US2141594A - Carburetor - Google Patents

Carburetor Download PDF

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US2141594A
US2141594A US189983A US18998327A US2141594A US 2141594 A US2141594 A US 2141594A US 189983 A US189983 A US 189983A US 18998327 A US18998327 A US 18998327A US 2141594 A US2141594 A US 2141594A
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fuel
throttle
valve
chamber
passage
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US189983A
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Chicago Don Cole
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BENDIX PROD CORP
BENDIX PRODUCTS Corp
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BENDIX PROD CORP
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M7/00Carburettors with means for influencing, e.g. enriching or keeping constant, fuel/air ratio of charge under varying conditions
    • F02M7/06Means for enriching charge on sudden air throttle opening, i.e. at acceleration, e.g. storage means in passage way system
    • F02M7/08Means for enriching charge on sudden air throttle opening, i.e. at acceleration, e.g. storage means in passage way system using pumps
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M1/00Carburettors with means for facilitating engine's starting or its idling below operational temperatures
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M2700/00Supplying, feeding or preparing air, fuel, fuel air mixtures or auxiliary fluids for a combustion engine; Use of exhaust gas; Compressors for piston engines
    • F02M2700/43Arrangements for supplying air, fuel or auxiliary fluids to a combustion space of mixture compressing engines working with liquid fuel
    • F02M2700/4302Arrangements for supplying air, fuel or auxiliary fluids to a combustion space of mixture compressing engines working with liquid fuel whereby air and fuel are sucked into the mixture conduit
    • F02M2700/4335Transport devices
    • F02M2700/4338Acceleration pumps

Description

Dec. 27, 1938. D. COLE v GARBURETOR Filed May 9, 1927 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 -MWW-%ZW Dec. 27, 1938. D. COLE 2,141,594
CARBURETOR Filed May a, 1927 I 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Y %mam-m Dec.27,1938.'. QCOLE 7 2,141,594
CARBURETOR vFiled. May-9, 1927 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 ATTORNEY Dec. 27, 1938. D. COLE 2,141,594
' CARBURETOR Filed May 9, 1927 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 IN VEN TOR.
B 3&1 0010 a. 690M" ATTORNEY Patented Bee. 27 193% hon dole, Chicago, m, aasignor to Bendix irredncts Corporation, South End, a corpora tion. of Indiana Application may 9, 1921?, denial No. will-9% dd (Ola.
for acceleration of the engine.
The present tendency in automobile development is to redesign the engine to provide greater power and, particularly, more rapid acceleration of the vehicle for a given weight. 'llhere is also a tendency to extend the range of operating speeds of the engine. For securing a, greater amount of power and higher speed, a large carbureting opening and intake passageway is desirable, but this afiects adversely the ability of the engine to accelerate the vehicle with carburetors now known. A carburetor and its engin? must for best results be considered. as a uni In order to secure maximum horsepower at high speed, it is necessary to use a large size carburetor and intake manifold. Thereby, the horsepower at. high speed is materially increased, and the change does not affect to any great extent the wide open throttle pe rformance at lowspeed, assuming that the engine is running at any given speed with wide open throttle. However, this change greatly impairs the flexibility and acceleration of the engine at low speed, and acceleration becomes the most troublesome probed lem in the running of the engine. The necessity for an increased size of carburetor and intake passageway is well appreciated by those skilled in the art in that a very low vacuum is desirable in the intake manifold at high speeds in order to provide maximum volumetric efflciency.
This requirement of very low vacuum at wide open throttle on high speed necessitates a large Venturiin the plain tube type of carburetor, or a light spring in an expanding type of carburetor.
Such a construction automatically permits of the maintenance of a very low vacuum at wide open throttle on low speed, and by the same token it reduces the suction at the fuel nozzle to a minimum. Furthermore, it reduces the suction on the nozzle further when the engine is running at idle speeds with substantially closed throttle.
It is well' known that an automobile engine will pull constantly at a very low speed withwide open throttle, but will not respond, assuming the same'construction, should the throttle besuddenly opened from a closed or idling position, unless it is aided by some accelerating device which supplies an extra amount of fuel to the carbu retor to compensate for the tendency of the fuel from the main jet to'lag behind the air,
During the open position of the valve the auxillary passageway supplies fuel for accelerating placement of liquid from a 1 am aware that it has been proposed hereto fore to provide positively operated means for injecting fuel during opening of the carburetor throttle for accelerating the engine, but devices of this character, as known in the prior art, have one fundamental defect in that they do not provide a definite quantity of fuel for a. given displacement of the throttle. in prior devices with 1 which ll am familiar, an excessive amount of fuel is discharged from the nozzle when it is not w needed.
According to my invention, 1 provide an accelerating mechanism which discharges a given volume of fuel for a given opening of the throttle in such a manner as to meet the requirements or the engine for acceleration more accurately the. is provided by devices of the prior art.
In the preferred form of my invention, I provide a pump having a given volumetric discharge for a given change in throttle position independently, or substantially independently, of the rate at which the throttle position is changed. Furthermore, in the preferred form of myinvention, repeated rapid operations of the throttle will not flood the carburetor withliquid fuel.
According to my invention the accelerating i'uel discharge is prolonged beyond the opening motion of the throttle to which it corresponds.
lit
That is to say, the discharge of the accelerating fuel increment is spread over a considerable pe- 39 riod of time instead of being dumped into the air stream in a lump. In the preferred form oi my invention this is secured by energizing a spring which recoils or deenergizes through an element involving the displacement of liquid from a chamber through a. restricted outlet. The spring is energized at the opening of the throttle. Its recoil rate is independent of its energizing rate.
The motion of the opening of the throttle is transmitted to a valve element which opens an auxiliary or supplementary passageway forfuel in addition to the main fuel feed passageway. The timed recoil of the spring closes that valve.
purposes. This fuel may be supplied in either orboth of the following ways, first, by suction from the float chamber past said valve, second, by directing the liquid discharged by the spring from said chamber into said supplementary passageway.
The element which provides for such slow" dischamber is essentially I a timing element or a dash-pot, but its dilemma I! art with the manner of constructing and operating a device embodying my invention, I shall describe in connection with the accompanying draw-I ing a specific embodiment of the same.
In the drawing:
Figure 1 is a diagrammatic sectional view of a carburetor embodying my invention;
Fig. 2 is a horizontal section taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1;
Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic sectional view of a modification;
Fig. 4 is a like diagrammatic sectional view of I another modification;
Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic sectional view of a modified form of pump and valve element;
Fig. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view of a modified form of accelerating compensating de- Fig. 7 is a diagrammatic sectional view of a further embodiment of the invention; and
Fig. 8 is a diagrammatic sectional view of a further embodiment.
