the cam disks by the action of a code bar throw-out lever TOL under the action of the cam CD9 as will be described later.
Code bar operating levers COL1 to COLs, inclusive, are provided one for each code bar and are operated by the armature of the impulse magnets M1 to Ms, inclusive.v Therefore, depending upon the Baudot code combination received, selected ones of the code bars will be shifted to the right in response to the operation of the masnets, so that the beveled edges of the code bars rest against the code bar reset wedge CBW. For example, as the impulse magnet keys SX1 to SK5 are successively opened, the opening of the key 5K1 enables the magnet M1 to operate the code bar CB1 if a marking impulse is received from the line at that moment. During the next inter- Aval the shunt key SK1 is closed and shunt key SK: is opened. If a spacing signal is received aligned. Hence the edges of the raised cams onV the rotating character determining cam disks will all come into engagement with the code bars and be prevented from further rotation. This occurs, as will be seen from the chart of Fig. l2, just after the start impulse and the live character selecting impulses have been received.
If, however, instead of a blank signal a character signal had been received, certain of the code bars would have been shifted to the right aspreviously described. This will result in an alignment of the notches of all five code bars in front of the cam disk to be selected. Consequently the selected cam disk will not be stopped because its projecting cam passes through the aligned notches in the bars. It therefore continues to rotate while the other cam disks are held stationary.
Each of the character determining cam disks is provided with a selection key as shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 13, these keys being designated SKa, SKC, etc. These keys are mounted on a selection key support 2l so that they are held just above the code bars. Consequently, when the raised cam of the selected cam disk passes through the aligned notches of the code bars it engages and closes the contacts of the selection key of the selected code disk. At the same time the cam disk CD10 will be rotating because its projecting cam' is not obstructed by the code bars. Hence it will close the universal key UK simultaneously with the closure of the selection key of the selected cam disk, as Will be described later. This establishes a selecting circuit to determine the character to be printed.
After the cam disk has been selected, the operations incident to the establishment of the se lectlng circuit just described take place during the further rotation of about 60 degrees as indicated by the chart of Fig. 12. During the lnterval after the Acode bars have been operated and the selecting circuit has been established the dot selector unit operates, as will be described later. At the end of this interval the cam of the disk CD passes beyond the universal key UK which now opens. At the same time the cam of the selected disk passes beyond its selection key which also opens. The simultaneous opening of these keys disestablishes the selecting circuit.
Just after the universal key UK opens and tie selection key of the selected disk opens, a projecting cam on the disk CD9 comes into play and operates the code bar throw-out lever TOL which, as will be clear from Figs. 1 and 2, swings the frame 26 carrying the code bars outwardly and away from the cam disks. Just before this occurs the unselected disks will all be held from rotation by the code bars, and they are somewhere between 30 and 60 degrees behind the selected disk at the instant the code bars swing outwardly. As the code bars swing outwardly the unselected cam disks are released and rotate with the selected cam disk although they are delayed with respect to it by the amount above indicated.
At the end of a complete rotation the edge of the cam of the selected disk engages the control roller or bar 25 (which was released at the end of the start impulse) and accordingly the selected disk comes to rest. During a short interval after the selected disk ceases rotating the unselected disks continue to rotate until the edges of their cams in turn encounter the control bar 25, whereupon they also come to rest. In other words, the unselected disks catch up with the selected disk during an interval following the last impulse of the Baudot code. This interval occurs while the sending station transmits the so-called stopping impulse which, as is well known, is a marking impulse.
Even if a starting impulse for a succeeding character selection should be transmitted before the unselected disks have caught up with the selected disk and come to rest, the fact that the disks are out of synchronism at the moment will cause no difiiculty. When the disk previously selected reaches the code bars it will either pass through o r be stopped, depending on whether it is again selected or whether it is not selected. If it is again selected it will function as already described. If some other cam disk is selected by the code bars, the previously selected disk will be stopped and the other cam disks (except the one now selected) will be stopped by the code bars. The selected cam disk Will in this case lag slightly behind the distributing disks CD1 to CDs, inclusive, and hence will pass through tion lever 28 is pivoted midway so that its kopposite end is depressed as the cam surface operates l the function lever and thus causes the function bar 29 to be depressed. The function bar is provided wlth a shoulder 3D which is thus brought 'to a level such that it will be engaged by the function bail 3| when the latter is operated by the function ball lever 32.
Each function cam disk is provided with an additional cam, herein referred to as the function bail cam, as shown at 33 in Fig. 7.
camis so arranged with respect to the main or This selecting cam 34 that it will come into engagement with-the function bail lever 32 just after the selecting cam 34 engages the function lever 28. Consequently the function bail 3| will be operatedI and, by engaging with the shoulder 30 of the function bar, will drive said bar to the left and away from the cam disk as shown in Fig.- 7. This movement of the function bar of course'occurs at the same relative point in the rotation of the interpreting unit as the selection of a character. lWhen the function bar is thus moved it operates through certain levers and other mechanisms to perform the various selected functions, .as will be described later. Further details of these function levers and mechanisms will be clear from a description of the operation of the machine which will be given hereinafter.
Dot selector the dot selector" to extend an electrical circuit the aligned notches of the code bars a little later than would otherwise be the case. Nevertheless it performs its function of establishing the desired selecting circuit when its cam comes in contact with its selection key SK.
Function determining cam disks passing through this key to the proper electrodes in the printing block PB to form the desired character pattern upon the paper.
The dot selector unit, as has already been explained, consists of a lightweight cylinder DSC of insulating material along whose surface in lines parallel lto its axis are mounted rows of commutator bars. The commutator bars are symbolically represented by the black horizontal lines in Fig. 1. Another symbolic representation appears in Fig.` 13 where the cylinder is made up of a set of disks having their edges recessed or notched at points where insulation appears in Fig. 1. The bars in Fig. 1 are all connected electrically common and, if both capital and small letters are to be printed, there will be two rows of bars for each letter, one corresponding to the lower case form of the letter and the other to its upper case form. There is also arow of commutator bars for each punctuation mark or other symbol in the lower case group and another row for each punctuation mark, gure or other symbol in the upper case group. Not only are the commutator bars in each row electrically common but the various rows of bars are also electrically connected together. If desired, the row of commutator bars corresponding to upper case letter S may be omitted if the combination corresponding to this character is to be used to operate a signal bell, as will be discussed later.
