US2099993A - Firearm - Google Patents

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US2099993A
US2099993A US699306A US69930633A US2099993A US 2099993 A US2099993 A US 2099993A US 699306 A US699306 A US 699306A US 69930633 A US69930633 A US 69930633A US 2099993 A US2099993 A US 2099993A
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barrel
projectiles
firing
slide
projectile
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US699306A
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Tauschek Gustav
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Tauschek Gustav
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F42AMMUNITION; BLASTING
    • F42BEXPLOSIVE CHARGES, e.g. FOR BLASTING, FIREWORKS, AMMUNITION
    • F42B5/00Cartridge ammunition, e.g. separately-loaded propellant charges
    • F42B5/02Cartridges, i.e. cases with charge and missile
    • F42B5/03Cartridges, i.e. cases with charge and missile containing more than one missile
    • F42B5/035Cartridges, i.e. cases with charge and missile containing more than one missile the cartridge or barrel assembly having a plurality of axially stacked projectiles each having a separate propellant charge
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A19/00Firing or trigger mechanisms; Cocking mechanisms
    • F41A19/06Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms
    • F41A19/42Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms having at least one hammer
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A9/00Feeding or loading of ammunition; Magazines; Guiding means for the extracting of cartridges
    • F41A9/01Feeding of unbelted ammunition
    • F41A9/06Feeding of unbelted ammunition using cyclically moving conveyors, i.e. conveyors having ammunition pusher or carrier elements which are emptied or disengaged from the ammunition during the return stroke
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F42AMMUNITION; BLASTING
    • F42BEXPLOSIVE CHARGES, e.g. FOR BLASTING, FIREWORKS, AMMUNITION
    • F42B5/00Cartridge ammunition, e.g. separately-loaded propellant charges
    • F42B5/26Cartridge cases
    • F42B5/32Cartridge cases for rim fire

Description

`G. TAUscHEK Nov. 23, 1937.

FIREARM Filed Nov. 23, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet l ANN @@@QQQQQQ NNf M RH OC Ts Na E4 MT ,m S a G BY of@ a MM ATTORNEYS Nov. 23, 1937.

G. TAUSCHEK FIREARM Filed Nov. 23, 1935 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 lNvEm-on $05 TA V fsw/SCHH( In!!! n l NN ww WQ G. TAUSCHEK Nov. 23, 1937.

FIREARM' Filed NOV. 23, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 www t lNvENTo GugY nv ausc/El( ATTORNEYS Patented Nov. 23, 1937y UNITEDSTATES PATENT ori-lcs Gustav Tauschek, New York, Y.

Application November' 23, 1933, serial No. 699,306 In AnstrlaSeptember 15, 1933 19 Claims.

My invention relates to firearms, and has for its object to enable a series of successive shots to be fired with the aid of a plurality of projectiles arranged in a novel relation toeach other.

In the accompanying drawings I have illustrated several forms of ammunition suitable for .use with my approved firearms, and also three typical and satisfactory forms of guns or riiies which I have devised for the firing of such ammunitlon.

Figs. 1 and 3 are longitudinal sections of two forms vof such ammunition in the form of cartridges; Figs. 2 .and 4 are end views looking from the right of Figs. 1 and 3 respectively and drawn l5 upon an enlarged scale; Fig. 5 is a partial longitudinal section showing a third form of such ammunition,likewise in the form of a cartridge; Fig. 6 is a cross section on line 6-6 of Fig. 5; Fig. 7 is a cross section of still another form of cartridge;

if) Fig. 8 is a perspective view of a ysheath which I may employ in conjunction with cartridges such as shown in Figs. 1-7; Fig. 9 is a side view, with parts in longitudinal section, showing still another form of ammunition for use with my lmproved firearms; Fig. 10V is a partial longitudinal section of a rifle embodying my invention; Figs. 1l

and 12 are cross sections on lines I I-Il and I2- l2 respectively of Fig. 10; Fig. 13 is a partial longitudinal section of another form of riiie embodying 30 my invention; Fig. 14 is a cross section on line I4-I4 of Fig. 13; Fig. 15 is a partial longitudinal section of a third form of rie embodying my in-4 vention; and Fig. 16 is a cross section on line IG- I6 of Fig. 15.

:.5 In Figs. 1 to 7 I have shown four different examples of cartridges suitable for use in my im- -proved firearms, it being understood that I do not'wish to restrict myself thereto, but that the carridge or ammunition may be given other forms 40 or constructions. The several forms of cartridges illustrated are alike insofar as each of them comprises a shell closed at one end and open at the other, with a plurality of bullets or projectiles arranged in tandem fashion within such shell, and

4" with a charge of powder or the like between each two neighboring projectiles. Figs. 1, 3, and 5 show the neighboring projectiles in contact with each other, but this is not an essential feature. The

i individual projectiles are in close (gas-tight) coni0 tact with the inner wall of the shell, so that each charge of powder or the like will be kept quite separate from the adjacent charge-or charges. In Figs. 1 and 2, the cartridge comprises a tube or shell I of thin metal closed at one end 5" by a bottom or plug 2 rigidly connected therewith in any suitable manner, as by slipping the end of the shell over said plug and then exerting pressure by means of rollers or otherwise to establish a firm. connection between said two parts. I prefer to provide said cartridge-(either the shell or 5 preferably the plug) with a'laterally projecting pin 3 which may serve as a convenient handle to grasp the cartridge during the loading of the gun or while removing the empty cartridge shell from the gun after ring. This pin 3 may also co- 10 operate with an ejector of any usual or approved construction, as referred to hereinafter in the description of the rie illustrated by Figs. 13 and 14. Within the shell I are disposed in tandem fashion the bullets or projectiles 4, here shown 15 as spherical balls. These projectiles are fitted into the shelll in a gas-tight manner, and when they are made of steel or other relatively hard material, I prefer to make the shell of softer and more compressible material, for instance copper, so as tc produce more readily a gas-tight jointl between the peripheries of the projectiles 4 and the surrounding cylindrical wall of the cartridge. As i1.- lustrated, the innermost projectile 4 engages the bottom or plug 2, and adjacent projectiles are in contact with each other; however, as stated above, such engagement and contact are not essential, although I prefer such arrangement of the projectiles, as it facilitates the proper spacing of the bullets within the cartridge and also offers other advantages, as explained hereinafter. Each of the spaces between adjacent projectiles 4, as well as the space between'the plug 2 and the adjacent bullet, contains a charge 5 which in this particular case consists of a mixture of a detonator and a propelling powder, so that such mixture can be set off by a powerful blo'w delivered locally against the outer surface of the shell I, preferably at av point about .midway between the ends of the space or chamber containing such charge.

