US2253000A - Textile and method of making the same - Google Patents

Textile and method of making the same Download PDF

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US2253000A
US2253000A US15701837A US2253000A US 2253000 A US2253000 A US 2253000A US 15701837 A US15701837 A US 15701837A US 2253000 A US2253000 A US 2253000A
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fibres
fabric
fibre
textile
synthetic resin
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Jr Carleton S Francis
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Jr Carleton S Francis
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H1/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres
    • D04H1/40Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties
    • D04H1/54Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties by welding together the fibres, e.g. by partially melting or dissolving
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D02YARNS; MECHANICAL FINISHING OF YARNS OR ROPES; WARPING OR BEAMING
    • D02GCRIMPING OR CURLING FIBRES, FILAMENTS, THREADS, OR YARNS; YARNS OR THREADS
    • D02G3/00Yarns or threads, e.g. fancy yarns; Processes or apparatus for the production thereof, not otherwise provided for
    • D02G3/22Yarns or threads characterised by constructional features, e.g. blending, filament/fibre
    • D02G3/40Yarns in which fibres are united by adhesives; Impregnated yarns or threads
    • D02G3/402Yarns in which fibres are united by adhesives; Impregnated yarns or threads the adhesive being one component of the yarn, i.e. thermoplastic yarn
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS, OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M15/00Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, with macromolecular compounds; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment
    • D06M15/19Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, with macromolecular compounds; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment with synthetic macromolecular compounds
    • D06M15/37Macromolecular compounds obtained otherwise than by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds
    • D06M15/39Aldehyde resins; Ketone resins; Polyacetals
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS, OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M23/00Treatment of fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics or fibrous goods made from such materials, characterised by the process
    • D06M23/16Processes for the non-uniform application of treating agents, e.g. one-sided treatment; Differential treatment
    • D06M23/18Processes for the non-uniform application of treating agents, e.g. one-sided treatment; Differential treatment for the chemical treatment of borders of fabrics or knittings; for the thermal or chemical fixation of cuttings, seams or fibre ends
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S215/00Bottles and jars
    • Y10S215/04Capping materials
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S264/00Plastic and nonmetallic article shaping or treating: processes
    • Y10S264/75Processes of uniting two or more fibers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/30Woven fabric [i.e., woven strand or strip material]
    • Y10T442/3065Including strand which is of specific structural definition
    • Y10T442/313Strand material formed of individual filaments having different chemical compositions
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/40Knit fabric [i.e., knit strand or strip material]
    • Y10T442/425Including strand which is of specific structural definition
    • Y10T442/438Strand material formed of individual filaments having different chemical compositions
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/608Including strand or fiber material which is of specific structural definition

Description

Patented Aug. 19, 1941 TEXTILE AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Carleton S. Francis, Jr., New York, N. Y.

No Drawing. Application August 2, 1931,

Serial No. 151,010

12 Claims. This invention relates to an improved fabric of novel construction and properties, and to a novel method of making same.

One object of the invention is to provide an improved fabric or cloth having certain desirable characteristics among which are the ability to resist creasing and wrinkling, increased strength and greater tenacity between component threads or fibres.

Another object of the invention is to provide a fabric which is a marked improvement over prior fabrics and which may be manufactured according to the invention at less cost and with less expenditure of time than prior fabrics.

The invention is applicable generally to any fabric whether it be knitted, woven, or matted as in the case of felt or paper, as will be set forth more particularly hereinafter.

It iswell known to the art that desirable qualities, such as resistance to creasing and improved wearing qualities, may be imparted to a fabric by impregnating the fabric with certain synthetic resinous materials. The resins most frequently, used are those known as the urea-formaldehyde resins. The practice, however, of using resins for the purpose has heretofore been limited to an after-treatment or, in other words, a finish-treatment after the fabric has been made. This practice is carried out by impregnating the fabric with a solution containing the resinous material. The fabric is thereafter dried and is then heat-treated to cure the resin.

