US2107691A - Block keying system - Google Patents

Block keying system Download PDF

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US2107691A
US2107691A US70566A US7056636A US2107691A US 2107691 A US2107691 A US 2107691A US 70566 A US70566 A US 70566A US 7056636 A US7056636 A US 7056636A US 2107691 A US2107691 A US 2107691A
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block
kerfs
blocks
mated
kerf
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US70566A
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Lawrence E Corser
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COMALAN Inc
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COMALAN Inc
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H33/00Other toys
    • A63H33/04Building blocks, strips, or similar building parts
    • A63H33/10Building blocks, strips, or similar building parts to be assembled by means of additional non-adhesive elements
    • A63H33/105Building blocks, strips, or similar building parts to be assembled by means of additional non-adhesive elements with grooves, e.g. dovetails

Description

Feb. 8, E CORSER 2,107,691

BLOCK KEYING SYSTEM Filed March 24, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEY Patented Feb. 8, 1938 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE BLOCK KEYING SYSTEM Application March 24, 1938, Serial No. 70,586

12 Claims.

My invention broadly relates to demountable building blocks and is more particularly directed to a novel duplex interlocking means for assembling structures of various types from unit blocks when laid endwise in superimposed courses with broken joints to construct intersecting building wings or the like wall components. The improved block coupling means herein provided allow all the units comprised in any such formation to be positively keyed together against accidental dismemberment by the use of universally interchangeable keeper strips of the flat sided type. Not only is layer course interlocked to layer course by the use of suitable keeper means, but the assembled component blocks of each such course are prevented from separating endwise along the broken joints thereof, so that my erected block structure may be freely handled, picked up bodily and installed as a portable bird house or some other utilitarian purpose. Such block sets also serve to amuse or instruct children and otherwise develop their constructive ability by building up toy houses, endless wall enclosures, pilasters or other structural variations. The present system provides for wooden blocks of different multiple lengths that can readily be fabricated on a rapid, low cost productive basis by means of simple wood working machinery. To this end, I prefer to resort to standardized mated primary kerfs that are cut lengthwise of each top or bottom parting face of every component block so as to fall into registry with corresponding kerfs sunk in an abutting block face, each pair of such longitudinal kerfs being located wholly within the width confines of such parting face and oppositely inclined in laterally spaced relation to leave a medial face region therebetween. Separate segmental keys or striplike keepers having a width approximately equal to twice the kerf depth, are then introduced into mated kerfs while my blocks are being built up; these component blocks may be freely slid into place end- Wise along the outwardly projecting longitudinal edges of each pair of these obliquely disposed 45 keepers so as to positively interlock the successive block courses without dependence upon block weight for structural stability.

Said. blocks may further be provided with an additional secondary kerf disposed between my 50 primary kerfs for the reception of an erect striplike spline by which to lock window or door frames 'in place, also panel work or the like decorative trim. Certain of my corner forming blocks may be additionally equipped with transversely disposed cross kerfs into which a bridging spline of an adjoining wing block is entered to. prevent block movement in any direction. By virtue of these combined ties, all of the built up block components become positively locked together to constitute a unitary structure that can be bodily lifted without dismemberment.

The object of the present invention is to provide for a comparatively simple block interlocking system of the character indicated.

A further objective is to positively interlock n adjoining faces of a pair of coupled members by the use of duplex spline means that are reversely inclined and laterally spaced apart to leave an interposed parting face region therebetween, which improved disposition shifts the respective 1 splines into adjacency with opposed marginal edge portions of one such member face and serves to restrict the tilt or cocking gap with respect to the other member face so as to afford augmented stability.

Embodied herein are also other novel structural features, all of which will hereinafter be more explicitly pointed out. Reference is had to the accompanying two sheets of drawings which are illustrative of certain alternative exemplifications, and in which drawings:

Fig. 1 shows a perspective view of a fragmental corner region of a structure built up in accordance with my interlocking block system.

Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view of adjoining block layers as taken along 2-4 of Fig. 1, .and Figs. 3 and 4 respectively represent certain modifications in the kerf disposition thereof.

