US2267848A - Support for normal body locomotion - Google Patents

Support for normal body locomotion Download PDF

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US2267848A
US2267848A US33176540A US2267848A US 2267848 A US2267848 A US 2267848A US 33176540 A US33176540 A US 33176540A US 2267848 A US2267848 A US 2267848A
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limb
member
joint member
support
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Byron M Taylor
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Byron M Taylor
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F5/00Orthopaedic methods or devices for non-surgical treatment of bones or joints; Nursing devices; Anti-rape devices
    • A61F5/01Orthopaedic devices, e.g. splints, casts or braces
    • A61F5/0102Orthopaedic devices, e.g. splints, casts or braces specially adapted for correcting deformities of the limbs or for supporting them; Ortheses, e.g. with articulations

Description

Dec. 30, 1941. B. M. TALYOR SUPPORT FOR NORMAL BODY LOCOMOTION INVEN Filed April 26, 1940 Patented Dec. 30, 1941 UNITED STATES mPATENT OFFICE sUProntr FOR NORMAL BODY Loooivro'rrou f 1 Byron Taylor, La Mesa, Calif.

Application April 26, 1949, Serial No. 331,765

8 Claims. (01. 128-80),

My invention relates to a support for normal muscles or opposed groups of muscles as affected by their controlling nerves. Th'e poise and readiness for instant action of any persons body depends upon the condition of the numerous balanced sets of opposing muscles and nerves in a persons body. This state of opposed muscle bal- .ance is known as muscle tone or tonic contraction; and in moving any part of the body,

which is done by these opposed muscle groups, when one muscle or one set of muscles contracts,

the tone of its antagonist is inhibited and the relative degree of contraction and inhibition depends upon the mass and speed of the organ in action. Thus in walking, the whole action of the leg and foot depends upon the relative degree of tone or elasticity of opposing muscles connected to the bones-of the hip, leg and foot. Some of these opposing muscles are continuously taut like stretched rubber bands. In infantile paralysis, or like conditions, when one of these ing its opposing group unaffected, soon thereafter the affected muscle, because the disease prevents normal stimulation by the nerves, loses its elasticity and becomes flaccid. Then its antagonist having no opposition, sharply contracts, thereby .overstretching the defective muscle and pulling their skeletal member, such as the foot, out of its normal position. Pathological literature stresses the fact that not until sometime later does atrophy of the affected muscle and .other' attendant evils begin. Because the affected muscle or muscles are abnormally stressed, the result is enfeebled circulation of the blood and constrlction of the nerves. Because of these abnormal stresses th'us set up, there is malnutrition of the bones. These abnormal'stresses, plus immobility, over a period of time may causeankylosis of the joints and deformities, such .as clubfoot. Under conditions such as these, not only will the aifected muscle atrophy, but its overly-contracted and disused antagonist will, after a time, also atrophy.

Modern treatment, to hold the alfected organ opposing muscle groups has been attacked leaved organ in plaster casts and braces; but such" casts do not permit any movement of either the unaffected or the affected muscles, and such stage of the disease as soon as the afiected'fgroup of muscles is discovered, whicharticulated' brace means will not only support the affectedbody' member, but which articulated brace means will also have yieldable tensionmembers to substitute for the loss of elasticity of the affected muscle or group of muscles.

By providing such a means the over-extension of the aifectedmuscle and the over-contraction of its antagonist will be prevented, normal cirf culation will be maintained, abnormal strains and stresses in muscles and deformities of bones will not occur; and because the limb will be held in a natural positiomit may be, exercised while the patient is convalescing; and with the patient kept in a normal position, all of his energy may be thus directed toward combatti'ng the ravages of the disease itself.

