US2281245A - Railway car - Google Patents

Railway car Download PDF

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Publication number
US2281245A
US2281245A US223963A US22396338A US2281245A US 2281245 A US2281245 A US 2281245A US 223963 A US223963 A US 223963A US 22396338 A US22396338 A US 22396338A US 2281245 A US2281245 A US 2281245A
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Prior art keywords
car
center sill
trucks
end
floor
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US223963A
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Parke Peter
Nils A Thunstrom
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Pullman Inc
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Pullman Inc
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Priority to US223963A priority Critical patent/US2281245A/en
Priority claimed from US32583040 external-priority patent/US2310497A/en
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B61RAILWAYS
    • B61DBODY DETAILS OR KINDS OF RAILWAY VEHICLES
    • B61D1/00Carriages for ordinary railway passenger traffic
    • B61D1/06Carriages for ordinary railway passenger traffic with multiple deck arrangement
    • B61D1/08Carriages for ordinary railway passenger traffic with multiple deck arrangement of sleeping carriages

Description

.Apri l2 8, 1942. v P. PARKE'ErA 2,281,245

RAILWAY CAR Filed Aug. 9, 1938 5 Sheets-Sheet l r n .PcztewPaw/he mg i v is? mall-0m 5 April 2s, 1942.

I P. PARKE ETAL RAILWAY CAR Filed Aug. 9;, 1938 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 April 28, 1942. P. PARKE ETAL RAILWAY CAR Filed Aug. 9, 1938 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 ATTORNEYS.

Patented Apr. 28, 1942 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE RAILWA! can Peter Parke and Nils A. Thunst rom, Chicago, 111.,

assignors to ThePullman Company, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Application August 9, 1938, Serial No. 223,963

Claims.

upper berth is eliminated and provides for maximum comfort alike to the passengers, whether tric loading of buflf and draft forces would necessitate adding metal in the center sill, thereby increasing its weight. The present-day demand for lighter weight equipment makes this undesirable.

Among the principal objects of the present invention, then, are the following: To provide a railway car of the duplex type having adequate they be traveling in the upper or the lower rooms.

In this car, as in other cars, the railway mail specifications require that all buff and draft loads shall be figured as being carried by the longitudinal members positioned below the floor level, and certain car builders, as a matter 'of practice calculate the center sill alone to carry these loads. Although these specifications were drafted for use in designing mail cars, the general practice is toapply them to passenger cars as well.

In order to have as light a member as possible and yet one having sufiicient strength to carry the buff and draft loads, it is necessary to so position the center sill that the line of bull anddraft will lie substantially along the horizontal line passing through the centers of gravity of the various center sill cross-sections throughout the length of the sill. For the sake of convenience this horizontal line will be referred to as the longitudinal axis of the center sill, and in order to eliminate eccentricity this axis should be substantially a straight line. Any deviation of this axis from a straight line results in the production of eccentricity in the end loading on the center sill, thereby producing a bending moment in the center sill. This condition requires the use of additional material in the center sill which adds weight to the car.

In many cars the lines of bull and draft do not coincide, because the bufling loads are carried partly through the buffers positioned on the end sills and partly through the couplers, while the draft loads are transmitted entirely through the couplers. In these cars it is desirable to have the line of bull very nearly correspond with the longitudinal axis of the center sill.

It is desirable to increase the distance between the floor and the roof of the car in order to provide adequate headroom in the lower and upper rooms. One way to provide this head room would be to depress the center sill along with the other longitudinal framing members in the underframe, thereby lowering the floor,

head room for both the lower and upper'rooms, and having a center sill adapted to carry bull and draft loads with a minimum of eccentricity in the application of such loads. or Other objects and advantages will become apparent as the disclosure proceeds and the description is read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 isa diagrammatic plan view showing the general floor plan arrangement of the rooms and the aisle, only the portion of the car from approximately its center to the non-articulated end being shown;

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic plan view showing the general floor plan arrangement from approxi mately the center of the car to the articulated end. This figure completes the showing of Fig. 1;

, Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic view in side elevation,

showing the general arrangement of the upper and lower bedrooms;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary plan view of the car underframe, showing the portion from approximately the center of the car to the vestibule or non-articulated end;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary plan view of the car underframe showing the portion from approximately the center of the car to the articulated end. This figure completes the showing of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary side elevational .view of the portion of the underframe included in Fig. 4; v

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary side elevational view of. the portion 01' the underframe included in Fig. 5;

but the increased stresses caused by the eccen- Fig. 8 is a vertical longitudinalsectionai view of the portion of the underframe shown in Fig. 4, and is taken on the line 8-8 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 9 is a vertical longitudinal sectional view of the portion of the underframe shown in Fig. 5, and is taken on the line 9-9 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 10 is a transverse sectional view of the car underframe taken'at the bolster along the line I fl-IO of Fig.4, and shows portions of the side posts and the method of tying them into sid sills;

Fig. 11 is a transverse sectional view of a por-v tion of theunderframe, taken at one of the needle beams on the line II-II of Fig. 5;

Fig. 12 is a transverse sectional view of a portion of the underframe, showing the jacking beam and. taken on the line I2-I2 Fig.

Fig. 13 is a transverse sectional view of the car taken at substantially its center portion, and shows in broken lines a portion of the car interior equipment;

Fig. 14 is a fragmentary transverse sectional view of the car taken in the region of the trucks, showing the relationship between the center sill and the side sills and floor stringers in this region;

Fig. 15 is an enlarged fragmentary plan view of the underframe at the non-articulated end of the car showing the coupler mechanism; and

Fig. 16 is a longitudinal sectional view through the portion of the underframe shown in Fig, 15,

' General organization Referring to Fig. 3, a car body is shown supported on a pair of trucks 26, 21. For the purpose of illustration, the car is articulated at one end and non-articulated at the other end. Obviously the invention is equally applicable to a completely articulated car, or to one which is wholly non-articulated. To aid the description we will refer to the non-articulated end of the car as the A end, and the articulated end of the car as the 13 end.

At the A end the car body is provided with a vestibule 28 (Fig. 1) of the usual type, having door openings at 29 and 38 which are closed by the usual doors 3I and 32. Steps (not shown) are furnished to permit passing to and from the car, and trap doors 33 and 34 cover up the steps and finish out the floor of the vestibule 28. At the B end of the car body a passage 35 permits communication between the present car and an adjoining car. There are no outside doors at this latter end. Doors 36, 31, are provided at the A and-B ends, respectively, of the car, and are hinged to end framing members and permit passage to and from the car interior.

In a further eifort to simplify the description.

of the particular embodiment of the present invention the side of the car, indicated by the letter C, will be referred to as the bedroom side, and the opposite side, indicated by the letter D, will be referred to as the aisle side.

Extending throughout the length of the car is an aisle 38, which passes along the. aisle side of the car. The bedrooms are positioned entirely along the bedroom side of the car, and open onto the aisle 38. In the particular embodiment chosen, duplex rooms are positioned in the region between the trucks, as shown in Fig. 3, and over thetruck at the A end of the car a pair of bed- 7 rooms 39, 48, are provided, both being on the same level and having a communicating door 4| and a. sliding partition 42 separating them. Be tween the room 39 and the A end of the car is a lavatory 48, having the usual hopper 49, washstand 58, and dressing shelf 5I. A door 52 gives access to the lavatory. Also at this end is positioned a porters seat 53.

Further along the car, toward the center, is

an upper room 43, separated from the room 48 by a solid wall 44. From this point to the region over the truck on the B end of the car are a plurality of duplex rooms. Over the articulated truck are an upper room 46, a locker 41 for housing equipment and porters supplies, and a locker 55 for housing electric panels, switches, etc.