Fig, 5 represents a plan view along line 5-5 of Fig. 1, and Fig. 6 is a similar view of a different 35 block course as taken along 6-5 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 7 details a special type of cleated foundation block taken along 1---'! of Fig. 6.

Fig. 8 depicts an insertable door frame as used for bird house purposes. 40

Fig. 9 in elevation, illustrates the attachment of a gable roof laid upon extensible rafters whose transverse profile is represented by Fig. 10, and Fig. 11 is a top view of one such adjustable rafter with the shingle boards removed.

As will be understood, all block components if made of wood, areintended to be smoothly finished to a common top and bottom face thickness, preferably standardized to correspond to a board thickness common to ash, poplar, white wood or the like waste material now available in vast quantities as a by-product in large saw mills. Each block may be made wider than its thickness and the maximum length thereof is preferably kept to about three times the given thickness. Certain half length blocks are utilized as filler pieces when forming a rectangular wall opening. All such blocks may likewise be cast from plastic material adapted to be worked into the desired cubical shape.

Referring first to Figs. 2 to 4, these crosssectional views characterize some of the alternative forms which my block interlocking means may assume. In the preferred form, the laid similar blocks 10A and IOB may have each of their top and bottom parting faces saw cut with an obliquely inclined pair of primary kerfs such as H and i2 running longitudinally within the face width confines to converge toward a common intersecting point B, of which one such may lie outside of a block profile as shown. 'In order to provide for universally interchangeable component blocks, it is preferred to direct the complementary pair of primary kerfs in a common direction as represented in the Fig. 2 block disclosure, the respective kerf mouths being kept separated and laterally spaced apart at A to about one-half of the block width W. It will be obvious that for a materially wider face, the respective kerfs may likewise be located closely contiguous to the marginal edges thereof. Each pair of such kerfs has oppositely inclined segmental keeper strips such as i 3 and I4 shiftably inserted therein which serve to positively interlock superimposed block layers against separation.. These keeper strips are preferably made of wood equal in length to the block cooperating therewith.

Interpcsed between each such kerf pair, some of my blocks may further be provided with a secondary perpendicular kerf l5 into which may be inserted a wooden spline such as l6. In Fig. 2, both exposed block side faces are kept flush without revealing any kerfs but these faces may be otherwise formed. For instance, in Fig. 3, one such face has the marginal edge thereof inset or ohamfered at I! to simulate panelled stone or the like effect, while each opposed side face l8 of this same block may be be eled to simulate a weather board or lapped siding effect when such blocks are selectively built up into a wall. Said side face may also be given a rounded profile in imitation of a log structure.

As a further alternative, the Fig. 3 blocks are shown provided with pairs of divergently disposed primary kerfs such as l9 and and reversely inserted therein is a flat sided keeper strip 2|, preferably made of dished cold rolled metal. In Fig. 4 there is disclosed still another style of keeper disposition in that only one such designated 22, is here inclined with respect to the level block parting face 23. Such keeper may interlockingly cooperate with an upright spline 24 or similar key means providing for a contracted strip edge spacing or gap G that is kept narrower than is the lateral spacing of the kerf mouths. My fiat sided keeper or keying means 24 is here arranged rectangularly with respect to the face 23 so as to interlockingly coact with the inclined keeper 22 The mode of application of my interlocking system is fragmentally represented in Fig. 1 where long standard blocks such as 25 and half length or multiple filler blocks such as 26, may be cooperatively assembled. Each corner forming block such as 21A. 21B, etc. is preferably given a somewhat different kerf formation; here one end region of the respective layer parting surfaces may be provided with a transversely disposed cross slot such as 28 having a bridge spline 29 loosely inserted therein to span the blocks 21A and 25, as shown. In the case of the several corner blocks it is preferred not to extend the kerfs into their exposed side faces and thereby impart a neat trim finish to the erected wall. A universal corner block maybe formed by extending the cross groove so as to cut through both of the exposed side faces thereof. An interlocking agency similar to 29 may be located at all corneiregions of my structure as will appear from Fig. 5 in which the corner block 213 is likewise equipped with a cross slot and cooperating spline but its spline 29 is set in quadrature with respect to that of the superimposed block 21A. When mounted in place as described, all next adjacent corner blocks are positively interlocked against endwise movement and the respective block courses are similarly retained against separation along their horizontal parting faces by resort to the reversely inclined keeper strips l3 and i4.

