US2236178A - Bobbin and spindle for spinning, twisting, and similar machines - Google Patents

Bobbin and spindle for spinning, twisting, and similar machines Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2236178A
US2236178A US235295A US23529538A US2236178A US 2236178 A US2236178 A US 2236178A US 235295 A US235295 A US 235295A US 23529538 A US23529538 A US 23529538A US 2236178 A US2236178 A US 2236178A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
bobbin
spindle
bushing
bore
blade
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US235295A
Inventor
John A Kennedy
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
SACOLOWELL SHOPS
Original Assignee
SACOLOWELL SHOPS
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by SACOLOWELL SHOPS filed Critical SACOLOWELL SHOPS
Priority to US235295A priority Critical patent/US2236178A/en
Priority claimed from US246539A external-priority patent/US2236179A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2236178A publication Critical patent/US2236178A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR MAN-MADE THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01HSPINNING OR TWISTING
    • D01H7/00Spinning or twisting arrangements
    • D01H7/02Spinning or twisting arrangements for imparting permanent twist
    • D01H7/04Spindles
    • D01H7/16Arrangements for coupling bobbins or like to spindles

Description

March 25, 1941.
J A. KENNEDY ,236,178
SPINNING, TWISTIHG,AND SIMILAR MACHINES BOBBIN AND SPINDLE FOR Filed Oct. 15, 1958 l ATTORINEY,
Patented Mar. 25, 1941 UNITED STATES nonnm Am) SPINDLE FOR SPINNING.
TWISTING, AND SIMILAR MACHINES John A. Kennedy, Saco, Maine, assignor to Sam- Ifioawlelll Shops, Boston, Mass, a corporation of Application October 15, 1938, Serial No. 235,295
4 Claims. (Cl. 242-462) This invention relates to bobbins such as those used in spinning, twisting and other textile machines. It involves both the construction of the bobbins themselves and also their mounting on the spindles which support and drive them.
In recent years there has been a constant trend toward the use of larger packages and higher speeds in spinning, twisting, and similar operations. The increased package size is of advantage in permitting longer production runs between shut-downs for dofling, while a higher pindle speed means, other conditions being equal, a greater production per operating hour. This trend has progressed to a point where the package load and the rotative speed in many cases introduce diihculties which offset some of the advantages gained, and one of these is the greatly increased rateof wear of both the bobbins and spindles, particularly at the points where the two are in mutual contact.
It is the common practice so to mount bobbins upon their supporting spindles that the wall of the enlarged bore at the base of the bobbin is pressed down upon and maintains a driving fit in a circumferential line of contact with the tapered portion of the spindle, commonly termed the v I understood from the following description when acorn. The spindle blade projects upwardly from this acorn and is much smaller in diameter so that there is no contact between the bobbin 'andany part of the spindle above the acorn up to a point near the tip or nose of the bobbin where its bore is reduced in size sufficiently to engage the spindle blade and thus center the bobbin. However, the common practice is to maintain a clearance of a few thousandths of an inch between the blade and the bore of the bobbin at this point. Such a construction 'is considered necessary to permit the bobbin to be seated with a driving fit on the tapered acorn, since otherwise the blade, which often also is tapered near its upper end, might first engage the bobbin and so prevent the production of effective driving contact between the bobbin base and the acorn. In addition, some clearance between the bobbin tip and the blade is of advantage in producing better running conditions.
While such constructions have been successful heretofore, the use of higher speeds and larger and heavier yarn packages-coupled with the fact that such packages are never accurately balanced, has so increased the vibration and torque loading upon the spindle that the rate of wear of the parts has been greatly increased and has become an important practical factcr. Frequently a slippage occurs between the bobbin and thespindle, due to several causes, such as the in creased drag of the traveller, or the vibration of the bobbin, with a resulting tendency of the bobbin to chatter or to creep upwardly along the taper of the acorn and-thus reduce the frictional grip depended upon to drive'it. When such slippage occurs, wear of the parts at the base of the bobbin progresses rapidly. Often, also, 'vibration of the bobbin whips the upper end of this member against the blade of the spindle, producing wear which increases very rapidly with an increase in the amplitude of relative oscillation of the parts. This also tends to losen the driving engagement of the bobbin with the acorn.
The present invention is especially concerned with the foregoing considerations. It aims to improve the construction of both the bobbins, and in some cases of their supporting spindles also, with a view of minimizing those factors responsible for the high rate of wear and the unsatisfactory operating conditions, and to provide'an arrangement in which the driving association of the spindle andbobbin willbe made substantially more satisfactory and the useful life of these elements will be correspondingly increased,
The nature of the, invention will be readily read in connection with the accompanyingdrawing, and the novel features will be particularly pointed out in the appended claims.