Because of the muscle tone of a person, the

skeletal and muscular system of each body member, as a leg or arm, 'is -mairitained in a state i of dynamic equilibriumsometimes known in the scienceof anatomy and physics as tone": or.

resonance. By varying the tone or elasticity of the muscles, a tuned or resonant system is thus provided within the bodyfor any particular function, such as walking or running, and

this system, accounts for the quickness and,

those actions which the affected member would normallyperform, andits movement will then' require excessive energy andwill be awkward, jerky and spasmodic, In walking for example, under, such conditions the entire complex system becomes unbalanced and distorted, In order to walk at all, the body iscompelled'by integrative adaptation, to ignore the affected factors and to alter the unaffected factors, and thus evolve a'new system of locomotion resulting in y a perverted function of the body member. I i normal position begins by putting the affect-J5 It is proposed in addition to apply a means I of skeletal muscular reinforcement to the affected organ so that tonic unbalance will be prevented, to also provide for the adjustment or variation of the said means so that resonance of the entire system, natural and artificial, be gained thus enabling the person to maintain normal movement and positions of the affected limb, or member of the body.

At first an attendant will merely exercise the affected limb or' member after the means of skeletal-muscular reinforcement has been adapted thereto. Because the tension of the yieldable means of the articulated brace means may be altered, the limb or member may be moved at different rates, and because the system is maintained at resonance, comparatively little energy will be required for movement, so that the patient will soon be able to aid inthe exercise. During the later stages of convalescenc'e, the affected limb, including its artificial counterpart, is kept'andjexerciisedinastate of resonance, sothat the patient can re educate himself in all the complicated reactions of self-locomotion.

With the above explanation" in view the objects of my invention are:

First, to provide a support of this class which is arranged to compensate weakened muscles and provides a resonant balance for cooperating musjcles in limbs of the disabled wearer and said-support thereby providing a combined condition of resonance for the "entire system, both natural and artificial, of normal locomotion. I.

Second, to provide asupport of this'class which is readily and easily fitted on and removed from the wearers limbs; 7

Third, to provide a support-of this class which is very light and comfortable to wear and therefore dissipates a very "small amount of the wearf en 1 J1 Fourthjto provide a supporter this class which guides and aids the action ofiwea kened muscles fin: a disabled "limb, thereby "providing a restored -dynamic balance of muscles -in' the limb which permits the graceful "e fiortles's movement as of T I Fifth, to provide asupport'of this class which is arranged to compensate disabled and weak- ;ened'mus'cles in both the "upper and lower por- ,ti ons of the fw'earers fleg'ior restoring 'a resonant cooperative relation of the muscles of the entire limb; Sixth, to provide a support of'this class which is arranged to very closely'duplicate the normal and natural action'andffunctionofithe joints-of her I {is pivotally supported -'o'n the ankle joint Seventh, to provide a support of this class wherein 'the knee 'joint member is arranged to ren me persons knee joint in secure andf'steady upright relation when in standing position and to simulate the natural pathof the knee joint with its shifting axis; 4

Eighth. to provide a support of this class in which springs are arranged to 'controlthe inertia "and opposingmuscular tensionof a persons disabled limbs' so that tonic thence of the limb is' maintained-permitting thefli'mb to develop nor- 'm al muscles and a'graoef'ul'a'c'tion;

Ninth, to provide a support of this class which s adily adjustable and applicable to variously affected wearers;

Tenth, to provide a support of this class which affords and promotes normal action 'which'is a necessity for normaljgrovvth and development and restoration, of g the function of normal ?5 muscles;

Eleventh, to provide a support of this class wherein the ankle joint member has substan-* tially the same axes as the axes of the ankle joint itself, thus allowing for a freedom of movement approaching the normal; and

Twelfth, to provide a support of this class which is very simple and economical of construction, eflicient in its action and which will not readily deteriorate or get out of order.

With these and other objects in View as will appear hereinafter, my invention consists of certain novel features of construction, combination and arrangement of parts and portions as will be hereinafter described in detail and particularly set forth in the appended claims, reference being had to the accompanying drawing and to the characters of reference thereon which form a part of this application in which:

Figure 1 is a fragmentary side elevational View of my support for normal body locomotion; Fig. "2 is a fragmentary front elevational view thereof; Fig.3 is atop or plan view showing the lower parts and portions omitted to facilitate the ill ustration; Fig. 4 is a fragmentary side 'elevational view showing the lower portion of my support for normal body locomotion from the opposite side, as shown in Fig. '1 of the drawing; Fig. 5 is 'a sectional view taken from the line 5-45 of Fig. 4; Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary "elevaparts and portions throughout the several views of the drawing.

