US2201716A - Knitting machine - Google Patents

Knitting machine Download PDF

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US2201716A
US2201716A US193622A US19362238A US2201716A US 2201716 A US2201716 A US 2201716A US 193622 A US193622 A US 193622A US 19362238 A US19362238 A US 19362238A US 2201716 A US2201716 A US 2201716A
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needles
thread
knitting
feeding
cam
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US193622A
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Jr Robert Evan Davis
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INTERWOVEN STOCKING CO
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INTERWOVEN STOCKING CO
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B9/00Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles
    • D04B9/18Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles with provision for splicing by incorporating reinforcing threads

Description

R. E. DAViS, JR
KNITTING MACHINE Filed March 3, 1938 3m @MMWW ATTORNEY 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 R. E. DAVIS, JR 2,201,716
KNITTING MACHINE Filed March 3, 1958- 'r Sheets-Sheet 2 R. E. DAVIS, JR 2,201,716
KNITTING MACHINE Filed March 3, 1938 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 ATTORNEY v May 21, 1940.
' KNITTING MACHINE 7 Filed March 3, 1938 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 A BY ATTORNEY R. E. DAVIS, JR 2,201,716 I y 21, 1940- E. DAVIS, JR i 2,201,716)
KNITTING momma Filed March a, 1938. 7 Sheets-Sheet s a, a IL, 55- mum: 6 2 a L f 1 4 V flam al f gffzgy f ATTORNEY y 21, 1940- R. E. DAVIS, JR 2,201,716
' KNITTING MACHINE 1 Fneq March 2', 1938 7 Sheets-Sheet. s
ATTORN EY y 1940.} R. E. DAv|s;,1R 2,201,716
KNITTING MACHINE Filed March s, 1938 7 sheets-sheet 1 Siwd'io n v 25 A'ITORNEY Patented May 21, 1940-, H
KNITTING MACHINE Robert Evan Davis, Jr., Fort Payne, Ala" assignor to Interwoven Stocking Company, New Brunswick, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application March 3, 1938, .Serial No. 193,622
9 Claims.
My invention consists in the novel features hereinafter described, reference being had to the accompanying drawings which illustrate an embodiment of my invention, selected by me for purposes of illustration, and the said invention is fully disclosed in thefollowing description and claims.-
My invention is an improved circular or seamless knitting machine for knitting plain knit seamless fabric by single feed and by multiple feed under the control of the pattern mechanism, and containing provision for incorporating an elastic thread under tension, fed to selected needles at one of the knitting stations, preferably in association with an inelastic body thread fed at that station,- to the end that portions of the seamless fabric, as the topof a stocking, may be formed of plain knitting with two, three or more courses knit simultaneously during each revounder tension, incorporated preferably with one of the body threads and secured to the fabric at spaced or separated points in each of the courses containing it, and floated on the inner face of the fabric between said points so as to draw the fabric into a plurality of vertically disposedrlblike ridges, and thereafter the feeding of the elastic thread may be discontinued and other portions of the tubular fabric, as the leg portion between the top and heel pocket and the foot portion between the heel and toe pockets may be knit with one, two or more feeds, i. e., by single course or multiple course plain knitting, as
preferred.
In carrying out my invention, the knitting machine is provided with a single circular series of vertically and independently movable needles,
a main knitting cam which may be located permanently in the cam ring, for example, at the throat plate, which is provided with the usual plurality of thread feeding fingers, movable into and out of operative position, and a series of auxiliary knitting cams located at intervals around the circular series of needles, each operating in association with a separate thread feeding finger (or fingers), the auxiliary cams and. their associated feed fingers being capable of movement into and out of operative position under. the control of the pattern mechanism, selected needles being arranged to be brought to a different elevation from that of adjacent nonselected needles at one of the knitting stations; so that the selected needles may receive the elastic thread while the body thread may be fed to all of the needles, and all of the needles receivlution of the machine, with the elastic'gthread ing the additional body threads adjacent to the auxiliary knitting cams when in operation, to produce the intervening courses not containing the inelastic thread.
