US2065265A - Oil burner - Google Patents

Oil burner Download PDF

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Publication number
US2065265A
US2065265A US651989A US65198933A US2065265A US 2065265 A US2065265 A US 2065265A US 651989 A US651989 A US 651989A US 65198933 A US65198933 A US 65198933A US 2065265 A US2065265 A US 2065265A
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Prior art keywords
air
burner
fuel
pot
fire
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Expired - Lifetime
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US651989A
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Oscar L Bock
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Oscar L Bock
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D5/00Burners in which liquid fuel evaporates in the combustion space, with or without chemical conversion of evaporated fuel
    • F23D5/02Burners in which liquid fuel evaporates in the combustion space, with or without chemical conversion of evaporated fuel the liquid forming a pool, e.g. bowl-type evaporators, dish-type evaporators
    • F23D5/04Pot-type evaporators, i.e. using a partially-enclosed combustion space
    • F23D5/045Pot-type evaporators, i.e. using a partially-enclosed combustion space with forced draft

Description

Dec. 2.2, 1936. o, L, BOCK 2,065,265

' OIL BURNER Filed Jan. 16, 1933 Patented Dec. 22, 19336 UNITED STATE-S PATENT CFFICE 1 Claim.

This invention relates to oil burners, and t the structure for introducing fuel to the hearth of said burners.- This application vis a. continuation in part. of application Serial No. 601,697, led March 28, i932, patented April 2 8, 1936, No.

2,038,522, as to all subject matter common to these two applications.

The primary object of the invention is to provide a new and eiiicient burner having certain parts thereof located in a particular position to increase the efficiency of the burner, and to prevent the clogging or carbonizing of the fuel inlet supply line.

A further object is to provide a new and improved oil burner by locating the fuel supply line in a particular position tol deliver fuel to the heated combustion zone, but at the same time have the fuel line removed from the heated combustion zone and above the said zone and adjacent the air stream so that the burner hearth may at all times attain a heat suflicent to vaporize the oil, and still prevent the heat from coming in close contact with the fuel line and .clogging the fuel line by carbonization.

Numerous 4other objects and advantages will be apparent throughout the progress of the following specification.

The accompanying drawing illustrates a selected embodiment of the invention and the views therein are as follows:

Fig. 1 is a detail sectional View of one type of burner and embodying the invention.

Fig. 2 is a detail sectional view of another type of burner and having the invention applied thereto.

Fig. 3 is another modified form of burner showing the invention.

Fig. 4 is a detail sectional view of a part of the burner shown in Fig. 3 showing additional cooling means for the inlet supply line.

Fig. 5 is a detail sectional View on the line 5-5 of Figwl.

Fig. 6 is a detail sectional view of another modified form of burner embodying the invention and provided with a clean-out rod.

. The burner shown in Fig. l comprises an outer casing or jacket I0 which is preferably cylindrical and has an integral spout or a pipe II operatively connected thereto, and this spout or pipe II provides means for delivering an air supply to the burner, suitable means, not shown, being in communication with the pipe to deliver air thereto. A fire-pot I2 is arranged in the jacket I0 and concentric therewith as clearly shown in Fig. 1. The pot I2 is provided with an upper peripheral flange I 3 which rests upon an inwardly extending ring or other suitable supporting means I4 projecting inwardly from the inner side walls of the casing I0. V'I'he fire-pot I2 is also spaced from the bottom I 5 of the casing to permit air to 5 circulate about the bottom as well as the side walls of the nre-pot. Holes or openings I6 are provided in the side walls of the fire-pot so that the air passing thereabout will flow through the holes and provide air to the burner to assist combustion. l0

A central air ue I1 extends upwardly in the fire-pot and is located concentrically thereof.

A pipe or riser I 8 is mounted on top of the flue I 1 and has an outwardly bulging surface I9 intermediate its upper and lower ends and near the top of the ue I'I so that air passing from the pipe line I I and through the flue I I may be discharged through the holes provided in the bulging surface I9 of the stack or riser. The upper end of the riser extends a predetermined distance above the upper edge of the fire-pot and is provided with an opening 2I at its upper end through which air passes from the flue I'I and riser or stack I8. The air coming through the opening 2I in the stack or riser provides additional air to complete combustion. and to give the ame an outward and upward spread.