The limb brace members and '2, knee joint member -3, ankle joint member 4, "ankle joint member-supports Send "6, shoe 1, limb supporting bands 8 and '9, hip joint member '10, liip engaging members 11 and [2, abdominal supports I 3 and I 4, sacrum engaging pad '1 5, and theco'inpensation'springs l6, M, [8, |'9,f20, 2|-and 22"constitute the principal'pairts and portions of my support for normal body locomotion.

The limb brace member I is constructed of a tubular member la and -'a tube like ineinber To which is telesc'opically positioned within the tube like member la,"ass'h6vvnbes't in Figs. 1 and 2 'df the drawing. 'The lower en'dbf this brace memmember Wand is fpivotally connected to the knee jointmr'nber-S at itsupper end by means of tlie pin 1c, as shown best-in Fig. 7 of the drawing. "Secured on opposite ends 'of this brace member I v are siibstan'tially flat plate like members 'Id in which are "positioned pivotal bearings at the pivotal connection of the limb brace member I with "the ankle joint member l and "the knee joint :member 3, all asshown best in Figs. 1 and? of the drawing; I

The lir'nb brace member "2 is "of similar construction to the limb "brace member "I and is pivotally connected'to the lower end of the hip joint member l0 "ati'tsupper end'a'nd is pivotally connected with the knee joint member 3 at its lower end bym'eans o'f 'thepin '2a,"as shown best in Figs. 1 and 7 ofjthedrawing. "Secured ranged'to'extend outwardly through the, arcuate slotted portion 3a. in the knee joint member 3, all as shown best inFigs.-6 and 7 of the drawing. This pin 20 extends outwardly from the side of theknee joint member 3 and engages the lever 3b; as shown best in Fig. 8 of the drawing. This lever 3b is pivotally mounted on the knee joint member 3 by means of a pin 30 and is provided withan angularly extending portion 3d, which is arranged to engage a notched portion 3e in the sliding latch member 3 which is reciprocally mounted on the knee joint member 3 by means of a pin 3g secured .to the knee joint member 3 and extending through the slotted portion 3h of said sliding latch member 3 all as shown best in Fig. 6 of the drawing. This sliding latch member 3 is provided with an angularly and inwardly extending portion 37' which is arranged to reciprocate in a slotted portion 376 in the knee joint member 3 as shown best in Fig. 9 of the hip engaging member II is the abdominal supdrawing. The extended end 3m of the angular portion 37' is arranged to engage a notch portion 3n in the stop member 311, which is rigidly secured on the outer side of the plate like portion Id secured on the upper end of the limb brace member I, as shown best in Fig. 6 of the drawing. The knee joint member 3 is provided with a downwardly extending portion 31" which is arranged to engage the stop member 31), as shown best in Figs. 6 and 10 of the drawing.

The ankle jointmember 4 is pivotally mounted on the ankle joint member supports 5 and 6 at its opposite ends and is substantially of curved form as shown in Fig. 5 of the drawing, it being noted that the pivotal axis of this ankle joint member 4 is positioned diagonally in relation with the shoe Lasshown best in Fig. 5 of the drawing.

The ankle joint member supports 5 and 6 are secured in diagonal relation on the shoe 1 by means of screws5a and Be, as shown best in Figs. 4 and 5 of the drawing.

,The shoe I' is substantially conventional in form and is arranged to support the ankle joint member supports 5 and 6 in rigid relation with each other so that the axes of the ankle joint member 4 is maintained in proper alignment with the wearers ankle joint, it being noted that the axes of the ankle joint member 4 correspond to the main axes of the ankle joint itself of the -wearers limb. Thus a rolling and lateral movement is possible.

The limb supporting bands 8 and 9 are secured on the limb brace members 2 and I respectively adjacent the opposite ends of the knee joint member 3, as shown best in Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawing. These limb supporting bands 8 and 9 are each provided with metallic band portions 80. and a suitable padding member 8b positioned internally of the metallic band portion 811, as shown best in Fig. 11 of the drawing. The opposite ends of the band portions 8a are adjustably secured together by means of a strap and buckle 8c and 8d respectively, all as shown best in Figs. 2 and 11 of the drawing.