In the drawing,
Figure 1 is a vertical, sectional view'of a bobbin embodying features of this invention and mounted on a spindle in the usual manner;
Figs. 2 and 3 are similar views illustrating different embodiments of the invention; and
Fig. 4 is a vertical, sectional view of the top portion of a bobbin showing a further modiflcation.
Referring first to Fig. 1, a spindle of a common 40 type is there shown hicluding a blade 2, whirl 3, and an acorn Q. Mounted on this spindleis a bobbin 5 comprising a hollow or tubular body similar in general form to the usual bobbins.- It may be made of wood, in accordance with the usual custom, or of any other suitable material.
1 The bore of the bobbin in the base portion there- Thisbobbin departs radically from prior constructions in the shape and arrangement of those parts which cooperate with the upper portion of the spindle blade. As shown, this part of the bobbin is equipped internally with a. resilient bushing 6 made of rubber, cork, or equivalent materials, rubber being preferred. It is held in place by abutting its upper edge against a shoulder 1, which may either be formed on the lower end of a sleeve or plug cemented into the top of the bobbin, or by making the upper end of the bobbin of a corresponding shape so as to produce a shoulder integral therewith. The particular construction used will depend upon the method of assembly which it is desired to follow. The lower end of the bushing abuts against a tapered -or frusto-conical metal washer 9 which is pushed into the bore of the bobbin and is held in place either by its frictional engagement with said bore or by resting on the upper shoulder of an annular portion Ill integral with the body of the bobbin.
The method of assembly at present preferred is to make the bobbin as illustrated in Fig. 1, to push the washer 9 into the bore from the top thereof, following this with the rubber bushing 6 and the sleeve 8, the latter being cemented .in place.
- Such a bobbin can readily be slipped on and off the spindle, whether the latter is stationary or running. Preferably the bore of the bushing is made .very slightly larger, say one or twothousandths of an inch, than the outside diameter of the spindle, and, because of its resilient nature, it will have a high degree of durability against any peening or frictional action of the spindle blade at its area of contact therewith.
In addition, it preferably exerts a slight yielding grip on the blade so that it supplements the rotating drive chiefly produced by the fit of the tapered base on the acorn 4 because of the high co-efficient of friction common to resilient materials of this nature when acting upon metallic surfaces. It also improves the running conditions of the bobbin, both because of its ability to absorb vibrations within its own mass, and also for the reason that it affords the bobbin more latitude in finding its own center of rotation. A firmer driving contact also is produced by the better fit of the bobbin base on the slow taper of the acorn 4, as above mentioned.
It will be observed that the tapered washer 9 serves not only as a positioning element for the bushing 6 but also aids in guiding the tip of the blade into the bore .of the bushing when placing the bobbin on the spindle.
By slight modification; as shown in Fig. 2, the construction above described lends itself to an arrangement in which the bobbin may be supported and driven from its upper end. This embodiment of the invention is like that shown in Fig. 1 except for the fact that the bore of the resilient bushing 6' is tapered to fit the tapered upper end portion of the spindle blade 2', and the acorn 4 of Fig. 1 is replaced with a stepped construction having an annular shoulder l2 adapt-- ed to act as a stop for the lower end of the bobbin. That portion of the acorn above the shoulder is so reduced in diameter that a radial clearance of in the neighborhood of ten to twentythousandths of an inch is provided between it and the bore of the bobbin, and the latter is made approximately cylindrical in form throughout the entire distance below the part III. If desired,
the shoulder l2 may be entirely'omitted. In anyv event, the bobbin should not be seated upon it with sufficient pressure to prevent the bobbin from moving radially relatively to the spindle to any degree necessary to enable it to find its own center of rotation.
This arrangement for suspending the bobbin from the rubber bushing 6' and driving the bobbin through the bushing is very useful in many situations and has the advantage of minimizing wear of the mutually contacting surfaces of the spindle and bobbin and giving the bobbin a better opportunity to centralize itself on the spindle.
Fig. 3 shows a construction in which a spindle like that illustrated in Fig. 1 is-used, but the mounting of the bobbin on the spindle is effected through the use of resilient means at both the top and bottom of the bobbin. In this construction the bobbin I4 is similar to that shown in Fig. 1 but is provided at its upper end with an inwardly projecting annular boss l5 having a shoulder at its lower end against which the upper end of the rubber bushing l6 bears. The bushing is followed into place by a conical metal washer l1, similar to that shown in Figs. 1 and 2 at 9, and operating through its frictional engagement with the bore of the bobbin as the sole means for holding the bushing up against the part l5. In addition, it performs the function of piloting the tip of the spindle blade into the bore of the bushing in placing the bobbin on the spindle. This same mounting of the bushing can be used in either of the forms of the invention illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2.