At one end of the cylinder DSC of the dot selecting unit is a spring drive 34 in the form of a helically coiled spring. One end of this spring is attached to one e'nd of the cylinder DSC and the other end is attached to a disk 35 which is frictionally engaged with another disk 33 mounted on the main shaft MS. The cylinder DSC is freely mounted on the main shaft MS and is normally heldfrom rotation by means of a dot selector start-stop lever DSL which engages a lug 31 on the cylinder. This lever DSL is mounted on a rotatable rod 33 at the other end of which is a lever 33. Lever 33 is arranged to be operated by a cam on the cam disk CDs to release the cylinder DSC so that it may rotate.
When the cylinder DSC is locked by engagement of the start-stop selector DSL with the lug 31, the plate 36 rotates with the main shaft MS and Africtionally drives plate 35 to wind up the spring 34 until the tension on the spring becomes great enough to cause the plate 35 toslip with respect to the plate 36. Thus at all times when the dot selecting cylinder DSC is stationary, the spring is tightly wound up. Consequently when the cylinder is released by thefoperation of the start-stop lever DSL (which, as seen from Fig. 12 occurs after about'260 degrees of rotation of the interpreting unit), the cylinder DSC will be rotated. Due to the tension of the spring drive 3l its movement will be so rapid that it will complete its rotation and come to rest by engagement of the lug 31 with the lever DSL, while the interpreting unit is rotating through an arc of only 30 degrees, as willbe seen from the chart or diagram of Fig. 12. The cylinder DSC is stopped by engagement of the lug 31 with startstop lever DSL, the cam of the disk CDs of the interpreting unit being so formed that said lever will fall back before the cylinder DSC completes its revolution.' y
At one end of the cylinder DSC are two pickup brushes PB1 and PB, the former being the lower case pick-up brush and the latter being the upper case pick-up brush. These two brushes are insulated from each other and are mounted on the cylinder DSC a distance apart which is determined by the number of rows of commutator bars on the cylinder DSC. Thus if there are 26 lower case symbols and an equal number of upper case symbols to be printed the brushes will be separated by one-fifty-second part of a circle or by 6.92 degrees. commutator bars is used, as will be the case where punctuation marks, figures, etc. are provided for in addition to capital and small letters, the two pick-up brushes will be correspondingly closer.
These two pick-up brushes are connected .to the poles of the case transfer switch CTS mounted on the end of the cylinderDSC, opposite the spring drive.- The center pole of this switch is connected to the common conductor connecting all of the commutator bars of the cylinder DSC. This center pole may be shifted from one contact of switch CTS to the other by the case transfer ring CTR. Ring CTR has a tapered cylindrical surface, and when moved to the right will force the center'pole of the switch from its upper to its lower contact. The purpose of this arrangement will become apparent in connection with the description of the operation of the machine.
The pick-up brushes PBi and PB wipe against the segments of the internal commutation ring CR, shown in more detail in Fig. 5. This commutation ring surrounds the end of the cylinder DSC and has an internal diameter slightly .greater than that of the cylinder. The commutator ring has one conducting segment for each two rows Ii.' a larger number of rows ofv of commutator bars on the cylinder DSC. In other words, for each lower case row of commutator bars and its associated upper case row of commutator bars there is one segment in the commutator ring. For example, if the vcylinder has fifty-two rows of commutator bars there will be twenty-six conducting segments of equal width in the commutator ring CR.. Each of the convducting. segments of the commutator` ringy is con'- ducted through cabling to one of the selection keys SK., SK, SKs, etc., of the interpreting unit.
Mounted on a base parallel to the dot selector cylinder DSC is a strip 40 carrying thirty-six wiper brushes as shown in Figs. 1 and 13. These brushes are designated WBi to WBas, inclusive, and correspond to the electrodes of the printing block respectively numbered from 1 to 36 in Fig. 1l. Various ones of these wiper brushes will be energized, depending upon which one of the rows of commutator bars on the dot selecting cylinder is selected by the energized segments of the internal commutation-ring CR and its associated pick-upbrush.
Printing operation Suppose it is desired to print the lower case letter b and that at some previous time the code combination for lower case printing has been received, so that the case transfer ring CTR. of the dot selecting unit is in its normal position as shown in Fig. 1. The various disks on the interpreting unit willbe held from rotation by means of the control bar or roller 25. Likewise the dot selector cylinder DSC will be held from rotation by the dot selector start-stop lever DSL, which iscontrolled by the cam disk CD8 of the interpreting unit. When the interpreting unit is atrest the shunt key SK! is held open and the magnet SSM is energized until such time as a starting impulse is received. If now a starting impulse followed by ve code determining impulses comes in over line L in Fig. 13, the 'starting impulse which is a spacing or no-current signal, will cause the release of the start-stop magnet SSM.
When the magnet releases its armature the lever SSL controlled by said armature removes the releasing latch RL from the detent 2| of the frame 22, so that the control bar or roller 25 is now free to rise. The pressure of the cams on the cam disks, which have heretofore been held against the frictional torque supplied by the main shaft MS, will forcebar 25 to rise, releasing the cam diskv CD10, together with the character determining cam disks CDs, CDD, CDC, etc., and the seven function determining cam disks, so that they all commence to rotate together. The cams CD1 to CD9, inclusive, are mechanically coupled to the disk ICD10 which was released by the operation of the trip off. latch SSL, and hence rotate with the other disks.
