US2052225A - Carburetor - Google Patents

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Publication number
US2052225A
US2052225A US593288A US59328832A US2052225A US 2052225 A US2052225 A US 2052225A US 593288 A US593288 A US 593288A US 59328832 A US59328832 A US 59328832A US 2052225 A US2052225 A US 2052225A
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Prior art keywords
fuel
venturi
conduit
chamber
carburetor
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US593288A
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David E Hartshorn
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David E Hartshorn
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M19/00Details, component parts, or accessories of carburettors, not provided for in, or of interest apart from, the apparatus of groups F02M1/00 - F02M17/00
    • F02M19/08Venturis
    • F02M19/081Shape of venturis or cross-section of mixture passages being adjustable
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M9/00Carburettors having air or fuel-air mixture passage throttling valves other than of butterfly type; Carburettors having fuel-air mixing chambers of variable shape or position
    • F02M9/02Carburettors having air or fuel-air mixture passage throttling valves other than of butterfly type; Carburettors having fuel-air mixing chambers of variable shape or position having throttling valves, e.g. of piston shape, slidably arranged transversely to the passage
    • F02M9/06Carburettors having air or fuel-air mixture passage throttling valves other than of butterfly type; Carburettors having fuel-air mixing chambers of variable shape or position having throttling valves, e.g. of piston shape, slidably arranged transversely to the passage with means for varying cross-sectional area of fuel spray nozzle dependent on throttle position
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S261/00Gas and liquid contact apparatus
    • Y10S261/56Variable venturi

Description

Aug. 25, 1 936. D. E, HARTSHORNr CARBURETOR 3 SheetsfSheet l Filed Feb. 16, 1932 Aug. 25,v 1936. D. E. HARTsHoRN CARBURETOR Filed Feb. 16, 1952 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 G.ll

liti

Patented Aug.y 2s, 193e Puri-:tirA oFF/ ICE cARUnE'ron David E. Hartsliorn, Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. .input-aum February 1e, 1932., serial No. 59ans' cia. ici. etitti invention relates, to an improvement in carburetors ior internal combustion engines, or other pses. l

obiect of my improvement is to simplify the construction and adjustment oi such carburetor devices and to increase their emcieicy and reliability in operation. Further objects and advantages `will be apparent on reference .to the drawings in view-of the following specication,

relating to. this invention.

in the drawings; I t Fig. l shows diagraatically in partial cross section a possible embodiment ci the invention.

Fig. 2 shows a modification oi the mixing venturi.

ru.' t is a section on the els-i of rig. i

or it.'

Fig. d is a section on the line il-ii oi Fig. l

dit

lib

l Fig. ii shows details in a partial vertical section through a carburetor according to' this invention.

Flin 6 is a horizontal section on the line t--b oi Fig. 5. l Fig. 7 is a broken vertical section on the line 'i-lgot Fig. 5, Y

Fig. d is a section on the line F-F'of the Fig. 6, Fig. t is a section on the line i oi Fig. 5, Fig. lil is a section on the line ld-iil ofFig. 6, and Figs. li, l2 and 13 are alternative sections on line lilti of Fie. 5.

The carburetor 'in the embodimentv oi Fig. 1 s the usual dost valve chamber indicated genorally as it with the haat ll for controlling admission ci iuel trom the line i2. -'lihe usual or own details may be employed ior admittingy iuel to the me feeding the Venturi chamber indicated genery as it.

The body l5 oi' the venturi maintains its ideal tapering and proportions for the most ad-y vantageous vaporization of the iuel by employings plunger ormovable member it telescoping wit themaln body i5 of the Venturi cham- 'ihe size of parts may be proportioned. however, so that the movable member may tele scope over the other member. The movable member I6 may be linked to throttling devices through a. straight line linkage or by more sim-j ple means indicated as the hingedly mounted levers i1 andv i8. The main body i5 maybe provided with guiding extensions on which the movable member I8 may readily slide. Adjusting;7 means mounted on either member niayde termine the range' of-'movement of the movable member to avoidunintentionally throttling the engine to a stall or to avoid over speeding the engine. Guideways it in the venturi are optional. The usual heatingjacket may bev employed on the outer Venturi member.