,Where the elastic thread is incorporated dur- 5 ing multiple courseknitting as in the top of a stocking, it will be obvious that it will be incorporated continuously throughout the successive 'revolutions of the machine, so long as it is fed,
but the course containing it will be spaced by the 10 intervening courses not containing elastic thread, and the stitches of each course will be knit into the stitches of a preceding and succeeding course formed of a different thread. The fabric produced by my improved knittingmachine, and 15 the process of knitting the same, are not claimed herein, as they form the subject matter of a separate application filed by me January 15, 1938, and given Serial No. 185,122. The machine embodying myinvention herein illustrated and described, is particularly designed for the production of seamless plain knit hosiery, particularly men's socks and anklets, but is obviously adapted for the production of other forms of seamless tubular fabric.
In the accompanying drawings which illustrate an embodiment of my invention selected by me for purposes of illustration:
Fig. 1 represents a partial front view of a knitting machine having my invention embodied therein, partly broken away.
' Fig. 2 is a side view of a portion of the machine, also partly broken away.
Fig. 3 is a plan view of the portion of the machine adjacent to the knitting cylinder andpshowing the parts associated therewith.
Fig. 4 represents a horizontal section on line 4-4 of Fig. 2.
Fig. 5 is a horizontal section through the sinker cap on line 5-5 of Fig. 2.
Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional viewon of Fig. 3, parts being broken away. f
Fig. 7 is a detail view partly in section, showing one of the auxiliary feeding fingers and the means for operating the same, parts being broken away.- r v I ,f
Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 7 showing one of the auxiliary knitting cams and the mecha.- nism for moving it into, and out .offoperative position, parts being broken away. r g
1 Fig. 9 is a diagrammatic view representing the cam ring cut at one point and spread out in a plane, as viewed from, the outside of the 'ring,and also showing the needlesand-thread feeding fingers.
line s--s Fig. 10 is a detail view of one of the short butt needles provided with a shoulder above the butt.
Fig. 10a is a-detail view of one of the short butt needles without such shoulder.
Fig. 11 is a detail view of one of the long butt needles provided with a shoulder similar to that shown in Fig. 10.
Fig. 111:. is a detail view of one of the long butt needles without such shoulder.
The knitting machine shown in the accompanying drawings is one of the well-known Banner machines for knitting a complete sock or stocking, manufactured by the Hemphill Company of Pawtucket, Rhode Island, to which cer tain parts have been added, and in which certain parts have been changed, in order to adapt it for carrying out my present invention.
In these drawings, I represents the frame of the machine, provided with the rotary needle cylinder 2, carrying a horizontal gear wheel 3, engaging a driving gear 4, for rotating it in the usual manner for circular work, and for reciprocating it in the usual manner for reciprocating work. 5, 50. represent picker mechanisms for narrowing and widening, for formation of heel and toe pockets, and 6 represents the latch ring, pivotally supported in the usual manner, all of which, parts may be of usual or any desired construction, and form no part of my present invention. The needle cylinder 2, carries in its needle grooves a single vertical series of needles which are divided in the usual manner, one-half being provided with long butts, and the other half being provided with short butts, the short butt needles operating in the usual manner with the narrowing and widening mechanism to produce the heel and toe pockets under the control of the usual pattern mechanism, forming part of the machine. For the purpose of selecting the needles which are to receive, and connect to the fabric the elastic thread, the needles of both kinds which are not to receive the elastic thread, are each provided with a shoulder above the butt, but of less radial extent than the butt. For example, in Fig. 10, I have shown a needle having a short butt la, above which is the shoulder 1b, referred to, while in Fig. 10a, I have shown one of the needles I, provided only with the short butt 1a. In Fig. 11, I have shown one of the long butt needles provided with the long butt 8a, and shoulder 8b, immediately above the same, while in Fig. Ha, I have shown a long butt needle 8, provided with the long butt 8a-, only. The separation of the points at which the I elastic thread is to be secured in the fabric is determined by the positions occupied by the needles I and 8, which are not provided with shoulders, with respect to the shouldered nee- .dles. This separation may be every other needle or a separation of two needles, three, needles, or more, as may be desired. I have found that a desirable separation of the selected needles is secured by separating the selected needles I or 8, which do not have the shoulders, by three intervening shouldered needles, as shouldered i brought at the time they receive the body thread, and this is most conveniently effected at the main knitting cam indicated at 9 (see Fig.9).
