US2126861A - Combined ink-marking and perforating machine - Google Patents

Combined ink-marking and perforating machine Download PDF

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US2126861A
US2126861A US152341A US15234137A US2126861A US 2126861 A US2126861 A US 2126861A US 152341 A US152341 A US 152341A US 15234137 A US15234137 A US 15234137A US 2126861 A US2126861 A US 2126861A
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marking
die
ink
perforating
inking
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US152341A
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Arthur W Altvater
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Arthur W Altvater
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C14SKINS; HIDES; PELTS; LEATHER
    • C14BMECHANICAL TREATMENT OR PROCESSING OF SKINS, HIDES OR LEATHER IN GENERAL; PELT-SHEARING MACHINES; INTESTINE-SPLITTING MACHINES
    • C14B5/00Clicking, perforating, or cutting leather
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C14SKINS; HIDES; PELTS; LEATHER
    • C14BMECHANICAL TREATMENT OR PROCESSING OF SKINS, HIDES OR LEATHER IN GENERAL; PELT-SHEARING MACHINES; INTESTINE-SPLITTING MACHINES
    • C14B2700/00Mechanical treatment or processing of skins, hides or leather in general; Pelt-shearing machines; Making driving belts; Machines for splitting intestines
    • C14B2700/11Machines or apparatus for cutting or milling leather or hides
    • C14B2700/116Perforating machines

Description

1938. A. w. ALTVATER 2,126,861
COMBINED INK-MARKING AND PERFORATING MACHINE Filed July '7, 1937 4 Sheets-Sheet l Aug. 16, 1938. A. w. ALTVATER COMBINED INK-MARKING AND PERFORATING MACHINE Filed July 7, 1937 4 Sheets Sheet 2 WE WW HWHJ 1} Aug. 16, 1938. A. w. ALTVATER COMBINED INK-MARKING AND PERFORATING MACHINE Filed July 7, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Au 16, 1938. A. w. ALTVATER COMBINED INK-MARKING AND PERFORATING MACHINE Filed Jul 7, 1937 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Patented Aug. 16, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE COlVIBINED INK-MARKING AND PERFORAT- ING MACHINE 15 Claims.
The present invention relates to 'shoe machines and more particularly to machines for performing combined ink-marking and perforating operations.
Cut-out machines, such as the well-known Western, are used extensively in the shoe industry to perform perforating and cut-out operations in shoe uppers and various parts thereof. Ink-marking attachments have been used also in connection with these well-known type of machines. Heretofore, it has been necessary to remove these attachments in order to restore the Western machine to its regular perforating operation. In these attachments, the operative was obliged to actuate, through use of her hands, the mechanism for bringing the inking means and the marking edges of the die into engagement in order to ink them. Furthermore, in these attachments, it was considered necessary to pivot the ink pad about an axis adjacent the front of the machine in order to expose it for a re-inking operation. Moreover, in these attachments the marking edges were not conveniently accessible to the operative so that they might be cleaned while the die remained in-the machine.
The principal objects of the present invention are to produce a combined ink-marking and perforating machine, which may be used also for marking, perforating or cutting-out merely by substituting the proper type of die for the combined ink-marking and perforating die, in which the die may be elevated to engage its marking edge with the inking means by the operative Without the use of her hands, in which the ink pad may be swung about an axis located remote from. the operative instead of adjacent thereto, and in which the marking edges may be exposed conveniently to the operative for cleaning purposes while the die remains in the machine.
To the accomplishment of these objects, and such others as may appear hereinafter, the various features of the present invention reside in certain devices, combinations and arrangements of parts hereinafter described and then set forth broadly and in detail in the appended claims which possess advantages readily apparent to those skilled in the art.
The various features of the present invention will be readily understood from an inspection of the accompanying drawings illustrating the best form of the invention at present known to the inventor, in which,
Figure 1 is a view in right side elevation, partly in section, of the Western cut-out machine;
Fig. 2 is an enlarged detail view in plan showing the mechanism for converting the Western into a combined ink-marking and perforating machine;
Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail view of the parts illustrated in Fig. 2;
Fig. 4 is an enlarged detail view in front elevation of the parts illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3;
Fig. 5 is a detail view in sectional elevation on the line 55, Fig. 2, illustrating the sponge rubber ink pad, the supporting guard plate therefor, the skeleton frame to which the guard plate is connected detachably, one of the die lift rails and the treadle-connected mechanism for lifting them, and I Fig. 6 is a detail view in front sectional elevation on the line 6-6, Fig. 5.