The present invention employs an entirely different means of introducing the resinous material into the fabric, and contemplates the association of fibres of synthetic resinous material with the fibres from which the fabric is to be made prior to the manufacture of the fabric. Thus, the synthetic resin fibres are mixed or combined with the fibres and the fabric then constructed therefrom. The fibres employed with the synthetic resin fibres may be natural fibres such as wood pulp, wool, cotton, linen, silk, asbestos,and the like, or they may be synthetic fibres such as rayon, cellulose acetate, spun glass, mineral wool, and the like, which synthetic fibres are well known to be inherently smooth-surfaced. In the production of woven or knitted fabrics, the association of the two types of fibres is brought about prior to the completion of the spinning of the yarn and preferably by mixing the fibres thoroughly together, which mixing is easily ac.- complished during the preliminary textile operations normally employed, for example, the carding step. However the association of the synthetic resin fibre and the other fibre may be accomplished by twisting the resin fibre around thread or yarn of the otherfibre or by twisting the thread or yarn of the other fibre around the resin fibre. In the case of matted fabrics such as felt or paper, the two fibres are mixed in the equipment used in the production of the fabric. The expressions mixing and mixture as used herein include all methods of associating the two types of fibres wherein the association takes place prior to the completion of the spinning of the yarn, in respect of fabrics made of spun yarns, and prior to the fabrication of fabrics not made of spun yarns.

After the synthetic resin fibre and the other fibre have been mixed or combined, the fabric is produced by the steps and the machines 'noraged. When the' fabric is cooled, the synthetic resin fibres become non-tacky and tough, and adhere to the other fibres, thus providing a fabric which resists creasing and wrinkling and pos sesses increased strength and greater tenacity between component threads or fibres.

The synthetic resin fibre may be composed of a wide variety of materials, and any synthetic resinous material capable of being formed into fibres which tacky at temperatures below that at which the fabric is damaged and which, at

room temperature, are non-tacky and sufficiently tough for the purpose may be used. The resin may be of the thermosetting or thermoplastic type, although.the latter is preferred, and may be colored or colorless depending on the type of fabric produced. For fabrics that are subjected to laundering, the synthetic resin fibre should be insoluble in water and inert to the acids and alkalies used in laundering. If the synthetic resin fibres are thermoplastic and soften during the laundering or subsequent ironing, it is not disadvantageous since the heat of the iron is equivalent to the heat-treatment originally employed in the production of the fabric. The ratio of synthetic resin fibre to other fibre may also vary widely depending on the properties of the two types of fibres and may be regulated to suit the purpose for which the fabric is destined, but

will be employed. Where a greater degree of strength or a close bonding of the component fibres is desired, the percentage will be relatively high, whereas in fabrics of certain construction where it is desirable to have a comparatively small amount of bonding of the component fibres, the percentage will be relatively small. 7

A typical example of a synthetic resin fibre which is particularly advantageous for use is a fibre of a copolymer of vinyl acetate and vinyl chloride. This fibre resembles rayon and is similar thereto in many respects, but it differs therefrom since it softens when heated to a temperature of approximately 200 F. When heated, it becomes adhesive to other fibres in contact with it and retains the adhesion upon cooling. It is tough and firm at ordinary temperatures, insoluble in water, and inert to the acids and alkalies used in laundering. This resin fibre is produced by methods well known in the artandv standard equipment, such as is utilized in the production of cellulose acetate yarn, is generally employed. Examples of other synthetic resinous fibres which may be used are polystyrene (vinyl benzene), vinyl acetate, polymers of acrylic acid, and acryla-tes, ormixtures or copolymers of two or more such resins including the copolymer of vinyl acetate and vinyl chloride, urea-formaldehyde resins, glyptal resins, and the like.