In order to obviate a break between the mortised or abutting end joints of any intermediate standardized blocks such as 25 or 26, the several foundation blocks such as 25 and 21E may be further interlocked endwise as in Figs. 6 and 7. For this purpose, complementary cross-sectionally V shaped sheet metal cleats such as 30 and 3| are respectively'arranged in opposition exteriorly beyond the keeper strips l3 and II. As a substitute, said initial block course may be doweled to an underlying board.

Regarding the assembly of my component blocks, a layout is first made of the proposed building by the use of appropriate foundation blocks. The next course may then be superimposed thereon in broken jointed fashion and the requisite splines or the like segmental keepers are slipped into place while the component blocks are being laid. In the present instance, the several keeper strips may be kept to a relatively loose fit in their respective inclined kerfs since their interlocking characteristic is not dependent upon frictional drag; instead said mated keepers provide for a contracted edge gap such as G. which affords a positive tie connection between the block courses. In dismantling a built-up structure, the component blocks may be individually slid endwise off of their cooperating keepers. Conversely, such blocks may during the erection of any such building, also be slid onto strips longer than their own length. I

The cited lateral spacing between my duplex splines serves to compensate for anticipated discrepancies in the accurate cutting of the reversely inclined kerfs in different parting faces. The resulting reduction in relative face tilt or cooking gap over the use of a single centralized block interconnection, becomes especially pronounced where such tilt effect is allowed to build up accumulatively as in the case of numerous smaller blocks that are stacked upon each other to a considerable height.

In Fig. 1, there is further disclosed inset panelwork comprising a series of ohamfered blocks such as 32 of which the respective ends may be slotted rafter section 60A is shown notched at 64 and shaped to interlockingly receive the block keys ll and i6. Said mated rafter sections may be cut to similar lengths. When in place, they are adjustably extended to span opposite building walls. The upturned face of each such rafter is provided with mated pairs of obliquely cut kerfs such as 65 and 66. The center pitch of each such kerf pair is purposely kept spaced apart by a distance L which corresponds with the projected standardized block length L. The arrangement is such that should the building wall be shortened or lengthened by a block length L, then the rafter sections 60A and 603 may be correspondingly telescoped to suit gable requirements and thereby bring the respective kerf pairs into different registry.

Each roof boardiil has snugly inserted therein a pair of reversed splines such as 61 and 68 running lengthwise of said board. After entering the respective depending splines into such registering kerfs, the length of each adjusted rafter section becomes fixed. One face portion of said roof boards may rest snugly against several rafters and the lower board edge is undercut to provide for a longitudinal lip 69 that overlaps the top edge of the next adjacent board edge in weatherproof fashion. The exposed outermost face of each such board may be beveled to simulate a shinglelike disposition. When my roof is assembled in place, all such overlapping boards become interlocked to the topmost block course so that the entire structure may be bodily lifted by said roof without collapse of any component parts.

As herein practiced, the use of oppositely inclined kerfs materially simplifies production and otherwise makes for a low cost block that may be neatly trimmed for a panelled effect and permits the compiling of a large variety of fancy structures. In the case of bird houses or the like cabinet work such built up wall designs are usually cheaper to produce in odd lots than are integral side wings of similar attractiveness. My block system may be sold in knocked down condition ready to be built up by a purchaser in accordance with furnished instructions. All interconnecting splines and keepers are nicely con-. cealed within the block side faces. The roof being positively tied thereto, such unitary structure is unlikely to be blown over even when exposed to a severe gale.

Other advantages inherent in my interlocked block system are believed to be apparent to those skilled in this art, it being obvious that various modifications in the kerf arrangement thereof may be resorted to in likewise carrying out my illustrative embodiments, all without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention heretofore described and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A building block system comprising a plurality of similar separable units assembled in superimposed courses to build up an erected wall,

certain adjoining blocks lying in different next adjacent courses having each of their respective parting faces provided with mated kerfs that lie within the adjacent width edges of such face and respectively include separate mouths laterally spaced apart to leave an interposed medial face region therebetween, said kerfs both being crosssectionally inclined relative to one another with the corresponding kerf mouths of the respective faces extending lengthwise in superimposed alignment to complete two strip receiving grooves of which the respective component kerfs are cross-sectionally arranged in pl'aniform registry, and a pair of identical flat sided keeper strips that are interchangeably insertable into either of said grooves to positively interlock the aforesaid parting surfaces against separation.

