US2303597A - Measuring pump - Google Patents

Measuring pump Download PDF

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US2303597A
US2303597A US33414540A US2303597A US 2303597 A US2303597 A US 2303597A US 33414540 A US33414540 A US 33414540A US 2303597 A US2303597 A US 2303597A
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Prior art keywords
diaphragm
chamber
liquid
piston
transmission
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Samuel L Adelson
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Infilco Inc
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Infilco Inc
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04BPOSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS
    • F04B43/00Machines, pumps, or pumping installations having flexible working members
    • F04B43/02Machines, pumps, or pumping installations having flexible working members having plate-like flexible members, e.g. diaphragms
    • F04B43/06Pumps having fluid drive
    • F04B43/067Pumps having fluid drive the fluid being actuated directly by a piston
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C02TREATMENT OF WATER, WASTE WATER, SEWAGE, OR SLUDGE
    • C02FTREATMENT OF WATER, WASTE WATER, SEWAGE, OR SLUDGE
    • C02F1/00Treatment of water, waste water, or sewage
    • C02F1/68Treatment of water, waste water, or sewage by addition of specified substances, e.g. trace elements, for ameliorating potable water
    • C02F1/685Devices for dosing the additives
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04BPOSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS
    • F04B43/00Machines, pumps, or pumping installations having flexible working members
    • F04B43/0009Special features
    • F04B43/0081Special features systems, control, safety measures
    • F04B43/009Special features systems, control, safety measures leakage control; pump systems with two flexible members; between the actuating element and the pumped fluid
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04BPOSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS
    • F04B49/00Control, e.g. of pump delivery, or pump pressure of, or safety measures for, machines, pumps, or pumping installations, not otherwise provided for, or of interest apart from, groups F04B1/00 - F04B47/00
    • F04B49/12Control, e.g. of pump delivery, or pump pressure of, or safety measures for, machines, pumps, or pumping installations, not otherwise provided for, or of interest apart from, groups F04B1/00 - F04B47/00 by varying the length of stroke of the working members

Description

s. L. ADELSON I 2,303,597

MEASURING PUMP Filed May 9,. 1940 '2 Shedts-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

WW; w/

1942- s. L. ADEL'SON 2,303,597

MEASURING PUMP Filed May 9, 1940 2 Sheets-Shet 2 INVENT OR.

Patented Dec. 1, 1942 1 UNITED v' STATE 1 OFFICE .MEASI JRINGPUMP I Samuel L. Adelson, Chicago, Ill.,' assignor to'Infilco Incorporated, a corporation of Delaware Application May 9, 1940, Serial No. 334,145 v (cl. 103-44)" claims.

to limit theinvention.

Ferric chloride solution is an efiicient and economical coagulant for impurities contained in sewage. Its advantages have beenknown theoretically for considerable time, but its practical application has met with difliculties caused in 'part by its inherent corrosiveness and in part by shortcomings of apparatus heretofore proposed for pumping or measuring corrodents, or fluids ofanykind J Liquid pumps known to the art are of thepiston or plunger or diaphragm type. An inherent problem of pistons is that of liquid slippage. It is one of the essentials of its construction that a mechanical piston has sliding fit in a surround-.

ing cylinder; and that involves the absence of a perfect seal. Substantially the same thing is true of a plunger. A diaphragm prevents liquid slippage; but as the edge of a diaphragm essentially must be sealed andfastened to a housing, close limits are set to the movement of the diaphragm. The diaphragm material as used in pumps known to the art mustbe strong and fiex-.

ible at the same time; such requirements are somewhat conflicting. Motion transmitted from the center of a diaphragm to the outer parts thereof as generally done in theprior art. cannot be precise, especially Where the suction lift, or discharge head or both. are subject to varia tion. Piston or plunger pumps are better in that respect; but pistons and plungers, and the cylinders thereof, cannot beec onomically or efiiciently constructed from rubber or other materials required by certain fluids, and they are unsuitable wherever a perfect or nearly perfect liquid seal is required to prevent inaccuracydue to slippage, to protect necessary metal parts from aggressive fluids,or to avoid the escape of fluid for any other reason. I

It is a general object of my invention to provide a pump wherein a body of liquid is reciproe cated by a mechanical piston and inlturn recipe rocates a diaphragm which is interposed between the liquid piston. and the fluid to be pumped. v I

It is a particular object to provide simple and efiicient means for controlling'theliquid piston or for centering the same with respect to the me chanical piston and the diaphragm.

- Anothergeneral object of my invention is toprovide a measuring pump adapted to perform the service outlined and being free from the limitations and shortcomings of prior devices.

Another importantobject is to provide a measv v t of pumpage can be predetermined and maintained constant re-.v

uring pump wherein the rate gardless of variations in suction lift or discharge head or both. I 1

Another important object is to provide a diaphragm pump, the diaphragm of which is fiexif I ble and may be made from impervious material of little mechanical strength, but yet efiiciently protectedagainstdistortion and stresses affecting the rate of .pumpage or raising the danger of diaphragm failure.

