US2074912A - Well - Google Patents

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US2074912A
US2074912A US1624235A US2074912A US 2074912 A US2074912 A US 2074912A US 1624235 A US1624235 A US 1624235A US 2074912 A US2074912 A US 2074912A
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casing
well
container
oil
pump
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Charles H Hutto
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Charles H Hutto
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/12Methods or apparatus for controlling the flow of the obtained fluid to or in wells

Description

March 23, 1937. C. H, HUTTo 2,074,932

WELL

Filed April 13, 1935 2 Sheets-Sheet l Patentedl Mar. 23, 1937 y UNITED STATES PATENT VOFFICE Claims.

My invention comprises a. well of novel construction and a new method of constructing the same. Although my invention is especially for oil production, it is not confined to this use and 5. may be employed for pumping water or other subterranean fluids that it is desired to bring to the surface. In the application of my invention to oil Awells it solves certain pumping problems not previously overcome'by prior art devices and for this reason the use of my new well construction results in a new method of pumping oil and this constitutes one phase of my invention.

I construct my well in a manner to convey the oil from the oil bed to the surface by passage through the casing which is conventionally present in prior art wells. By this means I eliminate the expensivetubing which, inthe prior art, is positioned inside the casing and is used for conveying the oil to the surface. The casing, constituting a passage larger in diameter than ordieXpeIlSe.

nary, presents less resistance to the work of pumping. In addition to these advantages I provide a simpler and lessexpensive method of dismantling and assembling the well than is known in the prior art.

In the prior art the tubing, in addition to serving as a conveyor for the oil, functions as a connecting rod between the pumping engine walking beam and the pump piston. Therefore, in re- 30 moving the pump elements it is necessary to disciable length of time.

My pump permits the use of a cable connection between the piston and the pumping engine walking beam. Therefore, less expensive and more portable equipment can be used for dismantling and assemblying the well and the operao0 from the casing back into the oil bed between the tion can be easily performed by the well attendant, commonly known as the pumper, in much less time than `has been found necessary in prior art practice. I

There are a number of novel features of my invention which permit me to accomplish these advantages.

I provide a seal between the casing and the subterranean pump. Thus, the oil is contained within the casing from the pump to the surface but it is confined within the pump from the level where it is joined to the casingdownward into the oil bed., The seal will not permit the oil to pass (Cl. 10S-179) pump and the casing. This seal is of novel construction.

I also construct the pump as a plurality of unitary elements each readily and freely removable from the well apart from the other elements. In dismantling the well, according to my invention, I do not endanger the future production of the well and I do this by the use of an element new in well construction which functions to contain the oil in the casing independent of the pump and which I, therefore,term a' container. Integral with the container I provide a standing valve. This standing valve also serves the additional purpose of being available and in operation in the event of the failure of the standing valve which I provide as part of the pumpvas in prior art practice.v This standing Valve of the container is, for this purpose, auxiliary to the primary standing valve of the pump. 'I'his is important in that the failure of a standing valve in the prior art practice causes the column of oil in the conveyor tubing to drop onto the oil bed, injure the bed and reduce its future production by creating aback pressure.

The pump elements are especially constructed to facilitate assembling and dismantling the well and a novel tool, of a structure to cooperate with the specially constructed pump elements, contributes to this purpose.

The various advantages as hereinbefore stated will be clear to those skilled in the art from the detailed description of the invention to follow' Fig. 1 presents a cross-sectional elevation of the well with the new pump in position.

Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken on line 2 2 of Fig. 1,

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view similar to Fig. 2, taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 1.