The cam disk CDs as it rotates closes the startstop shift key SK; and at the same time the cam CD5 opens the impulse magnet shunt key SK so that the impulse magnet M5 is conditioned to receive the rst character forming impulse oi' the Baudot code (see chart of Fig.v 12). If this impulse is a marking impulse the magnet Ms will operate the lever COLs to shift the'code bar CBs to the right until it engages the code bar wedge CBW. If the No. 1 impulse is a spacing. impulse the magnet M will remain deenergized.
Let us assume the code combination received is that for the character lb, which is Startmark-space-space-mark-markstop. Ther rst character determining impulse will be a .marking impulse and the code bar CB will be shifted to the right. The shunt key SK5 now closes and the cam disk CD4 opens the shunt key SKl to receive the second character determining impulse. This is a spacing impulse so the magnet M4 is not operated. As the cam disks continue their rotation, cam disks CD3, DC2 and CD1 successively open their corresponding shunt contacts so that after about 260 degrees of rotation the condition is that magnets M5, M2 and M1 have been operated and magnets M4 and Ma have not been operated. The code bars actuated by the operated magnets are accordingly shifted to the right. The cam in the disk CDs is so cut that as the shunt key SKs closes, the startstop shunt SKS is again opened. Hence the marking stop impulse which follows the last Baudot impulse energizes the start-stop magnet SSM to latch the detent 2l and hold the control bar 25 in its4 lowered position.
By this time the cam disks have rotated through about 260 degrees (see Fig. 12) and the edges of their projecting cams, with the exception of that of the selected cam disk, come into engagement with the'code bars and cease rotating. The 'code bars are now so set that the notches opposite the cam disk corresponding to letter B are in alignment. The cam of this disk passes through the aligned notches and operates selection key SKb. At the same time the cam disk CD10, whose cam is not obstructed by the code bars. closes the universal key UK. This completes a circuit (see Fig. 13) from positive battery, over the closed contact of the universal key UK, and over the closed contact of the selection key SKb. to the corresponding segment of the internal commutator ring SC. This circuit remains closed for a period long enough to permit the dot selector cylinder DSC to complete one full revolution, as will now be described.
It will be noted that the group of cams CD1 to CD10, inclusive, are not stopped by the code bars and hence continue to rotate together. lTherefore, shortly after the circuit is closed as above described the cam disk CDs operates the lever 39. This causes the dot selector start-stop lever DLS to disengafze the lug 3l, thus permitting the dot selector cylinder DSC to rotate rapidly in a counterclockwise direction under the impulsion of the spring drive 34. Bearing in mind that a circuit has been established to a segment of the commutator ring CR corresponding to the letter b, and that the center pole of the case transfer switch CTS is in contact with the terminal connected to the lower case pick-up brush PB1, it will be evident that when the commutator brush PB1 comes in contact With the activated segment of the commutator ring CR the circuit previously traced will be extended as follows: from the activated commutator bar. over the lower case pickup brush PB1, to the center pole of theswitch CTS. and thence to the common electrical connection for'all of the rows of commutator bars on the dot selecting cylinder DSC.
No circuit will beextended over the upper case pick-up brush PB when'it passes over the activvated segment of the commutator ring CR, be-
cause the center pole of the case transfer switch 1 CTS is in such position that the connection to the `lower case pick-up brush is open. Only the lower case pick-up brush PB1 is eifective, and hence during the moment the pick-up brush PB1 passes over the activated segment of the internal commutator ring, the row of commutator bars on the cylinder DSC corresponding to lower case letter b will be in contact with the wiper brushes WB1 to WBaG, inclusive. Consequently, such of the wiper brushes as make contact with the live segments of this row will be activated to in turn activate the electrodes of the printing block PB to which they are connected.
The circuit which completes the printing operation may now be traced in Fig. 13 as follows: from positive battery, over the actuated universal key UK, actuated selection key SK to the activated segment b of commutator ring CR, over lower case brush PB1, over the center pole and lower case contact of case transfer switch CDS, over the common cond tor to the various segments of the dot selecti g cylinder` DSC, thence from live segments in the row of segments corresponding to the letter b over such of the wiper brushes of the group WB1 to WBas as are in contact with live segments, over individual conductors to the corresponding electrodes of the printing block PB, and nnally through the paper to the bus bar BB and to negative battery. The circuit above traced causes the lower case letter b to be chemically imprinted upon the paper.
As already stated, a complete rotation of the dot selector cylinder just traced takes place during about 30 degrees of vthe rotation of the interpreting unit, and the establishment of the printing current occurs momentarily during this interval, asl will be clear from Fig. 12. At the end of this 30 degree period the universal key UK opens and breaks the printing circuit above traced. However, this circuit has already been broken by the pick-up brush PB1 passing off the line segment of the commutator ring CR.. Also the cam on .the cam disk CD9 is so cut that continued rotation of the shaft brings the hump of the cam against the code bar throwout lever TOL at approximately the same instant key UK opens. i The operation of this lever forces the code bars CB1 to CBs, inclusive, outward from the cam assembly and releases all of the determining cams, which now rotate through the medium of their driving frictional contact with the friction washers which are keyed to the main shaft. The outward throw of the code bar assembly forces thediagonal ends of the code bars against the code bar reset wedge CBW, thus restoring them to their normal or space position,
The rotation of the selected cam CDs is meanwhile arrested by its angular face coming in contact with the control bar 25 which was restored to' its locking position at the endof the start impulse. The remaining cam disks catch up with the selected cam disk while the stopping impulse is being received, this being a marking impulse following the last character impulse of the Baudot code. Upon completing their rotation the non-selected cam disks also come to rest against the control bar 25, and the whole mechanism is now ready to receive the code combination for another character.
It will be noted that the unselected cam disks, in passing from the position Where they were held by the code bars to their stop position, also contact their individual ,selection keys SKa, SKC, etc.. However, no circuit is completed as the result of this action, because the universal key UK is connected in series with all of the selection keys andfhaving cleared its cam, is now open.