'Another object is to provide a. pump compris-; "ing automaticmeans for controlling or correcting the position of the operation thereof. Still another, objef't is feeder that can be readily adjusted while in op; eration. r Still other objects will appear onconsideration pumping member during of the following description and of the appended drawings, wherein Fig. 1 shows a preferred embodiment of my invention in side elevation, the main operating parts being shown in section; v

Fig. 2 is a diagram showing the complete hydraulic system. of the invention, simplified by omitting certain auxiliary mechanical parts and showing other parts in purely diagrammatical form; I

Figs. 3 to 6 phases of the normal operation of the device;

Fig. ,7 is a simplified diagram showing a phase of irregular operation of the device and thus illust'rating the function of certain steps in regu lar operation thereof; I v 7 Figs. 8 and 9 are simp'lifieddiagrams of certain phases of automatic control inthe regular operation of the device; and

Fig. 10 is a simplified diagramnof a prior art device illustrating certain functions and advantages of the present device. Y

In the drawings numeral I0 designates a constant speed electric motor actuating the speed reducer ll todrive crank I2 which in turn reciprocates piston rod M by means of link I3. additional compound linkage being'provided as hereinafter described. Piston l5 has its wrist to' providea pump or are simplified diagrams of certain aphragm chamber pin pivotallysecured to piston rod l4 and slides in the bore of cylinder Hi. This cylinder is installed in upright position with its upper end open to the atmosphere through a recess |1 formed in the cover plate or' splash guard l8 of the cylinder; and piston rod l4 may pass through recess l1, no liquid seal being required for this rod. It will be seen that the front of piston I5 and the inner wall of cylinder I G- therebelow form an expandible chamber which may be designated as primary pump chamber or piston chamber l3. This chamber is spaced from a di- "2l by an intermediate transmission chamber 20. The transmission chamber is confined by a wall of. generally cylindrical shape, axis. The wall of the transmission chamber has a flattened portion in the upper part of the outer side thereof. The vertical cylinder 16 of piston I5 is joined to such flat portion by suit-,

able flanges. The primary pump chamber I9 communicates with transmission chamber 20 through a cylindrical bore in the wall of the latter, in the center of flange 22. Diaphragm chamber 2| is substantially bell shaped and its wall may merge into that of transmission chamber 20, allowing free communicationbetween the two chambers. The transmission chamber may be supported as at 23 and may directly or indirectly support the other chambers referred to as well as the motor and other auxiliary parts of the apparatus. Thie walls of cylinder l6,

' transmission chamber 2ll'anddiaphragm chamber 2| can be made of cast iron or the like.

In the interior of transmisison chamber 20 there is a partition extending across the axis of the chamber formed by an imperforate, rigid diaphragm 24 having a horizontal cylindrical passageway 25 formed therein: The axis of passageway 25 coincides with that of transmission and, diaphragmv chambers 20 and 2|. Diaphragm chamber 2| is closed and sealed at the far end thereof spaced from transmission chamber 24 by a thin and fiexible'soft rubber diaphragm 23. An elongated rod 21 which may be made of brass has one end thereof supported by arid rigidly secured to the center of diaphragm 25 by clamp members 28, the opposite end of the rod being slidably inserted in a guide box" 30 formed in the end wall 23 of transmission the rod extends through its axis coincides with thatchamber 20 so that passageway 25 and of the passageway. The guide box 30 may be of the antifriction type, no liquid seal being required at this point but a thimble 3| being sealed to the outsideof wall 29 around box 30 soas to catch whatever transmission liquid may bleed through the guide box 30. Rod 21 is not anactuating member for the diaphragm 26 but a carrimof control parts to be described presently, which control parts may bemade of brass, the same as the rod; the rod responds to movements of the diaphragm imparted by the transmission liquid and the general construction is such that the rod and parts associated therewith may oppose no appreciable resistance to the movement of the diaphragm. For this reason rod 21' is made very thin and light so that diaphragm 26 is substantially free from load or stresses which might otherwise be imparted thereto by the weight of the rod and associated parts, which loads or stresses might tend to distort the diaphragm or otherwise to affect the operation thereof. In cases where the diaphragm has to be particularly sensitive and thin an additional or secondary pump chamber with horizontal support for rod 21 may be provided spaced from guide box 30 and in, form similar to the same so as to completely eliminate gravitational stresses from diaphragm 25.

"way and the outer wall of the sleeve, for the transfer of transmission liquid. The sleeve has valve disks 33 and 34 rigidly secured to its end portions Onopposite sides of passage 25. Partition 24 in which the passage is formed has valve seats'35 and 36 formed therein at the ends of passage '25 facing valve disks 33 and 34 respecwith the two valve disks thererod 21 by small and 31 and 38 which 21 from abutments 33 tively. Sleeve 32 on is yieldably positioned on and 40 projecting from that whenever valve 33 or 34 is seated on the respective seat 35 or 36, the passage 25 is sealed and transmission chamber 20 hydraulically separated into two compartments forming extensions of the primary pump chamber i3 and of the secondary pump chamber 2| respectively. Normally, however, the passage 25 is free and unobstructed and in such condition the whole space of pump chamber l3, transmission chamber 2.

and diaphragm chamber 2| can be considered a' single chamber or compartment, and the transmission fiuid'with which the pump is provided can be considered as a'single body of fluid filling the whole of such single chamber or compartment. I

.A storage chamber 4| for transmission liquid is provided adjacent cylinder l8 and downwardly extending from adjacent the top thereof to a point adjacent transmission chamber 20. The upper portion of the cylinder l8 and the storage chamber- 2| are connected by suitable overflow meansjs'uch as lowering the common wall between the two, as shown, whereby transmission fluid which leaks by piston l5 from chamber I3 is collected in the storage chamber 4|. At the bottom of this storage chamber there are two compensating valves 42 and 43 which are normally held closed by compression springs of suitable strength. Either of the two compensating valves 42 and 43 when unseated allows flow of transmission liquid from or to transmission chamber2ll. Both compensating valves communicate. with that part of transmission chamber 20 which" forms an extension of piston chamber l3 when passage 25 is closed, sothat the compensating valve 42 or '43 can be unseated against the-action of the spring thereof, by 'moving piston l5 down wardly or upwardly while passage 25 is closed.