40 The cartridge shown in Figs. 3 and 4 has a shell I I' made of pasteboard or like material and having interior and exterior linings L and L'. respectivelyof oiled paper or other suitable material. The metallic bottom plug 2 is provided with the 45 lateral pin or projection 3 and also has at its exposed end an outwardly extending flange 2 against which abuts the adjacent end of the shell I'. These parts are connected rigidly in any suitable manner, for instance by means of a metal sleeve or ferrule 6 clamping the end of the shell around' the bottom plug 2.'. The bullets 4, of the same form as in Figs. 1 and 2, are shown in contact with each other, the last or innermost bullet engagingV the bottom plug 2'. Each of the spaces 55 between adjacent bullets, as well as the space betweenthe plug 2' and the innermost bullet, contains a charge 1, which in this case is not a mixture of a propelling powder with a detonator, but is exclusively a propelling charge. Separate detonating charges 8 are located in perforations of the shell I', said perforations and the charges 8 lying in the same longitudinal plane and being equally spaced, each charge 8 being preferably about midway of the length of the respective propelling charge 1. The detonating charges 8 are held in place by the linings L', L". The lining L also has the function of insuring a gas-tight joint at the peripheries of the bullets.

With the construction described above, relatively small chambers are left between the contacting bullets 4, owing to the spherical shape of these projectiles. When it is desired to provide greater propelling charges, I may give the projectiles an elongated shape, for instance as shown in Fig. 5. These projectiles have a preferably blunt-nosed body 4 witha. rearwardlyextending central spur or stem 4*, the end of which is preferably in contact with the adjacent body 4' or (in the casefof the rlast projectile) with the bottom plug 2 of the cartridge. 'I'he chambers containing the propelling charges 'I' may thus be made considerably larger than when employing spherical bullets in contact with each other. I have shown the shell I" thickened on one side, the chamber or bore which receives the projectiles and the propelling charges being eccentric to the outer surface oi the shell I", as lshown best in Fig. 6. yIn this thickened portion I place the detonatng charges which may be in the nature of detonating caps 8' of usual type, it being understood that the' shell is provided with perforations or recesses to receive these caps. As in Figs. 3 and 4, the detonating charges lie in the same longitudinal plane andr are evenly spaced, each detonating charge 8' being in proper co-operative relation to the corresponding propelling charge 'I'.

In order to obtain a tight it at the peripherles of the projectile bodies 4', I might provide the shell I" with an inner lining such as described above in connection with Figs. 1 to 4, especially if such shell should be made of pasteboard or like material. Instead of this, I might employ the construction shown in Fig. 5, where the projectile body is illustrated as composed of a core 4b integral with the s pur or stern 4', and of a jacket pr sleeve 4 surrounding said body and fitted against a shoulder 4d thereof. I'he parts 4a, 4b, 4d would be made of hard metal, and the jacket 4 of relatively soft metal, so as to secure a gas-tight joint at the inner surface of the shell I", particularly if the latter is made of hard metal.

Instead of employing the eccentric arrangement described in connection with Figs. 5 and 6 in order to obtain a one-sided thickening of the cartridge shell, Il might, as shown in Fig. "l, make the shell Il of uniform thickness throughout the major portion of its circumference, and form it with a thickened longitudinal portion or rib Ib at the side where the detonating charges or caps 8' are located, the construction in other respects being of the same character as described with reference to Figs. 5 and 6.

In order that cartridges of the types shown in Figs. 1 to 7, especially when their shells are made of pasteboard or of thin metal, may be protected, during storage or handling, against accidental knocks or blows, particularly such as might cause an explosion of the cartridge, I prefer to encase the individual cartridges, up to the time of their use, in protective sheaths or sleeves, for instance such as shown in Fig. 8. Such a sheath may consist of a piece of sheet metal 9 bent to the form of a cylindrical tube of proper diameter to receive one of the cartridges, the longitudinal edges of such piece being spaced so as tovleave a longitudinal slot il through which the vpin 3 of the cartridge may project. The projecting end of ythis pin constitutes a handle with the aid of which the cartridge may conveniently be slipped forwardly out of the protective sheath into the cartridge chamber at the end of the gun barrel, in the act of loading the gun.

The ammunition shown in Figs. 1 to 'l consists of cartridges each of which contains a plurality of projectiles in tandem arrangement and a corresponding number of charges. yIn Fig. 9 I have illustrated another form of ammunition employing a plurality of projectiles in tandem arrangement, with individual charges, but without placing them within the same shell. This ammunition comprises a plurality of projectiles connected with each other at their adjacent ends so as to form a unit which may be loaded into a gun.

