US2137238A - Method for making imitation tile - Google Patents

Method for making imitation tile Download PDF

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Publication number
US2137238A
US2137238A US674133A US67413333A US2137238A US 2137238 A US2137238 A US 2137238A US 674133 A US674133 A US 674133A US 67413333 A US67413333 A US 67413333A US 2137238 A US2137238 A US 2137238A
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United States
Prior art keywords
tile
sheet
wall
surface
areas
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Expired - Lifetime
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US674133A
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Samuel B Collins
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Samuel B Collins
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B44DECORATIVE ARTS
    • B44FSPECIAL DESIGNS OR PICTURES
    • B44F11/00Designs imitating artistic work
    • B44F11/04Imitation of mosaic or tarsia-work patterns
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T156/00Adhesive bonding and miscellaneous chemical manufacture
    • Y10T156/10Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor
    • Y10T156/1002Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor with permanent bending or reshaping or surface deformation of self sustaining lamina
    • Y10T156/1039Surface deformation only of sandwich or lamina [e.g., embossed panels]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T156/00Adhesive bonding and miscellaneous chemical manufacture
    • Y10T156/10Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor
    • Y10T156/1002Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor with permanent bending or reshaping or surface deformation of self sustaining lamina
    • Y10T156/1039Surface deformation only of sandwich or lamina [e.g., embossed panels]
    • Y10T156/1041Subsequent to lamination

Description

Nov. 22, 193s. s. B, COLLINS. 2,137,238 I V METHODv Fon MAKING IMITATION TILE v Fi`1ed June s, 1933 s sheets-sheet 1 2 H62. 2, zo'

INVEN-roR" Mnl/5L B. coul/vs Nov. 22,1938. s. B. COLLINS Y 2,137,238

METHOD FOR MAKING IMITATION TILE v FiledvJune 3, 1933 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Nov. 22, 193s. s. B. AQQLLINS 2,137,238

METHOD FOR MAKING IMITATION TILE y Filed June 3, 1933 .3 Sheets-Shes*l 3 j INVENTOR MMI/EL B. COLLI/KS ATTORNEY Patented Nov. 22, 1938 i UNITED STATI-:s

APATENT 4OFFICE METHOD Fon. Mama mn'rATloN TILE Samuel B. Collins, Bayonne, N. J. Application June 3, 1933, serial No. 674,133

3 Claims.

This invention relates to a wall covering inv imitation of tile.

One object of the present invention is a reduction in the cost of such wall covering. To 6 this end, the wall covering is made in sheets, in simulation of one or more tiles, which sheets are adapted to be applied to the surface of a wall by means of an adhesive. Preferably, such sheets are of a fibrous material, in whole or in part.

Another object of the invention is a wall covering in simulation of tile which is washable and unaected by moisture in contact with its surface. To this end, the exposed surface of the wall covering is coated with a water resistant r'layer, such, for instance, as a layer of some derivative of `cellulose acetate or' a synthetic resinoid.f"

It is also an object of 'the invention to provide a wall covering in simulation of tile which shall have the characteristics of tile insofar as retention of shape is concerned. Accordingly, a sheet of fibrous material, which is pressed out# wardly into the form of a tile, has in the pressed out portion vreenforcement of either a fibrous,

` solidified plastic or congelatious material.

The. invention also has to do with a method of manufacturing a wall covering in simulation of tile which is practical 'from the standpoint of ease and cheapness of manufacture, convenience in application and durability in use.

These and other objects of the invention and the means for their attainment will be more apparent from the following detailed description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings illustrating various embodiments by which the linvention may be realized, and in which:

Figure 1 is a view, in perspective, showing a sheet of fibrous material such as heavy paper composition or the like upon which the representation of one or more tiles is depicted;

Figure 2 is a view in transverse section showing a form of embossing dies by which the sheet if Figure 1 may be shaped to simulate tile;

Figure 3 is a perspective view showing the iinished wall covering simulating four tiles;

Figure 4 is` a view, partly in perspective and partly in section, on an enlarged scale, showing one method of reenforcing the outwardly pressed 50 portions;

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 4 but showing another method of reenforcement;

Figure 6 is a view, partly in elevation and partly in section, showing the application of one 55 form o f the wall covering to a surface;

Figure 7 is `a fragmentary view showing another modification of the invention in which the use of an additional reenforcing element is avoided; and

Figure 8 shows the completed article. I

While the size of the various sheets of wall. covering to be applied tovthe wall may vary,

` there is illustrated in Figure 1 aplane sheet I0 of, say, fibrous material uponv one surface Aoi? which are printed representations of four tiles l0 suitably spaced as vitreous tile would be when in place on a wall. These representations of tile take the form of square areas I2 separated by fairly wide lines or areas Il of, atleast, a rsomewhat contrasting color, there being a border I6 l5 around the edge of the sheet of a similar con- 4trasting color half the width of the dividing areas Il. 'I'hese division lines I4, I6 represent the cement or plaster normallyvisible when vitreous tile is laid into a wall and the border I0 area is half the width of the so-called cement I varea since it abutsv against a similar sheet and the two half width areas along the respective borders form the equivalent of a dividing area. Usually in a tile wall, the cement is tinted with 25 substantially the same color as the tile although appearing somewhatdarkir to the eye than the reiiecting surface of the tile. Accordingly, in printing the design on the plane sheet, the dividing or cementareas Il, I 6 are printed with the 30 same color as the squares I2 but of a slightly darker shade, or in a different color, as desired.