2. A building block system comprising a plurality' of separable units assembled in superim- Posed courses to build up an erected wall, certain adjoining blocks lying in different next adjacentcourses having each of their respective parting faces provided with mated kerfs that are laterally spaced apart and cross-sectionally inclined relative to each other, the corresponding kerfs of said respective faces extending lengthwise in superimposed alignment within the face width eonfines,'a separate keeper strip inserted into and engaging each of such aligned kerfs, and a spline interposed between said keeper strips.

3. A building block system having a plurality of separable units assembled in. courses to build up an erected wall including a corner structure comprising a pair of elongated corner forming blocks squarely assembled in abutting relation and lying in a common course, one of such corner forming blocks having its upturned face provided with a pair of laterally spaced mated kerfs that parallelly extend lengthwise of said face within the width confines thereof and which mated kerfs are cross-sectionally inclined with respect to each other, a cross slot also sunk into said face to intersect a mated kerf thereof and which cross slot lies in aligned registry with a kerf sunk into the upturned face of the other corner forming block, a flat sided bridge spline slidably entered into said slot and extending into the kerf registering therewith, and a pair ,of interchangeable fiat sided keeper strips respectively inserted into said mated kerfs, the lateral spacing between corresponding longitudinal strip edges being contracted relative to the opposite strip edges.

4. A building block system comprising a plurality of separable units having multiple lengths assembled in superimposed courses with broken joints to build up an erected wall, mated primary kerfs for the top and the bottom parting face of each such block, said mated kerfs being cross-sectionally inclined relative to each other and extending lengthwise within the width confines of their respective block faces in laterally spaced relationship and which kerf inclination in both the top and bottom faces of the respective component blocks converges in a common direction, and keeper strips operatively inserted into certain of said kerfs serving to positively interlock adjacent block courses.

5. A building block comprising mated primary kerfs for one face thereof, said mated kerfs being cross-sectionally inclined relative to each other and having mouths respectively disposed within the width confines of said face in laterally spaced relationship, and separate fiat sided keeper strips whose width is approximately twice the kerf depth and respectively inserted lengthwise.

into said mated kerfs, the exposed converging edges of said strips forming a contracted gap that is narrower than the lateral spacing given to the mouth of said kerfs.

6. A building block system comprising a plurality of separable units assembled in superimposed courses to build up a wall enclosure, certain component blocks in each such course having their respective top faces provided with mated kerfs that are cross-sectionally inclined relative to each other, keeper strip means inserted into certain of such kerfs and arranged to provide for a pair of longitudinal strip edges that form a contracted gap therebetween, and a roof supported by said wall enclosure comprising extensible rafter means which span oppositely disposed wall portions and the end regions of which rafters are respectively provided with kerfs that register with and interlockingly engage thekeeper'strips of the contiguous blocks lying immediately beneath the rafter ends.

7. In a building block system including separable units assembled to build up a wall enclosure, a gable structure supported by said wall and comprising a plurality of sectionalized rafters of which the respective mated sections are telescopically mounted in pairs, the upturned face of each such pair of sections being provided with a series of spaced apart spline receiving means arranged to fall into registry when a rafter is adjustably extended lengthwise, and a roof board disposed crosswise of said rafters and which board is provided with depending spline means entered into certain of the aforesaid registering receiving means and interlocking therewith so as to definitely fix the length of the engaged rafters.

8. A system for positively interlocking complementary members each having a face that is respectively superimposed upon one another, each such face being provided with mated primary kerfs respectively having an independent elongated mouth and which mouths are laterally spaced apart to include an interposed medial face region therebetween, said mated kerfs being cross-sectionally inclined relative to each other and having the mouths of the respective superimposed faces lying in registry wholly within the adjacent marginal edges of one such face, and interchangeable fiat sided spline strips respectively inserted into each registering pair of such kerf mouths to constitute duplex connections arranged to mutually cooperate and thereby positively interlock said superimposed faces against lateral separation.