A fuel conduit member it traverses the va- 5 porizing chamber in a line parallel to. the motion oi the movable member and is arranged in the venturi in an optimum relationship to the throat of the venturi. This is seen in Fig. 3 in cross section. A fuel conduit 2l is disposedl lo longitudinally of the member il@ to receive fuel from the oat valve chamber when needle valve c it is lifted from its seat, by one of the methods to be described later. The member te extends within the movable member iii and has a conl5 tinuous slot it or a Marly-arranged series of perforations in the upper side of the member 2li in communication with the conduit 2l. The slot may be of uniform-width'in the portion oi the member it that may be exposed in the Venturi chamber. The slot may alternatively be ofr increasing orl decreasing width as seen in Figs.

-ll and l2 and possibly longitudinally as well .ing means may be lprovided in the member it to feed the fuel slot or periorations adjacent the remote end of the member iii. A larger perforation or bore-could connect such an additional fuel conduit to the main or higher fuel conduit.

Control of the fuel flow through conduit il may -be by means of a rod it tted within the conduit il and adapted to move with the move-`v ments of the movable throttling member it. This rod mayl carry a small upstanding iin m5 to seal and sweep the slot 23 to prevent clogging. Increase in 'size of the fuel perforations or of the slot it is made available by increase in known bleedingfy Air is bubbled into the fuel streamy in controllable amounts to vary the richness or leanness of the fuel mixture passed into the Venturi stream.' Adjustability ofv the rod .25 rela tive to the 'movable member i6 may be accomplished in any :way as by a nut 2E held bye. stop 21 and threaded tocooperate with threads on the rod 25; The rod member is movable to vary the open length of conduit 2l in a. manner to comensate for changing conditions of operation such as from winter to summer. The rod 25 may have a squared end ora wedge shaped end in which latter case the rod is to be arranged with its sloped face toward the slot 23 to decrease or taper the flow of fuel inwardly from its end.

'Ihe venturi may be connected at its bottom to an air intake 30 and be provided with a drip pan 3|. The air intake may be of any of the known types including air filtering and/or optional hot spot heating.

The needle valve 22 may be lifted from its seat, sealing the end of the passageway 2|, by arotatable member 35. The lifting of needle valve 22 by member 35 may be through an adjustable connection to the throttling lever i8 arranged to vary the rate of opening, or through a choke connection such as 36 seen in Figs. 6 and 10 for. flooding the engine in cold starting. Alternatively, an independent choke inlet may be employed for flooding the venturi and the place of combustion such as the cylinders of an engine. An optional means for lifting the needle valve from its seat is seen in a vacuum connection 33 to the .intake manifold 39. The suction from the intake manifold 39 through the connection 38 operates on a piston 4U in a cylinder 4|. A spring 42 may hold the needle valve on its seat and be adjusted to the proper tension by a spider 43, movable by a threaded screw 44.

The embodiment in Fig. 2 shows tapering o'f the Venturi chamber by flare in its walls both as in Fig. 1 and at right angles to the tapering of the venturi illustrated in Fig.y 1 and Fig. 3 and additional thereto. A member H5, shown in part, constitutes a closure for the float valve chamber and is the xed member of the venturi. A member H6, shown in part, constitutes the movable plunger or throttle of the carburetor as in Fig. 2. The-carburetor of Fig. 2 connects to an intake manifold |39. The Venturi wall of plunger member H6 and the opposing wall of member ||5 may be roundedV out hollow to improve the venturi characteristics somewhat as seen in Fig. 6. The other orside Venturi walls in any embodiment of this invention would be plane to provide a reasonable fit between the fixed. member and the plunger member for sealing the Venturi chamber against undesirable leakage.'