Character spacing After each character is printed it is necessary to automatically move the printing block PB and completed its revolution'.
the platen P relative to each other so that there will be a space between the character which has just been printed and the next character to be printed. Character spacing is provided for in accordance with the present invention by a space operating lever` SOL (see Figs. l and 3). This lever is engaged by the high part of the cam disk CD7 just after the dot selector cylinder DSC has This, of course, occurs shortly before the interpreting unit completes its revolution, as will be clear from the chart of Fig. 12. The motion of the spaceoperating lever SOL is communicated through a spring 4I to a lever 42 which is attached to the,end of the space operating shaft SOS and rotates the. same through a slight arc, thereby causing the space operating arm SOA to engage a shoulder 43 on the space function bar SFB.
The space function bar SFB is therefore moved in a direction away from the cam disk SCD. Consequently, it strikes the spacing pawl bar SPB, causing the latter to engage a toothkof the spacing ratchet SR and advance said ratchet one tooth. The spacing ratchet SR is arranged l to move the paper carriage and printing block with respect to each other by means of a rack and pinion assembly and a rotatable shaft (not shown), the spacing ratchet and pinion being mounted on said shaft, as is well known in the art. If preferred, of course, the spacing ratchet may be connected through any other suitable known mechanism to produce a relative shift between the printing block PB and platen P. Thus the printing block PB is automatically advanced one step along the platen just after each character is printed unless this action is prevented, as will appear later.
Word spacing Spacing between words in teletype systems is accomplished, as is well known, by sending a special Baudot code signal. In the receiver lof the present invention the code bars CDBi to CDBs, inclusive, are set so that in `response to this "spacing code the space cam disk SCD (see Fig. 3) isy selected instead of one 0f the character determining cam disks. The disk SCD carries two cams, 44 and 45, so related to each other that when the cam 44 passes through the aligned notchesiof the code bars, the cam 45 will strike the space bail lever 46, which in turn drives the space bail 4l to the left in Fig. 3. Just before this occurs the cam 44 engages the space function lever 48 at its right hand end, thereby causing its left-hand end to press the space function bar SFB downwardly. Consequently its shoulder 49 is engaged by the lever 41 to drive the space function bar in a direction Space blocking As the space operating lever SOL operates with every revolution of the cam assembly, regardless of whether a character selection or a function selection is taking place, it is necessary to block the resulting spacing action during the other function operations such as carriage return, line feed, etc. The means for accomplishing this result is illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4. Referring particularly to Fig. 4, it will be seen that each of the function bars BFB, LFB, etc.. except the space function bar SFB, is provided with a graduated cam such as 50 on its upper surface. This cam engages a space blocking 1e- 'ver SBL, thus raising it up so that it is interposedin the path of the space blocking arm v SBA which is carried on the space operating shaft SOS (see Fig. 3).
Consequently the space blocking arm SBA cannot be moved from right to left in Fig. 3, and hence the space operating shaft SOS cannot be rotated to operate-the space function bar SFBV when the cam on the cam disk CD1 engages the space operating lever SOL. The motion of the space `operating lever SOL is taken up by the spring 4| andno spacing operation takes place. While Fig. 3 illustrates the space blocking operation in connection with the blank function, the same action takes place in connection with any of the other functions. For example, if the bell function bar BF is operated, spacing is blocked,
and the same holds true for all of the other function bars except the space function bar SFB itself.
- Upper and lower case functions The formation of upper and lower case patterns is determined by the position of the case transfer switch CTS, shown particularly yin Figs. 1 and 13,. The commutator rows on the dot selector cylinder DSC are arranged in such a manner that the row for the upper case of any given character makes contact with the wiper brushes WB; to WBas, inclusive, a short period after the corresponding lower case commutator row makes contact with said brushes. For example, if the dot selector cylinder` DSC is arranged for only twenty-six characters itwill have fifty-two commutator rows and each upper case row will be separated from the lower case row byy an arc of 6.92 degrees. Selection of the upper case dot pattern instead of the lower case patf tern is obtainedby routing the circuit through the upper case pick-up brush PB, which will make contact with the energized segment of the commutator ring 6.92 degrees later in the cycle, at which time the upper case row of segments on the cylinder DSC, instead of the lower case row for the desired character, will be in contact with the Wiper brushes. The circuit through the lower case pick-up brush PBi will, of course, be open andno circuit will be Acompleted through the lower case row of character determining segments on the cylinder DSC.
In order to shift from the lower case to the upper case the figures c-r upper case" Baudet code signal will be sent. When this code is received by the printer herein disclosed, it will operate the flgures" cam disk which, in accordance with the arrangements illustrated in Fig.
7, will cause the figures function bar FFB of Fig. 1 to be operated. This bar operates a lever 5I which in turn operates the T-shaped lever 52 to The Contact, thereby preparing the circuit through the upper case pick-up brush PBu. The lever system is held in shifted position by a detent 55 having a roller bearing against the round end of the T-shaped lever 52. Consequently, when the upper case signal has been received, upper...
case characters will be printed until .a shift is made to lower case printing.l
This is done by receiving the so-called letters or lower case code combination which selects the lower case cam disk, and through mechanism similar to that shown in Fig. 7 operates the letters function bar LFB. This bar engages a lever 56 which operates on the opposite end of the cross bar of the T lever 52, thus'shifting the vertical bar of the T lever to the right and causing the case transfer ring CTR to be shifted to the left on the main shaft MS. This releases the center pole of the case transfer switch CTS which shifts back to its lower case contact and prepares the circuit to the lower Case pick-up brush PBI. Consequently, character selecting codes received after this operation will cause lower case printing.
