US2163304A - Apparatus for trimming and joining the ends of fabric pieces - Google Patents

Apparatus for trimming and joining the ends of fabric pieces Download PDF

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US2163304A
US2163304A US142734A US14273437A US2163304A US 2163304 A US2163304 A US 2163304A US 142734 A US142734 A US 142734A US 14273437 A US14273437 A US 14273437A US 2163304 A US2163304 A US 2163304A
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carriage
sewing machine
chain
railway
machine
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US142734A
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Corrall Herbert
Heggie James
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Singer Co
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Singer Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B23/00Sewing apparatus or machines not otherwise provided for

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  • This invention relates to a type of sewing machine used in textile and analogous industries for trimming and stitching together the ends of long lengths of fabric pieces with provision for positive 5 feed by moving the machine.
  • the present invention has for an object to provide a piece-end sewing machine whereby a straight joining seam may be produced, particularly in light weight fabric, without subjecting it to any strain and without distorting the marginal end portions being joined.
  • Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a piece-end stitching machine embodying the invention inclusive of the railway upon which travels the carriage supportingl the sewing machine.
  • Fig. 2 is an enlarged side elevation of the carriage with the sewing machine, viewed from the opposite side from that represented in Fig. 1.
  • Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the machine. For the sake of clearness, the blower and its tube have been omitted.
  • Fig. 4 is an enlarged detail view of the ratchet and pawl device for retaining the feeding chain stationary.
  • Fig. 5 is a sectional elevation and Fig. 6 is an end elevation of the planetary gear drive for feeding the carriage with the sewing machine.
  • Fig. 7 is a detail sectional view through lines 'I-'l of Fig. 3 of the device for maintaining the feeding chain taut.
  • Fig. 8 is a detail View of the feeding mechanism.
  • I are upright leg-members of channel cross section supporting the cross members 2 secured to the former in any well-known manner. Secured upon the cross members are two parallel spaced horizontal rails 3 of L-section connected by spacing members 4. g
  • the sewing machine carriage 5 Adapted to freely run forward and backward along the rails 3 is the sewing machine carriage 5, the grooved wheels 6 of which rest upon the rails.
  • the carriage 5 has mounted thereon a sewing machine A, preferably o-f the well-known Singer class 81-24 single-thread overedge stitching type more fully illustrated in the U. S. Patent to I. F. Webb, No. 1,983,258 of Dec. 4, 1934.
  • This machine is provided with the usual cloth plate 'l and a main-shaft 8 upon which are mounted the tight belt-pulley 9 and loose belt-pulley l0.
  • An electric motor M for driving the sewing machine, is also mounted on the carriage 5 and has its driving pulley llvconnected with the pul- ⁇ l ⁇ leys 9 and I0 ofthe sewing machine by means of the belt I2.
  • the present machine is also equipped withA the manually operable pivotally mounted belt-shipper I3 fulcrumed on the screw I3 (Fig. 2) and carrying at its rearward end the spaced upstanding belt-guiding pins I4 and bent upwardly at its forward end to constitute a handle I5.
  • Screwed to and depending from the ⁇ belt-shipper ⁇ lever I3 is a bracket I6 carrying a vertically slidable and downwardly spring pressed plunger I'I the lower end of which is beveled as shown in Fig. 2.
  • a spring I8 connecting the bracket I6 with the carriage 5 urges the belt-shipper i3 in a direction to shift the belt l2 onto the loose pulley l0 to stop the operation of the sewing machine.
  • the feeding mechanism of the sewing machine is of known construction and includes the feed-dog 'I9 secured upon the free end of the feedbar pivotally mounted at 8
  • the feed-bar is connected by the short pitman 83 with the feed-lift eccentric 84 on the sewing machine main shaft 8.
  • the feed-advance eccentric 85 is connected by the pitman 86 with the bell-crank lever 81, 88, fulcrumed at 89 on the machine frame.
  • the arm 88 of the bellcrank lever is provided with a curved and undercut slot or guideway 90 for a slide-block 9
  • the machine is further provided with a manually operablev device enabling' the operator to conveniently shorten the initial or finishing stitches of a seam made by the machine.
  • Ihis device shown in Fig. 8, differs slightly from that disclosed in the aforesaid Webb patent.