As shown in Fig. 1, the Western cut-out machine comprises a bed I, a pressing member 8, a face plate 9 thereon, and a paper-cutting bed III for the face plate, generally in accordance with standard cut-out machine construction. The invention disclosed in the application filed jointly by Arthur W. Altvater and Franz Wunder, April 16, 1937, Serial No. 137,256, comprises an attachment for the Western cut-out machine which converts it into a combined ink-marking and perforating machine, which attachment is removed to restore the Western to its normal perforating or cut-out function.
The illustrated embodiment of the present invention converts also the Western into a combined ink-marking and perforating machine but in a manner which permits the Western to perform a combined ink-marking and perforating operation, a marking operation, or a perforating or cut-out operation merely by the insertion of the proper die therein.
Referring more particularly to Figs. 2 and 3, the upper surface of the bed 1 supports a pair of rails H and I2 which are connected as is the usual manner in the Western machine for sliding movement across the supporting face of the bed towards and from each other. The rails II and 12 are provided, respectively, with forward extensions l3 and M, the bottom faces of which, (Fig. 4), support, respectively, elongated brackets l5 and It. The inside faces of the brackets l5 and I6 support, respectively, die lift rails i1 and I8, (Fig. 2). To this end, each bracket carries a pair of horizontal screws l9, (Fig. 5), the shanks of which pass loosely, respectively, through slots 20 which are inclined forwardly and upwardly, a head on the screw l9 serving to hold the die lift rail on its supporting bracket while permitting the die lift rail to move relatively thereto in a manner and for a purpose to be described.
The rails II and I2 and the extensions thereof, embrace the sides of the combined ink-marking and perforating die 2|, (Figs. 2 and 3), and guide it for sliding movement from the position of clearance to and from the position of pressure. The die 2| is supported directly by the bed I while it is in the position of pressure, in which position the machine performs the combined inkmarking and perforating operation. The die 2| is supported both by the elongated brackets l5 and I5 and the die lift rails I! and H3 while it is in the position of clearance, in which position the operative removes the inked and marked work and locates another work piece on the. die for the next combined ink-marking and perforating operation.
The die 2| comprises a series of perforating tubes 22 and a series of markers 23, both series being constructed, associated and mounted in the usual manner. The perforating tubes 22, (Fig. 3), are mounted in. a tube holder plate 24 which rests upon a tube rest plate 25. The plates 24 and 25 are mounted upon a bottom plate 26 to the front face of which a handle 27 is connected. The handle 21 extends forwardly in position to be grasped by the operative to facilitate the sliding of the die from, and to, a position of'clearance to, and from, a position of pressure.
As usual in the manufacture of stitch-marking dies, so called, the markers 23 are formed by routing them out of a solid brass blank so that the marking edges rise vertically from a fiat plate 28 integral therewith. The plate 25 is perforated as shown in Fig. 2 to permit the passage of the tubes 22 therethrough. As usual in this type of die, the plate 28 is connected loosely to the tube holder and tube rest plates 24 and 25, there being, the usual series of springs (not shown) interposed between the bottom of the plate 28 and the top. of the. tube holder plate 24.
The work during the ink-marking and perforating operation is supported upon a stripper plate 29 having the usual opening 30 therein across which the work is drum-headed during the combined ink-marking and perforating operation. The work-supporting surface of the stripper plate 29 is provided also with the usual gauging pins 3|, of the bumper type and with the usual work clamps 32,. of the leaf spring type.
Experience has demonstrated that the mark made by themarkers 23 on the work should be sharply defined to provide the operative in the subsequent operation with a legible guide line. At the same time the sharply-defined line should be delicate to insure its registry with the overlapped overlay, other assembled part,,or the fancy stitches. If excess ink is allowed to dry on the marking edges they become thickened thereby with the result that the work is marked with a wide, ragged line which causes irregularities in the subsequent operation. As the overlapped part, an applique, an assembled upper blank, a gimp, or a fancy stitch cannot hide completely the wide, ragged line, the exposed portions thereof must be removed before the shoes can be sold. The ink removal operation takes place. when the shoes are finished and therefore considerable care and labor must. be expended, in removing .the exposed ink markv to avoid spoilage.
Heretofore considerable difficulty has been experienced in maintaining. the marking edges in a combinedink-marking and perforatingv die of the type disclosed herein free from accumulations of dried ink. Heretofore it has been found impracticable to clean such marking edges while the die remained in the machine.
