US2205679A - Shingle - Google Patents

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US2205679A
US2205679A US192093A US19209338A US2205679A US 2205679 A US2205679 A US 2205679A US 192093 A US192093 A US 192093A US 19209338 A US19209338 A US 19209338A US 2205679 A US2205679 A US 2205679A
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shingles
shingle
laid
area
course
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US192093A
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Jr Cortlandt F Ames
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Johns Manville Corp
Johns Manville
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Johns Manville
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04DROOF COVERINGS; SKY-LIGHTS; GUTTERS; ROOF-WORKING TOOLS
    • E04D1/00Roof covering by making use of tiles, slates, shingles, or other small roofing elements
    • E04D1/26Strip-shaped roofing elements simulating a repetitive pattern, e.g. appearing as a row of shingles

Description

c. F. AMEs, JR 2,205,679
SHINGLE Filed Feb. 23, 1938 INVENTOR CO/QTZAA/DT AMELIA BY 00% 4. mm
A ORNEY I shingles to be laid in overlapping courses on a roof or a side wall and, more particularly, to
Patented June 25, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE to J ohns-Manville N. Y.,
Corporation, New York, a corporation of New York Application February 23, 1938, Serial No. 192,093
8 Claims.
My present invention relates to prepared strip strip shingles cut from a continuous sheet of asphalt impregnated felt roofing material.
Roofing of the type referred to above is con ventionally prepared from a base material comprising felt, such as rag felt, asbestos felt, or the like, saturated with a relatively low meltpoint asphalt, and carrying, on at least its upper face, a coating of a high melt-point asphalt or other suitable water-resistant material. The coating generally has partially embedded therein a covering layer of a suitable comminuted mineral material such as crushed slate, crushed slag or the like of any desired color to provide a decorative and weather-resistant surfacing for the roofing.
Heretofore, strip shingles have been prepared from such base material, each shingle conventionally comprising a substantially rectangular strip having its area to be exposed divided into a plurality of shingle-simulating tabs by means of regularly spaced slots extending inwardly from the butt edge of the strip. Although strip shingles of this type have gone into wide commercial usage, they have failed to fully meet the requirements of the building arts of an easily laid, prepared shingle strip which will, when in place on a roof or side wall, closely simulate the appearance of conventional wooden or similar shingles. Thus, due to the thinness of the material from which the strip shingles are cut and the consequent fiat appearance of a roof laid therefrom, in order that the individual tabs defined by the slots will stand out, it has been necessary to make the slots of a considerable width. Accordingly, when shingle strips of this type are laid, the desired simulation of a wood shingle structure is not obtained due, for the most part, to the relatively wide slots or cracks between coursewise adjacent, shingle-simulating tabs, and to the lack of real or apparent butt thickness of the tabs.
Shingle strips of the prior art as described above exhibit the further disadvantage that considerable waste of the base material occurs in the process of their manufacture by reason of the removal of substantial portions of the material at the slots. Also, the presence of the slots necessitates full head lap over the entire width of the shingle to avoid penetration of moisture through the slots between overlapping shingles. Moreover, the thin, relatively narrow shingle simulating tabs are readily susceptible to raising or curling by the action of weathering conditions to permit the entry of moisture to the roof-supporting structure and consequent failure of the roof.
It has also heretofore been proposed to form 8 prepared strip shingles having an irregular lower edge, in some instances including a narrow line of contrasting color at the edge, to simulate the irregular appearance of the butts of a plurality of wooden shingles. The strips in this instance 10 are not provided with cut-outs, but the irregular butt edge, and the marking with a dissimilar color if such is provided, is relied upon to give the shingle simulating effect. These proposed constructions, however, have not been satisfac- 5 tory due to the fact that the butt edges of such shingle strips, when laid on the roof, are not emphasized in such a manner as to impart to the roof laid therefrom the appearance of a plurality of conventional wooden shingles.
It is, accordingly, an object of the present invention to provide a strip shingle which will closely simulate the appearance of a plurality of wooden or similar shingles laid in coursewise contiguous relationship. A further object 25 of the invention is to provide a strip shingle of the above-noted type which can be manufac tured without any substantial amount of waste occurring in the cutting of the same from a sheet of roofing material. A still further object 30 of the invention is the provision of a strip shingle, as referred to above, which will provide a maximum coverage with a minimum amount of material.