9. A building block unit comprising a side face including opposed marginal edges, said face having mated primary kerfs sunk therein to provide for a pair of elongated kerf mouths that are interposed within said marginal edges in laterally spaced relation to leave a medial face region between said mouths and which mated kerfs are cross-sectionally inclined to converge with re spect to said mouths, and interchangeable flat sided spline strips inserted into the respective mated kerfs, said strips having exposed corresponding edges that are wider in lateral spacing than the distance between said mouths.

10. A toy of the character described comprising a plurality of blocks assembled in face to face relation, and oppositely inclined fiat sided pieces fitted in mating grooves formed in the contacting faces of adjacent blocks.

11. A toy of the character described comprising a plurality of blocks assembled in face to face relation, the engaging faces of adjacent blocks being provided with a pair of grooves extending the full length of said faces, the side walls of each groove being parallel with each other ,but diagonally inclined with respect to the plane of the face surface in which the groove is formed, the face grooves of each block being matched with face grooves of an adjacent block and flat sided connecting pieces fitted in the matched grooves of each pair, with the flat sides of said connecting pieces lying parallel with the grooves, in which they are fitted, the connecting piece or pieces fitted in the mating grooves of each pair being oppositely inclined with respect to the connecting piece or pieces fitted in the mating grooves of the remaining pair, so that separation of the blocks is prevented except by relative sliding movement of the meeting faces in the lengthwise direction of the grooves formed therein.

12. In a keying system for building blocks or the like, the combination of a pair of faced units assembled in abutting face to face relation, a kerf sunk into each such face with corresponding edges of the respective kerf mouths disposed in registry and which kerfs are crosssectionally inclined in oblique planiform alignment with respect to one such abutting face, a flat sided interconnecting piece bridgingly inserted into both of said aligned kerfs, and cooperative fiat sided keying means located laterally away from the registering kerf mouths and having a flat side disposed in a substantially rightangular inclination with respect to the aforesaid one face, said keying means being arranged to coact with the interconnecting piece and serving to positively interlock the abutting faces against lateral separation.

LAWRENCE E. CORSER.

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Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2433149A (en) * 1945-08-29 1947-12-23 Ida A Overacker Building block
US2736188A (en) * 1956-02-28 Wilhelm
US2849832A (en) * 1956-01-26 1958-09-02 Jorgensen Bernhard Toy building sets
US2869355A (en) * 1956-11-06 1959-01-20 Bowlden Earl Truman Wall construction
US2895181A (en) * 1955-10-24 1959-07-21 Hope Robert Arthur Shake or shingle panels
US2981009A (en) * 1959-06-12 1961-04-25 Lindquist Nora Educational building block set
US3076286A (en) * 1955-07-15 1963-02-05 Stephen J Czecholinski Building blocks
US3080674A (en) * 1959-12-10 1963-03-12 Amici Charles Building blocks
US3124514A (en) * 1964-03-10 koutz etal
US3529390A (en) * 1968-08-09 1970-09-22 Grant Stetter Masonry wall construction
US3852909A (en) * 1969-12-27 1974-12-10 H Viebcke Blocks with detachable cap plates having additional mating connecting means
US4035947A (en) * 1975-08-21 1977-07-19 Burge David A Toy construction set having interconnectible components with interfitting formations
US4869039A (en) * 1987-04-20 1989-09-26 Paul Amos Toy building pad
DE29722703U1 (en) * 1997-12-22 1998-11-19 Ungerer Klaus Dipl Ing Dry masonry with ledge connection
US20020148181A1 (en) * 1996-02-08 2002-10-17 Friesner Charles E. Structural member
US20050034413A1 (en) * 1999-11-24 2005-02-17 Weber Ralf D. Universal structural element
US20060179741A1 (en) * 2005-02-03 2006-08-17 Thomas Sohm Unknown
US20060272264A1 (en) * 2005-05-11 2006-12-07 Parker William H Interlocking insulating firebrick
US20070028817A1 (en) * 2005-05-11 2007-02-08 Parker William H Self-aligning fire brick assembly
US20080187889A1 (en) * 2007-01-22 2008-08-07 Kuhn Michael H Method and apparatus for an architectural design aid system
US20140007527A1 (en) * 2006-03-14 2014-01-09 Mute Wall Systems, Inc. Barrier Wall and Method of Forming Wall Panels Between Vertical Wall Stiffeners with Support Members Extending Partially Through the Wall Panels
US10221529B1 (en) 2018-03-13 2019-03-05 Mute Wall Systems, Inc. Wall panels, barrier wall constructed from same, and methods of making both
US10400402B1 (en) 2018-03-13 2019-09-03 Mute Wall Systems, Inc. Wall panels, barrier wall constructed from same, and methods of making both

Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3124514A (en) * 1964-03-10 koutz etal
US2736188A (en) * 1956-02-28 Wilhelm
US2433149A (en) * 1945-08-29 1947-12-23 Ida A Overacker Building block
US3076286A (en) * 1955-07-15 1963-02-05 Stephen J Czecholinski Building blocks
US2895181A (en) * 1955-10-24 1959-07-21 Hope Robert Arthur Shake or shingle panels
US2849832A (en) * 1956-01-26 1958-09-02 Jorgensen Bernhard Toy building sets
US2869355A (en) * 1956-11-06 1959-01-20 Bowlden Earl Truman Wall construction
US2981009A (en) * 1959-06-12 1961-04-25 Lindquist Nora Educational building block set
US3080674A (en) * 1959-12-10 1963-03-12 Amici Charles Building blocks
US3529390A (en) * 1968-08-09 1970-09-22 Grant Stetter Masonry wall construction
US3852909A (en) * 1969-12-27 1974-12-10 H Viebcke Blocks with detachable cap plates having additional mating connecting means
US4035947A (en) * 1975-08-21 1977-07-19 Burge David A Toy construction set having interconnectible components with interfitting formations
US4869039A (en) * 1987-04-20 1989-09-26 Paul Amos Toy building pad
US6769220B2 (en) * 1996-02-08 2004-08-03 Charles E. Friesner Structural member
US20020148181A1 (en) * 1996-02-08 2002-10-17 Friesner Charles E. Structural member
DE29722703U1 (en) * 1997-12-22 1998-11-19 Ungerer Klaus Dipl Ing Dry masonry with ledge connection
US7340868B2 (en) 1999-11-24 2008-03-11 Weber Ralf D Universal structural element
US6874291B1 (en) * 1999-11-24 2005-04-05 Ralf D. Weber Universal structural element
US20050034413A1 (en) * 1999-11-24 2005-02-17 Weber Ralf D. Universal structural element
US20060179741A1 (en) * 2005-02-03 2006-08-17 Thomas Sohm Unknown
US20060272264A1 (en) * 2005-05-11 2006-12-07 Parker William H Interlocking insulating firebrick
US20070028817A1 (en) * 2005-05-11 2007-02-08 Parker William H Self-aligning fire brick assembly
US7677007B2 (en) * 2005-05-11 2010-03-16 Parker William H Interlocking insulating firebrick
US20140007527A1 (en) * 2006-03-14 2014-01-09 Mute Wall Systems, Inc. Barrier Wall and Method of Forming Wall Panels Between Vertical Wall Stiffeners with Support Members Extending Partially Through the Wall Panels
US9708781B2 (en) * 2006-03-14 2017-07-18 Mute Wall Systems, Inc. Barrier wall and method of forming wall panels between vertical wall stiffeners with support members extending partially through the wall panels
US20080187889A1 (en) * 2007-01-22 2008-08-07 Kuhn Michael H Method and apparatus for an architectural design aid system
US8113840B2 (en) * 2007-01-22 2012-02-14 SnapHouse, LLC Method and apparatus for an architectural design aid system
US10221529B1 (en) 2018-03-13 2019-03-05 Mute Wall Systems, Inc. Wall panels, barrier wall constructed from same, and methods of making both
US10400402B1 (en) 2018-03-13 2019-09-03 Mute Wall Systems, Inc. Wall panels, barrier wall constructed from same, and methods of making both

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