US2049550A - Cushion construction - Google Patents

Cushion construction Download PDF

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Publication number
US2049550A
US2049550A US592116A US59211632A US2049550A US 2049550 A US2049550 A US 2049550A US 592116 A US592116 A US 592116A US 59211632 A US59211632 A US 59211632A US 2049550 A US2049550 A US 2049550A
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springs
cushion
support
border
frame
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Expired - Lifetime
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US592116A
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William C Van Dresser
Wesley B Van Dresser
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Van Dresser Specialty Corp
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Van Dresser Specialty Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C23/00Spring mattresses with rigid frame or forming part of the bedstead, e.g. box springs; Divan bases; Slatted bed bases
    • A47C23/04Spring mattresses with rigid frame or forming part of the bedstead, e.g. box springs; Divan bases; Slatted bed bases using springs in compression, e.g. coiled
    • A47C23/043Spring mattresses with rigid frame or forming part of the bedstead, e.g. box springs; Divan bases; Slatted bed bases using springs in compression, e.g. coiled using wound springs
    • A47C23/0435Spring mattresses with rigid frame or forming part of the bedstead, e.g. box springs; Divan bases; Slatted bed bases using springs in compression, e.g. coiled using wound springs of adjustable resilience
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C7/00Parts, details, or accessories of chairs or stools
    • A47C7/02Seat parts
    • A47C7/34Seat parts with springs in compression, e.g. coiled
    • A47C7/345Seat parts with springs in compression, e.g. coiled of adjustable resilience

Description

Aug. 4, 1936. w. c. VAN DRESSER ET AL 2,049,550

CUSHION CONSTRUCTION 1 Filed Feb. 10, 1s a32 :5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR ATTORNEYS -4, 1936- w. c. VAN DRESSER ET AL Q 2 0 CUSHION CONSTRUCTION Filed Feb. 10, 1932 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

ATTO RN EYJ Aug. 4, 1936.

w. c. VAN DRESSER ET AL CUSHION CONSTRUCTION 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Feb. 10, 1932 lNVENTORS 71 228 221711 6 flrmlr s r W527 3' r fljress er ATTORNEYS Patented Aug. 4, 1936 [UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Dresser,

Detroit, Mich.,

assignors to Van Dresser Specialty. Corporation, Detroit, Mich., a corporation of Michigan Application February 10, -1932,Serial No. 592,116

8 Claims. (01. 155-179) This invention relates to a cushion construction of the character used in upholstered seats and-the like. I

One of the primary objects of this invention .is to provide a cushion construction having means for adjusting the firmness thereof whereby for a relatively light person the cushion may be made relatively soft while for a heavier person the cushion may be made much firmer.

More particularly the invention contemplates the provision of a cushion which will include a plurality of springs grouped to form a unit, means for yieldably supporting certain of these springs and means for adjusting the yieldability of this support.

Numerous other objects and advantages of this invention will become more apparent as the following description proceeds, particularly when reference is had to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a cushion construction in position in a vehicle seat;

Fig. 2 is a bottom plan view of a cushion constructed in accordance with the teachings of this invention;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken substantially on the line l4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken substantially on the line 55 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 2 showing a slightly modified form of construction;

Fig. .7 is a. sectional view taken substantially on the line 1'l of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 2 showing a fur ther modified form of construction;

Fig. 9 is a sectional view taken substantially on' the line 9-9 of Fig. 8;

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially on the line Hllll of Fig. 8; and

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary perspective view of a slightly modified form of supporting base form-v ing one of the elements of the construction.

A cushion constructed in accordance with the teachings of this invention will find utility in any seatconstruction whatever. The cushion may be utilized as the seat cushion of the construction or as the back cushion thereof. The invention will find particular utility, however, when incorporated in a seat construction of a motor vehicle and accordingly the invention will be described as being incorporated in a seat construction of this character.

Vehicle seat constructions, as generally made comprise a plurality of coil springs'grouped to form a spring unit and an upholstery covering for this unit. As generally madethese spring units are of medium firmness and are therefore adapted for persons of average weight. Such a cushionconstruction, however, is usually too soft for an extremely heavy person and too firm for a person of light weight, and the present invention therefore contemplates the provision of means for readily adjusting the firmness of such a cushion so that the same may be adapted to persons of different weights.

Referring then particularly to the drawings wherein like reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout all views, there is shown in Fig. 1 of the drawings a vehicle seat comprising a seat cushion l5 and a back cushion I6. While the vehicle seat disclosed is illustrated as being the front seat in the vehicle, it will be readily apparent that the invention will be equally applicable to the rear seat of the vehicle.

I One of the cushions forming a part of the vehicle seat such, for example, as the seat cushion I5, is illustrated in Figs. 2 to 4, inclusive, of the drawings.

of coil springs ll arranged in transverse and longitudinal rows to form a spring unit. A border frame i8 is preferably provided around the upper edge of the spring unit, the bordersprings of the unit having their top convolutions secured to this border frame. A wooden base frame I!) is also provided in accordance with the usual practice, the border springs of the unit resting on this base frame.

The springsof the unit may be secured together in any desired manner, it being important, however, that these springs be secured together for relatively free vertical movement with respect to each other. Thus if desired, the tops of the springs in adjacent longitudinal rows may be secured to each other by longitudinally extending coil spring cables 18', the springs being clipped to these cables whereby the springs are held in position within the spring unit, but may move vertically slightly relative to each other.