The above stated objects are attained in ac- 35 cordance with my invention which in its broader concept resides in an individual shingle unit including an exposure area of continuous surface demarked to simulate the appearance of the butts of a plurality of contiguous shingles, and a head lap area of pointed configuration. A further feature of my invention for the attainment of the foregoing objects is the simulation of a plurality of contiguous shingles in an individual shingle by the provision of an irregular butt edge for the shingle preferably employed in conjunction with a shaded area at and adjacent that portion of the shingle underlying the butt edges of shingles of a next higher course when the same are laid to impart an apparent enhanced butt thickness to the shingles and to bring out the irregularities of the butt edge of the strip.
A shingle strip as briefly described above provides the advantages that by reason of the conto tinuity of its exposure area, substantially no waste is incurred in the manufacture of the same and full width head lap is required only adjacent that portion of the strip which is to underlie the joint between strips of an overlapping course. As compared to hitherto proposed shingles intended to simulate the appearance of a plurality of shingles, the present shingle exhibits a substantial saving in material without loss of weatherproofness and particularly in its more specific form closely simulates the appearance of a plurality of individual wooden shingles due to the shaded area at and adjacent the butt edges of overlying strips, whereby a shadow line is provided which accentuates the irregular butt edge to impress said irregular butt edge on the eye of the observer and at the same time gives to the butt edge the visual appearance of a'thickness commensurate with the thickness of wooden shingles. Hence, particularly by combination of the irregular butt edge with the shading area and with the described construction of the head lap area, a shingle is obtained which exhibits none of the disadvantages of the shingles of the prior art and which does adequately fulfill the objects set forth above.
My invention will be more readily understood and further objects and advantages thereof will become apparent when reference is made to the more detailed description thereof which is to follow! and to the accompanying drawing in which Fig. 1 is a plan view of a shingle embodying my invention;
Fig. 2 is a plan view illustrating a plurality of the shingles of Fig. I laid in overlapping relationship on a roof or wall structure;
Fig. 3 is a fragmentary perspective view on an enlarged scale illustrating the appearance of the shingles when laid on a roof, and
Fig. 4 is a plan view depicting the manner in which the shingles are cut from a sheet of roofing material.
Referring particularly to Fig. l, a shingle strip iii in accordance with my invention is depicted. The shingle Ill is preferably composed of a. suitable base material such as an asphalt saturated felt, i. e., rag felt, asbestos felt or the like containing a low melt-point asphalt impregnant, and provided on one or both faces with a weatherresistant coating such as a high melt-point asphalt. The butt edge of the shingle strip is provided with a plurality of alternating projections and recesses i3 and M, respectively. One of the projections I3 is made to extend on opposite sides of the center line of the shingle for a purpose hereinafter described. The projections and re cesses i 3 and H are preferably of unequal and varying width and may, if desired, be arranged in such a manner that, when the shingles are laid, the butt edge contour of each strip will not conform with the butt edge of adjacent strips.
The face of the shingle Ill comprises an exposure area H and an overlap or head lap area l2. The longitudinal boundaries of the exposure area are determined by the irregular butt edge of the shingle and by the irregular butt edges of the shingles which will overlap the same as indicated by the dotted line l8 in Fig. 1. The mean width of the exposure area is represented by the dimension a. The head lap area includes a triangular portion having a height b substantially equal to the dimension a and a portion defined by the base of the triangle and the dotted line It, this portion having a maximum depth 0. The
dimension c is made at least equal to the width of overlap required at all points of the roof to prevent the passage of moisture between the overlapping shingles.
The asphalt or other weather-resistant coating provided on the upper face of the shingle preferably has partially embedded therein a suitable comminuted surfacing material such as crushed slate, crushed slag, or the like. The comminuted material It on the greater part of the exposure area I I and extending to a longitudinal line I I may be of any desired color to provide a pleasing decorative and/or shingle simulating effect. The comminuted material IS on the head lap portion of the shingle and extending down to the line II on the exposure area is of a color preferably darker than the material IE, or otherwise contrasting with the color of the material E6 to provide a shadow effect. If desired, however, the darker surfacing material may be confined to a narrow strip extending from the line I! to, say, the base of the triangular portion of the head lap area.