or rifle in the manner set forth hereinafter with reference to Figs 15 and 16.r Each of the projectiles has at its front end a nose 4 of smaller diameter than the body if of the projectile. This body is of cylindrical tubular character, and its rear end is crimped or otherwise fashioned to t tightly around the nose 4 of the next projectile. The nose is'preferably ball-shaped, and the connection between adjacent projectiles may be perfectly rigid, so that together they will form al straight rod, or a rslight looseness may be provided at the connection, insuiilcient to impair its gas-tight character, yet Igiving the flexibility of a ball-and-socket joint so that the series or string of projectiles maybe bent or even coiled, which would facilitate storage and shipment and also ai'ford advantages when such string is used in a gun, as explained below. The body 4f is preferably made with two annular nicks or constrictions 4f, between which is located the propelling charge 1', preferably with the interpositlon of a retaining disk 'I" of cardboard or other suitable material generally in contact with the head or nose 4e of the adjacent projectile. In the forward portion of the body, between the propelling charge 'l' and the nose, is disposed a substantially conical holder I0 having an annular channel I0 containing the annular detonating charge 8', so that such charge will be exploded by a blow directed against any point of the outer periphery of the body 4f, in the transverse plane containing said detonating charge 8. The holder I0 is also provided with one or more longitudinal channels I3" extending from the annular channel I0' to and through the nose 4', the latter having a central opening I0l communicating with said longitudinal channel or channels IB". At its rear end. the holder I 0 has a cylindrical portion Ib in tight engagement with the body 4f and forming a gas-tight barrier between the detonating charge 8' and the propelling charge 1' located in the same body 4f. It will be understood that in manufacturing such a series or string of projectiles, a projectile would first be empty, open at the rear end of the body, and uncrimped at such end. T'he holder III, with -the detonating charge 8' would vthen be introduced through the open rear end o f the body controlled by such movement of the barrel.

constriction 4g and the elastic ball socket, and

then forcing the nose of the rear projectile into such socketed rear end of the front projectile.

In Figs. 1-0, 11 and 12 I have illustrated a' cartridge of the type shown in Figs. 3 and'4, in conjunction with a repeating gun or rifle having a barrel movable relatively to the stock during and immediately after the recoil, and mechanism The barrel I I is provided at the breech with a chamber I Ia of proper size to receive one of the cartridges and also with a longitudinal slot IIb, open at the rear end, adapted to receive the pin 3. At

vI2 I have indicated a breech block, which may At its lower.

be of any suitable construction. portion, the 4barrel II is provided with a longitudinal series of equidistant openings II, their spacing corresponding to that of the several projectiles (or rather charges)` of the cartridge. The barrel II together with the breech block l2 and .associated parts is movable lengthwise of the The stock is formed with a chamber I3' in which a slide I5 is suitably guided for rectilinear movement parallel to the barrel axis. The slide is provided at its front and its rear ends with feet I5 which engage the guldeway formed on the lower wall of the chamber I3; the top of the slide is guided along the bottom of the barrel- II. The top of the slide also constitutes means for making a tight joint with the surface of the barrel at the lower ends of the openings II, which is of particular importance when the cartridge has an outer lining L of paper or the like and there is danger of gases escaping into the chamber I3. On the slide I5 is pivotally mounted at I6 a hammer I1 formed with a firing pin I1 in such a position that longitudinal movement of the slide will bring such pin successively into operative relation to the several firing openings IIC. To the slide I5 is further pivoted, at I8, a sear I9 adapted for a locking engagement with the hammer I1 by means of a hook or pawl I9' on the sear fitting against a corresponding shoulder on the hammer. The forward face of the firing pin is as nearly as possible perpondicthe seaz into locking engagement with the hammer I1 and to hold the lower end of the sear against a longitudinal trigger bar,2'| extending rearwardly from the trigger 2l which is pivoted to the stock I3 at 22. The trigger is under the influence of a spring 23 which also bears against a pawl 24 pivoted on the stock at 25 and adapted to project into notches I5" arranged at the lower portion of the slide I5. There are as many of these notches as the cartridge contains projectiles, and the arrangement of the notches I5" corresponds to that of the firing openings IIC, that is to say, the notches form a series or rack extending lengthwise of the rie, and the distance between adjacent notches is the same as the distance between adjacent firing openings. A spring 26 tends to push the slide I5 forwardly, the pawl 24'normally. holding the slide against such movement.

The trigger bar 2|' is provided at its rear end with a rearwardly facing hook 2|", located adjacent to, but normally out of operative engagement with, a forwardly facing hook 21 on a rod or bar 21 which extends lengthwise of the rifle. The forward end of the rod 21 extends close to the lower end of the pawl 24, but in the normal position, shown in Fig. 10, 'the bar permits said pawl to move freely as its upper end slides from one'notch of the slide to another in the manner set forth below. The rear end of the rod 21 is pivotally connected at 21" with a lever 28 fulcrumed on the stock I3 at 29, a spring 30 exerting a forward pressure on -the lower portion of said lever.l The upper end 28' of the lever 28 extends into anopening of the stock, and is adapted to be projected upwardly through said opening under certain conditions as explained below; normally, however, said opening is covered by the reech block I2 as indicatedin Fig. 10, so as to prevent such upward movement or projection cf the lever end 28.

The rifle illustrated by Figs. 10, 11 and 12 has its cartridge chamber Ila formed to receive cartridges of the type illustrated by Figs. 3 and 4.

The pin 3 in this case also has the function of insuring a proper positioning of the cartridge so that its detonating charges 8 will be in registry with the firing openings IIc when the cartridge is in position. The drawings show the rifle loaded, the hammer cocked and the entire mechanism in readiness for the first shot. Upon pulling back the trigger 2|, the trigger bar 2l' is raised and thus swings the searl I9 contraclockwise on its fulcrum I8 so that the hook or pawl I9 will release the hammer I1. Under the influence of the spring 20, the hammer swings upwardly on its fulcrum I6, whereby the firing lpin I'I' is thrown upwardly through the rst of the firing openings IIc and against the i'lrst detonating charge 8. This will set o the rst propelling charge 1, which is located between the rst two projectiles 4, and the foremost projectile will be expelled from the barrel I I. Preferably, as I have stated hereinbefore, the projectiles are in contact with each other, and the rearmost projectile is in contact with the bottom plug 2' so that the second projectile will be held positively against any rearward movement in the cartridge when the rst charge is fired. The recoil lcauses the barrel II together .with the breech block I2 to move toward the left in Fig. 10. Simultaneously,

since the ring pin I1 is in the first firing hole I Ic, and since these parts engage each other along the vertical surfaces which are perpendicular to the movement of the barrel, the hammer I1 is carried along by the barrel during its recoil, together with the slide I5. Since the extent of the recoil is exactly equal to the distance between two adjacent firing openings IIc and also to the distance between two adjacent notches I5, the pawl 24, which yields downwardly as the slide I5 moves toward the left, will at the end of therecoil. movement drop into the second notch I5".