Referring first to the embodiment shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the carburetor comprises essentially a bodyhaving certain passageways therethrough and provided with movable parts appurtenant to the passageways. The body I has an air inlet at 2 communicating through a constricted Venturi shapedpassagewaySwith the outlet opening 4. The outlet opening 4 is surrounded by the usual attaching flange 5 by which the carburetor is supported from the intake manifold of the engine. The outlet 4 is controlled by butter- 45 fly throttle valve 6 mounted on a rotating shaft 50 chamber 8 which may be integral with or formed separatelyv from the main body I. The fuel chamber 8 is provided with a cover member 9 se cured as by suitable screws ll over the top of the fuel chamber. Afloat II is hinged at l2 in- 56 side the fuel chamber, and this float controls a -the constant level chamberl, or to hold the lviigildtherein substantially constant, may be pro- I The carburetor body is provided with a fuel discharge nozzle l6 terminating within the Ven-' turi constriction I slightly abovethemost restricted part. a Obviously, this nozzle may be made integral or as a separate part, as is well known to those skilled in the art. It may comprise a single passage or a pluralityof s. The nozzle ll contains a vertical eway ll communicating at its lower end with a lateral passageway II, this passageway l8 branching -.to provide communication through the controllable or regulable port I! with the constant level chamber I, and communicating by way of a controllable or regulable constriction with a cylinder or chamber 2|. The restriction 20 is formed as a removable plug having a drilled passageway therethrough. By substituting plugs, the size of the restriction may be adjusted. This cylinder or chamber 2| has a passageway 22 leading to the bottom of the float chamber 8, but which passageway 22 is normally closed by valve member 23 on the lower end of a stem or plunger 24. The port I!) is controlled by an adjustable needle valve 25 in a manner known to those skilled in the art.
- The vertical fuel passageway l'l communicates intermediate its ends with a horizontal passageway 26 through a controllable restriction 21 with a vertical passageway 28. The passageway 28 leads to the idling discharge opening or nozzle 29 above the throttle, and it has communication with an air inlet opening 30 below the throttle communicating with the space between the nozzle l6 and the throttle valve 6, commonly termed the mixing chamber ll.
The vertical passageway 28 is preferably provided with a restriction at 32 just below the point at which the air inlet ll joins the vertical passageway.
A second air inlet 33 leading to the outside of the carburetor body is also provided to admit air from the outside, although the opening 33 may be dispensed with upon making proper provision for the entry of air at the opening 3|. It is con-' templated within the construction shown that these openings 3.. 2! and 33 may be adjustable as desired.
The parts of the carburetor thus far described provide for the normal function of introducing a predetermined amount of liquid fuel into the air flow passing into the intake manifold for both idling and for normal running. During idling the throttle valve 6 is closed, or substantially closed. and liquid fuel is drawn up through the vertical passageway 28 from the float chamber and discharged at the restriction 22 into the flow of air which passes in through the opening 30 and into the opening 23, and is discharged at i the opening 29 into the intake manifold above the throttle.
Upon opening of the throttle the opening 30 is placed under suction at the same time that air passes around the edges of the throttle, and a greater amount of air and a greater amount of fuel are then supplied to the engine. At the same time, the current of air through-the venturi 3 tends to draw liquid fuel from the nozzle i6, so that for further open positions of the throttle 6 fuel may be discharged at both the nozzle i6 and at the constriction 32 in the vertical passageway 28. Upon further open position of the throttle 6 the main discharge of fuel occurs at the nozzle l6 and a reversal of flow through the vertical passageway 28 may occur and air pass down through the constriction 32 and into the passageway- H to reduce the flow of fuel out of said nozzle l6 and break up the same by the inflow of air.
It-wlll be apparent to those skilled in the art that the nozzle I may be air bled by other means than that shown, if so desired.
If the setting of the needle valve25 is proper forproviding a suitable mixture of air and liquid fuel for running at a given speed or speeds, it will be apparent that sudden opening of the throttle 6 will admit to the intake manifold a quantity of air for which there is not a corresponding quantity of liquid fuel due to the friction of flow of'theliquidfuelandduetothcinertiaofthef till same. This is particularly aggravated in case the venturi 3 is of ample size to pass suflicient air at wide open throttle position.
As a preferred means for securing a suitable discharge of fuel from the nozzle It upon opening of the throttle valve 6, I provide a cam 35 on the throttle shaft 1 for operating a leverflfi pivoted atii'l to the body of the carburetor. The lever 36 at its free end is suitably connected to the rod 3? which extends down through the cover Q and is connected by a pivotal joint 33 to a plunger 3% which is guided within a cylindrical guide Ml. In the form shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the guide 40 is a complete cylinder formed as an integral part of the cover member 9, but obviously this may be varied. The plunger 39 acts like a piston. guided in the guide Mi, fitting closely within said guide ml and providing on its interior the chamber or cylinder ti. Thischamber has cylindrical walls and forms a. cylinder for the piston M, which piston is connected to the upper end of the hol- 10w stem 2%. The stem 28 has a passageway li-i communicating with the interior of the cylinder M and having a discharge opening extending out laterally, and when the parts are in the position shown in Figs. land 2, said port opens into the bottom of the float chamber 8. The stem 23 is preferably threaded into the piston M and the head it of the stern forms a valve normally closing the passageway 22, as previously referred to. The piston t2 bearsa pin 55, the length of ,which is adjusted to engage the head of the cylinder til when the same is moved down to a position corresponding to substantially wide open throttle.
A spring Mi bearing against the bottom of the piston M and the bottom wall of the float chamher i tends to close the valve 23 by raising the' piston and stem until said valve 23 closes the port it.
The stem 26 preferably has clearance in the port ti'for a purpose later to be described, but it is within the scope of my invention to have the stem 2t fitting closely in said port 2?. v
A spring ill surrounding the rod 3'! tends to raise the lever 36 and connected parts until upward motion is stopped by engagement with the cam The operation of these parts is as follows: Assume that the parts are in the condition shown, and that the carburetor is supplied with fuel and attached to the engine, the engine may idle with the valve 6 closed, as shown, and when it is desired to accelerate the engine the shaft I is turned by any suitable means, as is well known to those skilled in the art, to open the valve 6. Such opening movement rotates the shaft 1 and causes the cam 35 to depress the lever 36, swinging it about its pivot 31', and in-turn causing the lever to force the plunger member, 39 downwardly. this plunger member containing the cylinder 4|.
' The first result of depressing the plunger 39 is to sageways 43 and M. compresses the spring and causes the discharge opening 44 to be forced below place the liquid in the chamber ll under pressure and to tend to expel the same through the pas- Such downward pressure the wall in which the opening 22 is formed, discharging liquid fuel from said port 44 into the chamber 2|, and thence through the restriction and into the fuel pas- 'sageways l8 and I1. At the same time, the depression of the plunger 89 tends to raise the level of liquid in the'float chamber slightly. This effect may be controlled by'suitable proportioning .of the'parts to secure an advantageous eflfect in raisinsthe liquid level, orthe said effect may be fuel from said opening W and into the feeding passageway I 8 is not directly dependent upon the rate of motion of opening of'the valve 8, but is dependent upon the force exerted by spring iii. For example, assume that the valve 6 is suddenly thrown to apartially open position. The levgr 36 must swing down and the plunger 39 be depre sed,
since the cam 35 positively moves the lever is.
