US2214503A - Gas heating apparatus - Google Patents

Gas heating apparatus Download PDF

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Publication number
US2214503A
US2214503A US30575539A US2214503A US 2214503 A US2214503 A US 2214503A US 30575539 A US30575539 A US 30575539A US 2214503 A US2214503 A US 2214503A
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Prior art keywords
cone
heater
mantle
burner
heat
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Hugh G Landis
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BESS S LANDIS
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BESS S LANDIS
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24HFLUID HEATERS, e.g. WATER OR AIR HEATERS, HAVING HEAT GENERATING MEANS, IN GENERAL
    • F24H3/00Air heaters having heat generating means
    • F24H3/02Air heaters having heat generating means with forced circulation
    • F24H3/04Air heaters having heat generating means with forced circulation the air being in direct contact with the heating medium, e.g. electric heating element
    • F24H3/0488Air heaters having heat generating means with forced circulation the air being in direct contact with the heating medium, e.g. electric heating element using fluid combustibles

Description

Sept. 10, 19 40. 1-1 6. LANDlS 2,214,503

I GAS HEATING APPARATUS" Filed Nov. 24,1959

W Z A r /7 fin II II K/ffa.

. INVENTOR. a 6 GT 44007:,

, BY J i.

v ATTORNEY.

' Patented Sept. 10, 1940 2,214,503v GAS HEATING APPARATUS Hugh G. Landis,

Los Angeles, Calif.,' assignor-to Bess S. Landis Application November 24, 1939, Serial No. 305,755

9Claims.

My invention relates generally to gas heating apparatus and more particularly to that branch of the art which includes space heaters of the type wherein a current of air is used in con- 6 junction with heating means.

This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application, Serial Number 219,- 997, filed July 18, 1938, and which has since matured into Patent No. 2,181,138, dated November 28, 1939. p

The major object of my invention is to provide a combination heater and air-moving device which promotes the flow of heat therefrom into the useful zones for domestic and other heating purposes.

It is another object of my invention to provide a heater which makes use of the novel mantle described and claimed in my said copending application, but which can also be adapted for use with other forms of heat-producing means to accomplish the beneficial efiects herein set forth.

These and other objects and advantages of my invention will become'apparent from the following description of a preferred form thereof, and from an inspection of the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is an elevational view of a heater made in accordance with my invention, and

Fig. 2 is an elevational view of a simplified form of heater made accordingto my invention.

Referring now to the drawing, and particularly to Fig. 2 thereof, wherein the simpler form of my invention is illustrated, the numeral I0 indicates a shell of preferably cylindrical shape,

forming a combustion chamber inwhich a burner I3 is disposed, the shell being supported by any suitable means such as diagonal braces H.

A mantle M which may be constructed as described in my said copending application is mounted in the upper rim of the shell In in a substantially horizontal position with 'its lower face just above the normal upper limits of the visible flame of theburner l3, it being borne 5 in mind that this type of mantle will not function properly if it is placed so close to the upper face of the burner as to allow the flame to play across the mantle, since this results in the formation of carbon monoxide in relatively large quantities in accordance with known laws.

Disposed immediately above the burner I3 is a pyramid or cone 24 with its base substantially parallel to the mantle l4 and supported thereabove by any convenient means such as the framework 25. Disposed above the apex of the cone 24 and closely adjacent thereto is an electric fan indicated by the numeral 26 having a motor 21 supported on a horizontal platform 28 which is connected by suitable legs 29 to the cone 24 or to the framework 25 supporting it. 5 The cone 24 is preferably constructed of metal 'with its base polished so as to provide a good reflecting surface. While the cone may be made of solid metal, Iprefer to construct it of sheet metal and to fill the inside with some material having a low heat absorbing factor, such as asbestos or the like, so that there will be a minimum of heat lost by absorption through the base 30 of the cone.

By this construction, I obtain all of the ad- 15 vantages of the radiant heater illustrated in my copending application in combination with means for moving the air down through the area of maximum radiation, to further direct the heat .rays into the useful zone. For instance, when 20 a combination heater of this type is mounted on a standard and placed in a room to be heated, the fan 26 will force a strong current of hot air down to the floor, so that persons in the room will have the full benefit of practically all of 5 the heat generated by the heater, the cone 24 being spaced sufficiently above the mantle l4 so that the bulk of the radiant energy is directed outwardly at an angle between the cone and the mantle, and directly into the air stream 30 flowing down over the sides of the cone. Furthermore, the very high temperature of the mantle surfaces promotes convection currents up through the mantle and down into the air stream. heaters of this type work admirably when suspended by suitable means from the ceiling or rafters in large warehouses or similar buildings where it is desired to have the heaters out of the way and tosecure as uniform temperature 40 throughout the room as possible. For example, I have found that two or three heaters thus suspended from the rafters of a large warehouse, will, with a minimum consumption of gas, give a uniform temperature throughout the entire room with a minimum of convection currents, which condition is indispensable in certain industries, such as wineries and the like.

For large installations such as just mentioned,

I have found it advisable to use larger heaters 50 which are provided with a number of heating units. For.example, a plurality of burners can be grouped in a cluster under one cone in combination with an air-moving device as shown in Fig. 1, the cone being enlarged and the plurality 5 I have also found that combination I efiicient in heating shown and described of burners spaced side by side beneath the cone so as to give a greater quantity of heat. For example, I have found that a heater of remarkably high efiiciency and heat output is produced when 3 separate burners are spaced 120 apart beneath a single cone and stallation shown in Fig.1.