The spring 26 is, of course, compressed by the movement of the slide I5 during the recoil, but can not return the slide to itsoriginal position, since such slide is held by the pawl 24 in engagement with the second notch I5. Under the inuence of the spring I4, the barrel as well` as the breech block and the parts connected therewith are then thrown forward into-their original position, but the slide I5, being held by the pawl 24, remains in its new position, one step farther to the left than originally, and the firing pin I1 is therefore now in position to explode the second charge of the cartridge. During the forward movement of the barrel under the inuence of the spring I4,the inclined rear face of the firing opening I Ic in which the ring pin Iis at that time, acts on the correspondingly inclined rear face of the firing pin and depresses the latter so as to clear the path of the barrel and at the same time put the spring 20 under tension. If the person has released the trigger 2I immediately after pulling it, the hammer I 1, at the end of its downward movement, will be caught by the sear I9, these parts therefore again assuming the relative position shown in Fig. 10. It will, of course, be understood that the lower portion of the hammer I1 and the upper portion of the Sear, at the hook or pawl I9", are so fashioned that the sear will yield as the lower end of the hammer passes from above the hook I9' to` below the same. Under the lconditions just described, a single shot will be red and the parts will then be in the same position as shown in Fig. 10 except that the slide I5 and the hammer I1 will be one step to the left. If instead of releasing the trigger immediately after pulling it, the person keeps the trigger depressed, then, as the barrel is thrown forward by the spring I4 after the firing of the first shot, the sear I9 willnot be in position to catch and hold the hammer I1, and as a result thereof, the hammer, after having been thrown downwardly so as to compress the spring 20, will at once again be thrown upwardly by the spring, to bring theiring pin I1' against the second detonating charge 8, thereby exploding the second propelling charge and causing the second bullet to be fired from the rifle. Thus, as long as the trigger 2i is kept retracted, the riiie will act as a repeating rie, firing one shot after another, the slide I5 travelling one step to the left between each two successive shots so as to bring the hammer I1 successively into the several firing positions. After the last recoil, the hammer will be in the position illustrated in dotted lines and the ring pin will be in registry with a solid surface of the barrel, that is to say, beyond the last ring opening IIc to the left. The slide I5 will be in the position in which its last notch I5" at the right will be engaged by the pawl 24.' Thus, the spring 26 will'be fully compressed and ready to restore the slide I5 to the initial position whenever released from the holding action of said pawl. The hammer will be caught by the sear I9 as soon as the person releases the trigger 2l. The breech of the rifle is then opened by manipulating the breech block I2 in any well known or approved manner, vwhereby such' breech block will be .carried rearwardly `(to the left in Fig. 10) until its forward end uncovers the opening of the stock into which the upper end 28 of the lever 28 extends. As soon as thev breech block I2 no longer engages said lever end 28', the spring 30 will throw the lever 2B contra- 'clockwise, whereby the forward end of the rod 21 will be caused to engage the lower arm of the pawl 24 and swing the latter contraclockwise out of engagement with the slide I5. The latter will then be thrown toward the right by the spring 26 and will thus be brought back to the original position shown in Fig. 10. It will be understood that while the breech of the rifle is open, the spent cartridge is extracted from the barrel and a new cartridge inserted. Then the breech block is again brought to its normal position which causes the lever 28 to swing clockwise and the rod 21 to move away from the pawl 24 sol that the latter, under the influence of the spring 23, is thrown upwardly into engagement with the first notch of the slide I5, as in Fig. 10.

Since the insertion of a new cartridge into the cartridge chamber of the barrel takes place while the breech of the rie is open, there is some danger of premature firing, for instance if the trigger should be pulled after the cartridge has been inserted, but before the breech has been closed. To guard against this possibility, I have provided the hooks 2|" and 2 1. Normally, that is to say, when the breech block is in the closed position, these hooks are separated from each other and have no function. When, however, the breech block is moved rearwardly and the lever 28 swings contraclockwise under the infiuence of the spring 30, the forward movement of the rod 21 brings the hook 21 into locking engagement with the hook 2| so as to prevent any accidental movement of the trigger and t provide a safety lock therefor during all the time that the breech of the rifle is open. As soon as the breech block again reaches its closing position, the hook 21 moves rearwardly to disengage the hook 2I" and thus leave the trigger free for normal operation.

While Figs. 10, 11 and 12 show the rie charnbered to receive cartridges of the specific type shown in Figs. 3 and 4, it will be understood that only a very slight change is required in the cham-- bering of the rifle barrel to adapt it for the re- -ception of cartridges such as shown in Figs. l

and 2 or of cartridges of the type shown inI Figs. 5, 6 and 7. It will be understood that in each case the spacing of the ring openings inthe barrel would correspond to the spacing of the .notches on the slide I and also to the spacing of the charges in the cartridge. In the case of cartridges such as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the pin 3 would not be required to give the cartridge vany denite circumferential position in the barrel, because the cartridge charge would be exploded by a blow against any point of its periphery between two projectiles, since in this particular case the 'detonating agent is distributed uniformly within the entire charge, instead of being located at a definite point of the periphery as in the cartridges shown in Figs. 3 to 7.'

In Figs. 13 and 14 I have shown a rifle having the barrel I I the cartridge chamber I Ie of which is fashioned to receive a cartridge having a shell of the type shown in Figs. 5 and 6, while the arrangement oi.' projectiles and charges is of the character shown in Figs. 3 and 4. It will be noted that the cartridge chamber IIe of the barrel is eccentric so that the bore of the cartridge will be in axial alignment with the bore of the barrel. In this form the barrel is stationary relatively to the stock Il, that is to say, this form of my invention does not contain any recoil operated mechanism. In addition to the firing openings IId of the same character as in Fig. 10,` the barrel is provided with a recess IIf located in advance of the foremost firing opening the cartridge.