8b, of the needles 1 and 8, and the nibs Ia and 8a, of the selected needles, so that it necessarily follows that the shouldered needles will be drawn downward at the main knitting cams, which I conveniently term knitting station I, (see Fig. 9) to a greater extent than the non-shouldered selected needles, as clearly indicated in Fig. 9..
I0 represents the thread feeding finger for feeding elastic thread indicated at II, and which in this instance may be one of the throat feeding fingers which is normally maintained at a higher level than the adjacent thread feeding fingers for the body thread, one of which is indicated at I2, when in operative feeding position. It will be noted that the selected needles will take the elastic thread II, in their hooks at a higher point than that at which the body thread I3, is fed, and that the body thread is fed by the thread feeding finger I2, to all the needles, that is to say, both the selected and non-selected or shouldered needles, as clearly indicated in Fig. 9. It will be understood that the throat plate will be provided with the usual plurality of thread guides I2, which can be thrown into and out of operative position to feed body thread or threads to all the needles for striping, reinforcing and other purposes. The cam ring I4, is provided with one or more auxiliary knitting cams, and associated thread feeding mechanisms for feeding body thread to all of the needles in the same revolution of the machine when in operative positions. In. the drawings, I have shown the knitting cam ring provided with three auxiliary knitting cams and thread feeding mechanisms for each, disposed at convenient intervals around the knitting cylinder, and constituting knitting stations 2, 3 and 4, and this is my preferred arrangement as it permits the formation of a single course of knitting when the auxiliary cams are out of operative position, and the simultaneous formation of two, three or four courses, by throwing one or more of the auxiliary knitting cams into operation, but the particular number of auxiliary cams is not essential. The cam ring I4, is shown provided with the V shaped recesses indicated at I5, I6 and I1, in Fig. 9, associated with draw-down cams I8, I9 and 20 respectively, in a well-known manner, and cooperating with vertically movable thread feeding fingers 2|, 22 and 23, cooperating respectively with said cams, l8, I9 and 20, to provide knitting stations 2, 3 and 4. Each of the radially movable draw-down cams, one of which, cam 20, is shown in section in Fig. 8, is carried by a horizontal slide 24, movable in a guide 25, radially with respect to the cylinder into and out of operative position. Each slide is provided with a retracting spring 26, tending to move it inwardly into operative position, and a stop 21, is provided for each of these slides for arresting it in such a position that the cam carried thereby will engage the outer end portions of the butts of both the short butt and long butt needles exterior to the shoulders of the shouldered needles, as clearly shown in Fig. 8, so that the auxiliary cams will draw down all of the needles of the' circular series to the same extent. I prefer to make this stop adjustable to accommodate any variations in the needles which may occur from time to time, and to c,so1,71a 3 this end, each a the slides 24, is provided'with a slotted plate constituting the stop- 21, adjustably secured to the slide by a screw 28, in position toengage the guide 25, and limit the inward movement of the cam.
' The auxlliary thread.guides'2l, 22 and 23 will obviously be moved into and out of operative position simultaneously with their respective cams ll, 18 and 2B. These auxiliary fingers are pivotally mounted on brackets 29, secured to the latch ring at suitable points around the same,
so that they may be moved vertically into and out of operative position as indicated in Fig. 7, for example, which shows the finger 23, for the i5 cam 20, at knitting station 4. Each of the feeding fingers is provided with a retracting spring 30, normally tending to draw the finger downward into operative position, and the fingers are raised into inoperative position, against the tension of this retracting. spring 30, by a suitable mechanism hereinafter described. In the present instance, I have found it convenient tolocate auxiliary cams l8 and I9 at points adjacent to the hinge pin to, of the latch ring 8, and the cam 20, is located on the opposite side of the cylinder (see Figs. 2,3 and 4).