  • is connected by the short link 95 with the lower end of a manually operable bellcrank lever 96 pivotally mounted upon the screwstud 91 entering the upstanding xed arm 98 having its lower bent end secured to the sewing machine frame by a screw 99.
  • the bell-crank lever 9S is provided with an arm
  • 02 normally maintains the bell-crank lever 96 upwardly against the adjustable screw stop
  • Fig. 3 the belt-shipper I3 is shown in full line or off position and when manually shifted to dotted line or running position, to start the sewing machine, it is retained in that position by a shoulder on a latch-lever I9 pivoted at 20 on an ear 2
  • the tail of the latch-lever is relatively heavy and tends to drop under the influence of gravity and raise the front of the lever to locking position when the beltshipper lever I3 is manually shifted to running position to start the sewing machine.
  • a second slotted block 24 carrying a stop-pin 25' anda tripper 26 the rounded upper end 21 of which is in the path of traveling movement of the tail of the latch lever I9 and lifts it at the end of a sewing operation to release the belt-shipper I3 whichshifts the motor belt I2 from the tight pulley 9 to the loose pulley ID thereby stopping the sewing machine.
  • the stop-pin 25 engages the spring 4'5 pressed plunger
  • the stop-blocks 22 and 24 are adjustable longitudinally of their supportingrail 3 to suit the width ofthe particular fabric ends to be stitched together.
  • the blower is driven from the motor by means of Vthe belt 33.
  • the function of the blower is to maintain the chute clear of trimmings severed from the piece-ends being joined and prevent such trimmings from clogging the stitch-forming and feeding mechanisms of the sewing machine.
  • the chain embraces a sprocket-Wheel 35 fixed upon a crossshaft 36 journalled in depending brackets 31 secured to the rails 3.
  • the cross-shaft is provided with a crank-wheel 38 disposed exterior of the rails.
  • a ratchet-wheel 39 engageable by a pawl 40 pivotally mounted at 4
  • a pawl unlatching lever 43 Pivotally mounted upon one of the brackets 31 at 42 is a pawl unlatching lever 43 whose upper arm 44 is adapted to lift the pawl 40 clear of the ratchet wheel 39 in o-rder to permit endwise movement of the chain 34 by rotation of the crank Wheel 38.
  • the chain 34 embraces another sprocket-wheel 45 journalled upon a cross-shaft 46 journalled in spaced upstanding arms 41 pivoted at 48 to laterally extending arms 49 secured in any well-known manner to the cross-member 2.
  • the chain 34 is maintained taut by means of the adjusting rod 5I) one end of which bears against the cross member 2 while its threaded free end is fitted within an internally threaded aperture in the bearing 46 for the cross-shaft 46.
  • a small sprocketwheel 5I embraced by a chain 52 which is in driving engagement with a larger sprocket-Wheel 53 secured upon a housing 54 of a planetary gearing.
  • the housing is journalled by spaced ballbearings 55 upon a stationary bearing-bushing 56 clamped by screws 51 in the split upright standard 53 rising from the carriage 5.
  • the housing end of the bearing-bushing is formed as a pinion 59 which meshes with a second pinion 60 fixed by means of a key 6
  • Pinions 6D and 62 differ slightly in their pitch diameters and number of teeth.
  • Pinion 62 is in driving relation with a fourthpinion 64 formed upon the end of a shaft 65 journalled in the bearing-bushing 56.
  • a counter weight 66 is secured inside of the housing which latter is closed by the cover 61.
  • a pinion 68 which meshes with a gear 69 secured upon the stud-shaft 69 journalled in the standard 58.
  • ShaftV 69 is retained in its bearing Yby the collar 1
  • Frictionally held upon the hub of the gear 69 is a sprocket-wheel 1
  • the mechanism just described as mounted in the housing 54 constitutes a train of forward feeding elements of which the sprocket-wheel 1
  • An idler sprocket-wheel 12 is journalled upon a screw stud 13 fixed in the arm 14 extending from the carriage 5 and maintains the chain 34 in mesh with the sprocket-Wheel 1I.
  • is such that a relatively rapid rotation of the sprocket-wheel 53 will result in only'a partial rotation of the sprocketwheel 1
  • the belt is shifted from the loose pulley IIJ to the tight pulley 9 by manual manipulation of the shipper I3 which is retained in running position by the latch-lever I9.