Another resilient bushing I8 is mounted in the base portion of the bobbin and is held in place by an annular metal shield or ferrule 20. This member initially is made of channel section and it embraces the lower portions of both the bobbin and the bushing, its upper edges being crimped Thus it completely covers and protects the lower and it, it assists in-guiding the tip of the blade into the bore of the bobbin, and it prevents the rolling up of the lower edge of the bushing [8 which otherwise would be likely to occur. These parts can readily be made of such dimensions that the ferrule 20 does not interfere with the engagement of the bushing IB with the acorn 4, ample clearance being provided between the latter and the shield when the bushing is in full contact with the acorn.
A further arrangement for mounting the resilient bushing in the upper end of the bobbin is illustrated in Fig. 4. Here the bobbin 2| is provided with an annularinternal boss 22, integral therewith, and the bushing 23 is seated upon the shoulder at the upper end of this boss. It is held in place by a metal washer 24 forced into the upper end of the bore of the bobbin where it may substantially close said bore.
In all of these constructions the rate of wear of the mutually contacting surfaces of the bobbin and-spindle are greatly reduced, vibration of the bobbin on the spindle is cushioned and minimized, and the bobbin is afforded the degree of movement relatively to the spindle necessary to establishing and maintaining smooth running conditions. Thus the invention makes it entirely practical to gain the advantages of the higher other forms without departing from the spirit or scope thereof. Also, that theuse of such a construction as that shown in Fig. 3 for improving the association between the base portion of the bobbin with the acorn of the spindle'may, if desired, be used independently of any such cushioning means at the,tip of the bobbin as those above described.
Having thus described my invention, what I desire to claim as newis:
l. A bobbin for use in spinning, twisting and similar machines, said bobbin comprising a tubular body adapted to be slipped on and off a spindle in such a machine, a resilient bushing in the upper part of said body adapted to yieldingly center the upper portion of the bobbin on the spindle blade, means for holding said bushing in a fixed position in said body including a shoulder in the bobbin against which one end of the bushing bears, and a tapered irusto-conlcal sheet metal washer engaging the opposite endof .i said bushing and serving to guide the tip of the spindle blade into the bore of the bushing when said bobbin is slipped on the spindle.
2. A bobbin of the character described, comprising a tubular body adapted to be slipped on and off a spindle and having a resilient tubular bushing in the lower portion thereof adapted to yieldingly engage a cooperating portion of the spindle to center the base of the bobbin on the spindle, and an annular ferrule crimped around the lower edges of the bobbin and bushing and having a portion extending upwardly inside said bushing and serving to hold the latterin place, the internal diameter of the portion of said bushing adapted to engage the spindle being less than that of the ferrule.
3. A bobbin for use in spinning, twisting and similar machines, said bobbin comprising a tubular body adapted to be slipped onand off a spindle in such a machine, a resilient bushing in the upper part of said body adapted to closely encircle the spindle blade and to yieldingly center the upper portion of the bobbin on the spindle blade, 9. sheet metal washer of frusto-conical form, the lower and larger end of which engages the bore of the bobbin, the smaller end being directly upwardly, the lower end of said bushing bearing on said washer, and means in said bobbin above said bushing and against which the upper end of the latter bears and which cooperates with said washer in holding the bushing in its operative position.
. 4. A bobbinof-ithe character described, comprising a tubular wooden body adapted to be slipped on and ofi a spindle and having rubber bushings in the upper and lower portions thereof adapted to yieldingly engage cooperating portions of the spindle to center the bobbin on the spindle, a ferrule securing said lower bushing in place in said bobbin body and protecting the lower edges of both said body and said bushing while leaving the spindle engaging portion of the bushing projecting inwardly beyond said ferrule, a Irustoconical sheet metal washer engaging the bore of said bobbin and supporting the lower end of said upper rubber bushing, and means engaging the.
upper end 0! the latter bushing to cooperate with said washer in holding it in place in said bobbin.
JOHN A. KENNEDY.
, CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION. Patent No. 2,256,178. risrcn 2 19in.
JOHN A. KENNEDY.
It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered fatent requiring correction as follows: Page 1, sec- 0nd column, line 19, for the word "of" after-"view" read --to---; page 5, first column, line 18, claim- 1,: strike out "tapered"; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Office.
Signed and sealed this 6th day of May, A. n. 19in.
Henry'Van Arsdale, (S Acting Cominissioner of Patents.
US235295A 1938-10-15 1938-10-15 Bobbin and spindle for spinning, twisting, and similar machines Expired - Lifetime US2236178A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US235295A US2236178A (en) 1938-10-15 1938-10-15 Bobbin and spindle for spinning, twisting, and similar machines