The heat-treatment maybe accomplished by any one of a number of methodsdry-ho-t air, exposure to heated metal surfaces, steam or hot water. wearing apparel it is preferred to immerse the fabric in water at or approximating the boiling point, as it is found that the water carries the heat uniformly through the fabric and accordingly reacts on the thermoplastic fibres throughout the entire fabric. In certain cases, however, where it is desirable to obtain a surfaceglazed effect on fabrics wherein the thermoplastic fibres are largely exposed on the surface thereof, it maybe more desirable to heat the fabric by surface contact with heated metal such as is practiced in the conventional heated calender. In any event it is the purpose of the invention to utilize the adhesive qualities of the synthetic resinous fibres to create a bond between .the component fibres of the fabric. The method of doing so may be carried out in whichever manner may be selected to conform most satisfactorily with the effect desired in the finished fabric.

As an example, in the manufacture of spun rayon fabrics, the rayon staple is cut to a length of 1 to 2 inches, providing the yarns are being spun on what is conventionally known as the Generally in a treatment of fabrics for I cotton system, or in lengths that may vary' from 3 to 5 inches if the yarns are being spun on what is conventionally known as the worsted system. Following the same procedure, the resinous fibre is cut to the same length. Approximately 10% of the resinous fibre, for example, is then substituted for 10% of the cut staple rayon and thoroughly mixed therewith. Using this mixed stock, the fibres are then carded and spun in the conventional manner. The yarn thus. produced may then be woven or knitted to form the fabric in the conventional manner. The term textile employed herein and in the claims includes the spun yarn, whether single or plied, as well as threads, cords and fabrics of all kinds produced therewith.

As a step in the finishing operation, the fabric is exposed to heat at a sufficient temperature to render the resinous fibre tacky. As stated above,

a temperature of 200 F. will serve to render tacky the resinous fibre which is preferably used. While in a heated, tacky condition, the resinous fibre becomes adhered to the other fibres surrounding it, causing the fibres to cling together. On cooling, the resinous fibres become noncementitious and tough, although still adhering to the fibre surrounding them, with the result that the fabric has imparted to it a desirable firmness and tenacity.

If paper fibres are employed in the production of the fabric, synthetic resin fibres, insoluble in water, may be mixed with the pulp in the heater, or merely added to the head box of the paper machine, and during the fabrication of the paper sheet, the synthetic resin fibres are distributed through the pulp fibres. The subsequent heating of the fabricated sheet may take place on the driers if they are heated suificiently, but

preferably the paper is subjected to sufficient heat and pressure in a heated calender.

As above stated, the invention is not only apfibres. By means of the present invention, ,how-

ever, it is possible to make felt employing synthetic resinous fibres in conjunction with smoothsurfaced fibres, such as rayon, since the activated adhesiveness of the synthetic resinous fibres causes sufficient adhesion between the fibres. In the manufacture of felt, wherein synthetic fibres such as cut staple rayon are employed, it is found that if approximately 15% of the resinous fibres are substituted for an equivalent amount of the base fibre used, and the fibres carefully mixed,

for example in the standard mixing box, so that the resinous fibres are uniformly distributed, this mixed stock may then be processed on a felting machine in the normal manner wherein it is exposed to heat and pressure, it being essential only that the temperature equals or slightly exceeds the heat of incipient fusion or softening of the resinous fibre. Obviously, if desired, the

heat-treatment may be carried out after the manufacture of the felt. The adhesion between the fibres thus created by the resinous fibre serves to bind all of the fibres in the fabric, and thereby greatly improves the strength and quality of the product.

The felted products, including paper, and the methods of producing the same, described herein, are the subject matter of my copending application Serial No. 300,876, filed October 23,

1939, as a continuation-impart of the present application.

In its application to the formation of composite yarn, the invention contemplates broadly the combining of the synthetic resin fibre with other fibres inthe yarn. As previously pointed out, methods other than those abovedescribed may be employed. For example, a thread or yarn may be formed by twisting together a fila-, ment of the synthetic resin with a textile fibre or yarn. The synthetic resin fibre may be twisted around the textile fibre, or the textile fibre may be twisted around the synthetic resin fibre. If the principal object is to merely adhere the components of the composite yarn together, the textile fibre should be twisted around the synthetic resin fibre. On the other hand, it may be desirable in some instances to have the various yarns of the finished fabric adhere to one an,

other, in which case the synthetic resin fibre should be twisted around the textile fibre. This method and the resulting product is the subject matter of my copending application, Serial No. 402,812, filed July 17, 1941, as a continuation-inpart of the present application.