Carriage return function When the code combination for the carriage return" function is received the carriage return" function bar CRF in Fig. 1 strikes a pivoted lever 51 which acts through a link 58 to withdraw the space retaining pawl SRP from engagement with the teeth of the spacing ratchet SR. This movement of the space retaining pawl operates through a link 59 and a lever 60 to throw the spacing pawl bar SPB outwardly away from the 'spacing ratchet SR. The spacing ratchet is thus momentarily freed and starts to rotate in a clockwise direction because of the tension exerted upon it by `the carriage return spring (not shown). Since the pressure of the carriage return function bar CRF is applied to the lever 51 to accomplish. the results just referred to for only a brief period of time, the pawls SPB and SRP would almost immediately fall back into engagement with the spacing ratchet SR, were it not for the action of the carriage return lockout lever CRL. This lever is mounted on the carriage control shaft CCS between friction disks or collars such as FC. Therefore, at the time of the start of the clockwise rotation of the shaft, the carriage return lockout lever CRL is also turned in a clockwise direction, causing one of its outward ends to engage the spacing pawl bar SPB and hold it in its outward position, disengaged from the ratchet SR. The other end of the carriage return lockout bar CRL is connected through a pawl release link 6I to the outer end of the space retaining pawl SRP to hold it disengaged from the spacing ratchet. Consequently, the tension applied to the carriage control shaft CCS causes it to rotate in a clockwise direction until the entire mechanism is reset to its normal condition. The limits of travel for the carriage return lockout lever CRL are 'determined by the adjustable stop pins 62 and 53 on either side of the lever.
Bell function If the machine is in the upper case condition following the reception of the figures or upper case code combination, the reception of a code combination corresponding to some particular *character may be caused to operate a signal bell.
Let us suppose that the code combination corresponding lto the letter S is to be used for this purpose. The cam disk which causes lower case printing of the letter S in response to this code combination is in such case provided with a function lever such as that shown at 28 in Fig. 7, and this lever operates the bell fuction bar BF shown in Fig. l. This in turn operates the lever 64 which acts through the bell operate lever BOL to ring the bell G5. When the letter S code combination is used for this purpose, said letter will not be printed when the bell is rung, because the commutator row on the dot selector cylinder DSC for upper case S will be left blank, and hence no circuit will be completed through the wiper brushes WBi to WBas inclusive.
While the machine is in lower case condition, operation of the bell is prevented in response to this particular code combination by means of the bell function blocking bar BBB, one end of which engages in a notch in the bell operating lever BOL. When the figures function bar FFB is operated as previously described, it actuates the bell crank lever 5I to withdraw the bell function blocking bar BBB from engagement, with the bell operating lever BOL, so that it can ring the bell. The bell operating lever BOL is provided with a relief spring 56 so that when it is engaged by the bell function blocking bar BBB and the bell function bar BF is operated in response to the code combination for lower case letter s, the spring will take up the motion applied to the lever BOL by the bell function bar BF and the bell will not ring.
Line feed function In response to the code combination for line feed, line `feed function bar LFF is operated.. This actuates the lever 61 shown in Fig. 1 to operate the .pawl 68 shown in Fig. 13, through the rod 68 to advance the pawl to a new tooth of the ratchet 10. 'I'he pawl 68 when released moves upwardly and operates on the ratchet 10 to advance the platen P and the paper carried by it to a new line.
Blank function When so-called blank code combinations are received, all ve of the Baudet impulses are spacing impulses, and consequently none of the code bars CB1 to CBs are shifted. This causes one of the cam disks BCD (see Fig. 3) to operate the blank function bar BFB. The operation of this bar actuates the space blank lever SBL in a manner previously described, thereby preventing the character spacing cam CD1 from actuating the space operating shaft SOS. Consequently, during the reception of blank signals no spacing operation takes place. No printing operation will take place because the cam disk BCD does not actuate any selection key.
The operation of the blank function bar BFB may, if desired, act through a lever 1l to actuate a rod 12 which operates a bell crank lever 13 to move the link 14. When this link is operated two or more times in response to the reception of two or more blanksignals. it may operate in a well known manner, just as in the case of teletype machines now used, to lock out the sender associated with the receiving printer. Therefore, if the operator is sending to the distant station, and the operator at the distant station throws his break key so that thel line is in effect opened, successive blank signals will be received on the local printer. `These cause the lever 14 to lock out the local sender so that the distant station can transmit. The details whereby this vention. l Orientation magnet shunt keys SK; to SKs. inclusive, are
mounted on an orientation arm Il` as shown in Fig. 6, which maybe adjusted 'along the curved rod 18 to shift the position ofthese switches with respect to the start stop shunt key SKa.
As the position oi' the latter shunt key is ilxed,
any change of the position of the arm 'll will alter the time interval at which the impulse magnets M1 to Ms, inclusive, are thrown across the line.
While this invention has been disclosed in certain specific arrangements which are deemed desirable, it will be obvious that the general principles herein'disclosed may be embodied in many other organizations, widely different from those illustrated, without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the appended claims.
What is claimed is: 'y
l. In a reproducting system, a single reproducing element having a plurality of electrodes distributed over an area at diierent coordinate points thereof, means to selectively produce electrical activation of different combinations of said electrodes in accordance with different preconceived patterns, all utilizing electrodes in the same area and transmitted by groups of successive pulses, each group being less in number than the activated electrodes of a given pattern, said patterns involving electrodes at a plurality of points some of which are located with respect to each other at different distances from both coordinate axes of said area, a sheet upon which said patterns may be produced, means to cause current to pass through said sheet simultaneously from each of the selectively activated electrodes representing a given complete pattern to reproduce on said sheet the selected pattern in accordance with which said electrodes are selectively activated. and means to produce relative movement between said reproducing element and said sheet after each pattern has been reproduced, so that said successive patterns will be reproduced at different points on said sheet.
2. In a reproducing system, means to successively receive different groups of code impulses representing a plurality of patterns to be reproduced, a, single reproducing element having a plurality of electrodes distributed over an area at diiierent coordinate points thereof exceeding in number the code impulses representing a pattern, means controlled by said successive groups o! code impulses to selectively produce electrical activation of different combinations of said electrodes in accordance with the diiIerent patterns all utilizing 'electrodes in the same area, said patterns involving electrodes at a plurality of points some oi' which are located with respectl to each other at different distances from both coordinate axes of said area, a sheet upon which said patterns may be reproduced. means to cause `current to pass through said she'et simultaneaccordance with which said selectrodes are selectively activated, and means to produce relative movement between said reproducing element and said sheet after each pattern has been reproduced, so that said successive patterns will be reproduced at diillerent points on said sheet.