However, the piston '32 is yieldably held by the spring 66 and it can move downwardly. Hence, upon initial actuation of the lever 35 downwardly, the plunger M is projected into the well or cylinder 2i, ,and the spring 3% being thereby compressed raises the piston 32, discharging liquid fuel from the cylinder li through the restriction 20 into the fuel passageway iii. Hence, upon initial opening of the throttle, fuel is immediately injected at the same instant that more air is admitted and there is a continuation of discharge after the initial motion which has caused it. This is highly beneficial in two ways; first, a definite quantity of fuel is discharged; depending upon the throttle position independently of the rate at which the throttle is opened; and, second, the time required for the discharge of the predetermined quantity of fuel according to throttle setting is advantageous in preventing successive operations of opening the throttle E from flooding the carburetor with additional injections or fuel. This discharge is spread over'an' appreciable period of time and thereby secures a beneficial effect. The throttle valve ii may be closed without immediate filling of the chamber M, since the connection between the shaft l and the lever 36 is an impositive and under certain conditions a lost motion connection and successive fuel discharged corresponding to each increase of throttle opening.
The pin d5 previously referred to acts as a stop between the head of the plunger 39 and the piston at when the throttle is substantially wide open to open the valve 23 and to permit additional fuel to be drawn through the clearance between the stern ill and the opening 22, thencethrough the constriction 28 into the fuel supply passageway !8. There is a tendency at wide open throttle for the air bled jet I 6 to thin out the mixture to too great a degree, and a compensating flow pf fuel through the constriction!!! into the fuel supply passageway I8 is provided to meet this tendency to form a mixture which is too lean.
It will be observed that the projection of the plunger-24 into the well 2| has a displacing effect, forcing fuel out of said chamber 2! upon the initial movement. Such displacing eifect of the plunger 24 may be largely relied upon for the accelerating discharge. In such event, the particular feature of preventing successive operations of the accelerating'ful feed mechanism for successive operations of the throttle valve is secured, even though delayed discharge is, or is-not, present.
I have shown in Fig. 3 an embodiment of certain features of my invention. In this case the guide l0 is formed separstely'trom the float chamber 8. The stem 31, which depresses the plunger 39, is actuated by a bell crank lever 49, one arm of which, as shown at 50, comprises a cam engaging a roller on the upper end of the 5 stem 31 to depress the same. The lever 48 is pivoted on a rocking shaft SI and is actuated by the same actuating rod 52 which is connected to the operating arm 53 on the throttle shaft 1.
The nozzle It has a separate vertical passageway 53. In the present form the passageway 53 is in parallel to the main fuel passageway l1, and is connected to the chamber 2| so that the discharge of fuel for acceleration is distinct from the normal discharge of fuel under suction con- 16 trol from the float chamber. Thus, instead of two branches to a single outlet, there are two passageways having separate outlets into the air stream. This is optional.
The plunger 24' is made of a size to secure a substantial displacement of fuel, as may be required, when the same is thrust down into the chamber 2|. The space 8| within the cylindrical v guiding chamber below the plunger 39 communicates with the float chamber 8 through a 25 passageway 54 which has sufficient retarding effect on return flow to secure a positive effect below the piston 42, tending'to prevent excessive leakage out of the chamber 2| back into the float chamber. The plunger 24' may be made with clearance about the opening 22 which it-controlsr The delayed effect is secured in the present instance by leakage between the piston 42 and the walls of the cylinder of the plunger 39. That is to say, depression of the plunger 39 causes depression of the displacing, plunger 24' to force fuel from the chamber 2| and, at the same time, force some fuel out of the chamber 4| around the piston 42, so that an immediate repetition of opening and closing of the throttle valve 6 tends to be less effective for discharging fuel until sufflcient time has elapsed to permit filling of the .chamber 4|. In this.oase the dash-Dot effect is most prominent. It. will also be observed that.
during the time that. the plunger 24' is moving 46 up to where the head or valve 22 closes off the passageway 22,v there is a passageway open for fuel to be drawn from the float chamber through the clearance about the plunger 24', through the chamber 2|, constriction 20, and out the passageway 52. This, however, is cut off by the valve 23 as soon as the plunger 42 rises under the in fluence of the spring 48 to a point where the valve 23 closes. v
I have shown in Fig. 5 a construction of stem 5 54 in which a substantial clearance is formed between (1 stem and the walls of the opening 22, and where it is intended that the opening of said clearance passageway by depression of the plunger 54 to move the valve 23 from the opening 22 0 shall provide a suction eway through which fuel may be drawn by suction. That is to say,
in this case the stem 54 isofrelatively small displacement and has no great effect on displacing liquid from the chamber 2|, but it. provides by opening the passageway 22 for liquid fuel to be drawn by suction during the time that such valve is open. I have shown these three diiferent forms of plungers to indicate the diiferent functions which are emphasized by each. In the plunger 24, as shown in Fig. 1, the function which is emphasized is the positive discharge from the chamber 4| into the fuel supply passage by upward movement of the piston 42 in the cylinder 4|. This gives a protracted discharge of a positive character. In Fig; 3 I have shown a plunger vopening being'normally closed by the valve 22 5 charge through the controlling restriction 24 24' in which the discharge is secured substantially by displacement of liquid by the plunger itself, and the piston 42 and cylinder 4| form essentially a dash-pot construction for preventing successive operations from discharging too much 2 fuel into the carburetor. In Fig. 5 the feature of permitting a by-pass to be opened for a predetermined time, corresponding to the extent of change of opening of the throttle valve, is emphasized.
While in the embodiments shown in Figs. 1 and 3, the plunger 2! is mechanically actuated by the throttle shaft I, or the means which operates the throttle shaft I, it is to be understood that this plunger may be operated by other means which 14 will secure depression of the plunger in accordance with opening of the throttle valve. In Fig. 4 J
I have shown a carburetor in which the plunger 39 is depressed by a spring which is held under compression by the suction existing in the intake manifold. In this construction the guide 4ll is extended upwardly, as indicated at I, to form a cylinder in which a piston I is adapted to move. A compression spring '2 is disposed within the piston GI and it bears against the head S3 of 21 the cylinder I, tending to depress the piston 6| at all times. The piston 6| is connected to the plunger 39 by a connection or link 4. The cylinder ill has a series of openings" opening to the interior of the float chamber 8 above the liquid 3| level. The space above the liquid level in each form shown herein communicates by way of a vent with atmosphere, although this feature my be varied without departing from my invention. Descent of plunger 0| tends to increase the air 3 pressure on liquid in chamber 4. This may be utilized to assist in feeding additional fuel for acceleration.