Figs. 4 and 5 are cross-esctional views in elevation, similar to Fig. 1, showing the operation of the tool used in dismantling and assembling the well. v

In Fig. 1 there is shown the'bottom of an oil well. In the construction of the well it was first drilled to the depth to be occupied by the casing I. The casing I, which can be of usual construction, was then positioned to extend from the surface of the oil field to a level above the oil bed 2 but near it within the limits of oil well construction. The casing was then sealed with cement 3 to prevent water or other uids from owing from the upper soil into the oil bed to impair it. The well was then dug from the lower extremity of the casing into the 'oil bed 2. The perforated liner '4 was then positioned to extend from the bottom of the casing I into the oil bed, as seen in Fig. l. The per- -forated liner functions to strain the o il out of The well, as described thus far, may be of usual construction. In fact, my invention is applicable to wells of long use by simply replacing the prior vart'pump with my novel pump.

'Ihe well, in the condition described, is ready to be equipped with a. pumping means for lifting the oil to the surface.Y The pump I use for this purpose consists of the working chamber, indicated generally by the reference numeral 5, and

the piston 8. The piston I prefer to use includes a, so called, working valve 1, and, similar to common construction, it is one way in its action to give the oil passage through the piston out of the working chamber. However, instead of using the usual tubing for conveying the oil to the surface, I pump the oil directly into the casing as a passage to convey the oil to the surface.

I use the cable 28 as the power connection between the pumping engine walking beam and the piston. Accordingly, I connect the piston to the cable 29 by means-of the rod 88 which is large enough to cause the piston to fall of its own weight. As in common practice, the valve 1 opens on the down stroke of the piston to permit the passage of the oil,..and closes on the up stroke of the piston to seal it for lifting the oil, at the same time vdrawing more oil into the working chamber.

The working chamber consists of a working barrel 8, which fits loosely in the casing I and the container 26 hereinafter described, and includes the cylinder 8 in which the piston works. At the top of the working barrel is the bell shaped guide I8 which is beveled as shown at I2 to direct the piston unimpaired into the cylinder when it is being lowered into the well to assemble the pump. The guide I0, on its outer periphery, provides a flange that overlaps the container. The bell shaped guide I 8 is attached to the cylinder 9 by screw threads I8 or, instead of being attached directly to the cylinder, it may be joined to the cylinder by intermediate pipe to add length. This additional length is sometimes necessary to extend the working chamber from the casing, which is ab'ove the level of the oil bed, to a`level Within the limits of the o il bed because of the distance between the bottom of the casing and the oil bed. The intermediate pipe is of similar construction to the cylinder but itsinner surface need not be polished.

It will be noted that, contrary to conventional construction, the cylinder is open at its upper end and thus the piston is unhindered and can free passage into operative position in the well and out.

Attached to the lower end of the cylinder 9, as by threads I4, is the standing valve, generally indicated by the numeral I5. It consists of the drum I6 with the valve seat I'I and the poppet I8. On the upstroke of the piston the poppet I8 lifts against the action of the spring I9 to permit the oil to pass into the cylinder 8. In operation, the poppet rides in the guide. 20 which is perforated as shown in Fig. 3 to permit the passage of oil through the valve from below. On 75 the downstroke of the piston the poppet I8 seats,

the sand and permit it to pass into 'the pump.v

be'freely removed from the well without impair.

aided by the action of the spring I8, to seal the lower end of the working chamber.

The poppet is equipped with a flanged button 2| and the drum has a iiange 2i. 'These elements function in the assembling and disassembling of the well and will be discussed more at length hereinafter.

Between the working barrel and the casing I provide the fluid-tight packing seal 24, 2l which prevents the oil from passing below this level in the casing and positions the working chamber, which otherwise is suspended loosely in the container 28, stably withinV the well. When the well is inproduction there is a column of oil in the casing from this level to the surface of the ileld. The seal consists of two rings of rubber, lead or other pliable material which spreads under the weight of the working barrel. The lower ring 24 sets upon the container 28, the upper `ring 25 fits around the bell shaped guide I0,

which overlaps the container 28 for this purpose. and the two rings meet along the beveled surface 21, as shown. The working chamber, in position in the well, rests on the container 26 with the packing 24, 25 confined between the top edge of the container 26, the casing I and the flanged guide I0. The beveled surfaces 21 act to facilitate the spreading of the rings and also permit them to separate readily in disassembling the well.