Diaphragm 26' separates the secondary pump chamber2| from the ultimate by persons skilled in the art.

' Motor link l3 and the'piston rod H are pivotally secured together to form a compound system or toggle with two rate setting rods one of which is shown at 43, the other being parallel pump chamber 44' for ferric chloride? The latter pump chamber is It commu-- thereto and each of said rate setting rods 49 having one end thereof pivoted'to the pin which connects members I3 and I4 and the other to one side of a rate setting-yoke 50. This yoke is slidably supported from cylinder l6 by means including bracket 5|, screw 52 turnably held by said bracket, and nut 53 threadedly engaging screw 52 and rigidly secured to yoke 50. Longi tudinal adjustment of nut 53 on screw 52 can be efl'ected byturning the screw by means of knob 54. The position of nut 53 on screw 52 controls that of yoke 56 and that in turn controls the length of the stroke of piston I5'through the medium of toggle 49, I3.

In order to complete the hydraulic system in accordance with this invention, transmission liq'-' uidTL must 'be put in chambers I9, 20, and 2| and there must be a supply 6|! of ferric chloride FeCl at the intake of the suction hose 45 and a receptacle or conduit 6| for sewage S to be closed or otherwise for disposing the ferric chloride therein at the end of discharge hose 41, as diagrammatically shown in Fig. 2. The pump is self-priming; that is, when the check valves are in-good condition and the suction hose is not collapsible then the apparatus at the start of the operation pumps the air out of chamber 44 gradually raising the ferric chloride from supply 60. v a

Important phases ofthe normal operation of the device are shown in Figs. 3 to 6 in each of which the neutral or central position of piston i5 is indicated at I5A, that of diaphragm 26 at 26A; and that of valve disks 33 and 34 at 33A and 34A respectively. It will be seenthat piston |5' is caused to reciprocate in cylinder I 6 thereby shift-' ing transmission liquid in and through the chambers I9, 26 and 2| which shifting movement of the liquid in turn produces apulsating movement of diaphragm 26 between the two bodies of liquid, the transmission liquid on one side and ferric chloride on the other. In effect the two bodies of liquid act as one and the'liquid presprevent the disks 33 and 34 from approaching their respective seats beyond the point to which they are carried by rod 21. Accordingly transmission liquid unobstructedly ,communicates through passage and the liquid piston is operative during such normal operation.

Fig- 3 shows the device at.the start of a normal pump strok or cycle of operation. Piston I5 is in raised position at I5B, diaphragm 26 is flexed to the left as shown at 26B, and valve disks 33 and 34 are at 333 and 34B, allowing communication through passage 25. The check valves 46 and 48 are closed. The level of ferric chloride in supply tank 60 is at 60B.

Fig. 4 shows the device shortly after the start of the downward stroke of'mechanical piston I5 sure'on both sides of diaphragm 26 is uniform at all times. The unweighted and flexible diaphragm can freely move with the liquid within the limits determined by the diaphragm construction, material and installation. The periph-. eral portion ofthe diaphragm, being rigidly secured to the stationary wallsof chambers 2| and 44 is at rest. The central portion of the diaphragm reciprocates horizontally between outer limits the precise spacing of which is'afunction of (a) the length of stroke of the mechanical piston l5 and (b) the slip, if any, of transmission liquid past the mechanical piston. The volume.

of transmission fluid displaced from or into chamber I9 by'a stroke of the mechanical piston l5 equals the volume of the zone of pulsation of .diaphragm 26 in chamber 2|, the storage chamber 4| being sealed from transmission chamber 20 by valves 42 and 43 and the transmission fluid being aliquid and-therefore not compressible. The volume of the zone of pulsation of diaphragm 26 in turn equals the volumetric amount of ferric chloride raised and displaced from source towards discharge'6l.

As the diaphragm 26 pulsates the central. part of the diaphragm moves as described and shifts rod 21 with sleeve 32 back and forth through passage 25 so that valve disks 33 and 34 alternately approach the respective seats 35 and 36.

The spacing of disks 33 and 34 from one another, from diaphragm 26 and from seats 35 and 36 is madesuch that in normal operation afull stroke in normal operation. *Piston I5 has moved a short distance downwardly from I5B. Diaphragm 2.6 and valve disks 33 and 34 have moved a little toward the right. Suction check valve 46 remains closed but discharge check valve 48 has opened under the pressure of fluid displaced by diaphragm'26 on its travel towards the right. Ferric chloride is being discharged into receptacle 6|.