Shingles of the form described above are laid on a roof or side wall in the manner illustrated in Fig. 2. Thus, the shingles 10 are laid in overlapping courses on a suitable roof sub-structure such as the roofing boards IS. The shingles IDA of the first course are laid on the roof in endwise abutting relationship and secured thereto by nails or the like in any conventional or suitable manner. The second course of shingles indicated at IOB is then laid thereover to overlap the shingles of the course NA in such a manner that the upper end corners of the shingles lllB coincide with the points of the overlap area of the shingles IIJA. It follows that the shingles of the second course will be properly aligned for the length of the roof and will overlap the first course of shingles to such extent that their butt edges will lie within the areas of dark or shaded surfacing on the shingles of the first course and adjacent the lower boundary thereof. Further courses of shingles are then laid in a similar manner until the roof is completed.
It will be observed that due to the presence of the projection extending on opposite sides of the center line of each shingle, the required amount of head lap (see Fig. 1) will be provided by the overlapping shingles at the juncture between overlapped shingles. At the same time, at least the required amount of head lap is provided throughoutthe remaining portions of the overlapped shingles due to the gradually increasing depth of the head lap areas to a maximum where they underlie the joints between the overlapping shingles. Thus, the overlap between courses is such as to prohibit passage of moisture to the roof boards I 9 without, however, the presence of a substantial excessof the roofing material where it is not necessary. Hence, substantially maximum coverage is obtained from the amount of material employed. It will also be noted that the absence of narrow exposure tabs obviates the danger of raising or curling of the shingles by the action of winds or the like.
Shingles made in accordance withmy present invention and laid as describedabove will have the appearance to the eye of an observer on' the ground substantially as illustrated in Fig. 3. Thus, the dark or shaded coloring provided on the shingles of a course adjacent the butt edges of the shingles of an overlapping course accentuates the irregular appearance 'of the butt edges of the overlapping shingles due to the complemental irregularities in the width of the shaded area and, also, provides a shadow effeet which gives the appearance of an increased thickness to the overlapping shingles. The appearance thus attained closely simulates the visual effects provided by courses of wooden shingles.
The shingle strips of the present invention may preferably be cut from a length of the base roofing material continuously with the production of the same. The base material is preferably produced in the conventional manner, that is, a felt strip of indefinite length is led through suitable asphalt saturating and coating devices and to surfacing means at which a comminuted mineral material is showered in the adhesive coating while the latter is in a plastic condition and is partially embedded therein by suitable pressing rolls or the like. To form the shingles of the present invention, the mineral surfacing material is disposed as illustrated in Fig. 4 to provide alternating stripes 20 and 2| of relatively light and dark or shaded surfacing, respectively. The sheet after reciving the surfacing and having the same partially embedded in the coating, is
then led to cutting rolls provided with cutting blades adapted to sever the sheet into strip shingles of the configuration illustrated in Fig. 1.
The manner in which the shingle strips are derived from the roofing material with substantially no waste is diagrammatically indicated in Fig. 4. Thus, lanes of the shingles may be cut from the sheet, the shingle strips of adjacent lanes interfitting. The only waste of material resulting from the cutting operation is the comparatively small amount occurring at the edges of the sheet by reason of the irregularities there provided. By the use of a cutting roll having a circumference greater or less than the length of a shingle strip and by proper arrangement of the cutting blades employed to provide the ir regular edges, the irregularities of the butt edges of the shingles may be so arranged that each shingle of a lane differs from that of adjacent shingles of the lane. Hence, when the shingles are later laid on a roof or wall, no regularity in appearance will result.
Although the roofing sheet has been illustrated in Fig. 4 as being of a width to accommodate four lanes of shingles, it will be obvious that it can be of either greater or less width to accommodate any desired number of shingle lanes, it being preferable, however, that it be of a width to accommodate an even number of lanes so that the lanes will interfit as illustrated.
Having thus described my invention in rather full detail, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that these details need not be strictly adhered to, but that various changes and modifications may suggest themselves, all falling within the scope of my invention as defined by the subjoined claims.