A passageway 81 is formed through the head of the cylinder 64, and this communicates through 4 a passageway 22 with a suction port is opening into the main passageway of the carburetor above the throttle valve 8, so that the cylinder ill is subjected to the suction prevailingin the intake passageway above the throttle valve G. 4
The plunger is has the chamber 4| forming a cylinder for the piston 42. The piston 42 has the hollow stem 24 passingdown through an opening in the bottom wall, indicated at 22, this which forms the head of the plunger or rod 24. The piston 42 contains the stop pin 45 forming the compensating control, as in the previous embodiment. The hollow rod 24 has the discharge port 44 adapted to be plunged down into the 5 chamber 2| and to discharge its accelerating in the branch eway leading'to the main passageway II. a
The operation of the device shown in Fig. 4 is so substantially the same as that shown in Fig. 1, with the exception that'the plunger ll is actuated by the spring 42 acting under the control of suction in the intake manifold above the throttle. When the throttle is substantially closed 63 the suction in the intake manifold above the throttle is a maximum and the piston I will be drawn up against the head 62 of the cylinderv is. The idling charge is drawn through the vertical eway 28, air for the same passing in a through the openings II and 22; When the throttle is opened the suction in the intake manifold above the throttle will be reduced, and the spring 2 expands driving the plunger 2! downwardly and a part of the contents 7 which it over-runs.
it, idli dt i of chamber ii, as described in connection with i' ig. ll.
Tosecure best results the spring 62 must be proportioned to assume a definite position for a definite suction in the intake manifold. That is to say, the spring pressure should vary as the same is expanded orcollapsed, so as to assume a definite position corresponding to a definite suction. This proportioning of the spring to make it take a corresponding set for a given suction may be accomplished in any well known manner, as by forming it of variable cross section or variable diameter of coil, orby introducing a series of springs of difierent lengths.
The construction of the stem 2% and valve til may be identical with that 'shovn. in Fig. l, or it may be as shown in Fig. 3, 5 or Big. ii, depending upon the characteristics desired.
In Fig. 6 I have shown a modified form oi device for providing the accelerating discharge. According to this construction a cylinder iii. communicating at top and bottom with the float chamber 8, is provided. The communication ii at the upper end is preferably above the liquid level, and the communication 5% at the lower end is below the liquid level, preferably adjacent the bottom of the float chamber 8. A movable piston 52 hits closely within the cylinder This piston is mounted to slide on the stern lit, which stem at its lower end is drilled to provide a longitudinal passageway communicating laterally at it with the interior of the cylinder it. The stem it has a shoulder or collar it below the port i5, and the spring it which engages at its upper end a collar it on the plunger it tends to push the piston iii down over the valve opening it to close the same, the collar it tendingto-limit further movement of the piston "ill on said stem. The stem it extends up to a pivot joint at it where it is connected to the operating arm 3%. The spring d'l tends to raise the plunger it until the collar. "ll engages the cover member s. When the collar it is in engagement with the cover 53, the lower end of the rod "i3 projects into and closes the port ilii, which portv is an opening between the cylinder iii and the chamber ii. The chamber 2i has the restricted outlet, as indicated at til. The parts are shown in Fig. 6 as though the plunger J3 had just been depressed a short distance to permit the opening it to be exposed under the piston iii. The spring 36 has been compressed thereby and it tends to recoil and force the piston it downward, forcing liquid therefrom, a part of the liquid being expelled through the passageway dd, and another part through the opening i5 into the passageway id in the hollow stem and down into the chamber 2i and through the restriction it. The passageway lid in the present instance may be provided with a check valve l9 if so desired.
The stem i3 is provided with a reduced portion at til which is adapted to enter the port 22 when the throttle is in substantially wide open position for providing the compensating feed heretofore referred to.
In the present structure, that is, Fig. 6, opening of the throttle is accompanied by depression of the stem '13 and compression of the spring d5 which, upon recoil, forces fuel through the hollow stem until the piston i2 overtakes the port it This prevents further passage of fuel through this auxiliary by-pass including the restriction 20, except upon substantially wide open throttle position where the clearance between the stern "i3 and the port 22 permits liquid to be drawn through the passageway ti l, the clearance in the passageway 22, through the chamber 2!, restriction 20, and into'the air flow.
This form of feeding device may be introduced in the form shown in Fig. 4 if so desired. Thus, Figure 8 represents a carburetor embodying the fuel feeding device of Figure 6, vacuum actuated after the manner of the device shown in Figure 4, and having a separate outlet into the mixing chamber, as in Figure 3.
The carburetor shown in Figure 7 is formed merely by substituting, in Figure 3, the acceleration pump actuating means shown in Figure l, and requires no detailed explanation. The reference numerals applied to the various elements in this figure are the same as those used in Figures 3 and i.
It will be observed that the accelerating device of my invention provides, first, a displacement efiect of liquid useful in providing an accelerating discharge. The plunger it in being projected down into the liquid displaces a part of the same and tends to increase the level which assists in a discharge of a greater amount of fuel immediately upon opening the throttle. Likewise, the projection of the stern it, or it or 5%, displaces liquid in the chamber ii, also tending to supply additional fuel upon opening of the throttle.
A second effect which is produced by the device or my invention is the syringe efiect oi the chamber ll discharging liquid down through the hollow stem and discharge port it when the rod or stem fill is plunged into the chamber 2 I This provides 'a protracted charge, that is, a discharge which occurs after the motion causing it initially has ceased. This spreads the accelerating fuel charge over an appreciable period of time and secures a new and highly beneficial mode of operation. l
A further efiect is that of opening a lay-pass around the normal fuel restriction it during the period of acceleration. That is to say, when the throttle valve ii is further opened from any given position, the valve 23 is opened and, where cleai ance is provided around the same, fuel may be drawn through said clearance during the time that is required for the spring db to close the valve 23. This amounts to a time-interval during which a by-pass is opened upon movement of the throttle to a further open position.
In addition to the above efiects, a further effect is the compensating efiect which is secured by opening the valve 23 by engagement oi the plunger 39 with the pins d5 when the throttle is moved in proximity to its wide open position.
I domot intend to be limited to the details shown or described, since the illustration is substantially diagrammatic. My invention provides certain new' functions and I intend to claim broadly the means for securing the same.
I claim:-
1. In combination in a carburetor, an air pasedge, a fuel supply chamber, a fuel supply passage from the chamber to the air passage adapted to convey fuel drawn into the stream of air flowing in said air passage, 2. throttle for said air passage, a. second fuel supply passage for delivering fuel from the fuel chamber into said air passage, a valve normally closing said second passage for preventing the drawing of fuel therethrough, means for jointly opening the throttle and said valve, means for closing the valve, said closing means having a delayed action, and 'means for positively holding the valve open when the throttle is wide open.
2. In a carburetor having a main air passage, a fuel supp chamber, a fuel supply passage from the chamber having an outlet into the air passage, a fuel pump having a cylinder adapted to be filled from the fuel chamber and having a discharge passage communicating with the fuel supply passage, said cylinder having a piston fitting therein, a spring for actuating the piston to cause a discharge of fuel from the cylinder into said fuel supply passage, means to compress said spring, and a valve controlling the discharge of the pump and opened upon compression of the said spring.