The hip joint member ID is substantially flat and strap like in form and is pivotally mounted on the hip engaging member II by means of a ball and socket joint IIla as shown best in Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawing. The opposite end of the hip joint member ID is pivotally connected to the upper end of the limb brace member 2.

Secured on the side of the hip engaging member II is a strap like member I0b which .is arranged to partially surround the hip joint member I0, all as shown best in'Figs. l and 30f the drawing. The hip engaging member II is made of sheet metal and is shaped substantially .as shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 of the drawing. This hip engaging member II is substantially U shaped, as shown in Fig. 3 of the drawing and is arranged to support the hip engaging member I2 by means of the hinge -I2a which is secured on the extending portion Ila of the hip engaging member I I. These hip engaging members II and I2 are so arranged in their connection together that they conform with the hips of the wearer and are adjustably secured together at their ends by means of the straps, IIb.

Secured on the extending portion Ilc of the port I3. The abdominal support I4 is secured on the extending end I2b of. the hip engaging member I2, all as shown best in Figs. 2 and 3 of the drawing. These abdominal supports I3 and I4 are arranged to engage the abdomen of the wearer and provide relatively steady support of my support for normal body locomotion on the wearer.

Secured on the inner side of the hinge I2a is the sacrum engaging pad I5. This sacrum. engaging pad I5 cooperates with the abdomen engaging pads I3 and I4 in supporting my support for normal body locomotion on the wearer thereof.

The operation of my support for normal body locomotion is substantially as follows: Any person who has a disabled leg may placethe shoe 1 on the foot of the disabled leg and fasten the I limb supporting bands 8 and 9 above and below the knee respectively and the hip engaging members II and I2 are secured around the wearers hips in substantially the relation to each other as shown in Fig. 3 of the drawing. The knee joint member 3, together with its cooperating parts and portions, substantially duplicate the normal action of a persons knee.

The limb brace members I and 2 are pivotally mounted on the knee joint member 3 in opposed .relation to each other and the axis of these limb brace members I and 2 are held in ofiset parallel relation to each other, as shown by dash line A in Fig. 7 of the drawing. Figs. 6 and? illustrate the standing position assumed by the knee joint member 3 when positioned on the wearer. The offset parallel relation of the limb brace members I and 2 provides an arrangement whereby the pivotal relation of the limb brace members I and 2 with the joint member 3 tends to hold the limb brace members I and 2 in rigid parallel upright relation to each other. In this standing position, as illustrated in Fig. 6 of the drawing,

the extended portion 3m of the latch member 3 is positioned in the slotted portion 312 of the stop member 3p, holding the joint member 3 in rigid relation with the limb brace member I. The pivotally mounted ofiset relation of the limb brace member 2 with the limb brace member I tends to force the pin 2c into engagement with the end portion 2d of the slotted portion 3a in the knee joint member 3, all as shown best in Fig. 6 of the drawing. This connected relation of the limb brace members I and 2 provides a steady support whereby the standing position of a weakened limb is prevented from bending at the knee joint due to loss, of muscular control the knee.