The duplex rooms are indicated at 56 to 61, inclusive, 43 and 46, and are arranged in most part in pairs, as, for example, 56 and 51, with a partition 68 separating the two. This partition is provided with a communicating door 69 see Fig. 1), and a sliding partition 18 adapted to be pu hed into a recess between spaced panels 1 I, 12, mak- .ing up the stationary portion of the partition 68.

, When it is desired to provide communication between two adjoining bedrooms, such as rooms 56 and 51, the door 69 may be swung back into one of the rooms; as, for example, room 56, against the outside door 13, thus closing oflE this latter door but giving access to an outside door 14 from either of the bedrooms 56 or 51. If it is de- I sired to open the partition 68 still further, sliding partition 18 may be pushed back into the recess between the panels H and 12.

The upper rooms also are arranged, in most instances, in pairs,as, for example, rooms 58 and 59, and stairs 16, together with outside doors 11, 18, afford access to these adpoining rooms. A partition 19 separates adjoining upper rooms, and a communicating door 88 places them en suite. This door is the only movable part of the partition 19. a

Each of the rooms is provided with a couch 8 I which extends transversely of the car and is made into a bed for night use, a hopper 82, and a washstand and other toilet facilities, indicated at 83.

Framing in general bule builer wing 95 at the non-articulated end of the car, and a top frame 96,

Underjrame Extending longitudinally of the car throughout its length is a center sill 91, made up of a pair of Z-bars 98, 99, welded together at the top, as indicated at I88. I'his sill extends from the vestibule buffer wing 95 to the end frame 93, and through its entire length has a longitudinal axis which is substantially a straight line. This feature'is ver desirable, since the center sill is the min bu! and draft load-carrying member, and with this axis lying substantially along the line of bull and draft there is a minimum'of eccentricity in the application of such loads. This fact greatly reduces the stressing of the center sill, and permits the-use of a lighter member.

Positioned at the sides of the car are a pair of side sills I8I, I82, which, as shown, are angle bars, and extending transversely of the car between the side sills are a plurality of cross-bearers consisting of a body bolster I83 which supthese transverse members there are a plurality of shallow cross-bearers I08 (sometimes referred to as cross ties), which extend between the center sill and the side sills, and support the floor and equipment mounted on the under side of the car. Extending longitudinally of the car is a pair of floor stringers I 09-, H0, resting on the shallow cross-bearers, as shown in Fig. 14, and on top of these floor stringers is mounted the flooring III.

As shown in Fig. 10, floor stringers H3 and II! extend over the center sill with their top flanges and the top flanges of stringers I09 and H lying in the same plane. The flooring III rests on top of these flanges, and in the regions over the trucks is positioned approximately four feet three inches above the rails, which is the more or less conventional floor height.

The stringers H3, H4, I09 and H0 are provided with downward inclinations at II5 (see Figs. 6 to 9 inclusive) toward the level of the top surface of the center sill, and stringers H3 and Ill continue as flattened Z-bars throughout the region between the trucks, as shown in Fig. 13, so that in this region the floor level is lowered approximately six inches. The side sills IOI and I02 also are depressed between the trucks.

Over the trucks the shallow cross-bearers I08 extend through the Z-bars H3, H4, respectively, resting upon the center sill (as best shown in Fig. 14), and are secured at their other ends to side sills; while in the central region between the trucks these cross-bearers are secured to the sides of the center sill by means of brackets Hi, to which are riveted the cross-bearers, as indicated at Ill.

The jacking beam I06 (see Fig, 12) is made up of a web portion II8, a top flange II9 which extends from side sill to side sill passing over the center sill, and bottom flanges I which ter-' minate at and are welded to the center sill, as shown at I2I. A reinforcing plate member I22 joins the two bottom flanges I20, and is secured by rivets I23 to these flanges. A vertically extending web I24 is placed between the bottom flange I20 and the top flange II9, directly over the jacking pad I01, and is welded in place, as,

indicated at I25. The floor stringers I09, IIO, are riveted to the jacking beam by means of brackets I26. It is to be understood that one of these jacking pads, I01, is positioned on each end of the jacking beam, and that the structure of the jacking beam on both sides of the center sill is identical.