and substantially permanent adhesion of the component fibres, the steps comprising mixing together, prior to the completion of spinning, at

' least two types of fibres of textile-making length,

portions of synthetic resinous fibres and the fibres, particularly textile fibres, from which the fabric is to be produced, and by treating the associated fibres in accordance with conventional methods to produce the desired fabric. As a step in the manufacture of the fabric, or thereafter,

, the fabric is subjected to a heat-treatment to activate the adhesiveness of the synthetic resinous fibres. It will be understood, of course, that the description herein given is for the purpose of disclosure only and is not to be considered as a limitation upon the invention.

The expression .stabilized textile as used in the appended claims designates a textile resistant to abrasion and laundering and in which the fibres tacky by heat to effect a strong and substantially permanent adhesion between the fibres without rendering the textile non-porous.

2. The method of making a stabilized textile fabric, which comprises mixing together, prior to i the completion of spinning, at least two types of fibres of textile-making length, one of which is a synthetic resin fibre having an inherent tackiness upon heating, spinning said mixture of fibres into yarn, fabricating said yarn into fabric, subsequently heating said fabric to render said resin fibres tacky to effect a strong and substantially permanent adhesion between the fibres without rendering the fabric non-porous.

3. The method of making a stabilized textile, which comprises mixing together, prior to the completion of spinning, at least two types of fibres of textile-making length,-one of which is a synthetic resin fibre having an inherent tackiness upon heating, spinning. said mixture of fibres into yarn, subjecting the textile to treatment with hot water to render said resin fibre tacky to effect a strong and substantially permanent adhesion between fibres without rendering the textile nonporous. i

4. In a method of making a stabilized textile which is to be subjected to heat to effect a strong bres into yarn, subsequently rendering said resin one of which is a synthetic resin fibre capable of being rendered tacky upon heating below the temperature at which the other type of fibre is damaged, and spinning said mixture of fibres mto yarn.

5. As an article of manufacture, a stabilized textile comprising yarn formed from a mixture of at least two types of fibres of textile making length, one of which is a synthetic resin fibre having an inherent tackiness upon heating, the

fibres in the textile exhibiting a strong and substantially permanent adhesion due to the thermal tackiness after heating of said synthetic resin.

6. A stabilized textile as claimed in claim 5 wherein the synthetic resin fibres comprise thermoplastic resin fibres.

'7. A stabilized textile as claimed in claim 5 wherein the synthetic resin fibres comprise thermosetting resin fibres.

8. A stabilized textile as claimed in claim 5 wherein the synthetic resin fibre is present in an amount of from 5% to 20% by weight of the fibres.

9. As an article of manufacture, a singles yarn for use in stabilized textiles which are to be subjected to heat to effect a strong and substantially permanent adhesion between component fibres, comprising a mixture of at least two types of fibres of textile-making length, one of which is a synthetic resin fibre having an inherent tackiness upon heating which will eifect said adhesion.

10. In a method of making a stabilized textile fabric which is to be subjected to heat to effect a strong and substantially permanent adhesion of the component fibres, the steps comprising mixing together, prior to the completion of spinning, at least two types of fibres of textile-making length one of which is asynthetic resin fibre capable of being rendered tacky upon heating below the temperature at which the. other type of fibre is damaged, spinning said mixture of fibres into yarn, and fabricating a fabricfrom said yarn.

11. As an article of manufacture, a stabilized textile yarn formed from a mixture of at least two types of fibres of textile-making length, one of which is a synthetic resin fibre having an inherent tackiness upon heating, the fibres in the yarn exhibiting a strong and substantially permanent adhesion due to the thermal tacklness after heating of said synthetic resin.