Hd, at a distance therefrom corresponding to the spacing of the firing openings. The breech block I2 may be of any customary or approved construction and I have also indicated at E-an ejector of any approved type which is adapted to co-operate with the flange Aat the rear end of The hammer I'I" is fulcrumed at I6 on the slide I5 which has feet I5' and notches I" substantially as in the construction shown in Fig. 10. The hammer carries a ring pin IIa which a spring tends to project into the ring position. Furthermore, the hammer has a lateral projection Hb adapted to co-operate with the teeth of a stationary rack 3i. The forward faces of these teeth are inclined, while their rear faces are approximately vertical, or more accurately speaking, slightly curved to correspond to the path of the projection Ilb. The hammer is also provided with a handle I1 projecting outwardly. The notches I5 of the slide are adapted to receive the pawl-like end 24' ci the trigger 2 I." provided with a longitudinal slot 2I through whichextends the stationary fulcrum pin 22.

The spring 23' tends to pull the trigger -into the position illustrated, in which the pin 22 is at the rear end of the slot 2la and in which the pawllike end 2d is clear of the notches I5".

The operation of this form of my rie is as follows: Fig. 13 shows the initial position of the parts, before the trigger is pulled for the first shot. Upon retracting the trigger 2l", it rst swings on the pin 22 so as to raise the end 2d into the rst notch at the extreme left of the slide I5. 'I'he trigger and the slide thus become` locked for movement in unison'. Further retraction of the trigger will therefore not only pull the trigger backward causing it to slide along the pin 22 to the extent permitted by the slot ZI,

which is horizontal during this sliding movement,

but the slide I5 will share in this rearward movement of the trigger. The length'ofthe slot 2I is so proportioned as to give the slide I5 a longitudinal motion corresponding exactly to the spacing of the firing openings IId and of the notches I5". As the slide I5 moves to the rear, the inclined forward face ofthe iirst tooth of the stationary rack 3l will by its co-operation be exploded to fire the' first projectile of the car tridge. In this form of my invention, a separate pull on the trigger is required for the iiring oi each shot. Upon the release of the trigger, the slide I5 and the hammer Il" will remain in their new position, that is to say, with the firing pin in operative relation to the rst firing hole. the lateral projectionl i'Ib, by its co-operation with the rack SI, holding the parts in this position. The trigger 2i" upon being released will be pulled forwardly by its spring 23" so that the pawl-like end 2d' oi' the trigger will come into registry with the second notch I5 from the left. Upon then again pulling the trigger rearwardly it will cause the slide I5 to be moved another step to the left, thereby bringing about the firing ofthe second projectile. By a repetition of these operations, the projectiles will be iired in succession. After the ring'oi' the last projectile the slide I5 and the parts connected therewith will be brought back manually to the position illustrated, the handle I'I being used `to swing the hammer I'I"'downward'unti1 the projectiongllb is clear of the rack 3 I. In this construction, the barrel has no longitudinal slot such as the slot IIb of Figs. 1 0 and 12, since cartridges of the type shown in Figs. 5, 6 and 7 are provided, at the lower portion of the ange 2e, with a fiat ywhich in conjunctionwith a corresponding surface of the cartridge chamber serves to position vthe cartridge properly, the lateral pin 3 or 3 being crumed on the barrel at 32 and pressed inwardly by a spring 33. Instead of a single holding pawl 32. I may employ a plurality of them, for instance three at 90 from each other, as indicated in'Fig. l5. In the position illustrated-apother pawl 34 is arranged opposite to the upper pawl 32. This pawl 34 ispivoted at Si' uponV an arm 35 fulcrummed on the stock I3" at 35'. A spring 36 tends to throw the pawl 3d toward the upper pawl 32. `With the barrel is connected a longitudinal rod IIS suitably guided in the stock I3" and surrounded by the spring Iii the function of which is to restore the barrel 4to its forward position after the recoil. With the arm 35 is pivotally connected at 35" a link 3l fulcrumed at 3l on a bracket integral with the barrel II". The firing pin IId is located in a proper position to register with the detonating charge 8' when the rear end of a projectile is in engagement with the front ends of the pawls 32 and 3d as illustrated in Fig. 15. This tiring pin s preferably spring pressed as indicated so that it will have a tendency to move away from the bore of the barrel. yThe hammer I'Ie is fulcrurned at I6" on the stocky I3" and is under the influence of a spring 2@ tending to throw' it against the ring pin IId. The hammer is also provided with a lateral projection IIf which in the position illustrated co-operates with the front end of the trigger bar 2lc to hold the hammer in the position in which the spring 2@ is under full tension. The trigger 2 ib is pivoted at 22, and a spring 3Q tends to throw it into the position illustrated, where the trigger arm 2I engages a stop pin 39. The lateral projection I'If isalso adapted to co-operate with the pawl II@ fulcrumed on the barrel at Ml' and pulled into the lower position illustrated, by means of a spring di. As it may be desirable to prevent accidental firing of the riiie, I have indicated at d2 a safety catch of the eccentric type which can be turned manually either to a position where the trigger bar l is held locked against the stop pin 3Q, or into a position where the trigger and trigger bar are free for the operation of the rie.