3. In a reproducing system, means to receive a group of code impulses representing a pattern to be reproduced, a reproducing element having a plurality of electrodes distributed over an area,
means controlled by saidv group oi code impulses to select a determining element corresponding to the pattern to be reproduced, means to electrically activate various combinations of said electrodes in accordance with the pattern to be reproduced, means controlled by said determining element to determine the combination vof said electrodes to be activated, and means to cause current to Ipass from said activated electrodes through a sheet to reproduce the pattern corresponding to the activated group of electrodes.
4. In a reproducing system, means to successively receive different groups oi code impulses representing a plurality of patterns to be reproduced, a reproducing element having a plurality of electrodes distributed over an area, means controlled by each group of impulses to select a determining element corresponding to a pattern to be reproduced, means to electrically activate various combinations of said electrodes in accordance with the pattern to be reproduced, means controlled by the selected determining element to determine the combinations of said electrodes to be activated, a sheet upon which selected patterns may be reproduced, means to cause current to pass from said activated electrodes through said sheet to reproduce on said sheet the successive patterns in accordance with which said electrodes are activated, and means to produce relative movement between said reproducing element and said sheet after each pattern has been reproduced, so that said successive patterns will be reproduced at different points on said sheet.
5. In a reproducing system, means to successively receive diil'erent groups of code impulses representing a plurality of patterns to be reproduced, a plurality of conductors leading to a plurality of points distributednover'an area, means controlled by each group of impulses to select a determining element corresponding to a pattern to be reproduced, means to electrically activate various combinations of said conductors in accordance with diierent patterns to be reproduced, means controlled by the selected determining element to determine the combinations of said conductors to be activated, and means to successively reproduce the patterns determined by successive combinations of activated conductors upon a surface so that they will be visible thereon.
6. In a reproducing system, receiving means to successively receive groups oi.' code-impulses certain of which represent characters to be reproduced, a reproducing elementy having a plurality of electrodes distributed over an area, a translating devicehaving a determining element for each character to be reproduced, means controlled by each group o! impulses representing a character to select a determining element corresponding to the character represented by said group, a ,selectingl device having separate activating mechanisms, -each activating mechanism being arranged' to electrically activate said electrodes in diierent combinations one corresponding to each of said characters, means opcrating upon the selection of a determining element of said translating device and under the control thereof to select the activating mechanism of said selecting device corresponding to the character represented by the received group of impulses, said selected activating mechanism thereupon functioning to activate the corresponding combination of said electrodes, a sheet upon which selected 4character may be reproduced, and means to cause current to pass from said activated electrodes through said sheet to reproduce on said sheet the selected characters.
'1. In a reproducing system, receiving means to successively receive groups of code impulses certain of which represent lower case characters to be reproduced,l a reproducing element having a plurality of electrodes distributed over an area. a translating device having a determining element for each lower case character to be reproduced, means controlled by each group of impulses representing a character to select a determining element corresponding to the character represented by said group, a selecting device having separate activating mechanisms, each activating mechanism being arranged to electrically activate said electrodes in different combinations, certain of lsaid mechanisms being assigned to lower case characters, and other of said combinationsv being assigned one to each corresponding upper case character, means operating upon the selection of a determining element of said translating device and under the control thereof to prepare a connection to the pair of activating mechanisms corresponding respectively to the lower case and uppercase characters represented by the received group of impulses, means to determine whether said connections will be completed to the activating mechanism corresponding to the lower case character or to that corresponding to the upper case character, the activating mechanism to which the connection is completed thereupon functioning to activate the corresponding combination of said electrodes, a sheet upon which selected character may be reproduced, and means to cause current to pass from said activated electrodes through said sheet to reproduce on said sheet the selected characters.
8. In a reproducing system, receiving means to successively receive groups of code impulses certain of which represent characters to be reproduced, a reproducing element having a plurality of electrodes distributed over an area, a translating device having a determining element for each character to be reproduced, means controlled by each group of impulses representing a character to select a determining element corresponding to the character represented by said group,
ya. selecting device `having separate activating mechanisms, each activating mechanism being arranged to electrically activate said electrodes in different combinations one corresponding' to each of said characters, means operating upon the selection of a determining element of said translating device and under the control thereof to select the activating mechanism of said selecting device corresponding to the character represented by the received group of impulses, said selected activating mechanism thereupon functioning to activate the corresponding combination of said electrodes, a sheet upon which selected .character may be reproduced, means to cause current to pass from said activated elecsheet the selected characters, said receiving means also receiving groups o1' impulses corresponding to various functions such as spacing, line feed, etc., and said translating device also having a function determining element for each of said functions, said function determining elements when selected operating the corresponding function mechanisms.
9. In a reproduicng system, receiving means to successively receive groups of code impulses certain of which represent lower case characters to be reproduced, a reproducing element having a plurality of electrodes distributed over an area, a translating device having a determining element for each lower case character to be reproduced, means controlled by each group of impulses representing a character to select a determining element corresponding to the character represented by said group, a selecting device having separate activating mechanisms, each activating mechanism being arranged to electrically activate said electrodes in different combinations, certain of said mechanisms being assigned to lower case characters, and other of said combinations being assigned one to each corresponding upper case character, means operating upon the selection of a determining element of said translating device and under the control thereof to prepare a connection to the pair of activating mechanisms corresponding respectively to lthe lower case and upper case characters represented by the received group of impulses, means to determine whether' said connections will be completed to the activating mechanism corresponding to the lower case character or to that corresponding to the upper case character, the activating mechanism to which the connection is completed thereuponl functioning to activate the corresponding combination of said electrodes, a sheet upon which selected character may be reproduced, means to cause current to pass from said activated electrodes through said sheet to reproduce on said sheet the selected characters, said receiving means trodes through said sheet to reproduce on said 76 also receiving groups of impulses corresponding to various functions such as spacing line feed, etc., and said translating device also having a function determining element for each of said functions said function determining elements when selected operating the corresponding function mechanisms.