12. As an article of manufacture, a textile fabric which is to be subjected to heat to effect a strong and substantially permanent adhesion between component fibres, said fabric comprising yarns formed from a mixture of at least two types of fibres of textile-making length one of which is a synthetic resin fibre having an inherent tackiness upon heating which will efiect said ad-. hesion. CARLETON S. FRANCIS, Ja.

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Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2418904A (en) * 1943-06-23 1947-04-15 Carbide & Carbon Chem Corp Production of reinforced composite structures
US2435543A (en) * 1942-07-07 1948-02-03 Alginate Ind Ltd Textile fabric
US2459804A (en) * 1942-08-01 1949-01-25 American Viscose Corp Shaped felted structures
US2460674A (en) * 1943-02-01 1949-02-01 Trubenised Ltd Shaped fabric article
US2464301A (en) * 1943-12-18 1949-03-15 American Viscose Corp Textile fibrous product
US2476282A (en) * 1945-01-09 1949-07-19 American Viscose Corp Textile products and production thereof
US2476283A (en) * 1945-01-09 1949-07-19 American Viscose Corp Textile products and methods of producing them
US2483405A (en) * 1943-11-20 1949-10-04 American Viscose Corp Fibrous products and textiles produced therewith
US2493679A (en) * 1945-02-15 1950-01-03 Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp Apparatus, including a manually positioned upper die for shaping armature coils
US2500282A (en) * 1944-06-08 1950-03-14 American Viscose Corp Fibrous products and process for making them
US2501208A (en) * 1947-04-04 1950-03-21 Cheldin Sidney Cleaner for forks, combs, or like implements
US2526125A (en) * 1942-05-25 1950-10-17 American Viscose Corp Paper products and methods of making the same
US2535373A (en) * 1944-11-08 1950-12-26 American Viscose Corp Molded objects
US2615231A (en) * 1946-02-15 1952-10-28 Ici Ltd Textile product
US2712834A (en) * 1952-05-06 1955-07-12 Chicopee Mills Inc Fire retardant fabric
US2899351A (en) * 1959-08-11 Thermoplastic paper
US2959838A (en) * 1956-08-13 1960-11-15 American Viscose Corp Rayon swab
US3100733A (en) * 1959-01-19 1963-08-13 Du Pont Polymeric sheet material and method of making same
US3229008A (en) * 1961-12-05 1966-01-11 Eastman Kodak Co Process for producing a polypropylene fibrous product bonded with polyethylene
US3645819A (en) * 1967-03-16 1972-02-29 Toray Industries Method for manufacturing synthetic multicore elements
DE2810299A1 (en) * 1977-03-11 1978-09-21 Ici Ltd paper products
US4644741A (en) * 1984-06-11 1987-02-24 Golden Star, Inc. Mop yarns made by fiber bonding process
US4818316A (en) * 1987-06-04 1989-04-04 Collins & Aikman Corporation Method of forming a ravel resistant warp knit elastic tape
EP0359881A1 (en) * 1987-05-26 1990-03-28 Wool Research Organisation Of New Zealand Inc. A method of stabilising pile yarns of tufted, woven or knitted pile products
US5902956A (en) * 1995-08-25 1999-05-11 Parker-Hannifin Corporation EMI shielding gasket having a conductive sheating consolidated with a thermoplastic member
US20040031534A1 (en) * 2001-12-05 2004-02-19 Sun Isle Casual Furniture, Llc Floor covering from synthetic twisted yarns
US20050106966A1 (en) * 2003-11-18 2005-05-19 Sun Isle Casual Furniture, Llc Woven articles from synthetic yarns
US20050106974A1 (en) * 2003-11-18 2005-05-19 Larry Schwartz Coreless synthetic yarns and woven articles therefrom
US20050106975A1 (en) * 2003-11-18 2005-05-19 Sun Isle Casual Furniture, Llc Woven articles from synthetic self twisted yarns
US20060116041A1 (en) * 2004-11-30 2006-06-01 Sun Isle Casual Furniture, Llc Yarn having lateral projections
US20060225400A1 (en) * 2001-12-05 2006-10-12 Sun Isle Usa, Llc Method of making furniture with synthetic woven material