I provide a container, indicated generally by the reference numeral 26, which functions to close the lower endl of and contain the column of oil -within the casing I when the pump 5, including the piston 8, and the working barrel 8 and the standing valve I5, are removed from the well. 'I'he container 28 fits loosely in the casing I and liner 4 and includes the tubing 28 which extends from the casing, which is at a level above the level of the fluid bed, to a level far enough with- I in the limits of the fluid bed to permit the pump 5 to extend into the fluid bed. Attached to the tubing 26', below the lower extremity of the workingbarrel 8 and the standing valve I5, the tubing 28' being extended long enough for this purpose, I provide the'standing valve 28 which, in addition to closing the lower end of the container, operates auxiliary to standing valve Il.

The auxiliary standing valve 28 is similar to the standing valve I 5. It consists of the drum I8'. valve seat I1', and poppet I8. The poppet'rides in the guide 20 and is equipped with the ilanged button 2|. The drum I8 is provided with the flange 23'. The dimensions ofthe elements inside the drum I8', the inside dimensions of the drum itself and, especially, the dimensions of the button 2|' and the flange 23' are the same as or similar to corresponding elements of the standing valve I5. This permits the'use of the same tool for removing and applying either valve fromV or to the well. i

The auxiliary valve is joined to the casing by tubing 28 and is sealed by means of fluid-tight packing rings 24', 25' which are similar to the rings 24,125 and function in the same manner. The rings 24', 25 spread under the weight oi the container 28, which ts loosely in the casing I and liner 4, to position the container stably within the well and form a seal to prevent the oil from passing from the casing between the casing and container into the oil bed when the pump 5 has been removed from the well.

Referring now to Figs. 4 and'5, the attention is directed to the tool indicated generally by the numeral 3|. It comprises the rod 82, the dogs 34 and the hooked lingers 35. The dogs 34 are in constant engagement with the springs 36 lwhich tend to holdy them extended outwardly in the position shown in Fig. i. I'he springs are guided in the slots el of the shoulder 38 of the rod 32. 'I'he dogs 34 are"'provided with cam surfaces 3@ which engage the upper edge of the drum l5, as clearly seen in Fig. 4, to cause the dogs 35i to retract against the action of the springs 35 until they pass below the range oi the ange or shoulder 23. The springs at then extend the dogs outwardly into iatching engagement with the `shoulder 23.

is the tool advances into the drum iii vthe hooks L32 of the fingers 35a engage the button 2i and they spread until they fall beneath the flange or shoulder Si ih latching engagement therewith. The fingers 35 are pivoted at i3 and have the upwardly extending triggers iii which extend into the paths of the dogs 3Q and are actuated, when the dogs retract, to spread the hooks l2 to disengage them from the shoulder di. As

shown, the shoulder t@ extends below the dogs 3ft to form a protecting apron tl for the fingers 35. The apron ill is vprovided with the beveled surface i5 which functions to guide the tool into the working barrel t by cooperatingl with the surface i2 and from the working barrel into the drum it.

The tubing #it nts loosely over the cable 2t? and is so positioned whenever the tool 8l is attached to the cable. Whenever the tool is in the weil in engagement with. thesta/nding valve, either i5 or 2t, the tubing t6 can be dropped into thedwell where it falls to rest on the shoulder 38. In this position it has actuated the springs 36 and thus has retracted the dogs 3d out of engagement with the shoulder 23 and the fingers 35 out oi engagement with the flanged button 2i. By this means the tool has been released from the standing valve and'can be drawn from the well leaving the stand ing valve in the well.