The sheet may be of any convenient material, such as a fibrous material, for instance, a heavy paper or cardboard, which may be pressed into 35 shape as illustrated, for instance, at I3 in 'Figure 4, but, conveniently, a relatively thin, flexible, printed sheet I5, Figures 5, 6 and 7, may be applied to the surface of aso-called backing sheet I1,` Figure 5, and 36, Figure 6, for the back- 40 ing sheet, but it has been found desirable to use either a heavy cardboard or a composite backing sheet such as an impregnated paper stock.

Applied to that surface of the sheet which will be exposed on the wall, is a layer or coating I 45 of a material which is water resistant, which can be washed free of stains, even of grease and ink, without leaving a noticeable trace behind.- The exposed surface of the sheet may becoated with a cellulose compound coating composition, conveniently, a cellulose lacquer or cellulose acetate derivative or a synthetic resinoid or other water-proof,- stain-proof and wear resistant coating Il. This may be put on as a solution in liquid or semi-liquid orm either by means of a -roll or by spraying; The layer is then permitted to dry and harden. The coating may be applied in sheet form by heat and pressure. It is substantially transparent so that the coloring of the sheet I is visible therethrough. When heat is applied to such transparent sheet, it will permanently adhere to the surface of the forming sheet.

The various raised portions I2 representing `tile may then conveniently be formed by an embossing operation. As illustrated in Figure 2, upper and lower embossingdies 20 and 22 are provided, the lower die having four (in the illustrated embodiment) spaced rectangular male portions or tables 24 and the upper die having downwardly depending ribs 26 to form the sepa- -sheets, if separate, are united and the laminated structure pressed into the shape illustrated in Figure 3 where the tile portions I2 are raised a predetermined degree above the cement areas to simulate tile set in a wall.

'I'he raised tile areas I 2 may then be reenforced as by lling the depressions therebehind, by which they are formed, with stiifening means, for instance, rectangular sheets of suitable reenforcing material, such as cardboard or fibre board '30, Figure 4, placed in the depressions and secured in place by a suitable adhesive.

If desired, a backing sheet 3I may be provided, of any convenient and cheap material, such as paper, which will overlie the surfaceof the same.`

In Figure 5, the wall covering is illustrated as a composite structure formed by a sheet of corrugated paper 34 or the like having the usual surface sheets 36, 38 onopposite faces. One such surface sheet 36 corresponds to the backing sheet IIand to it is applied the sheet I which is printed or otherwise decorated to represent tile. It is then coated in any convenient way with a moisture proof layer I8. Such a composite construction is embossed as a unit and when dividing areas I4 and I6 are formed vin its surface by the dies, to represent the cement areas, the corrugations are crushed as shown at 42 while the uncrushed corrugations at 43 serve as the strengthening or reenforcing members. Such a sheet is satisfactory in many situations and is illustrated herein to show the wide range of compositions available for the purpose. The

- rear sheet 38 serves as convenient means whereapplied in plastic form and which will harden and retain its form and permit the sheet to be attached to the wall quickly and easily and repercent fibrous material, such as paper stock. v

Such a sheet is exible and to a high degree water resistant.

The Wall covering of this invention may also be formed without a reenforcement, or rather, by taking advantage of a greater thickness of a backing sheet. Thus, as in Figure 7, a backing sheet 44 of a thickness greater, say, double that hereinbefore described and, preferably, of fibrous material impregnated with a compound of asphaltum or the like, is covered with a pervious sheet I3 on which the representation of tile is depicted and'overlayed with the impervious layer I8. This laminated structure is then embossed or otherwise treated to produce therein the raised areas I2 in simulation of tile set in a wall and the depressed areas I4 in simulation of the cement areas. The depressed areas I4 then form ribs 46 as indicated in dot and dash lines in Figure 7, as will be understood. Subsequently, the rib portions 46 are cut off flush with the lower surface 45 of the tile portions I2 whereby the raised portions I2 are solid although composite and the depressed areas I4 are materially thinner than the adjacent portions, as at 41.' The thinner portions 41 lend a flexibility to the sheet which enables it to conform readily to inequalities in the wall surface to which it is applied by an adhesive.

It may also be found desirable to so design the sheet of wall covering that the areas in simulation of cement appear only on two sides as at 48.

These may be of the same'width as the areas I4 while the other two sides 49 are flush with the edge of the tile portions'I! and are adapted to abut against the areas 48 of adjacent wall coveringsections.