Fig. 5 shows the device at the end of such downward stroke and at the start of the subsequent upward stroke of mechanical piston l5. Piston |5 has moved further down from |5B to I50. The diaphragm and valve disks have further moved to the right to position 26C, 33C, and 340 respectively. Suction check valve 46 still remains closed Discharge check valve 48 is still open but the discharge 'of ferric chloride has ceased as the forward movement of piston l5 has reached zero value; a I

Fig. 6 shows the device shortly after the start of the'upward stroke otmechani'cal piston. l5. Piston I5 is somewhat above point I50. The diaphragm and valve disks have started on their way back to the left from 26C, 33C and 34C respectively;' The discharge check valve 48 has closed under the suction of the receding diaphragm and the suction check valve 46 has opened under the same influence. Ferric chloride is being lifted from source 60 and the solution level drops below 603.

At the 'end of the upward stroke piston l5, diaphragm 26 and valve disks 33 and 34 return to their respective B positions; suction check 'valve 46 closes and discharge check valve 48 still could cancel out but practically there will be some net'or xcess slippage in either direction.

The net amount and directionof slippage depends on various structural factors determined by slight and uncontrollable irregularities in the construction and installation of the machine', especially on the fitting between the skirt of pis- I slippage, including for instance the operating temperature, the contraction and expansion of the piston and cylinder and the the change of viscosity of the transmission liquid.

A control of 'such'constant or changing factors, or of'the liquid slippage itself,,is necessaryffor reasons which appear from a consideration of Fig. '7. Thisflgure assumes a tendency of the transmission liquid to escape on thedownstroke of piston l5 rather than on the upstroke. Nor

mal pulsation of diaphragm 25 is between the marks 26M and 26N which. areequally spaced from the centerline 28A. Under the conditions assumed, however, there would be an unbalanced tendencyof the diaphragm pulsation to be displaced towards the leftas the amount of transmission liquid in chambers I9, and 2| would be reduced by uncompensated slippage away from chamber IS on each downstroke. After some time the diaphragm would pulsate between the marks 2GP and 266). Mark. 26? wouldtend to come close to the wall of the diaphragm chamber and even to pass beyond the same whereupon the device would become inaccurate because diaphragm 26 would abutagainst the wall of its chamber; it would be partly removed from the action of the transmission liquid'and the remaining part excessively 'bulged and stressed as shown at 260. vWhen this extreme condition of pulsation described has been reached, as indicated by the mark 260, adjustment of the length of the pump stroke, by means of knob'54, would no longer accurately adjust the amount of pumpage- Such extreme pulsation and distortion of the diaphragm 26, would ultimately tend to burst the diaphragm, rendering the pump inoperative.

Control or compensation cannot be achieved by the construction or oper ation of the piston or cylinder itself. However,

it can be controlled by other means, such'as shutoff valves 33 and 34 and compensating valves of the liquid septa sage 25 would become successively greater on each suction stroke. However, near the limit of one suction stroke, this diiierential becomes great enough to overcome the slight resistance of spring 31. Thereupon disk 34 seats on valve seat 3i'with snap action, shifting the sleeve 32 furtherto the left over the very small distance remainingand promptly sealing thepassage 25..

This obviously occurs at a moment when pressure is still being applied by the mechanicalpiston, that is (Fig. 9), before the terminal position |5X of the suction stroke is reachedv and before the diaphragm 25 and control ,valve 34' have assumed the terminal "x" positions they would ultimately reach. Due to'the rapid action of the substantially uncompensated mechanism of valve 34, 35, as described, the seating of the 'valve from 34Y to 34Z is both initiated and completed before the end of the suction stroke of piston I5. As this suction stroke is being completed from |5Y to'l5X after the closing of the valve 24, a vacuum is created in the combined chambers I5, 20 suilicient to overcome the pressure of the spring ..of the compensating valve 43, whereupon the compensating valve 43, affording communication with and from storage chamber 4| is opened against the pressure of the spring of this compensating valve, admitting a suflicient amount of transmission liquid from storage chamber 4| into transmission chamber 25 to practically oifset the loss of transmission liquid incurred by slippage on previous pressurestrokes.

Accordingly the next pressure stroke brings the righthand limit of diaphragm pulsation back to a position identical with or approximating the initial one, 248. The next suction stroke is from I excess slippage of liquid is of average magnitude then such corrections may occur perhaps'after every, fifteenth v stroke. For example, during fifteen strokes there maybe escape of transmission liquid from chamber is but at the sixteenth stroke the vacuum created will be suflicient to 42 and 43. The control operates in the manner the line 34-34S to the line 34T-34U. In the position 34T, near the limitof a suction stroke, the valve disk 34 approaching seat 35 leaves only a very small annular slot at the end of passage 25. This restricted opening or slot creates an appreciable pressure difierential. in

the flow-or displacement of transmission liquid,

the amount of the differential being a function of the pressure then acting on thearea of this restricted opening, the size of the opening, and other factors well known to the art. Successive suction strokes would tend to bring the terminal suction position of disk 34 still farther tq'the left beyond point 34T.: The differential at pasovercomejthe pressure of the spring on the compensating valve 43 whereupon the liquid in chambers I9, 20 will be replenished from chamber.