Therue II may be provided with an elongated boss 22 which is provided with a' drilled opening 23. A fuel supply pipe line 24 is arranged in the 30 air pipe line I I and communicates with the opening 23. A spout 25 communicates with the pasrsage 23 and is arranged above the bed of the burner so as to keep it out of the direct combustion zone. This spout 25 is also so positioned that air coming through the apertures or openings 26 in the riser will come in'contact with the outlet or spout 25 and cool the same. Loose refractory material 26 may be arranged in the bot- 40 tom ofthe fire-pot. The fuel from the spout 25 will flow onto the refractory material 26 and burnthereon. However, the air coming through the openings 26 will tend to force the flames outwardly from the central stack. A refractory ring 21 is arranged about the inner side walls of the re-potnear the bottom thereof, as shown in Fig. 1, to assist in vaporizing the fuel as, during operation of the burner, this outer ring will become very hot. An upper inwardly extending peripheral refractory ring 26 is mounted on the upper edge of the fire-pot and projects inwardly about the side walls thereof a predetermined distance.

The fuel pipe line 26 is shown entering the lower central portion of the fire-pot. 'I'he fuel 55 flows through the pipe linel 2.4 and through the drilled passage 23 and drops out of the end of the spout 25, from which point it will flow into the vaporizing zone of the burner. 'Ihe outlet 25 is located in the air stream, air coming through the holes in the lower portion of the central riser or stack. 'Ihe outlet 25 is also arranged between .the air stream and the hot vaporizing area. Consequently, this outlet is kept relatively cool, while the vaporizing surface is allowed to reach a temperature high enough to effect complete vaporization of the fuel burned.

'I'he burner in Fig. 2 comprises a fire-pot 30 which has an air line 3| leading to a concentrically arranged flue 32 which extends upwardly from the base 33 of the fire-pot a predetermined distance as indicated by the numeral 34. This present burner is of the double wall type, having an outer wall 35 and a spaced inner wall 36, each of which are preferably made of refractory material and integrally connected. The inner wall 36 comprises a plurality of spaced fingers 31 which extend upwardly abruptly from an annular oil groove 38 formed in the refractory bottom 39. Inwardly ofl the groove 38 Athe refractory bottom is pitched outwardly, as indicated at 40.

An inverted dome-shaped member 4| ts over the top of the ue 32 and is provided with a plurality of air outlets 42'. An oil supply pipe line 43 is arranged in the air pipe line 3| and has a goose-neck spout 44 connected at its upper endV for depositing liquid hydrocarbon into the oil grove 38. The outlet 44 is positioned immediately in front of an air outlet 42 so that air coming in through the Vpipe line 3| will pass through the flue 32 and then through the outlets 42 by the inverted dome-shaped member 41|.

'Ihe same principle exists in this latter construction as 'in the construction shown in Fig. 1 and previously described. Oil passing through the pipeline 43 drops out through the goose-neck spout 44 and into the groove 38 which extends about the entire hearth, the oil following the groove 38 to maintain an equal level. Air is blown in from the central stack or ue about the feed pipe line 44. Combustion occurs around the outer edge of the vertical ngers 31. When the re is low, the re will burn near the bottom of the groove and toward the outer wall of the same. As the flame is increased in size, it will tend to lift itself onto the ngers 31 and burn in suspension. The refractory ngers 31 will attain a glowing heat and effect complete vaporization. The feed pipe line 44, however, will remain relatively cool because of the air passing around'it as rwell `as being cooled by the cold fuel passing through the inside of the fuel pipe line.