It will thus be seen that a wall covering is provided which simultates tile and which may be formed in small areas. Each sheet preferably represents one or a plurality of tiles, the tile being separated or spaced by depressed portions representing the cement bonding the tile in an ordinary tile wall. 'I'he preferred material is water resistant to permit its application to a wall with an adhesive and at the saine time it is coated with a water-proof, stain-proof, wear resistant coating, which may be applied in any convenient fashion. Such representation of a tile may be readily made by embossing in embossing dies with the aid of heat and pressure and the recesses forming the representations of the tile may be either lled with reenforcing material, such as rectangles of paper, cardboard, corrugated board or other material, or a plastic material which will harden in place, such as plaster of Paris or the rear portion of the depressed parts simulating the plaster may be removed to provide a thicker tile portion and a thinner plaster portion.

Various modifications will occur to those skilled in the art in the configuration, composition and disposition of the component lelements going to make up the invention as a whole as well as in the selection or combination of elements of the various modications into a component whole,

and no limitation is intended by the phraseology of the foregoing description or illustrations in the accompanying drawings.

What is claimed is:

l. The method of manufacturing a waterproof wall covering comprising printing on one surface of an opaqus paper sheet rectangular areas bounded by dividing spaces to simulate tile set in a wall bounded by cement, aiiixing the unprinted surface of such sheet to a sheet of a composition containing an asphaltum composition and a fibrous stock, then applying to the printed surface a fluid water resistant, transparent wear resistant material to form a layer and pressing outwardly the representation of spaced tile by heat and pressure.

2. The method of manufacturing a waterproof wall covering comprising printing on one surface of an opaque paper sheet rectangular areas bounded by dividing spaces to simulate tile set in a wall bounded by cement, aflixing the unprinted surface of such sheet to a sheet of a composition containing an asphaitum composition and a fibrous stock, then applying to the printed surface a fluid water resistant, transparent wear resistant synthetic resinoid material to form a layer and pressing outwardly the representation of spaced tile by heat and pressure.

3. The method of manufacturing a waterproof wall covering comprising printing on one surface of an opaque paper sheet rectangular areas bounded by dividing spaces to simulate tile set in a wall bounded by cement, aiixing the unprinted side of said sheet to a backing sheet of a composition containing an asphaltum composition and a brous stock, then applying to the printed surface a fluid water resistant, wear resistant material to form a layer, pressing outwardly the representation of spaced tile by heat and pressure thereby forming oppositely directed ribs behind the dividing spaces and cutting off said ribs substantially flush with the inner faces of the recesses.

SAMUEL B. COLLINS.

US674133A 1933-06-03 1933-06-03 Method for making imitation tile Expired - Lifetime US2137238A (en)

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2666726A (en) * 1951-04-21 1954-01-19 Crown Zellerbach Corp Method of making masked lignocellulosic material
US3432375A (en) * 1964-05-13 1969-03-11 American Can Co Method of raw edge protection
US20040144051A1 (en) * 1999-11-05 2004-07-29 Garcia Eugenio Cruz Direct laminated floor
US20050109445A1 (en) * 2003-11-25 2005-05-26 Pergo (Europe) Ab Process for achieving a surface structure on a decorative laminate
US20080176039A1 (en) * 2002-11-01 2008-07-24 Chen Hao A Surface covering panel
US7836648B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2010-11-23 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels
US7836649B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2010-11-23 Faus Group, Inc. Flooring system having microbevels
US8112958B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-02-14 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels
US8181407B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-05-22 Faus Group Flooring system having sub-panels
US8201377B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2012-06-19 Faus Group, Inc. Flooring system having multiple alignment points
US8209928B2 (en) 1999-12-13 2012-07-03 Faus Group Embossed-in-registration flooring system

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2666726A (en) * 1951-04-21 1954-01-19 Crown Zellerbach Corp Method of making masked lignocellulosic material
US3432375A (en) * 1964-05-13 1969-03-11 American Can Co Method of raw edge protection
US20040144051A1 (en) * 1999-11-05 2004-07-29 Garcia Eugenio Cruz Direct laminated floor
US8875460B2 (en) 1999-11-05 2014-11-04 Faus Group, Inc. Direct laminated floor
US8209928B2 (en) 1999-12-13 2012-07-03 Faus Group Embossed-in-registration flooring system
US7836649B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2010-11-23 Faus Group, Inc. Flooring system having microbevels
US8099919B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-01-24 Faus Group Flooring system having microbevels
US8112958B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-02-14 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels
US8181407B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2012-05-22 Faus Group Flooring system having sub-panels
US7836648B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2010-11-23 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels
US8448400B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2013-05-28 Faus Group Flooring system having complementary sub-panels
US20080176039A1 (en) * 2002-11-01 2008-07-24 Chen Hao A Surface covering panel
US20050109445A1 (en) * 2003-11-25 2005-05-26 Pergo (Europe) Ab Process for achieving a surface structure on a decorative laminate
US8201377B2 (en) 2004-11-05 2012-06-19 Faus Group, Inc. Flooring system having multiple alignment points

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