Fig. l5 shows the string oi projectiles in proper position for the firing of the rst shot. It will be noted that in this position the pawis 32 and 36 engage the rear end of the second projectile, and the firing pin Iid is in registry with the detonating charge contained in the'second projectile.

pulling the trigger 2lb, the trigger bar 2I will be depressed so as to clear the hammer projection Iif and release the hammer, which under the inuence of the spring'20 will be thrown against the firing pin l'ld exploding the detonating charge 8 contained in the second projectile. Through the channel or channels I and the opening illa the hot gases produced by the detonation of this charge will reach the propelling charge l of the projectile ahead, that is the iirst projectile in this case. This charge will be set off and the first projectile will be red from the rifle, the rear end of such projectile being sufriciently elastic to pull it clear of the' nose of the second projectile, the latter remaining stationary as any rearward movement of the second projectile relatively to the barrel is prevented by the pawls 32 and 34. The second projectile fits tightly into the opening at the rear end of the barrel, and constitutes a breech closure which the paw-l or pawls 32 prevent from moving rearwardly' in .relationto the barrel. The barrel then recoils, carrying with it the string of projectiles as well as the pawl 32 which remains in engagement with the rear end of the second projectile. At the same time the link 3l is carried back by the recoiling barrel, and swings the arm 35 on its fulcrum 35'. As the pivot 34 of the pawl 34 is at a considerably greater distance from the fulcrum 35 than the pivotal connection 35 of the link i'l, the pawl 34 is carried back considerably farther than the extent of the recoil, and slides rearwardly over and beyond the third projectile as the latter moves with the recoiling barrel. At the end of the recoil the pawl 34 has been carried to the left of the rear end of the third projectile. 'When then the barrel moves forward under the influence of the spring I4', the pawl Sil, being in engagement with the rear end of the third projectile, moves such propectile forwardly, together with all the projectiles connected therewith, the pawl 32 yielding to permit such movement and dropping into position behind the rear end of the third projectile as soon as the forward movement of the barrel has been completed, when the parts will have resumed the position shown in Fig. 15, except that the pawls 32, 34 will now engage the rear end of the third projectile, the string of projectiles having been advanced relatively to the barrel by the distance of one projectile. This successive feed of the projectiles occurs after each shot. During the recoil of the barrel the pawl 43 is carried along until its forward end passes from a position in irontv of the hammer projection I'lf, to a position in the rear thereof, the inclined face at the end of the pawl 40, and the spring 4l permitting the pawl to yield as it passes over the projection l'lf. When ,the barrel is thrown forward by the spring I4', the forward end of lthe pawl 40, which is preferably substantially perpendicular to the movement of the barrel, engages the rear face of the projection Ilt and thus swings the hammer We back slightly beyond the position shown in Fig. 15, the trigger bar 2 Ie rising to the position illustrated so as to lock the hammer, if the trigger has been released. If, however, the trigger has not been released, but is kept retracted, the hammer will not be locked by the trigger bar, but upon the pawl 40 at the end or its forward movement clearing the upper edge of the projection vl 1f, the hammer will at once be thrown against the ring pin Hd, and as long as the trigger is held depressed, one projectile will be fired after another in rapid succession until the last projectile but one has been i'lred. At the end of this operation, there will be no further feed of the string of projectiles. because the pawl 34 when moved backward will. find no projectile to advance. The last projectile will thus be left in a position corresponding to that of the second projectile shown in Fig. 15. When the next string or chain of projectiles is introduced into the rifle, the nose of the first projectile of the new string will be forced into the elastic socket at the rear end of the last projectile of the preceding string, and thus said last projectile will be connected with the new chain or string of projectiles. The gunner will by hand feed the new chain of projectiles forwardly, until the projectile left over from. the previous string of projectiles is in the position of the front projectile shown in Fig. 15. Instead of this, firing may be stopped (by releasing the trigger 2l) before the last projectile has entered the rie, so that the rst projectile of the new chain will be connected with the last projectile of the preceding chain while said last projectile is exposed and readily accessible for manipulation. Firing may then be resumed in the same manner as de-v additional cartridges'of the type herein set forth to be fed to the firing position successively by mechanism of a type well known in the art in connection with repeating or magazine rias.

While I have illustrated mechanical firing mechanisms, I desire it to be understood that other kinds of ring mechanisms may be employed, particularly electrical ring mechanisms of any well known or -approved type. y

While I have described and illustrated my invention as applied to rifles, it will be obvious that it may be used in connection with other firearms, for instance other small arms such as pistols and carbines, or larger arms such as machine guns, or even cannon or other ordnance.

When employing cartridges containing a plurality of projectiles and separate charges, as in Figs. 1 to 7, 10, and 13, lI prefer to graduate the amount of power of the charges, the charge for the front projectile being the largest or strongest, and the other charges decreasing progressively to the last charge (the one at the rear end of the cartridge). The purpose is to insure correct and uniform trajectories for all the projectiles notwithstanding the fact that the front projectiles have to travel a shorter distance before leaving the rie than the rear projectiles.

I claim: 1. A iirearm comprising a stock, a recoil barrel movable lengthwise of said stock, means holding a plurality of projectiles in tandem on the .longitudinal axis of the barrel, ring mechanism,

projectiles.

2. A rearm comprising a stock, a recoil barrel movable lengthwise of said stock and having a plurality of ring points at different distances from the end of the barrel, said barrel being adapted to'receive a cartridge containing a plurality of projectiles and charges spaced to register with said firing points, Afiring mechanism movable lengthwise of the stock into operative relation with the several iiring points of the barrel, and means, operated bythe longitudinal l movement of the barrel relatively to the stock, for

bringing said ring mechanism into operative relation with successive firing points of the barrel as successive shots are fired.

3. A rearm comprising a stock, a recoil barrel movable lengthwise of said stock and having a plurality of firing points at dierent distances from the end of the barrel, said barrel being adapted to receive a cartridge containing a plurality of projectiles and charges spaced to register vwith said firing points, a slide movable successive ring points of the barrel as succes-- sive shots are fired.

4. A lirearm comprising a stock, la recoil barrel movable lengthwise of said stock and having a plurality of ring points at different distances from the end of the barrel, said barrel being adapted to receive a cartridge containing a plurality of projectiles and charges spaced to register with said ring points, a slide movable lengthwise of the stock, a spring urging said slide to travel in one direction, holding means for normally preventing movement of said slide in the said direction, firing mechanism carried by said slide and including a iiring pin which in the lir- 'ing position and during the recoil of the barrel engages the barrel at one of its firing points to couple the barrel and the slide for movement in 'unison during the recoil and put said `spring adapted to receive a cartridge containing a pluunder tension, means whereby during the forward movement of the barrel following the recoil the firing mechanism and the slide will be uncoupled from the barrel -so that such forward movement will bring the next firing point of the barrel into operative relation with the firing mechanism,'and means for releasing the slide from said holding means to permit the spring to restore the slide to its original position.