This cycle of correcting actions may be repeated indefinitely except that a change of operating factors such as a drop or increase of the: discharge head on the ultimate pump chamber 44 may tend to affect the slippage of transmission liquid and so to provoke the compensating action described after a greater or smaller number of strokes. Duringv all this time the discharge of the pump is constant except for a perfectly negligible and practically immeasurable lag, at the moment of each correcting or compensating action. I I

Should Texcess slippageoccur on the suction stroke rather than on the pressurestroke then similar compensations occur through valve 42 whenever the amount'of transmission fluid in chambers I9, 20 and 2| becomes sumcient to extend the diaphragm 26 into the pumping chamber 44 to such an extent that the valve disk 38 is seated on seat 35.

Assuming now that by operation of knob 54.

and screw 52 the stroke of piston I5 is reduced in length then the pulsation of diaphragm 28 will Shrink and thepump discharge will be less. Accordingly if excess slippage occurs on the pressure stroke it will take a greater number of pulsations to allow the suctionstroke to reach a limit at which the control valve seats with conse quent replenishment of transmission liquid through the proper compensation valve. However, the diaphragm will reach such a limit and the control parts are-so dimensioned that the limit is reached before the diaphragm, during any part of its travel, abuts against any wallof the diaphragm chamber. Compensation 1 will take place and will return the diaphragm pulsation to its properlimits. Thus the automatic compensation described is operative irrespective of the length of the piston stroke. v

Both during a period of readjustment of the length of stroke as well as during" eration with any length of stroke, the recipipcation of the mechanical piston and the consequent pulsation I of the transmission fluid, and the pumping action of the diaphragm continues and the automatic volume compensation.

Fig. 10 should be considered for-an understanding of how this machine differs from diaphragm pumps of the prior art, as to operatio'n under normal or variable loads. The figure is a diagram of a typical device of the prior art. No claim is made for a device of such kind. The

diaphragm 62 has ferric chloride on the right-' hand side thereof. It is exposed to the atmosphere on the lefthand side. At the center of the diaphragm an actuating rod 63 is attached thereto extending in direction normal to the diaphragm plane to the left. Rod 65 is reciprocated by link 64 driven by the crank 65 of a motor 66. The motion of the rod is mechanically imparted to the center of the diaphragm and is in some way reflected by a change of the volume of pump chamber 61 on the righthand side of the diaphragm, the tendency being for the center of the and for the outer portion to be warped in concave form 62X due to the liquid pressure on the righthand side.

and tear on the diaphragm material, even ifpusher plates of liberal-size are attached and the diaphragm is molded. so that it has some play. Furthermore no constant relation exists between the length of the stroke of rod,63 and the volumetric contraction or expansion of chamber 61. For instance as long as the level of ferric chloride diaphragm to precede the outer portions thereof a As this form is reversed twice during each stroke there is obviously much wear in supply tank 60 is at 603, a suction stroke from 62A to 62B causes the diaphragm to assume sub- 7 stantially the shape indicated at BZY at theLend of the stroke. Under such conditions a certain amount of ferric chloride, say for instance lycu.

identical suction stroke from 62A to 623 causes I the diaphragm to assume substantially the shape 60 in. when us ng a particular size and construc-.

indicated at BZZ at the end of the stroke. Under such conditions the diaphragm is more concave on the left'side thereof than at 52,3? and the amountof ferric chloride pumped on each stroke is less than 1 cu. infbecause-the negative pressure of the ferricchloride acting oneach of the several 'points'of the diaphragm towards the righthand side thereof is greater and therefore more effective to balance the operating force transmittedto such. points from rod 63, which acts towards the lefthand side;"said operating force being transmitted fromrodfl to each of p said" points by the flexible solid substanceofth j diaphragm itself. Similarly any change of-the I discharge head affects the rate of pumpageg; Changes .of suction 'or discharge load vmay be due.

to variation inoperating conditions, o to struc- =1 tural changes. In some'cases it may'bdpossiblq to effect the change by an adjustment made in the mechanical parts moving rodfBS Frequent: 1y however, it is impossible and in all cases it is? inconvenient to make such adjustment when,

gradual or sudden changes of pump loadings occur.

Fig." 3 su-filcientlyi illustrates the action 5: the present deviceunder similar conditions; -Herc the operating force is transmitted to each point of the diaphragm by liquid bearing against the phragm'tends to befonyex rather than concave on the lefthand side thereof. vIts precise shape is unafiected by thesuction lift or discharge headg the feed is constant and the only reactionjto" varying'loads is in the consumption ofelectric current in theprimemover, which is negligible. 7 I The 'transmission'liquid, preferably is a. non:

cong'eali'ng, non-conducting lubricant of little iriscosity, such 'as a ligh't'oil.

guide box 30 is automatically lubricated so that reciprocation of rod 21 absorbs a minimum of In that event the power, producing maximum accuracy of the 'dia phragm motion. 'The'hydraulic transmission and control thereof will be operative under all condie tionsof service actuallygmet with in, practice. j Ultimate failure of diaphragm 26, which cannot be altogether avoided in practice except when replacing'the diaphragm .in time, can be easily" and] automatically detected by means such as; electric contact "80 extending into and insulated'[ from diaphragm chamberfZi and connected tothe positive pole of a source 82 of direct electric.

current, the negative pole being grounded to the 1 metallic casting of chamber 2| throughthe coil of a relay 83 actuating an alarm' device 84 or the; like. A spark plug BI is a convenient andeco- 1 nomical means to "provide the interior contact 80. Should diaphragm 26 develop any, initial fatigue or crack there would be seepage and later leakage of ferric chloride through the diaphragm into .chamber 2|, adding to the electric conduc tivity ofthe liquid in said chamber. This would complete a circuit exciting the relay and operat- 'j ing the alarm. A safety switchin the circuit of motor i0 may be provided in operativeconnection with the detector relay. By such means the sysgtem can be fully; protected against failure of mes chanical parts, loss of ferric chloride, and dea structive actionof the same.