At one side of the machine (see Figs. 1 and 2) there is provided a cam wheel 3| mounted on a shaft 82, and provided with a series of cam grades '33, 3t and 35, on its cylindrical face forengaging tappet levers 36, 31 and 38, respectively, all of said tappet levers being pivotally mounted on a stationary pin 39, secured to the frame of the machine, and tappet, levers 38 and .3! respectively, being provided with extensions 38a and 'S'lc. The tappet levers inthe construction herein shown, have their cam engaging ends on the sideoi the cylinder adjacent to knitting station 5, and almost directly below cam 20, and an its feeding finger 23 (see Figs. 2, .7 and 8), and
tappet 38 is provided with vertically movable rods M and M, for controlling thread guide 23, and cam'2b respectively, both of said rods being pivotally connected'to the tappet 38. The rod 49, w
as as clearly shown inFig. 7, extends upwardly to the thread feeding finger 23, and engages a stud 22s, on said finger, so that when the tappet 38, is raised by its cam grade '35, the finger will be thrown out of operative position as indicated in dd dotted lines, the rod 4! engaging a guide we,
. on the machine for maintaining it in proper relation with the stud 23a. The rod ll, is connected at its upper end with a bell-crank lever 42, pivoted to asuitable bracket a secured to the madd chine and having its upper arm engaging a stud 22s, on thes'lide 26, carrying the cam 20, so that the upward movement of the tappet 38, by its cam guide tbfiwili simultaneously withdraw the cam 2d and the thread finger 23, from operative 00 positiomand when the tappet 38, passes 05 of the cam" grad 35 ,*the cam 20, and thread feeding finger 2 ,will be returned to operati ve position by their respective springs 26, and 30. Obvio sly. the similar control of the cams I 8 and 66 19, which are on the opposite side of the machine,'will be effected by5a -downward pull insteadflof an upwardpush., This movement is efiecte'd by the exte ions a andlla, of the tappets l6 and 31, d appropriate connections.
- 70 Each of these extensions is provided'with a pair of vertically disposed rods '43, 44 and 45, 46, for securing the simultaneous movement of the cams ll 8 9 a their respective thread feeding fingers out of and into operative positions by the 75 cam guides 33 and 34. As theconnecting mechanisms are the same for both of the cams II and I9, a description of one set of these connections will serve for both. Thus the extension 31a, of tappet 31, which operates auxiliary cam I9 and its associated thread feeding finger 22, has its 5 rod 44, pivotally connected at its upper end with a short lever 41, pivotally mounted on thepivot pin 22b, on which the finger 22, is mounted,
this link 41, being provided with an extension on the other side of the pivot pin 22b, having a 10 lug 48, extending under the thread finger 22, so as to lift the finger into inoperative position when the rod 44, is drawn downward. The shorter rod 43, connected-with the tappet extension 31d, is
pivoted at its upper end to a bell-crank lever 49,
pivoted to the frame of the machine, and hav ing an upwardly extending arm engaging a stud 24a, on the slide 24, carrying the auxiliary cam Id. In like manner the vertically disposed rods,
and-'46, extending upwardly from the tappet 20 I extension 36a, are operatively connected with the auxiliary cam l8, and the associated thread feeding finger 2|, in exactLv the same manner just described, the parts of said connections where indicated in the drawings, carrying the same ref- 25 i erence numerals. It is desirable that the opera tive connections between the cam' grades 33, 34 and 35 on the pattern wheel, and the several auxiliary cams and auxiliary thread guides should be so constructed as not to interfere with so the raising of the latch ring 6, on its pivot pin 5a, when that is desired, and by the employment of the constructions previously described, it will be seen that the latch ring, together with the three auxiliary thread feeding fingers 2!, 22 and 35 23 carnbe swung upwardly on the pivot pin 80,. the feedingfingers being thereby disengaged from the upper ends of the rod 49, and the lugs 48, on the links 4.1, connected with the rods 63 and 45.