. 5. A firearm comprising a stock, a recoil barrel movable lengthwise of said stock and having a plurality of tiring points at dierent distances from the end of the barrel, .said barrel being adapted to receive a cartridge containing a plurality of projectiles and charges spaced to register with said ring points, a slide movable lengthwise of the stock, a spring urging said slide to travel in one direction, holding means for rior-A mally preventing movement of said slide in the said direction, firing mechanism carried by vsaid slide, means for causing the recoil of the barrel to carry the firing mechanism and the slide into rality of projectiles and charges spaced to register with said firing points, a breech block movable to open or close the breech of said barrel, a slide movable lengthwise of the stock, a spring urging said slide to travel in one direction, holding means for. normally preventing movement of said slide in .the said direction, firing mechanism carried by said slide, means for causing the recoil of the barrel to carry the ring'mechanism and the slide into operative relation with successive firing points of the barrel as successive shots are fired, and'simultaneously to put said spring under tension, and means, controlled by the movement of the breech block to the breech-opening position, for releasing the slide from said holding means to permit the spring to restore the slide to its original position.

7. A rearrn comprising a stock, arecoil barrel movable lengthwise of said stock and having a plurality of firing points at diierent distances from the end of the barrel, said barrel being adapted to receive a cartridge containing a plurality of projectiles and charges spaced to register with said ring points, a breech block movable to open or close the breech of said barrel, ring mechanism movable lengthwise of the stock info operative relation with the several firing points of the barrel, means, operated by the 1ongitudinal movement of the barrel relatively to the stock, for bringing said firing mechanism into operative relation with successive firing points of the barrel as successive shots are red, a trigger.

controlling said firing mechanism, and. safety means, controlled bythe movement of the breech block to the breech-opening position, for locking said trigger against accidental operation.v

8. A firearm comprising a barrel having a plurality of iiring points at diierent distances from its end, ring mechanism including a hammer adapted' by its striking action to explcdedetonating charges at the several iiring points individually, said hammer being movable lengthwise of the barrel into operative relation with the several firing points thereof, and a trigger movable bodily lengthwise of the barrel and having means to carry the hammer along with the trigger in such bodily lengthwise movement into operative relation with a dierent firing point of the barrel at each successive operation of the trigger.

9. A firearm comprising a stock, a barrel carried by said stock and having a plurality of firing points at different distances from the end of the barrel, a slide movable lengthwise of the stock and barrel, mechanism including a hammer adapted by its strikingv action to explode detonating charges'at the several rlng points individually, said hammer being mounted on said slide and adapted to be carried by the movement thereof into operative relation with the several firing points of the barrel, means for causing said hammer to operate during the movement of .the slide, and a trigger movable bodily lengthwise of the stock and barrel and having means to engage said slide and shift the same in unison with such bodily lengthwise movement of the trigger to carry the hammer into operative relation with a diierent firing point of the barrel at each successive operation of the trigger. 10. A rearm comprising a stock, a recoil barrel movable lengthwise of the stock, means holding a plurality of connected projectiles in tandem on the longitudinal' axis of the barrel, firing mechanism, and means, operated by the longitudinal movement' of the barrel, for feeding the connected projectiles forwardly in the barrel t0 bring successive projectiles into operative relation ,to the ring mechanism as successive shots are fired.

11. A rearm comprising a stock, a recoil barrel movable lengthwise of the stockand adapted to receive a plurality of projectiles and charges connected in tandem fashion, ring mechanism, holding mechanism mounted on the barrel and constructed to prevent rearward movement of the projectiles relatively to the barrel While permitting forward movement of the projectiles, and feed mechanism movably mounted on the stock and operatively connected with the barrel, and engaging the connected projectiles, the operative connection of the feed mechanism with the barrel being so constructed that during the recoil of the barrel said feed mechanism will sweep rearwardly along the connected projectiles, at least the distance of one projectile length, to engage another projectile, While during the succeeding return of the barrel to itsnormal position the feed mechanism will feed the connected projectiles one projectile length forward relatively to the barrel.

12. A firearm comprising a barrel having a breech open rearwardly, means holding a plurality of connected projectiles and charges in tandem on the longitudinal axis of the barrel, means for holding one of said projectiles in a position in which it closes the breech of the barrel, and means for feeding the connected projectiles forwardly in the barrel to bring successive projectiles into firing position as successive shots are red.

13. A firearm comprising a barrel adapted to receive a plurality of projectiles and charges connected in tandem fashion, means for holding'one .of said projectilesin a position in which it closes the breech of the barrel, and means, operated Vautomatically every time a shot is i'lred, for feeding the connected projectiles forwardly in the lbarrel to bring successive projectiles into ring position as successive shots are fired.

14. A firearm comprising a barrel having a breech open rearwardly, means holding a plurality of projectiles in tandem on the longitudinal axis of the barrel, means for holding one of said projectiles in a position in which it closes the breech of the barrel, and means for feeding the said projectiles in unison forwardly in the barrel to bring successive projectiles into ring position.

15. A firearm comprising a barrel having a breech open rearwardly,v means holding a plurality of projectiles in tandem on the longitudinal axis of the barrel, means for holding one of said projectiles in a position in which it closes the breech of the barrel, and means, operated automatically every time a shot is red, for feeding the said projectiles in unison forwardly in the barrel to bring successive projectiles into firing position.

16. A rearm comprising a barrel having a breech open rearwardly, means holding a plurality of projectiles in tandem on the longitudinal axis of the barrel, means for holding one of said projectiles in a position in which it closes the breech of the barrel, and means for feeding the said projectiles in unison axially through the open breech of the barrel to bring successive projectiles into ring position.