' While I have described one embodiment f my invention, Iwish it understood that variousmodifications can be applied all of whichareintended T to be covered by the following claims. I claim: l. A pump comprising diaphragm dividing said chamber. into two come 'partments, a liquid inlet into and an outlet from oneof said compartments, afluid displacingmember'in the second compartment, a partition in said second compartment interposed between-said a chamber, a. flexible, 2;

diaphragm and said fluid displacing member, an

said opening upon opening in said partition and means forclosing conduit means communicating with one of'said Y compartments and a cylinder communicating with theother of said'compar'tments, apiston in said cylinder, means foroperating said piston, a rigid partition in 'said second compartment interposed between said diaphragm and said piston, a passageway in said partition, a rod attached to said diaphragm and extending through said passageway, .and means carried by said rod for closing said passageway upon movement of thedia phragm to predetermined positions; 7

3. In combination, a' flexible diaphragm, a

chamber sealed bysaid diaphragm andadapted to receive and hold a liquid bearingagainst said diaphragm, a liquid in said chamber, means associated with said chamber adapted to displace 'a'jvolume of said liquid fromv one position toanother position therein-whereby said diaphragm is caused to pulsate, and'means oper able upon a predetermined movement of said diaphragm to seal said diaphragm from said liquid displacing means. V l

4. Apparatus according to claim 3 wherein said meanscontrolled from said diaphragm'comprises a restricted passageway interposed betweensaid I displacing means and said diaphragm, avalve associated with said passageway, and means movable with the motion of said diaphragm to open and close saidvalve.

5. In combination, a flexible diaphragm, a cas ing sealed atjone end by the same, vsaid casing being adapted to receive and to hold a liquid bearing against said diaphragm, a liquid in said casing, power driven means adapted to shiftsuch liquid in said casing, a partition in. said casing interposed between said diaphragm and saidpower driven means, said partitioribeing provided withan opening for flow of said liquid therethrough, means associated with said openingin said partition providing a] variable passage for movement of said diaphragm s topredetermined positions.

2, A 'pump comprising a chamber, a flexible diaphragm within said chamber dividing the same into ;two compartments, suction and discharge 9. In combination, a chamberhaving a diaphragm in one end portion thereof, a movable displacement memberin the other end portion 't-hereof, means for moving said displacement member, a partition between said end portions, a passage in said partition, and means for limiting the motionof said diaphragm comprising means,

for closing said passage in response to certain.

positions of said diaphragm.

l0. In combination, a chamber having a flexible a diaphragm and a piston therein, ,a fluid in said chamberpsaid piston being adapted to displace said fluid to operate said diaphragm, and means controlled by said diaphragm and,adapted to conflne the motion of said diaphragm in predetermined limits comprising means to cut off from and to readmit to said diaphragm fluid pressure resulting from motion of said piston upon travel of said diaphragm to said limits. 1

11. Apparatus according to claim 10 including means to adjust the length of the stroke of said piston so as to thereby adjust the volume of the pulsation ofsaid diaphragm, said adjusting means being independent from said'diaphragm controlled means.

12. A pump comprising a motor, linkage driven by said motor, a piston driven by said linkage, a cylinder for said pitson, an extension of said cylinder, a flexible diaphragm in said extension sealing the same, a chamber sealed by said flexible diaphragmand facing saidextension, suction and discharge conduits joining said chamber,

the now of said liquid therethrough toward and,

' away from said diaphragm, anda second casing sealed by said diaphragm facing said first named casing and adapted to receive and'discharge fluid to be pumped.

6.- Apparatus according to claim 5 including automatic'means for operating said means associated'with said opening in said partition to con'-' trol said variable passage, said meansbecom nz.

efl'ective tovary said passage when said diaphragm moves beyond a predetermined position.

7. Apparatus according to claim 5' including an auxiliary storage chamber for said liquid, said storage chamber having a common wall with said flrst casing, compensation valve means in said common wall, and means adapted to control. op,-

eration of said compensation valve means to cause adjustment of the volume of such liquid in said flrstcasing, such adjustment being caused by the pressure'resulting from said power driven means,

8. Apparatus according to claim 5 including a means for indicating failure of said diaphragm comprising an electric circuit including a pair of terminalsextending into said liquid and adapted check valves in said conduits, a rigid diaphragm in said extension between said cylinder. and said flexible diaphragm, a passageway in said rigid diaphragm having its axis normal to the plane or said flexible diaphragm, valve seats atthe ends" of said*passageway, a rod secured to said'flexible diaphragm and extending from the same through said passageway and held in position normal to the plane ofsaid flexible diaphragm, a sleeve loosely riding on said rod, means to yieldably position saidsleeve on said'rod so that the sleeve may extend through said passageway, said sleeve clearing said passageway, valve disks secured to said sleeve and adaptedcto seat on said. valve seats, compensating valves in said extension between said cylinder and said rigid diaphragm,

and a chamber adapted to communicate with said extension through said compensating valves.