The sinker cap 51!, will obviously be provided m with not only the usual cam portion indicated at 58, in its groove for operating the sinkers at knitting station I, in the usual manner, but will also be provided, as shown in Fig. 5, with additional cam portions indicated at 52, 53 and 5t, 43 corresponding to the positions of the auxiliary cams Id, i9 and 20; so as to reciprocate the sinkers in cooperation with the mitting of stitches at stations 2, 3 and d, by auxiliary knitting cams it, is and 2d. 5g
being knit continuously throughout the courses 0 v forming the top.: In knitting the top of the stocking in this manner, the pattern wheel 3l, will be in position to allow all of the auxiliary cams l8, l9 and 20, and their respective thread feeding fingers 2|, 22 and 23, to be brought into operative position for knitting at stations 2, 3 and 4. The main body thread feeding finger l2,
will be supplied with a body thread l3, and the auxiliary thread guides 2 l, 22 and 23, will be likewise suppliedwith body threads indicated at Ila,
Nb and l3c'in Fig. 9. The thread feeding finger III, at knitting station .I. will be supplied with elastic thread, either rubber thread or preferably Lastex, under tension suflicient to reduce the diameterof the plain knit courses of the top m 5 of the intermediate needles.
they leave the needles so that the fabric is drawn into vertically disposed parallel rib-like ridges simulating rib knit fabric, so that the plain knit top will have both the appearance and form-fitting eii'ect of an ordinary rib knit top, while the floats of the elastic thread on the inner face of the fabric will form horizontally disposed substantially continuous spiral beads, the individual coils of which will be separated by three intervening courses, so as .to permit these beads to very slightly indent the flesh of the wearer and provide a self-supporting function to hold the leg of the sock from slipping downward on the leg. The large number of coils of this bead on the inner face of the top, and their separation from each other, enables each coil to act independently, so that the cumulative effect of this spiral bead is sufiicient to insure the top of the sock remaining in position on the leg without slipping downward, with a minimum of tension of the elastic thread, and without any perceptible efiect on, or inconvenience to the wearer. Referring to Fig. 9, and understanding that the cylinder with its needles will move in the direction of the arrow, with respect to the cam ring, all the needles will be slightly raised by the main knitting cam element 8?). preparatory to being drawn down by the cam elements 9 and 9a, which will act upon the butts 7a and 8a of the selected needles, but will engage the shoulders lb and 8b, Thus, when the needles come to the feeding finger i0, ior the rubber thread, the selected needles without shoulders, will receive in their hooks the rubber thread which will not be fed to the remaining needles. As the needles pass the finger i2, the hooks oiall the needles will receive the body thread iii, the selected needles therefore drawing loops composed of the body thread and the rubber thread, while the remaining needles will draw loops of the body thread only, at knitting station i, the rubber thread being floated from one selected needle to the next, and behind the intervening needles with shoulders "lb and 8b, and thus the elastic thread will be floated on the inner face of the fabric. At knitting station 2, all of the needles are raised before they approach the feeding finger 2i, and take the second body thread iila, in their hooks, as they are drawn down by the auxiliary knitting earn it, which acts only upon the butts of all of the needles. so
that a second course of stitches composed of thread Ida, is formed, which is knit into the stitches of the preceding course containing the body thread it, and having the elastic thread ii, at the spaced wales formed by the selected needles. At station 3. all of the needles are again raised to receive the third body thread lab, from the thread finger 22, in their hooks, and all of. the needles are drawn down by the second auxiliary cam l9, to form a third course of stitches from the thread i312, which are knit into the stitches oi the preceding course formed by thread Ma. The needles are then raised and pass to the fourth knitting station, where they receive in their hooks the fourth body thread l3c, from the thread finger 23, and all of the needles are drawn down by the auxiliary knitting cam 20,
I to form a fourth course of stitches from the body thread lac, knit into the stitches of the course formed by the thread iflb. The needles are then .raised, and pass to the first knitting station where a course of stitches is formed from the body thread it, with the elastic thread ii, knit with the body thread in spaced wales by the selected needles, and the consecutive courses are formed from the body threads Ila, lib and lie, knitting on all the needles as previously described.