The deep cross-bearers I04, I05 (see Fig. 11) comprise a pair of webs I21, one placed on each side of the center sill, and a flange I28 completely surrounds each of the webs I21. The floor stringers I09, IIIl, are riveted to the crossbearers by brackets I34, and a reinforcing plate I29 joins and is secured to the bottom flanges of the webs I21.

All of the various longitudinal members tie into the end' sill I30 at the articulated end in some suitable manner, as shown in Fig. 5, and into the vestibule end sill I3I at the non-articulated end in the case of the center sill, as best shown in Fig. 4, and into the body end sill I32 in the case of the other longitudinal members. A pair of longitudinal members I69 extend from the vestibule end sill I3I to the body end sill I32, and each is suitably secured in place.

The' spacing of the shallow cross-bearers I08 depends largely upon the weights and location of the various pieces of equipment to be supported,

for example, heavy equipment will normally require close spacing of the shallow. cross-bearers, as indicated in Fig. 5.

Because of the extremely low floor level between v the truck regions it is often difilcult to find room for mounting of equipment, and consequently provision must be made in the underframe to increase available room. In Fig. 4 it will be seen that to the right of the deep cross-bearer I04 a portion of the floor stringer I I0 has been moved toward the center sill so as to provide a large opening I33 for receiving some large piece of equipment.

An attempt has been made to indicate in the drawings and description where the various members are attached, and many riveted joints have been shown in the drawings. It is to be understood, however, that the number of rivets required at each joint is not accurately shown.

Welding has been used to a great extent in securing together many of the members, and, of course, may be used in a great many places other than those shown.

The floor III may be made up of layers of cork or other suitable material placed on conventional flooring, and is supported on floor stringers, as best shown in Figs. 13 and 14. Along the sides of the floor truss planks I are placed between the floor and the side wall, and extend the full length of the car body, projecting below the flooring. These planks are flanged inwardly at I86, thus providing a seal for the floor along the sides of the car.

Floor supports I81, having flanges I88 engaging the flanges I88 .of the truss planks I85, extend upwardly from and are secured to the vertical flanges I89 of the side sills. I

Projecting downwardly from the-sides of the car are skirts I90, indicated in broken lines in Fig. 13, and they are provided with stifiening flanges I9I and are supported from the underframe by means of skirt supports I92. Flanges I93 extend along the top of the skirts for riveting purposes.

Referring to Figs. 4, 15, and 16, coupling mechanism, generally indicated at I94, is provided for fastening the car to an adjoining car at the nonarticulated ends thereof. The specific details of this coupling mechanism do not constitute part of the present invention, and for that reason only a general, brief description will suffice. The coupler itself is shown at I95 (Fig. 15), and extending rearwardly from the coupler head I 95 is a coupler shank I96. The center sill 91 of the car underframe is spread adjacent to one end thereof, as indicated at 91', and the coupler I95 with its shank I96 is supported between these spread portions 91' of the center sill. A draft gear arrangement, generally indicated at I91, is provided at the rear end of the coupler shank. This draft gear is adapted to take up shocks exerted on the coupler head I95 due to the transmission of forces through the coupler and 'is fastened to the center sill 91-of the underframe in some suitable manner to transfer forces from the shank I98 of the coupler into the center sill. Arms I98 are provided on each side of the shank I96 of the coupler, and by means of springs I99 these arms I98 tend to hold the coupler normally in its central position shown in Fig. 15. A coupler supporting member 200 is arranged to support the free end of the coupler. The present coupler arrangement is very similar to the one shown in the patent to Andrew Christianson No. 2,149,840, dated March '1, 1939. This patent clearly and completely details oi. construction and operation oi a tight-lock coupler or the type illustrated in the present application.

We claim as our invention:

1. A railway car of the class described mounted on trucks and having an-underirame including a center sill extending throughout the length of the car; the longitudinal axis 01' which is substantially a straight line, means at the ends oi.