3. In a carburetor, the combination of an air passage having a. throttle, a fuel supply chamber, a fuel supply passage from the chamber into the air passage, 9. second fuel supply passage subject to suction by the air flow in the air passage, 8. valvenormally closing off said latter passage to prevent fuel from being drawn through the same, means operated upon opening movement of the throttle independently of suction to open said valve, a. definite time consinning means to close said valve independently of the throttle, said time consuming means comprising a spring actuated piston, and a discharge passage for conveying fuel displaced by said spring actuated piston into said second fuel supply passage. 1
4. In a carburetor, the combination of an air passage having a throttle, a fuel supply chamber, a fuel supply passage from the chamber into the to suction by the air flow in the air passage, a valve normally closing oif said latter passage to prevent fuel from being drawn through the same,
means operated upon opening movement of the throttle to open said valve, a definite time consuming means to close said valve independently of the throttle, said time consuming means comprising a spring actuated piston, a discharge passage for conveying fuel displaced by said spring actuated piston into said second fuel supply passage, and means to hold said valve open when said throttle is wide open.
'5. Ina carburetor, the combination of an air passage having a throttle, a fuel supply chamber, a. fuel supply passage from the chamberinto the air passage, a second fuel supply passage subiect to suction by the air flow in the air passage, a valve normally closing off said latter passage to prevent fuel from being drawn through said second fuel supply passage, means operated upon opening movement of the throttle to open said valve, a definite time consuming means to close said valve independently of the movement of the throttle, and means to hold said valve open when said throttle is wide open.
6. In a carburetor, the combination of an air passage having a throttle, a fuel supply chamber, a. fuel supply passage from the chamber, an accelerating pump adapted to be filled from the fuel supply chamber and to discharge its fuel into the air passage, actuating means for moving said pump as a whole, and means energized by movement of the pump as a whole for discharging a predetermined quantity ofliquid from the pump in accordance with the extent of operation of said actuating means.
7. In combination with a throttle controlled carburetor, an accelerating pump device comprising a piston member and a cylinder member movable downward as a whole by opening of the throttle, a pair of springs, one connected to the piston member and the other to the cylinder member, and both energized by downward movement of the pump, a valve controlled by one of said members and opened by downward movement of the pump, the recoil of one of said springs causing movement of the members toward each other to discharge fuel and finally closing the valve, the recoil of the other spring separating the members to draw fuel into the P p.
8. In a carburetor, a main air passage having a constriction, a throttle for said passage, a fuel supply chamber having an outlet, a fuel supply outlet orifice for-controlling the flow of fuel from said supply chamber, a fuel pump having a. cylinder adapted to be filled from the fuel chamber and having a discharge port, a piston for the cylinder, 8. spring for actuating the piston to cause a discharge of liquid from the cylinder, means to compress the spring upon opening of the throttle, means for conducting the discharge of fuel from the orifice and from the discharge port of the fuel pump into the constriction in the main air passageway, and a valve normally closing the discharge port of the pump while the carburetor is delivering mixture.
9. In a carburetor having an air passageway, a Venturi constriction therein, a throttle therefor, means for feeding fuel into the stream of air in the Venturi constriction comprising a fuel supply chamber, a regulable outlet orifice and a delivery passageway leading from said orifice into said venturi and terminating in a delivery orifice therein subjected to the suction in said venturi, and means for providing accelerating fuel to be supplied to the air stream upon sudden opening of the throttle comprising a branch passageway from the fuel supply chamber to said delivery passageway, said branch passageway comprising a valve port, a movable valve member controlling said port, a spring for moving said valve to closed position and normally holding the same closed, and means for moving said valve member to open said port upon opening of the throttle, said means including a liquid dash pot,
.the liquid discharged from said dash pot passing through said valve port.
10. In combination with a throttle controlled carburetor, accelerating means comprising a collapsible chamber adapted to be filled with liquid fuel, said chamber having two ends, a member movable in one direction with the throttle connected to one end of the chamber, a spring pressing against the other end of the chamber, a stem limiting the expansion of the spring, and a valve controlling the discharge of .the accelerating means, said valve being opened upon compression of the spring, the recoil of the spring slowly collapsing the chamber to discharge fuel therefrom, and thereafter closing said valve.
11. The combination with a throttle controlled carburetor, and means for operating the throttle, of accelerating means comprising a piston mem ber and a cylinder member, a'connection from the throttle operating means to one of said members, a valve carried by the other of saidmembers, an'accelerating fuel feed passage controlled by said valve, and a spring connected to the other of said members tending to move it toward the said one member and tending also to close said valve.
12. In combination with a. throttle controlled carburetor and means for operating-the throttle,
of accelerating means comprising a collapsible chamber consisting of a piston member and a l t m said one member, and a connection from the throttle operating means to the other member whereby upon opening movement of the throttle the two members are jointly moved to energize the spring and open the said valve member, the recoil of the spring causing a protracted relative motion of the one member with respect to the.
other and a closing of said valve member.
13. In combination with a throttle controlled carburetor having a throttle operating means, of an accelerating device comprising a collapsible chamber consisting of two elements, a valve for controlling accelerating fuel feed connected to one of the elements, a spring also connected to said one element, and an impositive connection formed in part by said collapsible chamber be tween said throttle operating means and said valve, said valve being opened and said spring energized by movement of said throttle operating means to open the throttle, and said valve being closed by the recoil of said spring, the'closing of said valve being then delayed by the delayed escape oi the contents of said collapsible chamber.
id. In combination with a throttle controlled carburetor having throttle operating means, of an accelerating device comprising a collapsible chamber consisting of a piston and a cylinder, a swinging lever adapted to be actuated in one direction by the throttle operating means, and a spring for actuating it in the other direction, a link connecting the cylinder and the lever. a hollow stern for conveying the discharge of the chamber to the carburetor, a valve controlling said discharge, and a spring energized by movement of the chamber for moving the piston and closing said valve, whereby a protracted discharge is secured from said chamber.
15. in combination with a throttle controlled carburetor having throttle operating means, an
- accelerating tuel supply passageway having a dill controlling valve, a spring for closing the same, a collapsible chamber forming a connection between the throttle operating means and the valve for opening the valve and compressing the spring, said chamber collapsing under the pressure of the spring and permitting the valve to close, and means acting when the throttle approaches wide open position for permitting a continuous discharge through said accelerating fuel passage.
16. in a carburetor, a fuel supply chamber, an air passage. a throttle controlling the air passage, a fuel discharge passageway from the chamber leading into the air passage, an accelerating pump taking fuel from the chamber and discharging the same into the air passage, said pump being mechanicallyactuated upon opening the throttle to displace a definite volume of fuel therefrom in proportion to the opening of the throttle, and an automatic valve for the pump for closing off the discharge thereof when the definite volume corresponding to the setting of the throttle has beendisplaced from the pump, said pump comprising two members movable relative to each other to displace fuel from between them, one of said members being moved in consonancewith throttle movements and the other being connected to the valve.
17. In a carburetor: the combination of a main air passageway; a fuel supply chamber; a fuel discharge passageway from the chamber to the air passageway, said fuel discharge passageway including a fuel flow cpnstrictiongoverning the normal rate of fuel flow into the air passageway; a by-pass for fuel from the chamber into the air passageway around said fuel flow constriction, said by-pass including a cylinder, a piston projecting into said cylinder, and a plunger carried by the piston and provided with a fuel passage;
'a throttle for the air passageway; means for operating said throttle; and a connection from the throttle operating means tosaid piston including said cylinder.