  • the shift of the belt-shipper I3 carries the spring pressed plunger I'I to one side of the stoppin 23 and frees the carriage 5 from the stoppm.
  • the latch-lever I9 will be released by engagement with the rounded upper end 21 of the tripper 26 and, through the action of the spring I 8, the belt-shipper I3 will be moved to off position, shifting the belt I2 from the tight pulley 9 to the loose pulley II), which will permit the sewing machine to come to rest.
  • therfeeding element constituted by the chain 34 is stationary while the carriage 5, with the sewing machine A, is being propelled in one direction along the tracks 3 during a piece-end stitching operation but that the feeding element or chain 34 is circulatorily movable when the carriage 5 is manually returned to starting position.
  • a train of forward-feeding elements including a sprocket wheel mounted on said carriage, a driving connection between said motor and said forward-feeding train, a normally stationary sprocket chain mounted upon said railwayin permanent mesh with said sprocket wheel, and means for propelling said sprocket chain endwise for back feeding the carriage.

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  • Engineering & Computer Science (AREA)
  • Textile Engineering (AREA)
  • Sewing Machines And Sewing (AREA)

Description

FABRIC nmcs 4 sheets-sheet 1 W @a Nw June 20, 1939 H. czoRRALJ.y E; AL
APPARATUS FOR TRIMMING AND JOINING THE; ENDS OF Filed May 15, 1957' MN w n Nw Q5 S m%\ June 20, .1939. H. coRRALl. Er AL APPARATUS FOR TRIMMING AND JOVINING THE ENDS OF FABRIC PIECES Filed M ay 15, 1937 4 sheets-she@ 2 June 20, 1939. 2,163,304
APPARATUS FOR TRIMMING AND JoINING THE ENDS QF'FABRIG PIECES H. coRRALL :fr AL Filed May 15, 1937 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 clam/es SE1/effi@ W www June-zo, 1939. H, CORRALL Er AL 2,163,304
APPARATUS FOR TRIMMING AND JOINING THE ENDS OF FABRIC PIECES Filed May 15, 1937 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Patented `lune 20, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE APPARATUS FOR TRIMMING AND JOINING THE ENDS F FABRIC PIECES Application May 15, 1937, Serial No. 142,734 In Great Britain June 11, 1936 Claims.
This invention relates to a type of sewing machine used in textile and analogous industries for trimming and stitching together the ends of long lengths of fabric pieces with provision for positive 5 feed by moving the machine.
The present invention has for an object to provide a piece-end sewing machine whereby a straight joining seam may be produced, particularly in light weight fabric, without subjecting it to any strain and without distorting the marginal end portions being joined.
With the above and other objects in View, as will hereinafter appear, the invention comprises the devices, combinations and arrangements of parts hereinafter set forth and illustrated in the accompanying drawings of a preferred embodiment of the invention, from which the several features of the invention and the advantages attained thereby will be readily understood by those skilled in the art.
In the accompanying drawings, Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a piece-end stitching machine embodying the invention inclusive of the railway upon which travels the carriage supportingl the sewing machine. Fig. 2 is an enlarged side elevation of the carriage with the sewing machine, viewed from the opposite side from that represented in Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the machine. For the sake of clearness, the blower and its tube have been omitted. Fig. 4 is an enlarged detail view of the ratchet and pawl device for retaining the feeding chain stationary. Fig. 5 is a sectional elevation and Fig. 6 is an end elevation of the planetary gear drive for feeding the carriage with the sewing machine. Fig. 7 is a detail sectional view through lines 'I-'l of Fig. 3 of the device for maintaining the feeding chain taut. Fig. 8 is a detail View of the feeding mechanism. V
In the preferred embodiment of the invention, as illustrated, I are upright leg-members of channel cross section supporting the cross members 2 secured to the former in any well-known manner. Secured upon the cross members are two parallel spaced horizontal rails 3 of L-section connected by spacing members 4. g
Adapted to freely run forward and backward along the rails 3 is the sewing machine carriage 5, the grooved wheels 6 of which rest upon the rails. The carriage 5 has mounted thereon a sewing machine A, preferably o-f the well-known Singer class 81-24 single-thread overedge stitching type more fully illustrated in the U. S. Patent to I. F. Webb, No. 1,983,258 of Dec. 4, 1934. This machine is provided with the usual cloth plate 'l and a main-shaft 8 upon which are mounted the tight belt-pulley 9 and loose belt-pulley l0.