The bleeding or bubbling of air into the fuel to aid rapid mixing and vaporization of the fuel stream into the venturi air stream is accomplished by connections somewhat as seen in Figs. 5 and 6. A iixed Venturi member 2|! and a movable or plunger Venturi member 2 I6 cooperate with a fuel conduit member 220 to produce the desired explosive mixture for power in the engine. 'I'he fuel conduit in member 22|) consists of along bore |2| variably stoppered by the rod 225.. The additional fuel conducting means 22| are in full communication with ,the bore |2| and together.

they give a large wall area for bleeding purposes. Perforations 222 slope upwardly from one inner face of this fuel conduit to open air and one vor more of these perforations or ports may be selectively open to air. The projecting member 223 bored for these perforations 222 may be shaped* to retain a fine gauze cap to prevent entry of grit or may have any suitable cover-of variable opening or openings to be used in testing the carburetor for the effects of` varying bleeding into. the carburetor. l

, It is known that for acceleration or for heavy load relatively more poweror heat is required calling for a richer f uel lmixture than for mere economical operation. A series of supplementary .bleeding inlets 3211s entering the -other face of the fuel conduit to be varably opened depending possibly on `the load'carried by the engine.' The variable opening of bleeding inlets 221 is accomplished since use is made of the fact that during acceleration or heavy load there 5 is less suction in the intake manifold and less suction in any conduit entering the intake manifold. 'I'he fall in value of the suction is `employed to decrease bleeding of air into the fuel conduit. Additional bleedingconduits 221 are 10 thus controlled to, be fully operative only for lighter loads and variably or increasingly blocked by a piston 228 when an ever richer fuel is needed for ever heavier loads. 'f

Piston 228 is shown as a hollow capped cylinder, 15 spring pressed by springf229 into a position at the extremity of control cylinder 23D. The spring 229 is of suitablevstiif'ness and its response can be varied .by a screw frame or system 232. A cap 233 threads into the cylinder and holds screw 20 frame 232 in its adjusted position. A suction conduit 234 of suitable size connects into the in take manifold to cause piston 228 to respond promptly to changes in pressure conditions at that controlling point. The various most suitable fuel mixtures are thus obtainable over a wide range of operation by proper choice in the` area of the fixed bleed openings 222 and the area range of bleed openings 221. The projecting member 231 carrying bleed holes 221 may also have gauze capping means.

The embodiment of means for variably controlling the gas flow is seen in a gas throttle member 31 having a cam surface 31| that running on a flanged rotor or wheel 312 with a fixed axis 313- presses upwardly on -a similar flanged rotor or wheel 314 on axis 315 to rock the lifting member 35| for needlevalve 322., through axis 316. The respective locations of the rotor member 314 and its supporting .shaft 315'about which it rotates can be interchanged for an arrangement such as that of Fig. 1. v

' The cam accomplishes-the variable-movement of the needle valve by the choice of cutting o r outline in its surface v31| which may have any. form either` linear as shown or curved outwardly for more rapid opening at flrst.or curved inwardly for a less rapid rate of opening at first with more rapid opening later. This latter or hollow cutting gives relatively greater flow of gas for acceleration or for greater load. The cam like gas -throttle member 311s adjustably connected to the throttlingmember such as |1 or |8 by adjusting means such as aturnbuckle 311. f 'Ifhe usual hot jacketing of the venturi to im- 55. prove vaporization. is accomplished by water jacket members. and 41. The hot water or heating medium enters the jacketmember 46, through connecting pipe 48 and passes from the member to member 41 through pipe 49. A 60,. pipe 5| carries the cooled medium to the pump of the circulating cooling systemmfor the engine. 'I'he throttle rod 225 may-havaa slot 252 for addtzignal guiding means 253 to save wearon the Fig. 11 shows the alternative type of fuel slot 23a having increasing widthoutwardlydn conduit 'member 22|la whileY Fig.;12 shows another alternative type of slot 23h in fuel conduitv member 22|Ib to accommodate different conditions or fuels 7.0..

of different grades. I

Fig. 13 shows an alternative. arrangement of fuel outlet intoethe Venturi throat witha slot or slots 23e arranged at an angle to the air blast.