18. In a carburetor, the combination of an air passage having a throttle, means for operating said throttle, a fuel supply chamber, a fuel sup ply passage from the chamber into the air passage, a second fuel supply passage subject to suction by the air flow in the air passage, means to operate the throttle, a cylinder member, a piston member therefor, a spring for moving one of said members with respect to the other to force liquid from between them, means including said members for compressing said spring, an operative connection between said throttleoperating means and said spring compressing means, and a spring for restoring said members to normal position after operation.
19. In a carburetor, the combination of an air passage having a throttle, a fuel supply chamber, a fuel supply passage from the chamber into the air passage, 2, second fuel supply passage subject to suction by the air flow in the air passage, a
valve normally closing on said second passage to prevent fuel from being drawn therethrough, means to operate the throttle, a cylinder member, a piston member therefor, a spring formoving one of said members with respect to the other to force liquid from between them, means including the cylinder and piston for compressing said spring and opening said valve, an operative connection between said throttle operating means and said spring compressing means, and a spring for restoring said members to' normal position after operation.
20. In a throttle controlled carburetor having a venturl, a fuel supply chamber, a nozzle opening into the venturi and connecting with said fuel supply chamber, a collapsible syringe device connecting with the fuel supply chamber, said syringe being actuated by opening of the throttle for ejecting fuel, a separate passageway leading from said syringe device to said venturi, and a valve for automatically cutting oil connection between said device and said passageway after the syringe is collapsed.
21. In a carburetor having a throttle, a fuel nozzle, and means for supplying fuel thereto; an economizer valve for controlling the flow of additional fuel to the nozzle, an acceleration device, and an intermediate member actuated in one direction by the opening movement only of said throttle and actuated in the opposite directions by a spring,'said member in turn actuating the economizer valve and the acceleration device.
. 22. Inc. carburetor having a throttle, an acceleration device comprising two members arranged to pump fuel by movement of either member relative to the other, one of said members being reyieldable under pressure, the other of which is so connected as to be moved toward said one wall when the throttle is opened.
24. In a carburetor having a throttle, an acceleration device comprising a fuel container having walls relatively movable to vary the capacity of the container, means for moving one of said walls in accordance with the position of the throttle, another of said walls being yieldable in response to pressure within the chamber developed by movement of said one wall.
25. A charge forming device for internal combustion engines comprising, a mixture passage adapted to supply a combustible mixture to the intake port of the engine, means for supplying fuel and air thereto, a throttle controlling the flow through the mixture passage, means within the mixture passage for increasing the velocity of flow therethrough and means for supplying additional fuel to said mixture passage at the point where the velocity of flow is increased, whereby said additonal fuel is more readily atomized.
26. A chargeforming device for internal combustion engines comprising, a mixture passage adapted to supply a combustible mixture to the intake port of the engine, means for supplying fuel and air thereto, a throttle controlling the flow through the mixture passage, means within the mixture passage for increasing the velocity of flow therethrough, means for supplying additional fuel to said mixture passage at the point where the velocity of flow is increased, and means for rendering said last mentioned means eifective on opening-movements of the throttle.
27. A charge forming device for internal combustion engines comprising, a mixture passage plunger operating therein, means for supplying fuel to said cylinder, a fuel delivery passage from said cylinder to the mixing chamber, means-for actuating a pressure stroke of said'plunger concurrently with the opening of the throttle and for simultaneously connecting said ,fuel supply means and delivery passage, and means for automaticallyeflfecting a retarded closing of said discharge passage upon completion of throttle-opening movement.
29. Thecombination with a throttle-controlled carburetor comprising a mixing chamber, of an accelerating device, comprising a fuel pump dis charging into said mixing chamber, means actuated in common with said throttle upomits-opeming travel for actuating said pump, todeliver a mechanisms for operating the last named means in conjunction with the, throttle, said operating mechanism including a dash pot for varying the eflectlveness of said last named means to increase the flow of fuel according to the rapidity of operation of said operating mechanism.
31. The combination with a throttle-controlled carburetor comprising a mixing chamber, of an accelerating device comprising a fuel pump discharging into the mixing chamber, a valve controlling the discharge from said pump, means actuated by said throttle in its opening travel for actuating said pump to force a charge of fuel into the mixing chamber and for opening said valve to establish a subsequent flow responsive to reduced pressure in the mixing chamber, and means eflective in the open position of the throttle for gradually and automatically closing said valve.
32. The combination with a throttle-controlled carburetor comprising a mixing chamber, of an accelerating device comprising a fuel pump having a discharge connection to the mixing chamber, a valve controlling such connection and means variably responsive to movements of the throttle according to the rapidity of operation of the latter for actuating said pump and valve from the throttle.
33. The combination with a throttle-controlled carburetor comprising a mixing chamber, of a 3 nection being variably responsive to actuation of the throttle according to the carburetor temperature.
34. The combination with a throttle-controlled carburetor comprising a mixing chamber, and means establishing a normal fuel supply to said chamber, of means for increasing such supply, and an actuating connection to the last named means from thethrottle, varying in its eficctive response to control in an inverse proportion to the temperature, under which the control is exercised.
35. The combination with a throttle-controlled carburetor comprising a mixing chamber, of an accelerating device comprising a fuel pump having a discharge connection to said mixing chamber and a dash-pot forming an actuating connection to said pump from said throttle, effective to vary the response of said pump to a throttle movement, according to the rapidity of such movement.
36. The combination with asthrottle-controlled carburetorcomprising a mixing chamber, of an accelerating device comprising a fuel pump having a discharge connection to the mixing chamber, a valve controlling such connection, a dashpot operable by the throttle upon its opening movement to eifect a pressure stroke of said pump and an unseating of said valve, said dash-pot being variably responsive to said throttle according to the rapidity of throttle movement, and means for eifecting a retarded seating of said valve.
37. The combination with a throttle-controlled carburetor comprising a mixing chamber, of a fuel pump having a discharge connection to said mixing chamber, means for supplying fuel. to said pump, a dash-pot operatively connecting said pump and throttle, eflective. to vary the response of said pump according to the rapidity of actuation of said throttle, and spring means establishing the normal position of said pump and dash-p0.
38. The combination with a throttle-controlled carburetor comprising a mixing chamber, of a dash-pot comprising a piston and cylinder, means for actuating one of said dash-pot parts in common with the throttle, a spring opposing move- .ment of the otherdash-pot ,part responsive to throttle actuation, a pump comprising a cylinder and plunger, one of which is operatively connected to the freely movable dash-pot part, a fuel delivery passage from said pump to said mixing chamber, means for supplying fuel to said pump and means normally closing said fuel supply adapted to be opened by a throttle-responsive actuation of the dash-pot.
39. In a carburetor, comprising a mixing chamher and a throttle, means establishing a normal fuel delivery to said mixing chamber, a fuel pump for temporarily delivering additional fuel to the mixing chamber, and an actuating connection from the throttle tosaid pump including a common means to render said connection unresponsive to gradual throttle movement and to retard.
the suction stroke of the pump.