Cited By (49)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2899351A (en) * 1959-08-11 Thermoplastic paper
US2526125A (en) * 1942-05-25 1950-10-17 American Viscose Corp Paper products and methods of making the same
US2435543A (en) * 1942-07-07 1948-02-03 Alginate Ind Ltd Textile fabric
US2459804A (en) * 1942-08-01 1949-01-25 American Viscose Corp Shaped felted structures
US2460674A (en) * 1943-02-01 1949-02-01 Trubenised Ltd Shaped fabric article
US2418904A (en) * 1943-06-23 1947-04-15 Carbide & Carbon Chem Corp Production of reinforced composite structures
US2483405A (en) * 1943-11-20 1949-10-04 American Viscose Corp Fibrous products and textiles produced therewith
US2464301A (en) * 1943-12-18 1949-03-15 American Viscose Corp Textile fibrous product
US2500282A (en) * 1944-06-08 1950-03-14 American Viscose Corp Fibrous products and process for making them
US2535373A (en) * 1944-11-08 1950-12-26 American Viscose Corp Molded objects
US2476283A (en) * 1945-01-09 1949-07-19 American Viscose Corp Textile products and methods of producing them
US2476282A (en) * 1945-01-09 1949-07-19 American Viscose Corp Textile products and production thereof
US2493679A (en) * 1945-02-15 1950-01-03 Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp Apparatus, including a manually positioned upper die for shaping armature coils
US2615231A (en) * 1946-02-15 1952-10-28 Ici Ltd Textile product
US2501208A (en) * 1947-04-04 1950-03-21 Cheldin Sidney Cleaner for forks, combs, or like implements
US2712834A (en) * 1952-05-06 1955-07-12 Chicopee Mills Inc Fire retardant fabric
US2959838A (en) * 1956-08-13 1960-11-15 American Viscose Corp Rayon swab
US3100733A (en) * 1959-01-19 1963-08-13 Du Pont Polymeric sheet material and method of making same
US3229008A (en) * 1961-12-05 1966-01-11 Eastman Kodak Co Process for producing a polypropylene fibrous product bonded with polyethylene
US3645819A (en) * 1967-03-16 1972-02-29 Toray Industries Method for manufacturing synthetic multicore elements
DE2810299A1 (en) * 1977-03-11 1978-09-21 Ici Ltd paper products
US4644741A (en) * 1984-06-11 1987-02-24 Golden Star, Inc. Mop yarns made by fiber bonding process
EP0359881A1 (en) * 1987-05-26 1990-03-28 Wool Research Organisation Of New Zealand Inc. A method of stabilising pile yarns of tufted, woven or knitted pile products
BE1002262A5 (en) * 1987-05-26 1990-11-13 Wool Res Org New Zealand Inc product pile son method of stabilizing a pile tufted, woven or knitted.
US4818316A (en) * 1987-06-04 1989-04-04 Collins & Aikman Corporation Method of forming a ravel resistant warp knit elastic tape
US5902956A (en) * 1995-08-25 1999-05-11 Parker-Hannifin Corporation EMI shielding gasket having a conductive sheating consolidated with a thermoplastic member
US5996220A (en) * 1995-08-25 1999-12-07 Parker-Hannifin Corporation Method of terminating an EMI shielding gasket
US6462267B1 (en) 1995-08-25 2002-10-08 Parker-Hannifin Corporation EMI shielding gasket having a consolidated conductive sheathing
US20040031534A1 (en) * 2001-12-05 2004-02-19 Sun Isle Casual Furniture, Llc Floor covering from synthetic twisted yarns
US20060225400A1 (en) * 2001-12-05 2006-10-12 Sun Isle Usa, Llc Method of making furniture with synthetic woven material
US20060225399A1 (en) * 2001-12-05 2006-10-12 Sun Isle Usa, Llc Method of making furniture with synthetic woven material
US8052907B2 (en) 2003-11-18 2011-11-08 Sun Isle Usa, Llc Woven articles from synthetic self twisted yarns
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