In order to facilitate the cleaning of the marking edges 23 while the die 2| remains in the machine, the stripper plate 29 is pivoted about a horizontal axis located at the rear of the die so that the stripper plate 29 when located in the position of clearance maybe swung upwardly in a direction extending away from the operative to expose the marking edges 23 thereto.
To this end the bottom of the stripper plate 29 at the rear end corners thereof are provided with blocks 33 and 34, (Fig. 2), which are received in and pivoted to the arms of yokes formed, respectively, in rails 35' and 36. These rails are carried upon the upper ends of studs 31 which pass loosely through tube holder and tube rest plates, there being a head 38 on each stud, which works in an opening 39 formed in the tube rest and bottom plates and engages the bottom of the tube holder plate.
The stripper plate 29 is held normally in the position of Fig. 3 by a plurality of coiled springs 40, the bottom ends of which are seated in the tube holder plate and the upper ends of which are engaged with the bottoms ofthe rails 35 and 36.
With this construction, the stripper plate 29 may be swung upwardly from the full line position of Fig. 3 to the construction line position thereof, in a direction rearwardly, that is, in a direction away from the operative, to expose the markers thereto and thus facilitate their cleaning when required. The stripper plate 29 may be clamped in the position of Fig. 3 by a pair of pins 4|, only one of which is shown in Fig. 3. Each pin 4| depends from the bottom of the stripper plate 29 in position topass loosely through an opening 42 formed in the stripper plate supporting rail. arranged to be inserted into one of the forward coiled springs 49, the upper coils of which grip the tapered portion of the pin and lock securely the stripper plate in operating position.
In order to ink the marking edges 23 each time the die is moved into the. position of clearance from the'position of pressure, inking means is provided which is first inserted between the marking edges 23. and the bottom of the stripper plate 29 and then. the marking edges are moved vertically to cause them to engage the inking means. With this construction, all danger of depositing ink upon. the work-supporting surface of the stripper plate 29. is obviated.
The inking means comprises a sponge rubber ink pad 43;, (Figs. 5 and 6), which is cemented or otherwise secured to the bottom of a flat guard plate 44. The guard plate 44 is carried by a skeleton frame. As shown more particularly in Fig. 2, the frame is provided with a rear end 45 and side portions 45 and 41,. the inside faces of which are provided with grooves 48' which receive. the side edges of the guard plate 4'4. The rear edge of the guardplate 44 is bent. downward, which bent edge engages the rear end45 of the frame when the pad. is positioned therein. The sides of the frame are bracedby across piece480, Fig. 5. I
As illustratedi'n Fig. 2 the side edges 46 and 4'! of the skeleton. frame extend forwardly to the ends of the rails 3 and M, are then bent laterally away from each other and then forwardly parallel to eachother. Near the laterally bent portions, the side edges 46 and 41 are pivoted on studs 49 and 50, respectively, whichv project laterally from the free forward ends of supporting arms 5| and 52.
The bottom of the pin 4| is tapered and is The rear ends of the arms and 52 are bent lipwardly and are pivoted on studs 53 and 54 projecting laterally from brackets 55 and 56 rising, respectively, from the rails l3 and I4.
The rearward extending portions of the skeleton frame arms 46 and 41 are held normally, (Fig. 2) respectively, against the bottoms of stops 5! and 58 carried by the arms 5| and 52, by coiled springs 510 and 586, (Fig. 4), one end of each of which is connected to the skeleton frame and the other end of each of which is connected to the pivoted arm 5| or 52.
Thus the skeleton frame, and the ink pad supported therefrom, is pivoted about two independent axes. If the stripper plate 29 should be so large as to extend over the guard plate 44 during the combined ink-marking and perforating operation the stripper plate harmlessly causes the guard plate to swing downwardly about the axis of the studs 49 and 56 against the tension of the springs 51!! and 586. The skeleton frame and the ink pad supported therefrom may be swung upwardly in a direction away from the operative about the axis of the studs 53 and 54 to expose the sponge ink pad to facilitate its inking and its withdrawal from inking position so that the Western machine may be used for perforating, cutting out or marking in the usual manner, that is, without inking.
The arms 5| and 52 are locked from movement upwardly when the pivoted ink pad is located for.
the inking operation by latches 59 and 60 pivoted, respectively, on the elongated brackets l5 and I6. Each latch is provided with a downwardly bent end 6| and an intermediate notch 62, (Fig. 2), the notch embracing a pin 62 depending from the arms 5| and 52, respectively.