ber 2 pivots on the pin 2a in the. knee joint member 3 and forces the pin 2c in the slot 3a into engagement with the upper end B of the lever 31) causingthe portion 3d thereof to raise the latch member 3] disengaging the portion 3m thereof from a notched portion 3n in the stop member 310 permitting the limb brace member I to pivot on the pin lcinthe knee joint member 3. It will be noted that the pin 20 in the slotted portions -3a must pivot substantially twenty degrees on the pin 2a before the knee joint member 3 will bereelased from the rigid secured relation with the limb brace l and that as the wearers knee returns to substantially the stand- "ing position, the compression spring C, in engagement with one side of the lever 31), forces said lever 3b and the latch member 3 into engagement with the stop portion 3p thereby looking the knee joint 3 together with the limb brace I. It will be noted that the downwardly exand I8 are secured on the hip engaging member H at their upper ends and are secured to the limb supporting band 8 at their lower ends. These springs l6 and I8 are arranged to compensate for weakened muscles in the upper portion of the leg and are arranged to control the inertia and jerky reaction of muscles in the upper leg. The spring I! is secured at its upper end to the hip engaging member I l and is secured to the limb supporting band 9 at its other end. This spring is arranged to compensate for weakened muscles in the back side of the upper leg. The spring I 9 is interposed between an outwardly extending pin 2e on the limb brace member 2 and the limb brace member 1 near the lower end of the knee joint member 3, as shown best in Fig. 6 of the drawing. This spring l9 tends to hold the knee joint member 3 in substantially the position as shown in Fig. 6 of the drawing. This spring I9 is applied when the patients knee has a tendency to bend due to loss of muscular control. This spring [9 operates as an inverse function spring tending to hold the knee in steady upright position when standing and operates inversely after the knee is bent substantially 20 so that aid is provided in the bending action of The springs 2|) and 2| are arranged to compensate for weakened muscles in the lower leg which control the use of the ankle and foot. These springs 20 and 21 are interposed between the limb supporting band 9 and the ankle joint member 4 and supports 6, as shown best in Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawing. The spring 22 is interposed between the ankle joint member 4 andthe which my support for normal body'locomotion is applied, each weakened muscle being given aid persons limb are opposed and positioned in counter tension relations, the tonic balance becomes destroyed by disease or disablement of any of the opposed muscles. It is therefore desired to compensate for the weakened muscle or muscles by adding a spring or springs of substantially equivalent tension with the unbalanced relation between the two opposed muscles.

In this manner the tonic balance of the opposed muscles is restored providing a chance for the weakened muscle or muscles to exercise without undue strain and in normal movements, thus stimulating the nerves and circulatory systems toward their correct behavior pattern.

Though I have shown and described a particular construction, combination and arrangement of parts and portions, I do not wish to be limited to this particular construction, combination and arrangement, but desire to include in the scope of my invention, the construction, combination and arrangement substantiallyas set forth in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a support for normal body locomotion of the class described,'the combination of a pair of relatively and longitudinally shiftable limb braces and a knee joint member, said limb braces separately pivotally connected with said knee joint member in oiIset parallel relation to each other when in standing position, means for holding said limb braces in offset parallel relation, an ankle joint member pivotally connected to the lower end of one of said limb braces, and a shoe pivotally supported on said ankle joint member with its pivotal axis diagonally disposed to the axis of the pivotal connection between said limb brace and said ankle joint member.

2. Ina support for normal body locomotion of the class described, the combination of a pair of relatively and longitudinally slriftable limb braces and a knee joint member, said limb braces separately pivotally connected with said knee joint member in offset parallel relation to each other when in standing position, means for holding said limb braces in offset parallel relation, an ankle joint member pivotally connected to the lower end of one of said limb braces, a shoe pivotally supported on said ankle joint member with its pivotal axis diagonally disposed to the axis of the pivotal connection between said limb and said ankle joint member, and a hip engaging member pivotally connected with the upper end of one of said limb braces.

3. In a support for normal body locomotion of the class described, the combination of pivotally connected limb brace members, limb supporting bands secured thereon at opposite sides of the pivotal connection of said limb brace members and compensation springs cooperatively connected with said limb brace members and saidlimb supporting bands, an ankle joint member pivotally connected to one of said limb brace members, and a shoe pivotally supported on said ankle joint member with its pivotal axis diagonally disposed to the pivotal connection between said limb brace member and said ankle joint member. s

4. In a support for normal body locomotion of the class described, the combination of pivotally connected limb brace members, limb supporting bands secured thereon at opposite sides of the pivotal connection of said limb brace members and compensation springs cooperatively connected with said limb brace members and said limb supporting bands, an ankle joint member pivotally connected to one of said limb brace members, a shoe pivotally supported on said ankle joint member with its pivotal axis diagonally disposed to the pivotal connection between said limb brace member and said ankle joint member, and compensation springs interconnecting said ankle joint member and one of said limb supporting bands.

5. In a support for normal body locomotion of the class described, the combination of a limb brace member, an ankle joint member pivotally connected to the lower end of said limb brace member, a shoe pivotally supported on said ankle joint member with its pivotal axis diagonally disposed to the axis of the pivotal connection between said limb brace member and said ankle joint member.