What I claim is:
1. A shingle comprising a substantially rectangular exposure area including a butt edge of irregular contour to simulate the appearance of the butts of a plurality of shingles laid in coursewise adjacent relationship, a head lap area of pointed configuration to have a maximum depth substantially midway between its ends, surfacing material on said areas, the surfacing material on a portion of the shingle extending from the head lap area to a line below the jointure of said head lap and exposure areas contrasting in color to the surfacing on the major portion of the exposure area, whereby, when the shingles are laid in overlapping courses, the thickness and irregularities of the butts of the shingles of a course are accentuated by the surfacing of contrasting color on the shingles of the underlying course.
2. A shingle comprising a substantially rectangular exposure area and a head lap area of a configuration to have a maximum depth midway between its ends and a substantially lesser depth at its ends, the exposure area including a butt edge of irregular contour having projections and recesses to simulate the appearance of the butts of a plurality of shingles laid in coursewise contiguous relationship, one of said projections lying opposite the place of maximum depth of the head lap area.
3. A shingle comprising a substantially rectangular exposure area and a head lap area of a configuration to have a maximum depth midway between its ends and a substantially lesser depth at its ends, the exposure area including a butt edge of irregular contour having projections and recesses to simulate the appearance of the butts of a plurality of shingles laid in coursewise contiguous relationship, one of said projections lying opposite the place of maximum depth of the head lap area, surfacing material on said areas, the surfacing material on a portion of the shingle extending from the .head lap area to a line below but adjacent the jointure of the head lap and exposure areas being'of a color to provide a shadow effect on said portion of the shingle, whereby, when the shingles are laid in overlapping courses, the thickness and irregularities of the butts of the shingles of a course are accentuated by the shaded portions of the shingles of the underlying course.
4. A shingle comprising a substantially rectangular exposure area including a butt edge of irregular contour to simulatethe appearance of the butts of a plurality of shingles laid in coursewise contiguous relationship, and a head lap area of pointed configuration to have a maximum depth substantially midway between its ends,
surfacing material on said areas, the surfacing material on a portion of the shingle extending from the head lap area to a line below but adjacent the jointure of the head lap and exposure areas being of a color to provide a shadow eifect on said portion of the shingle whereby, when the shingles are laid in overlapping courses, the thickness and irregularities of the butt line of the shingles of a course are accentuated by the shaded portions of the shingles of the underlying course.
5. A shingle comprising an asphalt saturated felt base carrying on its upper face a coating of a bituminous material in which is partially embedded a surfacing of a comminuted mineral, said shingle having a substantially rectangular exposure area including a butt edge of irregular contour to simulate the appearance of the butts of a plurality of shingles laid in coursewise contiguous relationship, and a head lap area of pointed configuration to have a maximum depth substantially midway between its ends, the mineral surfacing on a portion of the shingle extending from the head lap area to a line below but adjacent the jointure of said head lapand exposure areas being of a color to give a shadow effect to said portion of the shingle, whereby, when the shingles are laid in overlapping courses, the thickness and the irregularities of the butts of the shingles of a course are accentuated by the shaded portions of the shingles of the underlying course.
iii
6. A roof covering comprising courses of shingles laid in overlapping relationship, each of said shingles including an overlapped area having a minimum depth at its nds and a maximum depth substantially midway between its ends and a substantially rectangular exposed area defined in part by an irregular butt edge having projections and recesses to simulate the appearance of the butts of a plurality of shingles laid in coursewise adjacent relationship, one of said projections lying opposite the place of maximum depth of the head lap area, and surfacing on said exposed areas, said surfacing including a portion on shingles of an underlying course adjacent the butt edges of shingles of an overlapping course of a color to provide a shadow effect, whereby the thickness and the irregularities of the butt edges of the shingles of the overlapping course are accentuated.
'7. A roof covering comprising courses of shingles laid in overlapping relationship, each of said shingles comprising an asphalt saturated felt base carrying on its upper face a coating of bituminous material in which is embedded a surfacing of a comminuted mineral material, and each of said shingles including an overlapped area having a minimum extension at its ends and a maximum extension substantially midway between its ends, the upper end contiguous corners of the overlapped areas of coursewise adjacent shingles superposed over the points of maximum extension of the overlapped areas of the shingles of an underlying course, each of said shingles including a substantially rectangular exposure area defined in part by an irregular butt edge adapted to simulate the appearance of the butts of a plurality of shingles laid in coursewise,
adjacent relationship, said mineral surfacing including a portion on shingles of an underlying course adjacent the butt edges of shingles of an overlapping course of a color to provide a shadow efi'ect, whereby the thickness and the irregularities of the butt edges of the shingles of the overlapping course are accentuated.