13. Apparatus according to claim 12 wherein the axis of said cylinder is vertical and that of said extension and passageway horizontal,

D 14-. Apparatus according to claim 12 wherein said linkage is of the compound type, means being provided'to adjust said linkage so as to',

control the length of stroke of said piston." 15. Pumping apparatus comprising in combination a casing, a flexible diaphragm dividing said casing into a pumping chamber and a power transmissionfichamber, a non-electrolytic power transmission'liquid in said transmission chamber and bearing against said diaphragm, power driven means for pulsatingly actuating'said liquid, and means for indicating failure ofsaid diaphragm comprising an electric circuit adapt-1 ed to bejoined to a source of electric current, said circuit having a pair of terminals extending into said power transmission liquid, and adapted to be completed through the dilution of the power to be joined to a source of electric current, and

to be completed acrosssaid terminals'upon mixture with the liquid in said power transmission chamber 'of an electrolytic liquid being pumped transmission liquid with an electrolytic liquid ein v umped." V SAMUEL n. ADELSON.

CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION.

,Patent'No. 2,505,597. December 1, 19LL2.

SAMUEL L ADELSON It is hereby certified thaterror appears in the printed. specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page it, first column, lines 60 and 61, for "fihR-ELLS to the line filL'F-jhU; In the place" read -26T26U. This in turn tends to displace-; line 62, for "ELL-514.3" read "EL E-5 4s"; page 6, second column, line 28, for "pitson" read -piston--; and that the said Letters Patent should be. read with this/correction therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in'rthe Patent Office. v

S igned and sealed this 2nd day of February; A. D. 1915.

Henry Van Arsdale (Seal) Acting Commissioner of Patents..

US2303597A 1940-05-09 1940-05-09 Measuring pump Expired - Lifetime US2303597A (en)

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Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2424595A (en) * 1944-03-13 1947-07-29 Hydraulic Impact Tool Company Pumping mechanism
US2444586A (en) * 1944-03-20 1948-07-06 Wuensch Charles Erb Pump
US2546302A (en) * 1946-06-04 1951-03-27 Cooper Bessemer Corp Flexible diaphragm pump
US2563939A (en) * 1943-12-06 1951-08-14 Nash Kelvinator Corp Fuel feeding device
US2691943A (en) * 1950-08-23 1954-10-19 Lapp Insulator Company Inc Diaphragm pump
US2754806A (en) * 1952-02-29 1956-07-17 Bendix Aviat Corp Hydraulically controlled variable stroke pump
US2774626A (en) * 1954-08-26 1956-12-18 Osceola J Gerbracht Spray pump apparatus
US2780404A (en) * 1953-07-21 1957-02-05 Gen Electric Fluid compressor
US2839002A (en) * 1954-05-13 1958-06-17 Williams Ernest Pumps
DE1034030B (en) * 1955-09-22 1958-07-10 Reiners Walter Dr Ing Diaphragm pump for non-lubricating and chemically aggressive liquids, especially for Pest control in agriculture
US2843044A (en) * 1954-07-14 1958-07-15 William H Mashinter Metering pump
US2856857A (en) * 1953-06-05 1958-10-21 Milton Roy Co Pump
US2869467A (en) * 1956-05-15 1959-01-20 Alexander S Limpert Liquid proportioning pump
US2943635A (en) * 1956-08-06 1960-07-05 Greer Hydraulics Inc Gas pressure booster system
US2953029A (en) * 1956-01-16 1960-09-20 Separation L Emulsion Et Le Me Kinematic control system, chiefly for pumps having an adjustable throughput
US3000320A (en) * 1957-07-18 1961-09-19 Ring Sandiford Pump
US3080821A (en) * 1959-09-25 1963-03-12 Scott & Williams Inc Pumps
US3251305A (en) * 1965-04-12 1966-05-17 Panther Pumps & Equipment Co Balanced pressure pump
US3254845A (en) * 1964-12-11 1966-06-07 Panther Pumps & Equipment Comp Fluid power transfer apparatus
US3257952A (en) * 1964-06-29 1966-06-28 Alan G Mccormick Bellows pump
US3285182A (en) * 1964-12-17 1966-11-15 Harry E Pinkerton Diaphragm metering pump
US3392674A (en) * 1966-10-28 1968-07-16 Paul W. Schlosser Pump with piston and diaphragm
US3402667A (en) * 1967-04-03 1968-09-24 Panther Pumps & Equipment Co Fluid power transfer apparatus
DE1288433B (en) * 1964-01-08 1969-01-30 Panther Pumps & Equipment Co Method and apparatus for transmission of energy of a driving medium to a medium driven
US3507583A (en) * 1967-10-04 1970-04-21 Gen Aniline & Film Corp Pump for liquids
US3902826A (en) * 1973-01-30 1975-09-02 Schlesiger & Co Kg Feluwa Piston pump
US3927605A (en) * 1974-02-25 1975-12-23 Graco Inc Linkage-drive pump
US4050859A (en) * 1976-07-01 1977-09-27 Graco Inc. Diaphragm pump having a reed valve barrier to hydraulic shock in the pressurizing fluid
US4358252A (en) * 1979-07-18 1982-11-09 Harben System Limited Diaphragm pumps
US4416599A (en) * 1980-10-17 1983-11-22 Dosapro Milton Roy Diaphragm pump with compensation means in the hydraulic control chamber
US4564340A (en) * 1983-11-12 1986-01-14 Abel Pumpen Gmbh Device for regulating the pressure and feed volume of a diaphragm pump
DE3430721A1 (en) * 1984-08-21 1986-03-06 Alldos Eichler Kg Diaphragm pump, in particular for dispensing liquids
FR2671139A1 (en) * 1990-12-28 1992-07-03 Milton Roy Dosapro Device for compensating for leaks in a hydraulically-controlled diaphragm pump
US5547351A (en) * 1994-03-01 1996-08-20 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Department Of Health And Human Services Low pressure low volume liquid pump
WO2011067587A1 (en) * 2009-12-01 2011-06-09 Health Protection Agency Assay method and apparatus