An electric motor M, for driving the sewing machine, is also mounted on the carriage 5 and has its driving pulley llvconnected with the pul- `l` leys 9 and I0 ofthe sewing machine by means of the belt I2.
The present machine is also equipped withA the manually operable pivotally mounted belt-shipper I3 fulcrumed on the screw I3 (Fig. 2) and carrying at its rearward end the spaced upstanding belt-guiding pins I4 and bent upwardly at its forward end to constitute a handle I5. Screwed to and depending from the `belt-shipper` lever I3 is a bracket I6 carrying a vertically slidable and downwardly spring pressed plunger I'I the lower end of which is beveled as shown in Fig. 2. A spring I8 connecting the bracket I6 with the carriage 5 urges the belt-shipper i3 in a direction to shift the belt l2 onto the loose pulley l0 to stop the operation of the sewing machine.
The feeding mechanism of the sewing machine, Fig. 8, is of known construction and includes the feed-dog 'I9 secured upon the free end of the feedbar pivotally mounted at 8| on the feed- I rocker 82. The feed-bar is connected by the short pitman 83 with the feed-lift eccentric 84 on the sewing machine main shaft 8. The feed-advance eccentric 85 is connected by the pitman 86 with the bell-crank lever 81, 88, fulcrumed at 89 on the machine frame. 'The arm 88 of the bellcrank lever is provided with a curved and undercut slot or guideway 90 for a slide-block 9| connected to the lower end of a link 92, the upper end of which is connected at 93 to anrarm 94 of the feed-rocker 82.
The machine is further provided with a manually operablev device enabling' the operator to conveniently shorten the initial or finishing stitches of a seam made by the machine. Ihis device, shown in Fig. 8, differs slightly from that disclosed in the aforesaid Webb patent.
Unlike the device of said Webb patent, the slide-block 9| is connected by the short link 95 with the lower end of a manually operable bellcrank lever 96 pivotally mounted upon the screwstud 91 entering the upstanding xed arm 98 having its lower bent end secured to the sewing machine frame by a screw 99. The bell-crank lever 9S is provided with an arm |08 terminating in a button I0| for convenient actuation by the operator. A spring |02 normally maintains the bell-crank lever 96 upwardly against the adjustable screw stop |03 threaded into the upper end of the fixed arm 98, and a pin |04 on the lever 5,5
contacting the stop screw |03 in which position of the bell-crank lever 96, |09 the sewing machine will produce a seam of normal stitch length. An adjustable stop |05, secured upon the fixed arm 98 by the screw |06, limits the downward movement of the bell-crank lever 96, |06. When short stitches are desired, preferably at the beginning or ending of a seam, the operator depresses the lever 96, which will shift the slide-bock 9| in 10 the arm 88 of the feed-actuating bell crank lever 81 thereby reducing the effective travel of the sewing machine feed-dog 19, as fully set forth in the Webb patent before referred to;
In Fig. 3 the belt-shipper I3 is shown in full line or off position and when manually shifted to dotted line or running position, to start the sewing machine, it is retained in that position by a shoulder on a latch-lever I9 pivoted at 20 on an ear 2| of the carriage 5. The tail of the latch-lever is relatively heavy and tends to drop under the influence of gravity and raise the front of the lever to locking position when the beltshipper lever I3 is manually shifted to running position to start the sewing machine. As in the device of the'Webb patent, there is preferably clamped upon one of the rails 3, near the end from which the sewing starts, a slotted block 22 from which rises a stop-pin 23 in the path'of traveling movement of the spring pressed plunger l1 carried by the belt-shipper lever I3. The purpose of this stop is to assist the operator in positioning the carriage 5 with the sewing machine A in starting position preparatory to a sewing operation. Y'
There is also preferablysecured to thesa-me \rail 3 which supports the stop 22 a second slotted block 24 carrying a stop-pin 25' anda tripper 26 the rounded upper end 21 of which is in the path of traveling movement of the tail of the latch lever I9 and lifts it at the end of a sewing operation to release the belt-shipper I3 whichshifts the motor belt I2 from the tight pulley 9 to the loose pulley ID thereby stopping the sewing machine. The stop-pin 25 engages the spring 4'5 pressed plunger |1 and prevents overrunning or coasting of the carriage 5 beyond seam-finishing position. The stop-blocks 22 and 24 are adjustable longitudinally of their supportingrail 3 to suit the width ofthe particular fabric ends to be stitched together.