An Mariam# naar. be emvlvyedbetween the l" carburetor and intake manifold fitting. 'I'his adapter can be of a size at one end to match a particular intake manifold and at the other end match a standard carburetor. Thinning and mixing of the fuel' stream can be accomplished in this adapter by circumferentially' disposed ports variably blocked by reeds secured at one end and adapted to yield at the other end to suction to admit a thin stream of air for a condition Vof increased suction. The air jets admitted give the intake mixture a sharp whirling effect. A rigid collar may be arranged to variably cover or" entirely cover these ports to limit their range of operation or render them entirely inoperative. Such a collar may be arranged to be operated from a distant point.

Changes in the present disclosure may be made by one skilled in the art without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention.

I claimz- 1. A fuel supply member with a central bore and slot means communicating to a vaporizing chamber, a throttle means for varying the area of slot in communication with the chamber and a iin on the throttle means to t in the slot and seal it or sweep the slot clean when moved relatively thereto. ,j

2. A carbureting means for internal combustion engines including means, having a Venturi chamber for mixing and vaporizing of fuel with a plunger member for varying the cross section of the vaporizing chamber, a stream lined fuel supplyconduit traversing the mixing chamber adjacent the Venturi throat, means disposed along the conduitfor admitting fuel from the conduit into the throat of the venturi and a fuel regulating rod rigid with the plunger for effectively closing or opening the fuel admitting means in` movements.

'3. A fuel supply conduit for the carbureting .means of claim 2 characterized in that the rod is adjustable relative to the plunger member.

'4. A fuel supply conduit for the carbureting means of claim 2 characterized in that the fuel conduit has a continuous slotinthe portion tol be exposed tothe mixing chamber and the fuelregulating rod has a n projecting into the slot to sweep it clean in movements longitudinally of the slot in the supply conduit.

5. In a carburetor a plunger for controlling the. size of a Venturi passageway to throttle an internal combustion enginewithA a means adapted to variably dilute the fuel by mixing in air before entering the fuel into the Venturi means through a slotted fuel conduit traversing the Venturi chamber, the slotting being of a configuration to pass the desired limited flow of the fuel mixture and disposed at the upper side of -the fuel. conduit.

6. A fuel supply means with a longitudinal vbore having slot means communicating to a chamber, a throttle means to vary the slot area communicating with said chamber and means on the throttle means arranged to sweep said slot.

'1. A fuel supply means having a Venturi type mixing chamber, a plungermember forming part 0f the Venturi chamber and arranged on movement to vary the cross sectional areas of the chamber to vary the capacity of the fuel supply means while maintaining the taper of the venturi, a fuell supply member with a fuel conduit arranged traversing the Venturi chamber and communicating therewith and means carried by the vplunger member for variably stopping the fuel conduit both internally and externally.

8. A fuel supply means having a. Venturi type mixing chamber, aplunger member forming part of the Venturi chamber and arranged to vary the cross sectional areas of' the chamber to vary the capacity of the fuel supply means without varying the taper of the venturi, a fuel supply member traversing the venturi with afuel conduit communicating with the Venturi chamber andVl means for variably throttling the fuel conduit inv linear relationship with throttling of the venturi, and both externally and internally.

9. A carburetor having a Venturi chamber pr Y vided with a plunger with its inner surfaces shaped as part ofthe venturi, a. fuel conduit and spray means telescoping within the plunger, and means cooperating with the plunger to vary the length of the vfuel column in the conduit in accordance with motions of the plunger.