It will thus be seen that the knitting of the elastic top proceeds very rapidly, since four courses are knit with every revolution ofv the needle cylinder, until the desired length of the top has been produced, and it is desired to knit the leg portion of the stocking. At this point, the thread guide ill, for feeding the elastic thread is thrown out of operation under the control of the pattern mechanism by any of the usual means employed, and indicated in dotted lines at Fig. 1. for-example, after which the leg portion of the stocking can be knit, if. desired, by multiple course plain knitting, four courses being knit at a time, by permitting the auxiliary cams and other associated thread feeding fingers to remain in operative position. Obviously, the leg portion of the stocking could be knit by consecutive single courses with a single thread, if desired, by throwing all of the auxiliary cams and their associated feeding fingers out of operative position, or it could be knit by multiple knitting by the formation or two courses at each revolution of. the cylinder, by throwing out of operation two of the auxiliary cams and their associated feed fingers, as the knitting cams i8, i9 and their feed fingers 2|, 22, so that the multiple courses would be knit only at stations i and 4 for example. Or the leg could be knit by the formation of three courses simultan ously by throwing out of operation one of the auxiliary knitting cams as the cam 20, for example, and its associated thread feeding finger 23, in which case the multiple courses would be formed at stations i, 2 and t. The type of knitting to be employed in the leg of the stocking, and which would in all probability, be followed throughout the foot portion between the heel and tce pocket, can readily be secured by providing the cam wheel 30, with the appropriate cam grades 33, 84 and 35.
After knitting the leg portion of the stocking of the desired length, any of. the auxiliary cams and other feeding fingers which have been operating during the formation of the leg are thrown out of operation, and it is desirable, although not necessary, to knit one or more complete circular courses with theknitting thread it, and main hitting cam 8a, after which the heel pocket is knit by reciprocating work, and narrowing and widening in the usual manner, by means of the thread it, and the main knitting cam in the usual manner. If desired, body thread finger i2, may be thrown out of operation and another finger at the throat plate carrying a heavier thread, may be brought into operation for knitting the heel pocket, or the heel pocket may be knit with the body thread 03, and an additional thread or threads, as desired.
After knitting the heel pocket, circular knitting is again resumed, preferably by multiple courses, using the main knitting cam and one or more of the auxiliary cams, and their associated feed fingers, thus forming the foot of the stocking by multiple feeding and plain knitting, with either two, three or four threads, as desired.
Immediately before the commencement of knitting oi the toe pocket, I prefer to throw out of operation the auxiliary cams and their associated fingers used in knitting the foot, and knit a few looping courses, using only the main knitting cam and the body thread i8, or other body thread from a throat plate feed finger, after tion, as variations may be made therein, in the manufacture of machines embodying the invenr which the toe pocket is knit in the usual manneedles, means adjacent to one of said for her with a single thread by reciprocating work and narrowing and widening as described by reference to the heel pocket,.and the stocking is completed by looping on the upper half of the foot, the meeting edges of the toe pocket and the foot portions, in the usual manner. The toe pocket also may be formed ofthe thread l3, or a heavier thread or threads, if desired.
The entire stocking is therefore knit as a unitary fabric, including the plain knit top portion with the incorporated elastic thread, which forms an elastic form-fitting and self-supporting top for the stocking, and holds it in position on the leg without the necessity of using a garter.
The upper edge of the top may be finished in any desired manner, for example, by ,a turned and sewed welt, or by the formation of a selvage or anti-rave] course or courses, of single thickness, in any desired manner.
It will be obvious that in multiple course knitting body threads of. the same or different colors may be employed; and where different colors are used, pleasing striping effects can be simultaneously obtained. It will also be understood that while in the accompanying drawings, I have only shown a single thread feeding finger foreach auxiliary cam, a plurality of feeding'flngers maybe provided for each of these auxiliary cams, where found necessary or desirable, and operated under-the control of the pattern cam, so as to employ at each knitting station, body yarns of different characteristics, as to material, thickness or color, and shift one of the thread fingers for any knitting station out of operation, and another one into operation to produce color efiect or different character of fabric, at different portions of the multiple knitting, as may be desired.