The well is constructed in this manner. Presuming that the well has been drilled and the casing i, sealed with cement 3, has been positioned in the well and the perforated liner t positioned in the Well. equipped with apump. The well, inthe condition stated, may be one newly constructed or one that has been operated according to prior art practice and is now to be equipped in accordance with my invention. The cable 29 is rst passed through the tubing it and is then attached to the tool 3i. The ring 25' is positioned on the container 26 and the ring 2t is positioned over it. The tool 3i is now attached to the valve 28 with the dogs 3d engaging the flange 23' and the hooks Q2 engaging the buttonl. 'Ihe tool is now lowered into the well carrying with it the lower standing valve 2t and the tubing 26 as a unitary structure comprising the container 25.

' The standing valve 28 will continue into the well until the ring 2d' engages rthe top of the liner li. The container 25 is made long enough to extend from the casing i to a level well within the limits of the oil bed so that the working chamber, in its position within the container, extends to a level within the limits of the oil bed. This is readily accomplished by using a standard size tubing. The weight of the container 26 and the standing valve i5' cause the rings 24 and 25' to spread to form a stable support for the container y 2t and a fluid-tight seal between the container 2G and the casing l.

Until the container 26 has been'positioned in the well the tubing 46 has been held at the sur- The well is now ready to be face. Now it is dropped into the well and it falls until it resest on the shoulder 38. In the latter position it has released the dogs from engagement with the ange 23 and the fingers 35 from engagement with the button 2|'. This permits the tool 3l to be brought to the surface leaving the container 2E stably in position in the well.

In a similar manner the working barrel and standing valve l5, as a unitary structure comprising the working chamber, are lowered into the well. The ring '25 is positioned on the bell shaped guide l0 and the ring 2li is positioned over ring 25. The tubing i6 being positioned on the cable, the tool 3| is attached to the valve l5 with the dogst engaging the flange 23 and the fingers 35 engaging the button 2l. The valve i5 is then lowered into the well until the ring 2t rests on the top of the container 26. yThe weight of the working barrel assembly causes the rings 2t and 25 to spread coniined between the top edge of the container 26, the casing l and the iianged guide lll to position the working chamber stably within the well and form a seal between the working barrel and the casing which prevents oil from passing from the casing into the well outside the working barrel. The tool is now removed from the valve l5 in the same manner in which it was removed from valve Zt, by the use of the tubing-d6.

When .the tool'is brought to the surface, the piston is attached to the cable in its stead and the piston is lowered into the well. In its descent into the well the piston is guided into op.- erating position in the cylinder by bell shaped guide i0. The cable is now rigged up for pumping and the well is ready to produce.

It will be noted that the cylinder above the piston is open to the casing. In the down stroke of the piston the valves l5 and 28 close under the action of the springs i9 and i9' and the oil in the working chamber passes through the valve "l and through the piston 6 directly into and through the casing l. On the up stroke of the piston the valve 'l seals and the piston lllits the oil in its passage through the casing i to the surface. At the same time the piston draws oil into the working chamber 8 through thevalve i5 and the valve 2B which lift against action of the springs I9, I9' respectively acting on the two valves. one standing valve is necessary. However, if the standing valve of the ordinary well fails, there is serious danger that the well be permanently injured. At any rate, the well must be dismantled for repair and this, as brought out more fully hereinafter, involves much greater danger of impairing the future production of the well. In the use of my pump, should one of the standing valves fail, the other valve would continue in operation and production of the well would be maintained uninterrupted.

Should it ever become necessary to dismantle my new pump as, for example to make repairs, the cable is simply rigged for pulling the pump and the piston is pulled unhindered by and independent of the working chamber. In most cases this is allthat is necessary to completely repair the pump because the most frequent repair necessary is the replacement of piston packing. This repair accomplished the piston can be replaced in the well, the cable rigged for pumping and the well is .again ready for production with little trouble and at small expense and, more important, without a great hiatus in production.