In the illustrated embodiment of the invention, when the combined ink-marking and perforating die 2| is moved from a position of pressure to a position of clearance, the stripper plate 29 rides over the upper surface of the guard plate 44, thus inserting the ink pad 43 between the marking edges 23 and the stripper plate. The stripper plate studs and supporting springs are mounted to clear the lateral sides of the ink pad and its supporting means when the die is moved from the position of pressure into the position of clearance.
Referring now to Figs. 4 and 5, the forward end of each die-lifting rail l1 and l8 is provided with a stop 63. Heretofore when the operative moved the die from the position of pressure into the position of clearance, she was obliged to engage the front face of the die with the stops and then pull hard on the die in order to move the die-lifting rails forwardly and upwardly to carry the die off the brackets l5 and I6 and the marking edges 23 into engagement with the ink pad 43.
In order to free the operatives hands to the sole duty of removing one piece of work and of substituting another piece of work therefor when the die is in a position of clearance, in the illustrated embodiment of the invention, the die-lifting rails are actuated from a treadle to cause them to lift the marking edges 23 into engagement with the ink pad.
To this end, the die-lift rails l1 and I8 are provided, respectively, with depending rear ends 64 and 65, (Fig. 4). Journalled in the elongated brackets l5 and |6 is a rock shaft 66 provided with arms 6'! and 68. The arms 61 and 68 are provided with horizontal pins 69 and 10, respectively, engaged with the ends 64 and 65 of the die-lift rails i1 and H3, respectively. The rock shaft 66 is provided with a third arm H, (Figs. 4 and 5), to
which the upper end of a treadle'rod I2 is hooked, the treadle rod being suitably urged upwardly by a spring 13, (Fig. l), to restore the parts operatively connected to the treadle to their normal position upon its release by the operative. The arm H is provided with a stop screw 13, (Figs. 1, 4 and 5), the point of which engages the front face of the bed I in order that the normal relationship between the pins 69 and I6 and the portions 64 and 65 of the rails l1 and 3, respectively, may be adjustably controlled.
In order to control adjustably the force with which the marking edge of the die 2| engages the ink pad 43, the front face of the bracket I6 carries a screw 14, (Figs. 1, 3 and 4), the point of which is arranged to engage the front end of the die-lift rail I3 and limit the forward and upward movement of both of the die-lift rails under the influence of the treadle-controlled die-lifting mechanism;
Nothing herein explained is to be interpreted as limiting the various features of the present invention in the'scope of its application to use in connection with the particular machine or the particular mode of operation or any combination thereof selected for purposes of illustration and explanation. While the particulars of construction herein set forth are well suited to one mechanical form of the invention and to the uses to which it is put, it is not limited as to these uses, nor to these details of construction, nor to the conjoint use of all its features, nor is it to be understood that these particulars are essential since they may be modified within the skill of the artisan without departing from the true scope of the actual invention, characterizing features of which are set forth in the following claims 'by the intentional use of generic terms and expressions inclusive of various modifications.
What is claimed as new, is:
1. A combined ink-marking and perforating machine having, in combination, a marking die provided with at least one marking edge, marking edge inking means, a support located at the position of clearance for supporting the die therein, and treadle-controlled means for moving the inking means and the'support relatively to engage the marking edge and the inking means.
2. A combined ink-marking and perforating machine, having, in combination, a marking die provided with at least one marking edge, marking edge inking means, supports located at the position of clearance and pressure, respectively, for supporting the die therein, means for moving the die from one support to the other, and separate means for moving the inking means and the position of clearance support relatively to engage the marking edge and the inking means.
3. A combined ink-marking and perforating machine having, in combination, a marking die provided with at least one marking edge, marking edge inking means, supports located at the position of clearance and pressure, respectively, for supporting the die therein, means for moving the die from one support to the other, and treadlecontrolled means for moving the inking means and the position of clearance support relatively to engage the marking edge and the inking means.
4. A combined ink-marking and perforating machine, having, in combination, a marking die provided with at least one marking edge, a stationary ink pad, a support located at the position of clearance for supporting the die therein, and treadle-controlled means for moving the support to engage the marking edge and the inking means.
5. A combined ink-marking and perforating machine having, in combination, a stripper plate, a marking die provided with at least one marking edge spaced from the stripper plate, means for inking the marking edge, and means, including treadl'e-controlled mechanism, for moving the inking means and the marking edge relatively in two: directions substantially normal to each other to insert the inking means between the stripper plate and the marking edge and to engage the marking edge and the inking means.