In Fig. 3- there is shown a very simple construction which also follows the same principles previously referred to. The burner shown in Fig. 3 comprises an outer casing 58 having an air supply pipe line or ue 5| which passes around the bottom and side walls of the fire-pot 52. The

fire-pot 52 is spaced from the bottom 53 of the casing and is concentrically spaced relative to the casing 50 to provide an air space 54 between the exterior walls of the fire-pot and the inside Walls of the casing. -The re-pot 52 is supported in position by the annular flange 56 on the casing. A refractory material annular ring 51 is supported on the top of the fire-pot and extends inwardly a predetermined distance. The re-pot is preferably made foraminous, being provided with a cated in the path of the incoming air from the adjacent air openings 58. The walls of the burner will become extremely hot, but by bringing the outlet away from the walls and placing it in the cool air stream between the point of outlet of the air and the fuel, it will be kept relatively cool and free from carbon formation. A low or small fire tends to burn in the center of the pot because of the blast of air from all the sides. High fire, however, tends to lift toward the outlet or open end of the fire-pot with little or no fire burning down into the bowl. Consequently the end of the pipe or spout 6| will not be subject to the direct heat of the flame as it is located considerably back from the flame proper in the path of the inwardly directed air.

To further enhance the cooling of the spout 6|, a plurality of converging openings 63 may be formed about the inlet 60 so that air coming through the line 5| will be directed or impinged directly against the outer Walls of the spout 6|, Figs. 4 and 5.

The burner shown in Fig. 6 comprises the outer casing 50 and the inner pot 52 which is protom of the fire pot or burner 52 at a point indicated by the numeral 1|. This refractory material does not extend above vthe lowermost row of holes 12. 'I'he fuel supply pipe line 10 is provided with a clean-out rod 13 whichv is used periodically to prevent the caking or coking of carbon about the outlet of the fuel pipe lin'e. The holes 58 extend about the supply pipe line 10 and tend to keep the mouth of the outlet of the fuel pipe line free from carbon. It has been found that the fire will burn cleaner when the fuel inlet and discharge are located above the lowermost row of holes 12.

In conventional burners, particularly in the gravity feed type, the oil is fed to the combustion chamber through a pipe which is threaded directly into the side walls or bottom of the combustion chamber. During operation, oil is fed through this pipe and flows into the chamber where it is vaporized by the radiant heat of combustion. In certain'stages Aof the operation, the walls and bottom become heated, and if given a suflicient amount of air, the fuel adjacent thereto will be completely burned., If, however, certain portions of the containing wall are not, at some time during the operating cycle, allowed to attain a temperature whichis beyond the end point of the fuel burned and consequently not receive suilcient air, residual carbon will be formed. Furthermore, suflcient air for combustion is vnot supplied to 'this area as it is generally mitted. The result is that carbon will accumulate and eventually an encrustation will be caused about the fuel outlet and produce stoppage of the oil and require periodic cleaning.

The present invention eliminates these inherent defects on account of the cooling eect on the pipe itself by the air, as well as the cooling eect of the cold oil entering the burner. The area immediately adjacent the entrance oi' the feed pipe tends to remain relatively cool, and combustion will not occur in and around this particular area.

The present invention provides a burner having means for causing the oil todrop onto the vaporizing surface from a point above the surface. Also, the oil discharge is separated from the containing walls of the combustion chamber. By placing the point of oil discharge between the incoming air and the zone of combustion, this oil will be kept cold by the air passing around it and yet allow the oil to ow into the zone of higher temperature. f

Changes may ber made lin the form, construction, and arrangement of the parts without departing from the spirit of the invention or sacricing any of its advantages, and the right is hereby reserved to make all such changes as fairly fall within the scope of the following claim.

The invention is hereby claimed as follows:

A burner comprising a iire pot having a closed bottom, and an open top, forming a combustion chamber, an air receiving chamber therein comprising an air inlet conduit, a dome shaped member enclosing said air inlet conduit and forming a downwardly extending air passage therebetween, said member being provided with a plurality of radially extending ducts for conducting currents of air from the downwardly extending passage into the combustion zone, a fuel supply pipe extending into the combustion chamber and into the path of the incoming currents of air from the radial ducts, an annular groove formed in the bottom of the combustion chamber for receiving fuel from the fuel supply pipe, an outer wall, and an inner wall spaced from the outer wall, and surrounding said annular groove,lsaid inner wall comprising a plurality of upwardly extending fingers.

vOSLJAR. L. BOCK.