:It will be understood that my invention is not limited to the specific details'and formation of parts herein shown, and described in the embodiment selected by me for purposes of illustration, and within the scope of the following claims. What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
l. A circular plain knitting machine having a leavingselected needles'at a higher level than the remaining needles, separate thread feeding devices adjacent to said cam for feeding an elascated at diiferent points around the series of tic thread to the hooks of said selected needles, and an inelastic thread to the hooks of all of the needles, and separate thread feeding mechanism adjacent to each of the other cams for feeding a separate inelastic thread to the hooks of all of the needles, and means for moving each of said last mentioned cams and their associated thread feeding'mechanism into and out of. operative position.
2. A clrcular plain knitting machine having a single circular series of independentlymovable needles provided with cam engaging butts, certain needles being provided each with a selecting shoulder above and of less radial extent than,
the butts thereof, a plurality of knitting cams, lo-
. eng in said selecting shoulders andlowering certain needles to bring selected needles to a higher level than the remaining needles, separate thread feeding devices adjacent to said cam for feeding an elastic thread to the hooks of said selected needles and an inelasticthread to the books of all of the needles, and separate thread feeding mechanism adjacent to each of the other cams for feeding a separate inelastic thread to the hooks of all of the needlesyand means for moving the said thread feeding mechanism for feeding the elastic thread to said selected needles adjacent to said first mentioned cam into and out of operative position. I I
3. A circular plain knitting machine having a single circular series of independently movable needles provided with cam engaging butts, certain needles being provided each with a shoulder above and of less radial extent than the butts thereof, a plurality of knitting cams, located at different points around the series of needles, means adjacent to one of said cams for engaging said shouldered needles and lowering them so as to-leave selected needles at a higher level than the remaining needles, separate thread feeding devices adjacent to said cam for feeding an elastic thread to said selected needles and an inelastic thread to all of the needles, ,and separate thread feeding mechanism adjacent to each of the other cams for feeding a separate inelastic thread to all of the needles, 'means for moving said elastic thread feeding mechanism for the said selected needles adjacent to said first mentioned cam into and out of operative position without interference with the other feeding mechanisms, and means for moving each of said last mentioned cams and its associated thread feeding mechanism into and out of operative position simultaneouslyi 4. A circular plain knitting machine having a single circular series of independently operable ble needles provided with butts, certain of said needles being provided each with a shoulder above and of less radial extent than the butt, and certain selected needles, spaced from each other by one or more shouldered needles, being without said shoulders, a main knitting cam for engaging the butts of said selected needles, and the shoulders of the remaining needles, to bring the hooks of said remaining needles to a lower level than those of the selected needles at thethread feeding position, separate thread feeding mechanism adjacent said cam, for respectively feeding a thread to' said selected needles only, and a separate thread to all of the needles, a plurality of auxiliary knitting cams for engaging the butts of all'the needles without operatively engaging said shoulders, and a 'separate thread feeding mechanism for feeding a difierent thread to all of the needles;
5. A circular plain knitting machine having a single circular series of independently operable needles provided with butts, certain of said needles being provided each with a shoulder above and of less radial extentthan the butt, and certain selected needles, spaced from each other by one or more shouldered needles, being without said shoulders, a main knitting cam for engagingthe butts of said selected needles, and the shoulders of the remaining needles, to bring the hooks of said remaining needles to a lower level than those of the selected needles at the thread feeding position, separate thread feeding mechanism adjacent said cam, for respectively feeding to a thread to said selected needles only, and a separate thread to all of the needles, a plurality of auxiliary knitting cams for engaging the butts of all the needles without operatively engaging said shoulders, and a separate thread feeding mechanism for feeding a different thread to all of the needles, and means for moving the thread feeding mechanism for the selected needles only, into and out of operative position.