6. A combined ink-marking and perforating machine having, in combination, a stripper plate, a marking die provided with at least one marking edge spaced from the stripper plate, a stationary ink pad, means for moving the stripper plate and the marking edge in one direction to insert the ink pad between the marking edge and the stripper plate, and treadle-controlled means for moving the marking edge in another direc tion to cause it to engage the ink pad.
7. A marking machine having, in combination, a pair of marking die rails, each having a vertical bracket, a stop and a latch thereon, a support pivoted on each bracket, a skeleton frame, having two sides, each side being pivoted to one of the supports, mounted between the rails, an ink pad supported from the frame, a spring interposed between each side and its support for maintaining normally the sides engaged with the bottom of the stops, respectively, and means on the supports cooperating with the latches, respectively.
8. A combined ink-marking and. perforating machine, having, in combination, a combined ink-marking and perforating die, having upstanding marking and perforating edges and a stripper plate normally overlying them, means for moving the die from, and to, a position of clearance to, and from, a position of pressure, and means permitting the stripper" plate to be swung about a horizontal axis located adjacent its rear edge when the die is located in the position of clearance to expose the marking edges to the View of and access by the operative.
9. A marking machine having, in combination, a marking die having at least one marking edge, a support for the die including at least one die lift rail, inking means for the marking edge, means for supporting the rail for movement upwardly and forwardly, means for moving the rail upwardly and forwardly to engage the marking edge andthe inking means including a rock shaft operatively connected to the rail, and treadlecontrolled mechanism for rocking the rock shaft.
10. A marking machine having, in combination, a marking die having at least one marking edge, a support for the die including at least one die lift rail, inking means for the marking edge, means for supporting the rail for movement upwardly and forwardly, means for moving the rail ing edge and the inking means including a rock shaft operatively connected to the rail and treadle-controlled mechanism for rocking the rock shaft and a stop for limiting the movement of the treadle-controlled mechanism.
12. A marking machine having, in combination, a marking die having at least one marking edge, a support for the die including at least one die lift' rail, inking means for the marking edge, means for supporting the rail for movement upwardly and forwardly, and means for moving the rail upwardly and forwardly to engage the marking edgewand the inking means including a rock shaft operatively connected to the rail and treadle-controlled mechanism for rocking the rock shaft, and stops for limiting the movements of the rail and of the treadle-controlled mechanism', respectively.
13. In a marking machine, the combination with inking means, a support therefor, and a stripper plate normally having a path of movement which clears the support, of safety means permitting the support to yield in the accidental event the stripper plate fails to clear the support.
14. In a marking machine, the combination with inking means and a support therefor comprising a skeleton frame having one rear end and two side portions terminating in free ends, each side portion being bent reversely intermediate the rear end and the free end to direct the free ends of the side portions rearwardly, of a support for each side portion having, a front end to which the side portion adjacent the bend therein is pivotally' connected, and, a rear end pivoted on a stationary axis, whereby the skeleton frame as a unit may pivot on the pair of supports, and the skeleton frame and the supports may pivot on the stationary axis.
15. In a marking machine, the combination with a guard plate and an ink pad carriedthereby, of a.- skeleton frame having arear end and two side portions forming a blind opening, each side portion being provided with a groove to receive the opposite side edges, respectively, of the guard plate for sliding movement into and out of the opening.
ARTHUR W. ALTVATER.
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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2502738A (en) * 1944-04-29 1950-04-04 Nicolle Charles Machine for closing compound packages
US3855926A (en) * 1973-08-06 1974-12-24 J Dikoff Signature writer
FR2408438A1 (en) * 1977-11-09 1979-06-08 Montels Franck Machine for figuring leather sheet with embossing and perforations - synchronises intermittent advance of sheet with reciprocation of tool holder
US4220085A (en) * 1974-12-03 1980-09-02 Pitney Bowes Inc. Low-noise printing device

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2502738A (en) * 1944-04-29 1950-04-04 Nicolle Charles Machine for closing compound packages
US3855926A (en) * 1973-08-06 1974-12-24 J Dikoff Signature writer
US4220085A (en) * 1974-12-03 1980-09-02 Pitney Bowes Inc. Low-noise printing device
FR2408438A1 (en) * 1977-11-09 1979-06-08 Montels Franck Machine for figuring leather sheet with embossing and perforations - synchronises intermittent advance of sheet with reciprocation of tool holder

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