6. In a support for normal body locomotion of the class described, the combination of a pair of limb braces and a knee joint member, said limb braces connected with said knee joint member,

pin and slot means controlling the relative movement of said limb braces and an inverse function spring interconnecting said limb braces at opposite ends of said knee joint member.

7. In a support for normal body locomotion of the class described, the combination of a pair of limb braces and a knee joint member, said limb braces connected with said knee joint member, a pin secured to one of said limb brace members and said knee joint member provided with a slot in which said pin is reciprocally mounted and an inverse function spring interconnecting said limb braces extending substantially parallel with said limb braces over said knee joint member.

8. In a support for normal body locomotion of the class described, the combination of a pair of limb braces, and a knee joint member, said limb braces connected with said knee joint member in pivotal relation with each other and an inverse function spring connected with said limb braces in substantial alignment with said braces and said knee joint member arranged to pass over the pivotal joint of said knee joint member with said limb braces.

BYRON M. TAYLOR.

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Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2559473A (en) * 1949-01-27 1951-07-03 Sr Wallace L Slodek Leg brace
US2573866A (en) * 1948-05-14 1951-11-06 Myron W Nusbaum Leg brace
US2578108A (en) * 1949-08-16 1951-12-11 Loxla C Thornton Leg brace
US2632440A (en) * 1947-12-17 1953-03-24 John M Hauser Leg brace joint and lock
US2656834A (en) * 1951-07-06 1953-10-27 Nathan R Hatkoff Orthopedic device for the ankle
DE1055177B (en) * 1954-08-23 1959-04-16 Harry Erik Rehnberg Beinstuetze
US2883982A (en) * 1956-09-06 1959-04-28 Fred E Rainey Leg brace
US3086521A (en) * 1961-02-06 1963-04-23 Univ California Lower leg brace
US3230952A (en) * 1962-03-08 1966-01-25 Terron Candido Reyes Orthopedic apparatus having an improved joint construction
US3999540A (en) * 1976-01-08 1976-12-28 Freeman Gordon J Fastener means for a leg brace to connect to a shoe
US4370977A (en) * 1981-05-04 1983-02-01 Kenneth D. Driver Knee and elbow brace
US5058574A (en) * 1990-06-22 1991-10-22 Anderson Lucinda L Therapeutic limb brace
FR2721203A1 (en) * 1994-06-20 1995-12-22 Sudre Fils Brace the lower limb.
US5743837A (en) * 1994-11-01 1998-04-28 Laurcath Corporation Body mounted muscle exercise device and method
US6752774B2 (en) * 2001-06-08 2004-06-22 Townsend Design Tension assisted ankle joint and orthotic limb braces incorporating same
US20110093080A1 (en) * 2009-10-20 2011-04-21 Slone Clinton N Extra-articular implantable mechanical energy absorbing assemblies having two deflecting members and methods
WO2012125765A3 (en) * 2011-03-14 2012-11-15 Glaister Brian C Orthosis
US20130046218A1 (en) * 2011-08-15 2013-02-21 North Carolina State University Apparatus and clutch for using controlled storage and release of mechanical energy to aid locomotion
US8523948B2 (en) 2009-10-20 2013-09-03 Moximed, Inc. Extra-articular implantable mechanical energy absorbing assemblies having a tension member, and methods
US20140046235A1 (en) * 2012-08-09 2014-02-13 Egas Jose-Joaquim DeSousa Dynamic Load Bearing Shock Absorbing Exoskeletal Knee Brace
US20140046234A1 (en) * 2012-08-09 2014-02-13 Egas Jose-Joaquim DeSousa Dynamic Load Bearing Shock Absorbing Exoskeletal Knee Brace
US9265647B2 (en) 2012-08-09 2016-02-23 Egas Jose-Joaquim DeSousa Dynamic load bearing shock absorbing exoskeletal knee brace
CN105997320A (en) * 2016-06-22 2016-10-12 广东省工伤康复中心 Knee-powered radian pulley-type foot drop and hemiplegic gait orthosis
US9572691B2 (en) 2009-04-28 2017-02-21 Cadence Biomedical, Inc. Adjustable prosthesis
US9872789B2 (en) 2012-02-07 2018-01-23 Ossur Iceland Ehf Joint for rehabilitation device