8. A circular plain knitting machine having a single circular series of independently operable needles provided with butts, certain of said needles being provided each with a shoulder above and of less radial extent than the butt, and certain selected needles, spaced from each other by one or more shouldered needles, being without said shoulders, a main knitting cam for engaging the butts of said selected needles, and the shoulders of the remaining needles, to bring the hooks of said remaining needles to a lower level than those of the selected needles at the thread feedin position, separate thread feeding mechanism adjacent said cam, for respectively feeding a thread to said selected needles only, and a separate thread to all of the needles, a plurality of auxiliary knitting cams for engaging the butts of all the needles without operatively engaging said shoulders, and a separate thread feeding mechanism for feeding a different thread to all of the needles, means for moving the thread feeding mechanism for the selected needles only, into and out of operative position, and means for moving each of said auxiliary cams and its associated thread feeding mechanism into and out of operative position.
'7. A circular plain knitting machine having a single circular series of independently operable needles provided with butts, certain of said needles being provided each with a shoulder above and of less radial extent than the butt, and certain selected needles, spaced from each other by one' or more shouldered needles, being without said shoulders, a main knitting cam for engaging the butts of said selected needles. and the shoulders of the remaining needles, to bring the hooks of said remaining needles to a lower level than those of the selected needles at the thread feeding position, separate thread feeding mechanism adjacent said cam, for respectively feeding a thread to said selected needles only, and a separate thread to all of the needles, a plurality of radially movableauxiliary knitting cams located at different positions around said series of needles, and means for holding said cams when in operative position out of operative relation with said shoulders, and in position to engage the butts only of all of the needles, and a separate thread feeding mechanism for each knitting cam for feeding a different thread to all of the needles.
8. A circular plain knitting machine having a single circular series of independently operable needles provided with butts, certain of said needles being provided each with a shoulder above and of less radial extent than the butt, and certain selected needles, spaced from each other by one or more shouldered needles, being without said shoulders, a main knitting cam for engaging the butts of said selected needles, and the shoulders of the remaining needles, to bring the hooks of said remaining needles to a lower level than those of the selected needles at the thread feeding mechanism for each knitting cam for feeding a different thread to all of the needles, and means for moving each of said auxiliary cams and its associated thread feeding mechanism into and out of operative position.
9. A circular plain knitting machine having a single circular series of independently operable needles provided with butts, certain of said needles being provided each with a shoulder above and of less radial extent than the butt, and certain selected needles spaced from each other by one or more shouldered needles being without said shoulders, a main knitting cam constructed and positioned to engage the butts of said selected needles and the shoulders of the intervening needles and leave their hooks below the books of the selected needles, at the thread feeding position, means for separately feeding an elastic thread into the hooks of the selected needles and for feeding an inelastic thread to the said intervening needles, a plurality of auxiliary knitting cams at different knitting stations around the circular series of needles movable into and out of operative position and supported when in operative position in position to engage the butts only of all the needles, a thread feed mechanism adjacent to each of said auxiliary cams for feeding an inelastic thread to all the needles, and means adjacent to each of said auxiliary knitting cams, operatively connected therewith and with its cooperating thread feed mechanism for throwing them into and out of operative positions.
ROBERT EVAN DAVIS, JR.
Disclaimer 2,201,716.R0bert Evan Davis, J12, Fort Payne, Ala. KNITTING MACHINE. Patent dated May 21, 1940. Disclaimer filed July 13, 1950, by the assignee, The
Davis Company. Hereby enters this disclaimer to claims 1 to 9, in
elusive, of said patent. [Ofiicial Gazette August 8, 1950.]
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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2928266A (en) * 1954-04-05 1960-03-15 Hugh T Overton Knitting machine
US20100229283A1 (en) * 2009-03-16 2010-09-16 Stephano Diaz Article of clothing
US10433597B2 (en) * 2016-11-30 2019-10-08 Gusto Outfitters, Llc Evaporative neck cooling device

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2928266A (en) * 1954-04-05 1960-03-15 Hugh T Overton Knitting machine
US20100229283A1 (en) * 2009-03-16 2010-09-16 Stephano Diaz Article of clothing
US8321963B2 (en) * 2009-03-16 2012-12-04 Stephano Diaz Article of clothing
US10433597B2 (en) * 2016-11-30 2019-10-08 Gusto Outfitters, Llc Evaporative neck cooling device

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