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US235295A US2236178A (en) 1938-10-15 1938-10-15 Bobbin and spindle for spinning, twisting, and similar machines
US246539A US2236179A (en) 1938-10-15 1938-12-19 Bobbin
GB1722/39A GB523972A (en) 1938-10-15 1939-01-18 Improvements in and relating to bobbins for spinning, twisting, and similar machines

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2236178A true US2236178A (en) 1941-03-25

Family

ID=22884905

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US235295A Expired - Lifetime US2236178A (en) 1938-10-15 1938-10-15 Bobbin and spindle for spinning, twisting, and similar machines

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US2236178A (en)
GB (1) GB523972A (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2639647A (en) * 1949-02-23 1953-05-26 Nat Paper Can & Tube Company Battery insulator tube manufacture
US2668020A (en) * 1950-10-25 1954-02-02 Sonoco Products Co Yarn shipping core
US2922274A (en) * 1957-11-13 1960-01-26 Curtiss Wright Corp Textile spindles, particularly for top driving of filling quills
US3293842A (en) * 1965-05-26 1966-12-27 Jefferson Mills Inc Spindle mounted automatically doffable warp bobbin
US3454235A (en) * 1966-10-17 1969-07-08 Fusion Rubbermaid Corp Tapered wall tube
US4381088A (en) * 1980-10-01 1983-04-26 Dayco Corporation Bobbin core
US5119997A (en) * 1991-08-19 1992-06-09 Lee Jung W Tubular bobbin and spindle assembly for a yarn
US20110226883A1 (en) * 2006-10-03 2011-09-22 Sca Tissue North America Llc Dispenser that automatically transfers rolls of absorbent material, method of reloading same, and rolls of absorbent material for use in same

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2773346A (en) * 1953-05-18 1956-12-11 Draper Corp Textile spindle

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2639647A (en) * 1949-02-23 1953-05-26 Nat Paper Can & Tube Company Battery insulator tube manufacture
US2668020A (en) * 1950-10-25 1954-02-02 Sonoco Products Co Yarn shipping core
US2922274A (en) * 1957-11-13 1960-01-26 Curtiss Wright Corp Textile spindles, particularly for top driving of filling quills
US3293842A (en) * 1965-05-26 1966-12-27 Jefferson Mills Inc Spindle mounted automatically doffable warp bobbin
US3454235A (en) * 1966-10-17 1969-07-08 Fusion Rubbermaid Corp Tapered wall tube
US4381088A (en) * 1980-10-01 1983-04-26 Dayco Corporation Bobbin core
US5119997A (en) * 1991-08-19 1992-06-09 Lee Jung W Tubular bobbin and spindle assembly for a yarn
US20110226883A1 (en) * 2006-10-03 2011-09-22 Sca Tissue North America Llc Dispenser that automatically transfers rolls of absorbent material, method of reloading same, and rolls of absorbent material for use in same
US8511600B2 (en) * 2006-10-03 2013-08-20 Sca Tissue North America Llc Dispenser that automatically transfers rolls of absorbent material, method of reloading same, and rolls of absorbent material for use in same

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB523972A (en) 1940-07-26

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2236178A (en) Bobbin and spindle for spinning, twisting, and similar machines
US2872774A (en) Mounting for a spindle base of a spinning and twisting spindle in a textile machine
US2650465A (en) Mounting for spindles
US3167262A (en) Vibration-suppressed bobbin assemblies
US2625336A (en) Textile spindle
US2922274A (en) Textile spindles, particularly for top driving of filling quills
US3368767A (en) Textile pirn
US2699033A (en) Textile spindle
US2236179A (en) Bobbin
US2331611A (en) Bobbin and spindle
US2251390A (en) Means for mounting bobbins on spindles to dampen the vibration thereof
US2241118A (en) Spinning and twister spindle
US3467327A (en) Spindle snugging pirn
US3306543A (en) Yarn carrier mounting device
US2541802A (en) Spindle for use in textile machines
US2576124A (en) Double twist spindle
US2220006A (en) Spindle for strand wrapping
US2938676A (en) Top drive spinning spindle
US2497834A (en) Spinning and twisting spindle structure
US2249387A (en) Spindle
US2241140A (en) Spindle
US1662781A (en) Bobbin-clutching means for rotatable spindles
US3498554A (en) Textile spindle assembly
US505507A (en) Spinning-machine spindle
US2336593A (en) Textile spindle