'the car for receiving the bufijand draft loads,

the'relative positions 01 the center sill and said means being such that the longitudinal axis of the center sill will be substantially along the line of bail and draft applied at said means, car side sills lying substantially in the horizontal projection of the center sill in the region between the .sills lying within the horizontal projection of the center sill in the region between the trucks and positioned at a higher elevation with respect to the center sill in the regions over the trucks, and

a 11001. Supp rted on the side sills throughout their length and spaced above the center sill adjacent to the trucks.

3. A railway car mounted on trucks and having an underframe including a bull and draft load-ca yin member which is positioned longitudinally oi. the car and whose resultant longitudinal axis is substantially a straight line, the position oi. said member being such that the longitudinal axis is substantially in line with the *line of bufl and draft, a longitudinal member on each side of the bud and draft load-carrying member and extending the full length oi the car, each of said longitudinal members lying substantially in the horizontal projection of the but! and draft loading-carrying member in the region between the car trucks and projecting above the horizontal projection of said load carrying member in the region over the trucks, and a floor supported on said supporting members throughout their length and also supported on and spaced above the center sill adjacent to the tricks.

4. In a railway car having a pair 01 trucks, an underframe comprising a center sill extending the full length of the car and whose longitudinal axis is substantially a straight line, a pair of .side sills lying substantially in the horizontal projection of the center sill in the region between the trucks and being raised to a higher elevation in the region above the trucks and floor stringers disposed with their upper edges above and closely adjacent to the plane oi. the top of the center sill in the region between the trucks and with their upper edges space above the plane of the top of the center sill in the regions over the trucks.

5. A railway car mounted on trucks and having an underframe including a butt and draft loadcarrying member which is positioned longitudimembers supported on said longitudinal mem-v bers and disposed below the top or the butt and draft load-carrying member inthe region between the trucks and on top of said load-carrying member in the regions adjacent to the trucks.

PETER. PARKE. NILS a THUNSTROM.

I CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION. I Patent No. 2,281,24 April 23, 19M. PETER PARKE, ET AL.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification 6f the above nmnbered patent requiring correction as follqwsr Page 2, second colunin, line 29, for "adpoining" read --adjoiningpage 1+, first column, line 52, claim 2, after "and" insert --also slipportefl on and f; and that the said Letters Patent, should be read with this correction therein that the seine may confonn to the record of the case in the Patent Office, v Signed and sealed this 25rd day of June, A. D. 191.12.

Henry Van Arsdale, (Seal) Acting Commissioner of Patents.

US223963A 1938-08-09 1938-08-09 Railway car Expired - Lifetime US2281245A (en)

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US32583040 US2310497A (en) 1938-08-09 1940-03-25 Railway car

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2788750A (en) * 1954-01-13 1957-04-16 United States Steel Corp Railway car underframe construction
DE1121641B (en) * 1956-06-18 1962-01-11 Budd Co Base for railroad passenger cars
US4353313A (en) * 1979-05-24 1982-10-12 Centro Ricerche Fiat S.P.A. Body for a railway carriage
JP2009214876A (en) * 2008-03-11 2009-09-24 Alstom Transport Sa Railway carriage with access adapted for mobility-impaired passengers

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2788750A (en) * 1954-01-13 1957-04-16 United States Steel Corp Railway car underframe construction
DE1121641B (en) * 1956-06-18 1962-01-11 Budd Co Base for railroad passenger cars
US4353313A (en) * 1979-05-24 1982-10-12 Centro Ricerche Fiat S.P.A. Body for a railway carriage
JP2009214876A (en) * 2008-03-11 2009-09-24 Alstom Transport Sa Railway carriage with access adapted for mobility-impaired passengers
US20090255437A1 (en) * 2008-03-11 2009-10-15 Alstom Transport Sa Railway vehicle carriage facilitating access for passengers with reduced mobility
US8286560B2 (en) * 2008-03-11 2012-10-16 Alstom Transport Sa Railway vehicle carriage facilitating access for passengers with reduced mobility

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