Secured to and rising from the carriage 5 are a pair of spaced standards 28 to the upper'ends of which is fixed a bracket 29. A blower 30, bolted to the bracket, is provided with a tube 3| 55 which' terminates over an inclined chute 32 the upper end of which is disposed belw thef`work support 1 adjacent the trimmer mechanism. The blower is driven from the motor by means of Vthe belt 33. The function of the blower is to maintain the chute clear of trimmings severed from the piece-ends being joined and prevent such trimmings from clogging the stitch-forming and feeding mechanisms of the sewing machine. Y Disposed longitudinally of and between the 65 rails 3 is a normally stationary endless' chain 34 constituting' an element of an auxiliary feeding mechanism. At one end of the rails the chain embraces a sprocket-Wheel 35 fixed upon a crossshaft 36 journalled in depending brackets 31 secured to the rails 3. The cross-shaft is provided with a crank-wheel 38 disposed exterior of the rails. Also secured upon the cross shaft 36, intermediate the rails, Fig. 4 is a ratchet-wheel 39 engageable by a pawl 40 pivotally mounted at 4| upon the rail 3. The ratchet wheel and pawl maintain the chain normally stationary. Pivotally mounted upon one of the brackets 31 at 42 is a pawl unlatching lever 43 whose upper arm 44 is adapted to lift the pawl 40 clear of the ratchet wheel 39 in o-rder to permit endwise movement of the chain 34 by rotation of the crank Wheel 38. Y
At the other end of the railway the chain 34 embraces another sprocket-wheel 45 journalled upon a cross-shaft 46 journalled in spaced upstanding arms 41 pivoted at 48 to laterally extending arms 49 secured in any well-known manner to the cross-member 2. The chain 34 is maintained taut by means of the adjusting rod 5I) one end of which bears against the cross member 2 while its threaded free end is fitted within an internally threaded aperture in the bearing 46 for the cross-shaft 46.
Secured upon the tight belt-pulley 9 on the sewing machine main-shaft 8 is a small sprocketwheel 5I embraced by a chain 52 which is in driving engagement with a larger sprocket-Wheel 53 secured upon a housing 54 of a planetary gearing. The housing is journalled by spaced ballbearings 55 upon a stationary bearing-bushing 56 clamped by screws 51 in the split upright standard 53 rising from the carriage 5. The housing end of the bearing-bushing is formed as a pinion 59 which meshes with a second pinion 60 fixed by means of a key 6| upon the hub of a third pinion 62 which is journalled upon a headed bearing-stud 63 entering a threaded aperture in the housing 54. Pinions 6D and 62 differ slightly in their pitch diameters and number of teeth. Pinion 62 is in driving relation with a fourthpinion 64 formed upon the end of a shaft 65 journalled in the bearing-bushing 56. A counter weight 66 is secured inside of the housing which latter is closed by the cover 61.
Secured upon the exposed end of the shaft 65 is a pinion 68 which meshes with a gear 69 secured upon the stud-shaft 69 journalled in the standard 58. ShaftV 69 is retained in its bearing Yby the collar 1|] secured to the shaft. Frictionally held upon the hub of the gear 69 is a sprocket-wheel 1| whose teeth are in permanent mesh with the upper flight of the normally stationary chain or feeding element 34 disposed between the rails 3. The mechanism just described as mounted in the housing 54 constitutes a train of forward feeding elements of which the sprocket-wheel 1| remains permanently in intermeshing relation with the chain 34. An idler sprocket-wheel 12 is journalled upon a screw stud 13 fixed in the arm 14 extending from the carriage 5 and maintains the chain 34 in mesh with the sprocket-Wheel 1I.