Referring now to Fig. 1 in detail, the numerals I311, I31), and 130 indicate three burners arranged in a cluster beneath a-eone 24a, the burners and cone being supported by a framework comprising vertical members l5 and l5a, base member l6 and top member IT. The framework is preferably formed of pipes so as to serve the double purpose of supporting the heater and supplying fuel to the burners. Suitable means such as the T It may be provided in the upper member for suspending the framework from the ceiling of a room.

The cone 24a may, of course, be constructed as shown in Fig. 2, but I prefer to form the cone with a cavity IS in its base as illustrated in Fig. 1. As previously mentioned, it is advisable to make the cone hollow and fill it with a low heat absorbing substance so as to reduce the heat loss due to absorption. A fan 26 is suspended above the cone 24a from a cross-piece 28 upon which the motor 21 may be mounted.

The operation of this form of my device is the same as that of the form shown in Fig. 2, the fan 26 blowing a strong current of air down over the sides of the cone which carries the heat down into the useful zone. By providing the cavity IS in the base of the cone, I reduce the heat absoroed by the cone and increase its useful life and in addition promote the convection of heat down under the edges of the cone and into the path of the fan-caused air stream.

It is to be understood that while this invention is particularly valuable in conjunction with the mantles of my said copending application, the mantles can be dispensed with and the heat from the burners allowed to pass directly upwardly to the base of the cone to be deflected downwardly and outwardly into the air stream caused by the fan 26. In this connection, I have found that the provision of the cavity is is a very distinct aid in producing a proper convection flow of heat into the air stream for conveyance downwardly to the useful portions of the space being heated. As mentioned, this form of my invention when suspended from above is particularly large areas such as storerooms, wineries, and the like.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that I have an embodiment of my invention which is fully capable of attaining the fan in the type of inobjects and providing the advantages hereinbetore stated, but it is to be understood that the form shown herein is merely illustrative of the broad concept of my invention as defined by the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. A space heater of the class described which includes: a burner; a fan disposed above said burner to direct a stream of air downwardly; and means disposed between said fan and said burner for deflecting said air stream away from said burner, whereby heat is carried downwardly and outwardly away from said burner.

2. A heater as defined in claim 1 in which said deflecting means comprises a substantially conical body with its base spaced above said burner and its apex adjacent said fan.

3. A heater as defined in claim 1 in which said burner is provided with a mantle overlying the same.

4. A heater as defined in claim 1 in which said deflecting means is provided with a downwardly opening cavity.

5. A heater as defined in claim 1 in which said deflecting means comprises a substantially conical body with a concave base spaced above said burner.

6. A radiant type heater which includes: an open flame burner; a mantle overlying said bumer comprising a metal plate having a multitude of relatively small vertically cellular openings therein; means for supporting said mantle just above the normal upper limit of the flame issuing from said burner; and means disposed above said mantle for directing a flow of air downwardly around the outside thereof without directing any air on to said mantle.

7. A radiant type heater as defined in claim 6, in which said last-mentioned means comprises a substantially conical body with its base spaced above said mantle and an electric fan disposed adjacent the apex of said conical body and adapted to blow a stream of air downwardly thereon.

8. A space heater of the class described which includes: a burner; a mantle overlying said burner; a substantially conical body having a concave base disposed above said mantle; a fan disposed above said conical body and adjacent its apex and adapted to blow air downwardly whereby an air stream is directed downwardly over the sides of said conical body to convey heat downwardly and outwardly from said burner without any of said air stream being directed on to said burner.

9. A heater as defined in claim 8 which is provided with a plurality of burners under said conical body and means for suspending it from above.

HUGH G. LANDIS.

US2214503A 1939-11-24 1939-11-24 Gas heating apparatus Expired - Lifetime US2214503A (en)

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2453913A (en) * 1943-08-28 1948-11-16 Bryant Heater Co Radial flow forced-air heater
US2515525A (en) * 1944-11-08 1950-07-18 George A Brightwell Gas-burning heater and air circulating fan
US2752911A (en) * 1954-10-28 1956-07-03 Ernest F Fisher Salamander type heating apparatus
US2796699A (en) * 1953-10-26 1957-06-25 John M Stinson Frost control device
US2832580A (en) * 1955-02-09 1958-04-29 Selas Corp Of America Convection heating unit
US2889142A (en) * 1957-01-08 1959-06-02 William L Ammann Crop conditioning means
US3437323A (en) * 1966-11-28 1969-04-08 Frank W Thomas Apparatus for the flue curing of tobacco
US20130312728A1 (en) * 2012-05-25 2013-11-28 Green Hydrotec Inc. Liquid Fuel Combustion System

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2453913A (en) * 1943-08-28 1948-11-16 Bryant Heater Co Radial flow forced-air heater
US2515525A (en) * 1944-11-08 1950-07-18 George A Brightwell Gas-burning heater and air circulating fan
US2796699A (en) * 1953-10-26 1957-06-25 John M Stinson Frost control device
US2752911A (en) * 1954-10-28 1956-07-03 Ernest F Fisher Salamander type heating apparatus
US2832580A (en) * 1955-02-09 1958-04-29 Selas Corp Of America Convection heating unit
US2889142A (en) * 1957-01-08 1959-06-02 William L Ammann Crop conditioning means
US3437323A (en) * 1966-11-28 1969-04-08 Frank W Thomas Apparatus for the flue curing of tobacco
US20130312728A1 (en) * 2012-05-25 2013-11-28 Green Hydrotec Inc. Liquid Fuel Combustion System

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