Cited By (37)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2563939A (en) * 1943-12-06 1951-08-14 Nash Kelvinator Corp Fuel feeding device
US2424595A (en) * 1944-03-13 1947-07-29 Hydraulic Impact Tool Company Pumping mechanism
US2444586A (en) * 1944-03-20 1948-07-06 Wuensch Charles Erb Pump
US2546302A (en) * 1946-06-04 1951-03-27 Cooper Bessemer Corp Flexible diaphragm pump
US2691943A (en) * 1950-08-23 1954-10-19 Lapp Insulator Company Inc Diaphragm pump
US2754806A (en) * 1952-02-29 1956-07-17 Bendix Aviat Corp Hydraulically controlled variable stroke pump
US2856857A (en) * 1953-06-05 1958-10-21 Milton Roy Co Pump
US2780404A (en) * 1953-07-21 1957-02-05 Gen Electric Fluid compressor
US2839002A (en) * 1954-05-13 1958-06-17 Williams Ernest Pumps
US2843044A (en) * 1954-07-14 1958-07-15 William H Mashinter Metering pump
US2774626A (en) * 1954-08-26 1956-12-18 Osceola J Gerbracht Spray pump apparatus
DE1034030B (en) * 1955-09-22 1958-07-10 Reiners Walter Dr Ing Diaphragm pump for non-lubricating and chemically aggressive liquids, especially for Pest control in agriculture
US2953029A (en) * 1956-01-16 1960-09-20 Separation L Emulsion Et Le Me Kinematic control system, chiefly for pumps having an adjustable throughput
US2869467A (en) * 1956-05-15 1959-01-20 Alexander S Limpert Liquid proportioning pump
US2943635A (en) * 1956-08-06 1960-07-05 Greer Hydraulics Inc Gas pressure booster system
US3000320A (en) * 1957-07-18 1961-09-19 Ring Sandiford Pump
US3080821A (en) * 1959-09-25 1963-03-12 Scott & Williams Inc Pumps
DE1288433B (en) * 1964-01-08 1969-01-30 Panther Pumps & Equipment Co Method and apparatus for transmission of energy of a driving medium to a medium driven
US3257952A (en) * 1964-06-29 1966-06-28 Alan G Mccormick Bellows pump
US3254845A (en) * 1964-12-11 1966-06-07 Panther Pumps & Equipment Comp Fluid power transfer apparatus
US3285182A (en) * 1964-12-17 1966-11-15 Harry E Pinkerton Diaphragm metering pump
US3251305A (en) * 1965-04-12 1966-05-17 Panther Pumps & Equipment Co Balanced pressure pump
US3392674A (en) * 1966-10-28 1968-07-16 Paul W. Schlosser Pump with piston and diaphragm
US3402667A (en) * 1967-04-03 1968-09-24 Panther Pumps & Equipment Co Fluid power transfer apparatus
US3507583A (en) * 1967-10-04 1970-04-21 Gen Aniline & Film Corp Pump for liquids
US3902826A (en) * 1973-01-30 1975-09-02 Schlesiger & Co Kg Feluwa Piston pump
US3927605A (en) * 1974-02-25 1975-12-23 Graco Inc Linkage-drive pump
US4050859A (en) * 1976-07-01 1977-09-27 Graco Inc. Diaphragm pump having a reed valve barrier to hydraulic shock in the pressurizing fluid
US4358252A (en) * 1979-07-18 1982-11-09 Harben System Limited Diaphragm pumps
US4416599A (en) * 1980-10-17 1983-11-22 Dosapro Milton Roy Diaphragm pump with compensation means in the hydraulic control chamber
US4564340A (en) * 1983-11-12 1986-01-14 Abel Pumpen Gmbh Device for regulating the pressure and feed volume of a diaphragm pump
DE3430721A1 (en) * 1984-08-21 1986-03-06 Alldos Eichler Kg Diaphragm pump, in particular for dispensing liquids
EP0175105A1 (en) * 1984-08-21 1986-03-26 Wolfgang Eichler KG Membrane pump, especially for dosing liquids
US4619589A (en) * 1984-08-21 1986-10-28 Alldos Eichler Kg Diaphragm pump, particularly for dosing liquids
FR2671139A1 (en) * 1990-12-28 1992-07-03 Milton Roy Dosapro Device for compensating for leaks in a hydraulically-controlled diaphragm pump
US5547351A (en) * 1994-03-01 1996-08-20 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Department Of Health And Human Services Low pressure low volume liquid pump
WO2011067587A1 (en) * 2009-12-01 2011-06-09 Health Protection Agency Assay method and apparatus

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