The ratio of the gear drive between the sprocket-wheels 53 and 1| is such that a relatively rapid rotation of the sprocket-wheel 53 will result in only'a partial rotation of the sprocketwheel 1|, which, due to its meshing with the normally stationary chain or feeding element 34, Will cause the carriage 5, with the sewing machine, to move or be propelled along the rails 3 at a stitching speed substantially commensurate with that' of the regular feeding movements of the feed-dog. Should there occur a difference between the travel of the carriage 5 and the workadvancing movements of the feed-dog of the sewing machine, this is compensated for by slippage of the sprocket-wheel 1| which is frictionallyY retained upon the hub of the gear 69 by the springwasher 15 retained upon the shaft 69 by nuts 16. Inthe operation of stitching two piece-ends together, these are secured "upon the impaling pins 11 in overlapping relation, with their free ends disposed beneath the presser-foot I8 of the sewing machine. The electric motor is then started by a conventional toggle-switch S mounted upon the carriage and, as the driving belt I2 from the motor M to the sewing machine A is on the loose pulley I0, the carriage 5 with the sewing machine will remain stationary. When it is desired to begin stitching, the belt is shifted from the loose pulley IIJ to the tight pulley 9 by manual manipulation of the shipper I3 which is retained in running position by the latch-lever I9. The shift of the belt-shipper I3 carries the spring pressed plunger I'I to one side of the stoppin 23 and frees the carriage 5 from the stoppm.
When the motor belt I2 is shifted from the loose to the tight pulley on the sewing machine main-shaft 8, stitching will begin and, by means of the sprocket-chain drive 52 between the sprocket-wheels 5| and 53, the planetary speedreducing gearing will be set in motion and, through'the sprocket-wheel 'II meshing with the normally stationary chain or feeding element 34, the carriage 5, with the sewing machine A, will be propelled along the tracks 3.
As the carriage 5 with the sewing machine approaches the end of its range of travel, the latch-lever I9 will be released by engagement with the rounded upper end 21 of the tripper 26 and, through the action of the spring I 8, the belt-shipper I3 will be moved to off position, shifting the belt I2 from the tight pulley 9 to the loose pulley II), which will permit the sewing machine to come to rest.
When the carriage 5, with the sewing machine, has arrived at the end of its range of travel in completion of a piece-end stitching operation, the carriage is manually returned to starting position at the other end of the rails by giving the chain 34 a partial circulatory movement, effected by manually turning the crank-wheel 38, after preliminary manual release of the pawl 40 from the ratchet-wheel 33. 'Ihe chain 34, being still in mesh with the now nonrotary sprocket-wheel 1I, will return the carriage to initial position.
As the carriage 5 with the sewing machine approaches its starting position the inclined end of the spring-pressed plunger pin I1 will ride over the top of the stop-pin 23 all as fully described in the Webb patent before referred to.
It will be observed that therfeeding element constituted by the chain 34 is stationary while the carriage 5, with the sewing machine A, is being propelled in one direction along the tracks 3 during a piece-end stitching operation but that the feeding element or chain 34 is circulatorily movable when the carriage 5 is manually returned to starting position.
The invention is not to be understood as limited to the specic embodiment thereof chosen for the purposes of the present disclosure.
Having thus set forth the nature of the invention what we claim herein is:
1. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a railway and a wheeled carriage mounted thereon, of a sewing machine mounted on said carriage and including stitchforming and work-feeding mechanisms, an electric motor mounted on said carriage for driving said sewing machine, a normally stationary chain disposed lengthwise of said railway, a connection including a speed reducing gearing between said chain and said carriage for moving the latter with said sewing machine on said railway at stitching speed and means including said chain for returning said carriage with said sewing machine to starting position on said railway.
2. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a railway and a wheeled carriage mounted thereon, of a sewing machine mounted on said carriage and including stitchforming and work-feeding mechanisms, an electric motor mounted on said carriage for driving said sewing machine, a normally stationary chain disposed lengthwise of said railway, a connection between said chain and said carriage for moving the latter with said sewing machine on said railway, and means including said chain for returning said carriagerwith said sewing machine to starting position on said railway.
3. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a railway and a wheeled carriage mounted thereon, of a sewing machine mounted on said carriage andincluding stitchforming and work-feeding mechanisms, an electric motor mounted on said carriage for driving said sewing machine, a normally stationary chain disposed lengthwise of said railway, a connection between said chain and said carriage for moving the latter with said sewing machine on said railway, and manually operable means including said chain for returning said carriage with said sewing machine to starting position on said railway.
4. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a railway and a wheeled carriage mounted thereon, of a sewing machine mounted on said carriage and including stitchforming and work-feeding mechanisms, an electric motor mounted on said carriage for driving said sewing machine, a chain disposed lengthwise of said railway, means for maintaining said chain stationary, a connection between said chain and said carriage for moving the latter with said sewing machine on said railway, and manually operable means, including said chain, for returning said carriage with said sewing machine to starting position on said railway.
5. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a railway and a wheeled carriage movable thereon, of a sewing machine mounted upon said carriage and including stitchforming and feeding mechanisms, an electric motor mounted uponsaid carriage, a driving connection between said motor and said sewing machine, a chain disposed lengthwise of said railway, a driving connection between said motor and said chain independent of said sewing machine feeding mechanism for moving said carriage on said railway and means including said chain for returning said carriage with said sewing machine to starting position on said railway.
6. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a railway and a wheeled carriage mounted thereon, of a sewing machine mounted upon said carriage and including stitchforming, work-feeding and trimming mechanisms, an electric motor mounted on said carriage, a driving connection between said motor and said sewing machine, a blower mounted upon said carriage, a driving connection between said motor and said blower, a trimmer chute and a tube for directing a blast of air from said blower into said chute to clear the latter of trimmings.
'7. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a railway and a carriage mounted thereon, of a sewing machine and driving motor therefor both mounted on said carriage, permanently intermeshing elements mounted respectively on said carriage and railway, driving means between said motor and the carriage-supported element for propelling the carriage in one direction, and actuating means connected with the railway-supported element for propelling the carriage in the opposite direction.
8. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a railway and a carriage mounted thereon, of a sewing machine anda driving motor therefor mounted on said carriage, permanently intermeshing elements mounted respectively on said carriage and railway, driving means between said motor and the carriagesupported element for propelling the carriage in one direction, means for interrupting the propulsion of the carriage in said direction, and actuating means connected with the railway-supported element and adapted to operate while said driving means is inactive for propelling the carriage in the opposite direction.
9. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a railway and. a carriage mounted thereon, of a sewing machine and a driving motor therefor both mounted on said carriage, a train of carriage-feeding elements mounted on said carriage, a normally stationary feeding element in permanent mesh with one of the elements of said train and mounted on and extending lengthwise of said railway, a driving connection between said train of elements and said motor, and actuating means applied to said normally stationary feeding element, for propulsion of the carriage while the elements of said train are inactive.
10. In a machine of the class described, the combination with a railway and a carriage mounted thereon, of a sewing machine and a driving motor therefor both mounted on said carriage, a train of forward-feeding elements including a sprocket wheel mounted on said carriage, a driving connection between said motor and said forward-feeding train, a normally stationary sprocket chain mounted upon said railwayin permanent mesh with said sprocket wheel, and means for propelling said sprocket chain endwise for back feeding the carriage.
HERBERT CORRALL. JAMES HEGGIE.
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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3009428A (en) * 1959-01-30 1961-11-21 Curtis Marble Machine Co Sewing machine
US3396686A (en) * 1966-05-27 1968-08-13 Curtis Marble Machine Co Sewing apparatus
US4061096A (en) * 1976-07-09 1977-12-06 Louisville Bedding Company Quilted material mending system
US4192241A (en) * 1978-09-15 1980-03-11 Reed Donald K Apparatus for quilting layered fabrics
US4700642A (en) * 1985-04-24 1987-10-20 Young Engineering Inc. Joining continuous lengths of web materials

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
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US3396686A (en) * 1966-05-27 1968-08-13 Curtis Marble Machine Co Sewing apparatus
US4061096A (en) * 1976-07-09 1977-12-06 Louisville Bedding Company Quilted material mending system
US4192241A (en) * 1978-09-15 1980-03-11 Reed Donald K Apparatus for quilting layered fabrics
US4700642A (en) * 1985-04-24 1987-10-20 Young Engineering Inc. Joining continuous lengths of web materials

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