US651989A 1933-01-16 1933-01-16 Oil burner Expired - Lifetime US2065265A (en)

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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2418622A (en) * 1943-06-05 1947-04-08 Perfection Stove Co Liquid fuel burning apparatus
US2423809A (en) * 1942-03-21 1947-07-08 Miller Co Ignition means for liquid fuel burners
US2423808A (en) * 1941-02-06 1947-07-08 Miller Co Method of and apparatus for burning liquid fuel
US2432143A (en) * 1943-11-13 1947-12-09 Miller Co Liquid fuel feeding and burning apparatus
US2499308A (en) * 1944-12-04 1950-02-28 Otto C Griewank Oil-burning heater
US2513551A (en) * 1947-04-17 1950-07-04 Columbus Metal Products Inc Pilot structure for vaporizing burners
US2535443A (en) * 1948-05-07 1950-12-26 John F Meyer Oil burner and mixer
US2581238A (en) * 1946-08-08 1952-01-01 Socony Vacuum Oil Co Inc Vaporizing vertical pot type oil burner
US2663366A (en) * 1953-09-16 1953-12-22 Herman R Harris Trough-type oil burner with forced combustion air supply
US3045662A (en) * 1959-02-02 1962-07-24 Kohli Benjamin Heating apparatus
US3779693A (en) * 1972-03-15 1973-12-18 N Mckenney Charcoal igniting apparatus
US4133632A (en) * 1976-06-03 1979-01-09 Daikin Kogyo Co., Ltd. Vaporizing type oil burner
EP0220356A1 (en) * 1984-05-09 1987-05-06 Scan-Development Ky Vaporizer-burner
US6419480B2 (en) * 1996-04-20 2002-07-16 Ahmad Al-Halbouni Method and apparatus for providing low level Nox and CO combustion
US20150090246A1 (en) * 2013-10-01 2015-04-02 International Clean Energy Solutions, Ltd. Cooking stove

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2423808A (en) * 1941-02-06 1947-07-08 Miller Co Method of and apparatus for burning liquid fuel
US2423809A (en) * 1942-03-21 1947-07-08 Miller Co Ignition means for liquid fuel burners
US2418622A (en) * 1943-06-05 1947-04-08 Perfection Stove Co Liquid fuel burning apparatus
US2432143A (en) * 1943-11-13 1947-12-09 Miller Co Liquid fuel feeding and burning apparatus
US2499308A (en) * 1944-12-04 1950-02-28 Otto C Griewank Oil-burning heater
US2581238A (en) * 1946-08-08 1952-01-01 Socony Vacuum Oil Co Inc Vaporizing vertical pot type oil burner
US2513551A (en) * 1947-04-17 1950-07-04 Columbus Metal Products Inc Pilot structure for vaporizing burners
US2535443A (en) * 1948-05-07 1950-12-26 John F Meyer Oil burner and mixer
US2663366A (en) * 1953-09-16 1953-12-22 Herman R Harris Trough-type oil burner with forced combustion air supply
US3045662A (en) * 1959-02-02 1962-07-24 Kohli Benjamin Heating apparatus
US3779693A (en) * 1972-03-15 1973-12-18 N Mckenney Charcoal igniting apparatus
US4133632A (en) * 1976-06-03 1979-01-09 Daikin Kogyo Co., Ltd. Vaporizing type oil burner
EP0220356A1 (en) * 1984-05-09 1987-05-06 Scan-Development Ky Vaporizer-burner
US6419480B2 (en) * 1996-04-20 2002-07-16 Ahmad Al-Halbouni Method and apparatus for providing low level Nox and CO combustion
US20150090246A1 (en) * 2013-10-01 2015-04-02 International Clean Energy Solutions, Ltd. Cooking stove
US9506656B2 (en) * 2013-10-01 2016-11-29 International Clean Energy Solutions, Ltd. Cooking stove
US10077898B2 (en) 2013-10-01 2018-09-18 International Clean Energy Solutions, Ltd. Combustion engine for burning a fuel mixture of water and alcohol

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