In some cases when the piston has been re- In the normal operation of the well but 4 moved it will prove advisable to remove the standing valve I5 to determine the condition of the cylinder and the valve. This can be done with little trouble and loss of production. For this purpose the piston is removed from the cable and the tool 3i attached. The tool is now lowered into the well and, guided by the bell shaped guide Il and the surface 45 it will pass readily into the cylinder 8 and the drum I6. The cam surfaces 3l of the dogs 34 engaging the top of the drum will cause the dogs to retract against the action of the springs 36.- In the continued de- .scent of the tool 3i the dogs 34 will extend outwardly and be in latching engagement with the flange 23 and the fingers 35 will spread until the hooks 42 engage the flange 4I of the but-y ton 2I,

The tool is now drawn up and the hooks 42 first lift the valve I5 from its seat I'| and relieve the retarding action of the weight of the column of oil in the casing I. In addition, the removal of the cylinder does not disturb the container 26 and itspacking seal and the column of oil in the casing is not removed. In prior art wells, the removal of the pump also removes the column of oil from the pump to the surface, or else it must be permitted to fall into the well directly onto the oil bed.

While the working barrel 8 is being pulled, it will Ibe noted, the lower standing valve 28 carries the load of the column of oil, and it is not permitted to fall onto the oil bed. If the oil is permitted to fall onto the bed, it sets up a back pressure which seals the sand and impairs the future production of the well. This has been the cause of frequent injury to the wells of prior art practice.

If it is desired to remove the lower standing valve 28, this can be done without injury to the not leave a heavy column of oil to fall onto thed bed. It will be noted that the casing is free from obstruction at this stage of the dismantling of the well and there is no great problem in swabbing the well. Enough oil remains in 'the casing to prevent the air from coming into contact with the bed when the lower standing valve 28 is removed.

In the prior art practice it will be noted that, when the well is dismantled for repair, the pump in its entirety, including the working barrel, the piston and the single standing valve, are removed as a unit. T'he connecting rod to the piston constitutes the tubing that conveysv the column of oil and there is a column of air in the casing. As the tubing is parted progressively into lengths to bring the pump to the surface, the column of oil is also brought to the surface and the removal of the pump exposes the bed to the air. This causes a cooling of the bed with a resultant parafning which lowers the future production of the bed. I eliminate any danger of the oil bed being exposed to air.

I claim: l. A well comprising a casing extending from the surface of the field to a level only near to but above the level of the fluid bed for passage of thel absence of the pump and to permit the passage of fluid from the fluid bed to the casing, said pump being so positioned relative to the container that it may be removed from the well without causing the container to release the column of fluid in the casing for passage from the casing into the fluid bed.

2. A well comprising a casing extending from the surface of the fleld to a level only near to but above the level of the fluid bed for passage of pumped fluid to the surface, a container to close the lower end of the casing so constructed as to permit the passage of fluid from the fluid bed to the casing but to prevent the passage of fluid from the casing into the fluid bed and extending from the casing to a level within the limits of the fluid bed, a pump within the well extending to a level within the limits of the fluid bed for pumping fluid from the fluid bed into and through the casing, means for removing the pump from the well, the pump being extended into the container and positioned in such a manner that the removal of the pump from Ythe well may be effected without causing the container to release the column of fluid in the casing for passage from the casing into the fluid bed.

3. A well comprising a casing extending from the surface of the fleld to a level only near to but above the level of the fluid bed for passage of the pumped fluid to the surface, a container to close the lower end of the casing so constructed as to permit the passage of fluid from the fluid bed to the casing but to prevent the passage of fluid from the casing into the fluid bed and extending from the casing to a level within the limits of the fluid bed, a pump within the well comprising a working chamber and a piston extending to a level within the limits of the fluid bed for pumping fluid from the fluid bed into and through the casing, means for removing the piston from the well independent of the working lchamber, the working chamber comprising a cylinder open at its upper end to permit unhindered insertion and removal of the piston, means for removing the working chamber from the well, the working chamber being extended into the container and positioned in such a manner that the removal of the working chamber from the well may be effected without causing the container to release the column of fluid in the casing for passage from the casing into the fluid bed.