40. Ina carburetor, means forming a mixing conduit, a throttle valve controlling said mixing conduit, normal fuel supply means for said mixing-conduit, auxiliary fuel supply means for said mixing conduit, means for operating said auxiliary fuel supply means in-response to opening movements of said throttle, and a suction operated device for cutting of! said auxiliary fuel sup- P y m n 41. In a carbureto means forming a mixing conduit, an accelerating pump for supplying fuel to said mixing conduit and a suction operated device for cutting off the flow of fuelfrom said accelerating pump.
42. In a carburetor, an airsystem including a venturi, a fuel system for delivering fuel thereto and including a. plurality of nozzles terminating within said venturi, means effective for normally delivering fuel through part only of said nozzles,
vacuum operated pump means eflective for delivering an accelerating charge through another of said nozzles, and valve means controlled by I said pump means and effective after delivery of the accelerating charge to continue the delivery of an enrlchening charge through said last mentioned nozzle;
1. 43. Ina carburetor including a'fuel reservoir and having an air passage, a normal fuel system for feeding fuel into said air passage, a pick-up system including a pump and having an auxiliary fuel passage communicating with said air passage independently of said normal fuel system and with said pump, said fuel passage being subject to the suction in the air passage, and a check valve controlling said fuel passage so arranged that suction in the air passage tends to close the valve,'sald valve being adapted to? prevent discharging of fuel from said fuel passage and pump when the latter isv inoperative.
44. In a carburetor having a fuel mixture passage including a throttle valve, a main fuel system for supplying fuel to said fuel mixture passage, a fuel reservoir, means for temporarily feeding a charge of fuel into said fuel mixture pas-' sage including a pump and an auxiliary passageway having an outlet communicating with said fuel mixture passage at an elevation above that of the fuel level in said reservoir, said auxiliary passageway being subject to the suction in the fuel mixture passage, the main portion of said auxiliary passageway being normaily'hlled with fuel by the head of fuel in said reservoir, and a check valve in said auxiliary eway located below the fuel level in said reservoir for sealing said auxiliary eway against the vacuum in said fuel mixture passage and so arranged that suction in the fuel mixture passage tends to close said valve.
45. In a carburetor, an air system including a venturi, a nozzle system for delivering normal fuel supply to said venturi, .a supplemental no'zzle system for delivering an enrichening charge to said venturi, said supplemental nozzle system including an operative connection to a source of fuel supply and containing both a check valve and economizer valve normally so positioned as a to prevent the supply of fuel through the supplemental nozzle system, and means for first closing the check valve and then opening the economizer valve for delivering an accelerating charge through said supplemental nozzle system and thereafter establishing an emichening flow through said supplemental nozzle system from said source of supply.
46. In a carburetor, an air system, a nozzle system for normally delivering fuel to the air system, a supplemental nozzle system having a flow passage including both a normally closed v economizer valve and normally open check valve, and fluid operated means-for opening said economizer valve and temporarily closing said check' valve.
47, In a carburetor, an air system and a float chamber, a nozzle system for delivering normal valve and then opening the economizer valve for delivering an acceleratingcharge through said plemental nozzle system without disturbing the fuel flow through said first mentioned. nozzle system, and thereafter establishing an enrichening flow through said supplemental nozzle system from said float chamber. v
48. In a carburetor. an air system and a float chamber, a nozzlesystem for delivering norms! fuel supply to said air system from mid float chamber, and including asconnection with said ,iloat chamber, a supplemental nozzlersystemzfor delivering an enricheniu'g charge to said air system andinciuding a second separate connection to said float chamber. said second connection containing both a check valve and an economizer valve so positioned as to prevent the supply of fuel throu the supplemental nozzle system, and vacuum operated pump means for first closing the check valve and then opening the economizer valve for delivering an accelerating charge through said supplemental nozzle system without disturbing the fuel flow through said first mentioned nozzle system. and thereafter establishing an enrichening flow through said supplemental nomle' system fr said float chamber.
49. In .a carburetor having a main air passage, a fuel supply chamber, a fuel supply passage from the chamber having an outlet into the air passage, a fuel pump having a stationary cylinder adapted to be filled from the fuel chamber and having a discharge passage communicating with the fuel supply passage, said cylinder having a piston fitting therein, a spring for actuating the pistonto cause a discharge of fuel from the cylinder into said fuel supply passage,
,of the cylinder, a piston slidable on said member,
and an outlet formed in said member and controlledby the position of the piston.
52. In a carburetor having a fuel passage, an acceleration pump comprising a chamber adapted to receive fuel, a throttle actuated member movable longitudinally of the chamber, a piston slidable on said member and yieldingly urged in one direction thereon, and an outlet duct formed in said member having one of its ends normally obstructed by the piston and its other end discharging into said fuel passage.
53. In a carburetor having a fuel mixture passage, a fuel reservoir, a pick-up system including a pump having a fuel inlet communicating with said reservoir and an outlet passage communicating with said fuel mixture passage, a check valve in said fuel inlet, and means controlling said outlet passage for sealing the latter against the vacuum in said fuel mixture passage when said pump is inoperative.
54. In a carburetor having a fuel mixture passage including a throttle valve, a fuel reservoir,
means for temporarily feeding a charge of fuel into said fuel mixture passage including a pump and having a fuel passageway communicating with said fuel mixture passage, the main por-' tion of said fuel passageway being normally filled with fuel by the head of fuel in said reservoir, a valve in said passageway normally preventing the flow of fuel therethrough under the influence of the suction in said fuel mixture passage when said pump is inoperative, means associated with said valve for moving the same to an open position by the pressure of the fuel in said passageway when said pump is actuated, and
yielding means for closing said valve when the pressure of the fuel in said passageway falls below a predetermined value.
55. In a carburetor having a fuel mixture passage including a throttle valve, a fuel reservoir, means for temporarily feeding a charge of fuel into said fuel mixture passage including a pump and having a fuel passageway communicating with said fuel mixture passage, the main portion of said fuel passageway being normally filled with fuel by the head of fuel in said reservoir, a valve in said passageway normally preventing the flow of fuel therethrough under the influence of the suction in said fuel mixture passage when said pump is inoperative, means associated with said valve for moving the sameto an open position by the pressure of the fuel in said passageway when said pump is actuated, yielding means tending to close said valve, and mechanism operable upon opening movement of said throttle for actuating said pump.
56. In a carburetor having a throttle and a fuel reservoir, an acceleration device comprising a fuel chamber communicating with the reservoir, an actuating member positively moved when the throttle is opened, fuel-displacing means in the chamber slidably related to said actuating mem ber, resilient means engaging the actuating member and the fuel-displacing means to yieldingly resist sliding movement therebetween under the influence of fuel pressure when the device is actuated, and a check valve preventing flow of fuel from the chamber to the reservoir.
57. In a carburetonhaving a throttle and a fuel reservoir, an acceleration device comprising a fuel chamber having a restricted connection to the fuel reservoir, an actuating member movable in consonance with throttle position, a fuel-displacing member in said chamber slidably related to the actuating member, and resilient means transmitting the force of the actuating member to the fuel-displacing member.