10. In a reproducing system, receiving means to successively receive groups of code impulses certain of which represent characters to be reproduced, a reproducing element having a plurality of character forming units distributed over an area, a translating device having a rotatable character determining cam for each character to be reproduced, means controlled by each group of impulses representing a character to select a cam corresponding to the character represented by said group, a selecting device having a plurality of different sets of activating elements each arranged to activate a corresponding combination of said character forming units, means operating on the selection of a cam and under the control thereof to select the set of activating elements of said selecting device corresponding to the character represented by the received group of impulses, said selected set of activating elements thereupon functioning to activate the corresponding combination of said .character forming units, a sheet upon which selected characters may be reproduced, and means to cause said activated character forming units to form a character on said sheet. i
amm
irmamreeeivuumuu' to ely receive swaps of code impubl certainofwhich representlowercasecharactcrsto be reproduced, a reproducing element lmving aplucombination of said character forming units, certain of said sets of activating' elements being `assigned to lower case characters, and others being assigned one to each corresponding upper case character,- means operating onthe selection of a cam and under the control thereof to preselect the two sets of activating elements corresponding respectively to the lowercase and upper case characters represented by the received group of impulses, means to determine a final selection between said upper case and lower case sets of activating elements, said selected set of activating elements thereupon functioning to activate the corresponding combination of said character forming units, a sheet upon which selected characters may be reproduced, and means tov cause said activated character forming units to form a character on said sheet. l
12. In a reproducing system-'receiving means to successively receive groups of code impulses certain of which represent characters to be reproduced, a reproducing element having a plurality of character forming imits distributed over an area, a translating device having a rotatable character determining cam for each character to be reproduced. means-controlled by each group of impulses representing a character to select a cam corresponding to the character representedv by said group, a selecting device having a plurality of diii'erent sets of activating elements each arranged to activate a corresponding combination of said character forming units, means operating on the selection of a cam and under the control thereof to select the set of activating elements ofsaid selecting device corresponding to the character represented by the received group of impulses, said selected-set of activating elements thereupon functioning to activate the corresponding combination of said character forming units, a sheet upon which selected characters may be reproduced, means to cause said activated character forming units to form. a character on saidr sheet, said receiving Vmeans also receiving groups of impulses corresponding to various functions such as "spacing," line feed.
etc., and said translating device also having fimction determining cams in addition to said character determining cams, said function determining cams when selected operating the correspondingfunction mechanisms.
13. In a reproducing system, receiving means to successively receive groups of code impulses certain of which represent lower case characters to be reproduced, a reproducing element having a plurality of lcharacter forming imits dis--Y tributed over an area, a translating device having a rotatable character determining cam for each lower case character to be reproduced, means controlled by each group of impulses representingacharactertoselectacamcorrespondingtothecharacterrepresenfedbysaidgroup, a selecting device ,having a plurality of diiferimt sets of activating elements eacharranged to actinte a combinationl oi said char.- acter forming units, certain of'said sets of aciivating elements being assigned to lower `case clmracters, andy others being assigned lone to cach ding upper case character, means operatingontheselection ofacamandunder the control thereof to preselcct the two sets of activating elements corresponding respectively to the lower case and upper case characters represented by the received group of` impulses, means to determine a ilnal selection between said upper case and lower case sets of activating elements, said selected set of activating elements thereupon functioning to activate the corresponding combination of said character forming units, a sheet upon which selected characters may be reproduced, means to cause said activated character forming umts to form a character on said sheet, said receiving means also receiving groups of impulses corresponding to various functions such as spacing, line feed, etc., and said translating device also having function determining cams in addition yto said character determining cams, said function determining cams when selected operating the corresponding function mechanisms.
14.. In a reproducing system, receiving means to successively receive groups of code impulses certain of which represent characters to be reproduced, a reproducing elementV having `a plurality oi character forming units distributed over an area, a translating device having a rotatable cam for each character to be reproduced, means controlled by each group of impulses represent-A ing a character to select a cam corresponding to the character represented by said group, said means permitting the selected cam to continue rotating while preventing rotation of the nonselected cams, a. rotatable selecting device having a plurality of different sets of activating elements, each arranged to activate a diiferent combination of said character forming units, means to release said selecting device for rotation while said non-selected cams are prevented from rotation, means operated by the selected cam to select the set ofv activating elements in said rotating selecting device corresponding to the character represented by the received group of impulses, said selected set of activating ele-k ments thereupon functioning to activate the cor-` responding combination of said character forming units after which the selecting device ceases rotating, a sheet upon which selected characters maybe reproduced, means to cause said activated character forming units to form a character on said sheet, and means to release the non-selected cams and restore them to normal.
15. In a reproducing system. receiving means to successively receive groups of code impulses certain of which represent lower case characters to be reproduced, a reproducing element having a plurality of character forming units distributed over an area, a translating device having a ro- .tatabie cam for each lower case character to be reproduced, means controlled by Veach group of impulses representing a character to select a cam corresponding to the character represented by said group, said means permitting the se'- lected cam to continue rotating while preventing rotation of the non-selected cams, a rotatable selecting device having a plurality of different sets of activating elements, each arranged'to activate a diilerent combination of said character forming units, certain of said sets of Yactivating and others being `assigned one to 'each corresponding upper case character, means to release said selecting device for rotation while said nonselected cams are prevented from rotation, means operated by the selected cam lto preselect the two sets of activating elements corresponding respectively to the lower case and upper oase characters represented 'by the received group of impulses, means to determine a final selection between said upper case and lower case sets of activating elements, said selected set 'of activating elements thereupon functioning to activate the corresponding combination of said character forming units after which the selecting device ceases rotating, a sheet upon which selected characters may be reproduced, means to cause said activated character forming units to form a character on said sheet, and means to release the non-selected cams and restore them to normal.