4. A well comprising a casing extending from the surface of the field to a level only near to but above the level of the fluid bed for passage of the pumped fluid to the surface, a container to close the lower end of the casing so constructed as to permit the passage of fluid from the fluid bed to the casing but to prevent the passage of fluid from the casing into the fluid bed and extending from the casing to a level within the limits of the fluid bed, a fluid-tight seal between the container and the casing, a pump within the well extending from the casing to a level within the .limits of the fluid bed for pumping fluid from the fluid bed into and through the casing and comprising a working chamber and a piston, means for removing the piston from the well independent of the working chamber, the working chamber comprising a cylinder open at its upper f working chamber from the well, the pump being extended into the container and positioned in such a manner that the removal of the pump from the well may be effected without causing the container to release the column of uid in the casing for passage from the casing into the fluid bed.

5. A well comprising a casing extending from the surface of the eld to a level only near to but above the level of the uid bed for passage of the pumped fluid to the surface, `a container to close the lower end of the casing so constructed as to permit thepassage of iiuid from the fluid bed to the casing but to prevent the passage of fluid from the casing into the fluid bed and extending from the casing to a level within the limits of the fluid bed, a pump within the well extending to a level within the limits -of the iiuid bed for pumping iiuid from the iiuid bed I into and through the casing, means for removing the pump .from the well, the pump being extended into tlie container and positioned in such a manner that the removal of the pump from the well may be effected without causing the container to release the column of iiuid in the casing for passage from the casing into the uid Y bed, means for removing the container from the well, the means ior removing the pump and the container being similar in dimensions to permit the use of the same tool for removing both elements. i,

6. A well comprising a casing extending from the surface of the eld to a level only near to but above the level of the fluid bed for passage of the pumped iuid to the surface, a container to close the lower end of the casing to prevent the passage of uid from the casing into the uid lbed and comprising a tubing extending from the casing to a level within the limits of the uid bed and a standing valve at the lower end of the tubing which opens to permit the passage of iluid from the uid bed to the container and closes to prevent the passage of fluid back into the fluid bed, a pump within the well extending to a level within the limits of the uid bed for pumping fluid from the uid bed into and through the casing and comprising a working' chamber and a piston, means for removing the piston from lthe well independent of the workingout causing the container to release the columnl of iiuid within the casing for passage from the casing int'o the fluid bed, means embodied in the standing valve of the container for removing the container from the well, the standing valves of the working chamber and the container being oi similar dimensions to permit the use oi' the same tool for removing both elements.

'1. A well comprising a casing extending from the surface of the field to a levelnear to but above the level of the uid bed for passage of.

the pumped uid to the surface, a container to close the lower end of the casing comprising a tubing fitting loosely within the casing and extending from the casing to a level within the limits of the uid bed, a duid-tight seal between the casing and the container to prevent the passage of uid from the casing to the fluid bed, a pump for pumping the uid from the iiuid bed into and throughthe casing and comprising a working chamber and a piston, the working chamber fitting loosely in the casing, extending from the casing into the container to a level Within the limits of the uid bed and comprising a cylinder tting loosely within the container and open at its end to permit the unimpairedbinsertion and removal of the piston, a ange at the upper end of the cylinder overlapping the container and a packing confined between the upper edge of the container, the casing andthe iiange for resting the working chamber on the container in stable position within the well, means for removing the piston from the well independent of the working chamber, means for removing the working chamber from the well without disturbing the container and its seal, ,means for removing the container from the well, the means for removing the working chamber and the container being of similar dimensions to permit the use of the same tool for removing both elements.

8. A Well consisting of a casing a`nd a subterranean pump, the pump comprising a working chamber within the space described by the inside periphery of the casing, the working chamber consisting of an upright cylinder open to the casing at its upper end, a piston and a first ,standing valve for passage of the oil into the cylinder, a fluid-tight seal between the Working chamber and the casing to prevent the passage,

rst standing valve, operable simultaneous with but independent of it, the second standing valve forming a unit separate .from the ilrst standing valve and positioned within the space described by the inside periphery of the casing, a fluidtight seal between the second standing valve and the casing to prevent the passage of oil from the casing into the oil bed, means embodied in the second standing valve to facilitate its removal from the well, the means for removing the iirst and second standing valves being of like construction to permit the use of the same tool.