8. A shingle adapted to be applied in side by side relationship with similar shingles in a laterally extending course and to overlap similar shingles laid in staggered relationship in the adjacent lower course, said shingle comprising an asphalt saturated felt base carrying on its upper face a coating of a bituminous material in which is partially embedded a surfacing of a comminuted mineral, said shingle having a substantially rectangular exposure area and a head lap area having a minimum extension at its ends and a maximum extension substantially midway between its ends, said head lap and exposure areas being so proportioned and arranged that each upper end corner of the head lap area will overlie the point of maximum extension of the head lap area of a shingle of said underlying course when the shingles are laid, said corners and said point of maximum extension providing means for self-aligning and self-spacing of the shingle, and said substantially rectangular exposure area being formed to simulate the appearance of the butts of a plurality of shingles laid in coursewise adjacent relationship, the mineral surfacing on a portion of the shingle extending from the head lap area to a line below but adjacent the jointure of said head lap and exposure areas being of a color to give a shadow effect to said portion of the shingle.
CORTLANDT F. AMES, JR.
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Cited By (44)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US2487593A (en) * 1948-04-05 1949-11-08 Johns Manville Self-aligning shingle
US3127701A (en) * 1960-07-13 1964-04-07 Johns Manville Roof covering
US3919823A (en) * 1974-04-03 1975-11-18 Lloyd A Fry Roofing Company Roof shingle
US4187650A (en) * 1978-03-13 1980-02-12 Poplin James E Construction unit
US4333279A (en) * 1980-01-03 1982-06-08 Manville Service Corporation Three-tab shingle with staggered butt edge feature
US4527374A (en) * 1980-01-03 1985-07-09 Manville Service Corp. Three-tab shingle with staggered butt edge feature
US5406766A (en) * 1993-07-29 1995-04-18 Monier Roof Tile Inc. Multi-color concrete tiles and method and apparatus for making same
US5426902A (en) * 1987-10-20 1995-06-27 Certainteed Corporation Composite shingle having shading zones in different planes
USD369421S (en) 1995-03-17 1996-04-30 Elk Corporation Of Dallas Random cut laminated shingle
US5611186A (en) 1994-02-01 1997-03-18 Elk Corporation Of Dallas Laminated roofing shingle
USD379672S (en) * 1994-12-28 1997-06-03 Owens Corning Fiberglass Technology, Inc. Tab portion of a roof shingle
US5666776A (en) 1991-09-18 1997-09-16 Elk Corporation Of Dallas Laminated roofing shingle
USD388195S (en) * 1995-03-17 1997-12-23 Certainteed Corporation Shingle
US6195951B1 (en) 1988-03-28 2001-03-06 Certainteed Corporation Composite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6305138B1 (en) 1987-10-20 2001-10-23 Certainteed Corp. Composite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US20040055241A1 (en) * 2002-09-23 2004-03-25 Building Materials Investment Corporation Backer for tabbed composite shingles
US7743573B1 (en) 2007-09-17 2010-06-29 Engineering Innovations, LLC Roofing composition
US20150308121A1 (en) * 2014-04-28 2015-10-29 Robert Fox Pre-cut design shingle kit and method of use
US9212487B2 (en) 2005-09-28 2015-12-15 Elk Premium Building Products, Inc. Enhanced single layer roofing material
US9290942B2 (en) 2013-01-04 2016-03-22 Certainteed Corporation Roofing shingle with enhanced shadowline appearance
US9399870B2 (en) 2014-11-21 2016-07-26 Building Materials Investment Corporation Roofing shingle system and shingles for use therein
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Cited By (55)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2487593A (en) * 1948-04-05 1949-11-08 Johns Manville Self-aligning shingle
US3127701A (en) * 1960-07-13 1964-04-07 Johns Manville Roof covering
US3919823A (en) * 1974-04-03 1975-11-18 Lloyd A Fry Roofing Company Roof shingle
US4187650A (en) * 1978-03-13 1980-02-12 Poplin James E Construction unit
US4333279A (en) * 1980-01-03 1982-06-08 Manville Service Corporation Three-tab shingle with staggered butt edge feature