58. In a carburetor having a throttle, actuating mechanism therefor, and a fuel reservoir, an acceleration pump comprising an actuating member connected to the throttle actuating mechanism to be positively moved when the throttle is opened, a fuel chamber having a restricted connection to the reservoir, fuel-displacing means in the chamber slidably related to the actuating member, and resilient means transmitting the movement of the actuating member to the fueldisplacing member.
59. In a carburetor having a throttle, actu ating mechanism therefor, and a fuel reservoir, an acceleration device comprising an actuating member movable in accordance with throttle position, a fuel chamber receiving fuel from the reservoir, a piston in the chamber slidable on the actuating member, a connection between the actuating member and the piston including resilient means designed to transmit force from the actuating member to the piston, and means operative at least during the working stroke of the piston to restrict the flow of fuel from the chamber to the reservoir.
60. In a carburetor having a throttle and a fuel reservoir, an acceleration device comprising an actuating member movable in accordance with throttle position, a fuel chamber supplied with fuel from the reservoir, a fuel-displacing member in the chamber, a sliding connection between the actuating member and the fuel-displacing member including resilient means for transmitting force from the actuating member to the fueldisplaclng member, and a pressure-responsive fuel inlet valve controlling the flow,of fuel between said chamber and said reservoir.
61. In a carburetor, a throttle valve, an actuating member movable with and by the throttle valve, a pump to supply additional fuel to the mixture when the throttle valve is 'opened and including an independently movable element, and also including a positively operated prime acting member movable with respect to said movable element and a yieidable connecting member between said movable pump element and said prime acting member, and means to positively actuate the prime acting member and hence cause the yieldable member to impart continuous pumping stroke to the movable member during a limited period of time, said means being operated by said actuating member which is movable with and by the throttle valve.
62. In a carburetor having a fuel mixture passage, a throttle valve for controlling the flow of 255 fuel mixture from said passage, means for regulating said throttle valve, a pick-up mechanism including a pump cylinder having an outlet communicating with said fuel mixture passage, a piston in said cylinder, a plungerextending in advance of and movable relative to said piston having a stem actuated positively. by said throttle valve regulating means for discharging fuel into said mixing chamber simultaneously with the opening of said throttle, and resilient means coacting between said stem and said piston yieldably urging the latter toward said plunger forsupplementing the discharge of fuel during opening of said throttle valve and for continuing the discharge of fuel from said cylinder for a limited period after said throttle valve is opened.
63. In a carburetor having a fuel mixture pas-.
sage, a throttle valve for controlling the flow of fuel mixture from said passage, apparatus for regulating said throttle valve, a pick-up mechanism including a cylinder having an outlet communicating with said fuel mixture passage, means actuated positively by said throttle valve regulating apparatus for discharging fuel into said fuel mixture passage simultaneously with the opening of said throttle, a piston in said cylinder, and a yieldable member bearing between said positive acting fuel discharging means and said piston for imparting a delayed fuel discharging action to the latter.
i 64. In a carburetor having a fuel mixture passage, a throttle valve for controlling the flow of fuel mixture from said passage, apparatus for regulating said throttle valve, a pick-up mechanism including a cylinder having an outlet communicating with said fuel mixture-passage, a plunger slidably mounted in said cylinder occupying substantially less than the full crosssectional area thereof and having a stem actu- DISCLAIMER 2,141,594. -D0n Cole, Chicago,
Corporation.
Gazette November 7 1.939.]
Ill. OARBURETOE- 1938. Disclaimer filed October 18, 1939,
ated positively by said throttle regulating apparatus, a piston slidably mounted on said stem located between said plunger and the outer end of said cylinder and having an outer periphery closelyfitting the inner periphery wall of said cylinder, an abutment on said stem, and a spring bearing between said piston and said abutment normally urging said piston toward said plunger.
65. In a carburetor, pick-up mechanism including a cylinder, a pair of relatively movable fuel-displacing members slidably mounted in said cylinder, one of said members being in close fitting relation with the inner periphery of said cylinder and the other member occupying less than the full cross-sectional area of said cylinder, means for positively operating the latter fueldisplaclng member including rigid actuating elements, and resilient means bearing between said rigid elements and the close fitting fuel-displacing member for operating the latter.
66. In a carburetor having a fuel mixture pas-,
sage, a throttle valve in said passage, apparatus forregulating said valve, pick-up pump mechanism including a pump cylinder, a pair of relatively movable fuel-displacing members in said cylinder, one being in close fitting relation with the inner peripheral walls of said cylinder and the other occupying less than the full cross-sectional area of said cylinder, rigid actuating elements connected with said throttle valve regulating means for positively actuating the latter member simultaneously with the opening of said throttle valve, and a yieldable actuating element eoacting between said rigid elements and the close fitting fuel-displacing member for imparting a delayed action thereto during opening of said throttle valve.
DON COLE.
Patent dated December 27,
by the assignee, Bendix Products Herebgl enters this disclaimer to claims 33, 34, 40, and 41 of said patent.
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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2416797A (en) * 1943-09-23 1947-03-04 Dodson Edward Fuel injection system for internalcombustion engines
US2423589A (en) * 1943-11-22 1947-07-08 George R Ericson Engine control device
US2547579A (en) * 1943-06-17 1951-04-03 Niles Bement Pond Co Carburetor
US2611592A (en) * 1948-10-27 1952-09-23 Thompson Prod Inc Dual carburetor
US2633342A (en) * 1949-07-26 1953-03-31 Erwin G Baker Automotive carburetor
US2633085A (en) * 1948-12-20 1953-03-31 Robert H Hieger Carburetor acceleration pump
US2736539A (en) * 1947-10-17 1956-02-28 Bendix Aviat Corp Carburetor
US2803443A (en) * 1954-09-20 1957-08-20 Acf Ind Inc Carburetor step-up
US3189330A (en) * 1962-11-29 1965-06-15 Acf Ind Inc Carburetor
GB2159345A (en) * 1984-04-03 1985-11-27 Weidmueller C A Gmbh Co An assembly for releasably securing an electronic component to a printed circuit board

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2547579A (en) * 1943-06-17 1951-04-03 Niles Bement Pond Co Carburetor
US2416797A (en) * 1943-09-23 1947-03-04 Dodson Edward Fuel injection system for internalcombustion engines
US2423589A (en) * 1943-11-22 1947-07-08 George R Ericson Engine control device
US2736539A (en) * 1947-10-17 1956-02-28 Bendix Aviat Corp Carburetor
US2611592A (en) * 1948-10-27 1952-09-23 Thompson Prod Inc Dual carburetor
US2633085A (en) * 1948-12-20 1953-03-31 Robert H Hieger Carburetor acceleration pump
US2633342A (en) * 1949-07-26 1953-03-31 Erwin G Baker Automotive carburetor
US2803443A (en) * 1954-09-20 1957-08-20 Acf Ind Inc Carburetor step-up
US3189330A (en) * 1962-11-29 1965-06-15 Acf Ind Inc Carburetor
GB2159345A (en) * 1984-04-03 1985-11-27 Weidmueller C A Gmbh Co An assembly for releasably securing an electronic component to a printed circuit board

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