17. A rearm comprising a barrel having a plurality of firing points at different distances from the end of the barrel, said barrel being adapted to receive a cartridge containing a plurality of projectiles and charges spaced to register with said firing points, ring mechanism movable lengthwise into operative relation with the several firing points of the barrel, and means, operated by the discharge of the rearm, for bringing said firing mechanism into operative relation with successive iring points of the barrel as successive shots are red.

18. A firearm comprising a barrel, means holding a plurality of projectiles in tandem on the longitudinal axis of the barrel, ring mechanism including a single firing pin, means for effecting relative lengthwise movement to establish vsuccessively an operative relation between the said firing pin and the several projectiles, and means for causing the several projectiles to be red successively by the same ring pin as the latter is in operative relation with the respective individual projectiles.

19. A rearm comprising a barrel, means holding a plurality of projectiles in tandem on the longitudinal axis of the barrel, ring mechanism including a single ring pin, and means for effecting relative lengthwise movement to establish successively an operative relation between the said firing pin and the several projectiles.

GUSTAV TAUSCHEK.

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US2419371A (en) * 1939-02-02 1947-04-22 Schlumberger Marcel Cartridge
US2897757A (en) * 1955-07-15 1959-08-04 Jacob J Kulluck Gun cartridge
US3139795A (en) * 1962-05-24 1964-07-07 Altschuler Samuel Tandem loaded firing tubes
US3169333A (en) * 1963-06-14 1965-02-16 Jr John J Scanlon Projectile for firing a leakproof caseless round
US3395478A (en) * 1962-03-02 1968-08-06 Army Usa Rifle mounted auxiliary firearm and multiprojectile cartridge therefor
US3416252A (en) * 1963-04-02 1968-12-17 Army Usa Combination firing and ejecting mechanism for a grenade launcher
US3421244A (en) * 1962-03-02 1969-01-14 Us Army Firing mechanism for a rifle mounted auxiliary firearm
US3571961A (en) * 1968-10-07 1971-03-23 Sako Ab Oy Firing mechanism with a rearwardly activated firing pin
US3854231A (en) * 1968-09-26 1974-12-17 H Broyles Electrically fired multiple barrel superimposed projectile weapon system
US3952658A (en) * 1968-09-26 1976-04-27 Broyles Howard F Electrically fired superimposed projectile
US4035943A (en) * 1975-04-14 1977-07-19 Bruno Civolani Radial percussion arrangement for firearms using self-propelling ammunition with peripherial priming
US4285153A (en) * 1979-05-07 1981-08-25 Crouch Alferd H Weapon
WO1998039614A1 (en) * 1997-03-03 1998-09-11 Jim Powers Repeating small arms utilizing stacked caseless cartridges
EP0932806A1 (en) * 1996-10-23 1999-08-04 O'DWYER, James Michael Cannon for axially fed rounds with breeched round sealing breech chamber
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US6715398B2 (en) 1994-03-14 2004-04-06 Metal Storm Limited Barrel assembly for firearms
US20040069173A1 (en) * 2002-10-15 2004-04-15 Mark Key Projectile for rapid fire gun
US20040093783A1 (en) * 1995-07-19 2004-05-20 O'dwyer James Michael Weapon with recoil damping
US20050043101A1 (en) * 2003-08-21 2005-02-24 Less Lethal, Inc. Bean bag baton
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US2419371A (en) * 1939-02-02 1947-04-22 Schlumberger Marcel Cartridge
US2897757A (en) * 1955-07-15 1959-08-04 Jacob J Kulluck Gun cartridge
US3421244A (en) * 1962-03-02 1969-01-14 Us Army Firing mechanism for a rifle mounted auxiliary firearm
US3395478A (en) * 1962-03-02 1968-08-06 Army Usa Rifle mounted auxiliary firearm and multiprojectile cartridge therefor
US3139795A (en) * 1962-05-24 1964-07-07 Altschuler Samuel Tandem loaded firing tubes
US3416252A (en) * 1963-04-02 1968-12-17 Army Usa Combination firing and ejecting mechanism for a grenade launcher
US3169333A (en) * 1963-06-14 1965-02-16 Jr John J Scanlon Projectile for firing a leakproof caseless round
US3952658A (en) * 1968-09-26 1976-04-27 Broyles Howard F Electrically fired superimposed projectile
US3854231A (en) * 1968-09-26 1974-12-17 H Broyles Electrically fired multiple barrel superimposed projectile weapon system
US3571961A (en) * 1968-10-07 1971-03-23 Sako Ab Oy Firing mechanism with a rearwardly activated firing pin
US4035943A (en) * 1975-04-14 1977-07-19 Bruno Civolani Radial percussion arrangement for firearms using self-propelling ammunition with peripherial priming
US4285153A (en) * 1979-05-07 1981-08-25 Crouch Alferd H Weapon
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US20050188833A1 (en) * 1994-03-14 2005-09-01 O'dwyer James M. Projectile and method for sealing a projectile in a barrel
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US8109212B2 (en) * 2000-05-15 2012-02-07 Metal Storm Limited Sleeved projectiles
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US20050268807A1 (en) * 2002-04-19 2005-12-08 Bambach Ramon J Projectile sealing arrangement
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US7395762B2 (en) 2002-10-15 2008-07-08 Key Mark B Projectile for rapid fire gun
US6862996B2 (en) 2002-10-15 2005-03-08 Mark Key Projectile for rapid fire gun
US20040069173A1 (en) * 2002-10-15 2004-04-15 Mark Key Projectile for rapid fire gun
US20060011088A1 (en) * 2002-10-15 2006-01-19 Key Mark B Projectile for rapid fire gun
US9448026B2 (en) 2003-02-10 2016-09-20 Defendtex Pty. Ltd. Selectable kinetic energy of projectiles
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US20050043101A1 (en) * 2003-08-21 2005-02-24 Less Lethal, Inc. Bean bag baton
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