US4527374A (en) * 1980-01-03 1985-07-09 Manville Service Corp. Three-tab shingle with staggered butt edge feature
US5660014A (en) * 1987-10-20 1997-08-26 Certainteed Corporation Composite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US5426902A (en) * 1987-10-20 1995-06-27 Certainteed Corporation Composite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6523316B2 (en) 1987-10-20 2003-02-25 Certainteed Composite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6305138B1 (en) 1987-10-20 2001-10-23 Certainteed Corp. Composite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US5901517A (en) * 1987-10-20 1999-05-11 Certainteed Corporation Composite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6195951B1 (en) 1988-03-28 2001-03-06 Certainteed Corporation Composite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US5666776A (en) 1991-09-18 1997-09-16 Elk Corporation Of Dallas Laminated roofing shingle
US5406766A (en) * 1993-07-29 1995-04-18 Monier Roof Tile Inc. Multi-color concrete tiles and method and apparatus for making same
US5595698A (en) * 1993-07-29 1997-01-21 Monier Roof Tile, Inc. Method of making multi-color concrete tiles
US5611186A (en) 1994-02-01 1997-03-18 Elk Corporation Of Dallas Laminated roofing shingle
USD379672S (en) * 1994-12-28 1997-06-03 Owens Corning Fiberglass Technology, Inc. Tab portion of a roof shingle
USD388195S (en) * 1995-03-17 1997-12-23 Certainteed Corporation Shingle
USD369421S (en) 1995-03-17 1996-04-30 Elk Corporation Of Dallas Random cut laminated shingle
US20040055241A1 (en) * 2002-09-23 2004-03-25 Building Materials Investment Corporation Backer for tabbed composite shingles
US6804919B2 (en) * 2002-09-23 2004-10-19 Building Materials Investment Corporation Backer for tabbed composite shingles
US9212487B2 (en) 2005-09-28 2015-12-15 Elk Premium Building Products, Inc. Enhanced single layer roofing material
US7743573B1 (en) 2007-09-17 2010-06-29 Engineering Innovations, LLC Roofing composition
US8065854B1 (en) 2007-09-17 2011-11-29 Engineering Innovations, LLC Roofing composition
US9290942B2 (en) 2013-01-04 2016-03-22 Certainteed Corporation Roofing shingle with enhanced shadowline appearance
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US9399871B2 (en) 2014-11-21 2016-07-26 Building Materials Investment Corporation Roofing shingle system and shingles for use therein
US9752324B2 (en) * 2015-03-13 2017-09-05 Building Materials Investment Corporation Roofing shingle system and shingles for use therein
USD766467S1 (en) 2015-03-13 2016-09-13 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle
USD766466S1 (en) 2015-03-13 2016-09-13 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle
USD767172S1 (en) 2015-03-13 2016-09-20 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle
US9410323B1 (en) * 2015-03-13 2016-08-09 Building Materials Investment Corporation Roofing shingle system and shingles for use therein
USD764076S1 (en) 2015-03-13 2016-08-16 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle
USD769472S1 (en) 2015-03-13 2016-10-18 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle
USD765885S1 (en) 2015-03-26 2016-09-06 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle
USD765886S1 (en) 2015-03-26 2016-09-06 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle
USD763468S1 (en) 2015-03-26 2016-08-09 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle
USD765888S1 (en) 2015-03-26 2016-09-06 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle
USD765273S1 (en) 2015-03-26 2016-08-30 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle
USD765274S1 (en) 2015-03-26 2016-08-30 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle
USD765887S1 (en) 2015-03-26 2016-09-06 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle
USD766469S1 (en) 2015-03-26 2016-09-13 Building Materials Investment Corporation Shingle
USD814069S1 (en) * 2016-02-27 2018-03-27 David Nowacek Straight edge roof tile
USD814068S1 (en) * 2016-02-27 2018-03-27 David Nowacek Wavy edge roof tile

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