16. In a reproducing system, receiving means to successively receive groups of code impulses certain of which represent characters to be reproduced, aA reproducing element having a plurality of character forming units distributed over an area, a translating device having a rotat-` able cam for each character to be reproduced, means controlled by each group of impulses representing a character to select a cam corresponding to the character represented by-said group, said means permitting the selected cam to contlnue rotating While preventing rotation of the non-selected cams, a rotatable selecting device having a plurality of dlilerent sets of activating elements, each arranged to activate a diierent combination of said character forming umts, means to release said selecting device for rotation while said non-selected cams areprevented from rotation, means operated by the selected cam to select the set of activating elements in said rotating selecting device corresponding to the character represented by the received group of impulses, said selected set of activating elements thereupon functioning to activate the corresponding combination of said character forming units after which the selecting device ceases rotating, a sheet upon which selected characters may be reproduced, means to cause said activated character forming units to form a characteron said sheet,said receiving means also receiving groups of impulses corresponding to various functions such as spacing line feed, etc.,
elements being assigned to lower case characters said translating device'also having function determining cams in addition to said character determining cams, said function determining cams when selected operating the corresponding function mechanisms, and means to release the nonselected cams and restore them tol normal.
17. In a reproducing system, receiving means to successively receive groups of code impulses certain of which represent lower case characters to be reproduced, a reproducing element having a plurality of character forming units distributed over` an area, a. translating'device having a rotatable cam for each lower case character to be reproduced, means controlled by each group of impulses representing a character to selectv a cam corresponding to the character represented by said group, said means permitting the selected cam to continue rotating while preventing rotation of the non-selected cams, a rotatable selecting device having a plurality of different sets of activating elements, each arranged to activate a diierent combination of said character forming units, certain of said sets of activating elements being assigned to lower case characters and others being assigned one to each corresponding upper case character, means to release said selecting device for rotation while said non-selected cams are prevented from rotation, means operated by the selected cam to preselect the two sets of activating elements corresponding respectively to the lower case and uppercase characters represented by the received group of impulses, means to determine a final selection between said upper case and lower case sets of activating elements, said selected .set of activating elements thereupon functioning to activate the corresponding combination of said character forming units after which the selecting device ceases rotating, a sheet upon which selected characters may be reproduced, means to cause said activated character forming units to form a character on said sheet, said receiving means also receiving groups of impulses corresponding to various functions" such as spacing," line feed, etc., said translating device also having function determining cams in .addition to said character determining cams,
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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2486985A (en) * 1945-10-10 1949-11-01 Ruderfer Martin Electrical printing type
US2524127A (en) * 1946-11-06 1950-10-03 Ibm Printing character forming wires
US2560474A (en) * 1947-06-18 1951-07-10 Teletype Corp Keyboard operated magnetic recorder
US2632386A (en) * 1949-04-20 1953-03-24 Burroughs Adding Machine Co Wire type printing machine
US2681614A (en) * 1949-09-27 1954-06-22 Burroughs Corp Recording machine with grouped recording elements operable selectively to form data-representations
US2715360A (en) * 1950-03-03 1955-08-16 Ncr Co Electrical printing apparatus
US2851141A (en) * 1955-06-20 1958-09-09 Ibm Wire printing typewriter
US2967083A (en) * 1956-11-26 1961-01-03 Radiation Inc Fixed styli recording head
US2974368A (en) * 1956-09-12 1961-03-14 Burroughs Corp Method and apparatus for the fabrication of electrostatic recording heads
US3038158A (en) * 1960-01-29 1962-06-05 Philip H Allen Registers
US3075193A (en) * 1958-04-28 1963-01-22 Schiebeler Werner Electrolytic process for producing characters and marks
US3139026A (en) * 1963-07-02 1964-06-30 Ncr Co Thermal printers
US3225883A (en) * 1962-11-13 1965-12-28 Waldemar A Ayres Word writing machine producing closed-up printing in response to simultaneous actuation of keys
DE1245181B (en) * 1965-09-06 1967-07-20 Licentia Gmbh Character generator for registration devices
DE1673971B1 (en) * 1968-02-02 1972-05-25 Hartmann & Braun Ag DEVICE FOR RECORDING ALPHANUMERIC CHARACTERS

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2486985A (en) * 1945-10-10 1949-11-01 Ruderfer Martin Electrical printing type
US2524127A (en) * 1946-11-06 1950-10-03 Ibm Printing character forming wires
US2560474A (en) * 1947-06-18 1951-07-10 Teletype Corp Keyboard operated magnetic recorder
US2632386A (en) * 1949-04-20 1953-03-24 Burroughs Adding Machine Co Wire type printing machine
US2681614A (en) * 1949-09-27 1954-06-22 Burroughs Corp Recording machine with grouped recording elements operable selectively to form data-representations
US2715360A (en) * 1950-03-03 1955-08-16 Ncr Co Electrical printing apparatus
US2851141A (en) * 1955-06-20 1958-09-09 Ibm Wire printing typewriter
US2974368A (en) * 1956-09-12 1961-03-14 Burroughs Corp Method and apparatus for the fabrication of electrostatic recording heads
US2967083A (en) * 1956-11-26 1961-01-03 Radiation Inc Fixed styli recording head
US3075193A (en) * 1958-04-28 1963-01-22 Schiebeler Werner Electrolytic process for producing characters and marks
US3038158A (en) * 1960-01-29 1962-06-05 Philip H Allen Registers
US3225883A (en) * 1962-11-13 1965-12-28 Waldemar A Ayres Word writing machine producing closed-up printing in response to simultaneous actuation of keys
US3139026A (en) * 1963-07-02 1964-06-30 Ncr Co Thermal printers
DE1245181B (en) * 1965-09-06 1967-07-20 Licentia Gmbh Character generator for registration devices
DE1673971B1 (en) * 1968-02-02 1972-05-25 Hartmann & Braun Ag DEVICE FOR RECORDING ALPHANUMERIC CHARACTERS

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