9. A wellconsisting of a casing,- a subterranean pump and a container, the pump being positioned within the space described by the inside periphery of the casing and comprising a working barrel, a piston and a rst standing valve, the working barrel consisting of an upright cylinder open to the casing at its upper end, the iirst standing valve being positioned at the lower end of the cylinder to permit the passage oi' the pumped iiuid-into the cylinder and forming a unitary structure with the cylinder, means embodied in this structure to facilitate its removal from the well without disturbing the container, the container comprising a tubing between the pump and lthe fluid bed and'a second standing valveauxiliary to the ilrst standing valve and operable simultaneously with but independent'of it, and a duid-tight seal between the container and the casing.

10. In awell as claimed in claim 9, means embodied in the auxiliary standing valve to facilitate its removal from the well.

CHARLES H. HUTTO.

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Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2432028A (en) * 1943-06-02 1947-12-02 Lamtex Equipment Corp Insert apparatus for oil well casings
US2674198A (en) * 1951-12-07 1954-04-06 Charles P Howe Method of pumping oil under pressure without the loss of gas
US2702598A (en) * 1951-12-06 1955-02-22 Ben Weingart Packer for wells
US3384179A (en) * 1966-03-16 1968-05-21 Marcus W. Haines Combined anchor and pump shoe
US3897824A (en) * 1974-09-05 1975-08-05 Cameron Iron Works Inc Blowout preventer testing apparatus
US4382623A (en) * 1980-08-19 1983-05-10 Tri-State Oil Tool Industries, Inc. Apparatus for retrieving fluid plug
US5456312A (en) * 1986-01-06 1995-10-10 Baker Hughes Incorporated Downhole milling tool
US5605366A (en) * 1994-11-23 1997-02-25 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. External pulling tool and method of operation
US5639135A (en) * 1994-11-23 1997-06-17 Enterra Oil Field Rental Fishing tool and method of operation
US5873411A (en) * 1997-04-07 1999-02-23 Prentiss; John Gilbert Double acting reciprocating piston pump
US6209637B1 (en) 1999-05-14 2001-04-03 Edward A. Wells Plunger lift with multipart piston and method of using the same
US6467541B1 (en) 1999-05-14 2002-10-22 Edward A. Wells Plunger lift method and apparatus
US6719060B1 (en) 2002-11-12 2004-04-13 Edward A. Wells Plunger lift separation and cycling
US20050022994A1 (en) * 2003-07-30 2005-02-03 Conocophillips Company Well chemical treatment utilizing plunger lift delivery system
US20070039739A1 (en) * 2003-07-30 2007-02-22 Conocophillips Company Well chemical treatment utilizing plunger lift delivery system with chemically improved plunger seal
US20100294507A1 (en) * 2009-05-22 2010-11-25 Integrated Production Services Ltd. Plunger lift

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2432028A (en) * 1943-06-02 1947-12-02 Lamtex Equipment Corp Insert apparatus for oil well casings
US2702598A (en) * 1951-12-06 1955-02-22 Ben Weingart Packer for wells
US2674198A (en) * 1951-12-07 1954-04-06 Charles P Howe Method of pumping oil under pressure without the loss of gas
US3384179A (en) * 1966-03-16 1968-05-21 Marcus W. Haines Combined anchor and pump shoe
US3897824A (en) * 1974-09-05 1975-08-05 Cameron Iron Works Inc Blowout preventer testing apparatus
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US7451823B2 (en) 2003-07-30 2008-11-18 Conocophillips Company Well chemical treatment utilizing plunger lift delivery system with chemically improved plunger seal
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