10. In a. carburetor, a movable plunger for varying the size of the air passageway the plunger being shaped to form a Venturi throat when associated with the fixed portion of the carburetor, a means controlled by changes in pressure of the fuel mixture due to movements of the plunger to vary admission of air to a stream of liquid fuel,`and means traversing the Venturi throat, approximately centrally thereof for delivering the fuel mixture into the Venturi chamber.

11. A carburetor having" a movable plunger member as. an air throttle for a Venturi mixing chamber, a fuel valve member mounted on the plunger to move therewith and guide means to check tendencies of the last memberto rotate relative to the plunger member.

12. A carburetor having a Venturi chamber provided ,with a plunger with its inner surfaces shaped as part of the Venturi passageway, a fuel conduit member telescoping within the plunger and adapted to deliver fuel into said Venturi chamber and means cooperating with the plunger .to vary the length of the fuel column in the fuel conduitlfor any movement of the plunger.

13. In' combination with an intakemanifold, a carburetor having a conduit for liquid fuel, open port means of adjusted area for admission of air into the fuel stream in the fuel conduit and supplemental air admission port means communicating with the fuel conduit, said supplemental port means being closed or variable in area under control of the changing pressures in the intake manifold to have increased area for low pressure conditions in the manifold and to vhave reduced area for increased pressure in the manifold to enrich the fuel at higher loads.

14. In combination in a carburetor associated with an intake manifold, a fuel conduit for liquid gfuel, a group of air admission ports entering the conduit to be selectively closed to .adjust operating conditions over the whole operating range of the carburetor and other air admission ports nor- DAVID E.A HARTSHORN.

US593288A 1932-02-16 1932-02-16 Carburetor Expired - Lifetime US2052225A (en)

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2573093A (en) * 1946-10-14 1951-10-30 Charles H Burson Multiple jet carburetor
US2672329A (en) * 1949-07-13 1954-03-16 Zarnack Werner Carburetor of combustion engines with automatic fuel regulation
US2711884A (en) * 1950-06-20 1955-06-28 Zarnack Werner Carburetor for internal combustion engines
US2732193A (en) * 1956-01-24 Carburetor
US3931368A (en) * 1974-02-04 1976-01-06 Ford Motor Company Fuel flow proportioning valve
US3949025A (en) * 1974-01-04 1976-04-06 Dresser Industries, Inc. Variable throat venturi apparatus for mixing and modulating liquid fuel and intake air to an internal combustion engine
US3965221A (en) * 1974-07-03 1976-06-22 Dresser Industries, Inc. Fluid flow device and liquid metering
US4021513A (en) * 1973-11-07 1977-05-03 The Zenith Carburetor Company Limited Carbureters
US4280969A (en) * 1976-09-16 1981-07-28 Swanson Wilbur M Carburetor
US4971730A (en) * 1989-08-15 1990-11-20 Edmonston William H Carburetor-air deflector bar

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2732193A (en) * 1956-01-24 Carburetor
US2573093A (en) * 1946-10-14 1951-10-30 Charles H Burson Multiple jet carburetor
US2672329A (en) * 1949-07-13 1954-03-16 Zarnack Werner Carburetor of combustion engines with automatic fuel regulation
US2711884A (en) * 1950-06-20 1955-06-28 Zarnack Werner Carburetor for internal combustion engines
US4021513A (en) * 1973-11-07 1977-05-03 The Zenith Carburetor Company Limited Carbureters
US3949025A (en) * 1974-01-04 1976-04-06 Dresser Industries, Inc. Variable throat venturi apparatus for mixing and modulating liquid fuel and intake air to an internal combustion engine
US3931368A (en) * 1974-02-04 1976-01-06 Ford Motor Company Fuel flow proportioning valve
US3965221A (en) * 1974-07-03 1976-06-22 Dresser Industries, Inc. Fluid flow device and liquid metering
US4280969A (en) * 1976-09-16 1981-07-28 Swanson Wilbur M Carburetor
US4971730A (en) * 1989-08-15 1990-11-20 Edmonston William H Carburetor-air deflector bar

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