Cited By (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2632440A (en) * 1947-12-17 1953-03-24 John M Hauser Leg brace joint and lock
US2573866A (en) * 1948-05-14 1951-11-06 Myron W Nusbaum Leg brace
US2559473A (en) * 1949-01-27 1951-07-03 Sr Wallace L Slodek Leg brace
US2578108A (en) * 1949-08-16 1951-12-11 Loxla C Thornton Leg brace
US2656834A (en) * 1951-07-06 1953-10-27 Nathan R Hatkoff Orthopedic device for the ankle
DE1055177B (en) * 1954-08-23 1959-04-16 Harry Erik Rehnberg Beinstuetze
US2883982A (en) * 1956-09-06 1959-04-28 Fred E Rainey Leg brace
US3086521A (en) * 1961-02-06 1963-04-23 Univ California Lower leg brace
US3230952A (en) * 1962-03-08 1966-01-25 Terron Candido Reyes Orthopedic apparatus having an improved joint construction
US3999540A (en) * 1976-01-08 1976-12-28 Freeman Gordon J Fastener means for a leg brace to connect to a shoe
US4370977A (en) * 1981-05-04 1983-02-01 Kenneth D. Driver Knee and elbow brace
US5058574A (en) * 1990-06-22 1991-10-22 Anderson Lucinda L Therapeutic limb brace
FR2721203A1 (en) * 1994-06-20 1995-12-22 Sudre Fils Brace the lower limb.
WO1995035075A1 (en) * 1994-06-20 1995-12-28 Bernard Sudre Lower limb orthosis
US5743837A (en) * 1994-11-01 1998-04-28 Laurcath Corporation Body mounted muscle exercise device and method
US6752774B2 (en) * 2001-06-08 2004-06-22 Townsend Design Tension assisted ankle joint and orthotic limb braces incorporating same
US9572691B2 (en) 2009-04-28 2017-02-21 Cadence Biomedical, Inc. Adjustable prosthesis
US9034049B2 (en) 2009-10-20 2015-05-19 Moximed, Inc. Extra-articular implantable mechanical energy absorbing assemblies having a tension member, and methods
US9788956B2 (en) 2009-10-20 2017-10-17 Moximed, Inc. Extra-articular implantable mechanical energy absorbing assemblies having two deflecting members and methods
US8523948B2 (en) 2009-10-20 2013-09-03 Moximed, Inc. Extra-articular implantable mechanical energy absorbing assemblies having a tension member, and methods
US9060867B2 (en) 2009-10-20 2015-06-23 Moximed, Inc. Extra-articular implantable mechanical energy absorbing assemblies having a tension member, and methods
US20110093080A1 (en) * 2009-10-20 2011-04-21 Slone Clinton N Extra-articular implantable mechanical energy absorbing assemblies having two deflecting members and methods
WO2012125765A3 (en) * 2011-03-14 2012-11-15 Glaister Brian C Orthosis
US9492302B2 (en) * 2011-08-15 2016-11-15 North Carolina State University Apparatus and clutch for using controlled storage and release of mechanical energy to aid locomotion
US20130046218A1 (en) * 2011-08-15 2013-02-21 North Carolina State University Apparatus and clutch for using controlled storage and release of mechanical energy to aid locomotion
US9872789B2 (en) 2012-02-07 2018-01-23 Ossur Iceland Ehf Joint for rehabilitation device
US9265647B2 (en) 2012-08-09 2016-02-23 Egas Jose-Joaquim DeSousa Dynamic load bearing shock absorbing exoskeletal knee brace
US20140046234A1 (en) * 2012-08-09 2014-02-13 Egas Jose-Joaquim DeSousa Dynamic Load Bearing Shock Absorbing Exoskeletal Knee Brace
US20140046235A1 (en) * 2012-08-09 2014-02-13 Egas Jose-Joaquim DeSousa Dynamic Load Bearing Shock Absorbing Exoskeletal Knee Brace
CN105997320A (en) * 2016-06-22 2016-10-12 广东省工伤康复中心 Knee-powered radian pulley-type foot drop and hemiplegic gait orthosis

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