According to the teachings of this invention certain of the springs forming the spring unit are supported on a yieldable support arranged to By reference to these figures, it will vbe noted that the cushion comprises a plurality I These springs may, if desired, be of lighter gauge than the other springs of the spring unit in accordance with the usual practice. 7

As illustrated, thesprings disposed in the three longitudinal rows arranged centrally of the spring unit, with the exception of the border springs at the ends of these rows, are mounted as a group on a yieldable support. These springs are designated by the reference character 25, and it will be noted that these springs are of shorter length than the border springs ii to provide a chamber 26 below these springs and centrally of the spring unit.

The springs 25 are preferably secured at their lower ends to longitudinally extending coil spring cables 21, which are similar to and extend parallel with the cables l8. Thus the lower ends of the springs 25 are yieldably secured together, and if desired each cable It may be connected to the cable 2'? extending parallel therewith by means of a listing strip or the like 23. Listing strips 29 may also be provided connecting the cables i8 secured to the border springs H to similar cables 30 secured to the lower ends of these border springs. v

The springs 25 are supported on a felt pad or the like 35, this pad being preferably of a size sufficient to extend under all of the springs 25. This felt pad is in turn supported on a screen which is secured in any desired manner at its edges to a frame comprising longitudinally extending channel bars 31 and transversely extending end channel bars 38. It will be noted particularly by reference to Fig. 4 of the drawings that the center portions of the end cross bars 38 are preferably offset downwardly so as not to unnecessarily limit downward movement of the end springs of the group of springs 25.

It will be understood that the frame, the wire screen and the pad together constitute a floating or yieldable support for the springs 25, and the present invention contemplates the provision of means for adjusting the yieldability of this support. For this purpose shafts 4|) are provided, there being preferably two of these shafts, one disposed adjacent each end of the floating sup-, port above referred to. Since these shafts and their associated mechanisms are identical in construction, only one of the shafts will be deflange 44. Coiled about the shaft 40 on opposite sides of the collar 43 are springs 45, these springs having their adjacent ends anchored in slots 46 formed in the flange 44.

These springs are torsion springs, and the free end of each spring is secured to the hub 50 of an arm 5|, it being understood that there are two arms 5! and that the hub of each of these arms is rotatably mounted on shaft 40. These hubs are disposed adjacent opposite ends of the shaft 40 and the torsion springs work in opposite directions so as to urge these arms 5| upwardly or in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 3 of the drawincs. f

Pivotally secured to the end of each arm 5! is a link 52, and each link is pivotally connected as by a. pin "to the adacent portion of one of the side frame members 31. It will be noted that the web of each frame member is preferably cut away as at 54 adjacent each point of attachment of a link 52 to the frame member to provide for free pivotal movement of the links 52. 5

With the structure as thus far described, it will be understood that the springs 35 will urge the arms 5| and the links 52 upwardly, and since the links 52 constitute the sole support for the floating frame, the-springs 45 constitute a means to 10 yieldably support this frame. Itwill be further apparent that if the shaft 40 is rotated, the force of the springs 45 may be adjusted to either increase or decrease their yieldability as a support for the frame.

For the purpose of accomplishing this adjustment, there is preferably fixed to one end of the shaft a worm wheel 55, and arranged for engagengent with this worm wheel is a worm 56 formed on. the end of a shaft 5!. This shaft is extended to 20 project through one end of the cushion construction and is provided on its end with a knob or the like 58 by which the shaft may be rotated.

To increase the yieldability or flexibility of the supporting means, there is preferably provided a 5 counterbalancing spring which acts mainly when the levers 5i are in their uppermost position. Thus there is secured to each hub a hook or the like 60, and secured to each of these hooks is a tension spring or the like 6| which tends to rotate the hub 50 against the action of its respective' spring 45. Thus it will be understood that when the cushion is only lightly loaded, the force of the springs 45 will be partially counterbalanced by the springs 6| so that the support for the springs 25 will be quite yieldable. As, however, the springs 25 are forced downwardly, the

force exerted by the counterbalancing springs will be relieved, and the supporting frame will be supported only by the springs 65.

In use it will be understood that the spring unit including the border springs I1 and the springs 25 will be suitably covered by padding or the like and an upholstery cover 66. With the seat cushion installed in a vehicle seat, if a heavy person desires to use the seat, he may adjust the shafts 40 to increase the force exerted by the springs 45 and to thus decrease the yieldability of the support for the springs 25. The cushion will thus be made relatively firm and more comfortable for the heavy person. If, however, a lighter person desires to use the seat, he may rotate theshafts 40 to reduce the force exerted by the springs 45, with the result that the cushion will be made softer and more comfortable for the lighter person. The initial compressoin of the springs 25 will be absorbed by the springs themselves, but as these' springs are forced downwardly the yieldable support moves downwardly against the force exerted by the springs 45. Further, during the initial downward movement of the support the force of the springs 45 is partially balanced by the springs 6i, these latter springs, however, becoming inoperative upon a predetermined downward movement of the support. Even 65 when the springs 45 are under compression, that is, when they are carrying the weight of a heavy person, they are not near the'limits of their yieldability, thus giving the person a soft flexible ride even over a very rough road.

As illustrated, two of the shafts 40 are provided, and these shafts may be separately adjusted to separately adjust the springs 45. carried thereby. Thus one end of the seat cushion may be made relatively firm or soft as compared to the 7| other end of the cushion by adjustment of one only of the shafts 40. It will beunderstood that if one of the shafts only is adjusted the entire floating support will be slightly tilted, pivoting on the unadjusted supporting links 52 as a fulcrum. 7

In Figs. 6 and '7 a slightly modified form of construction -is disclosed in which the center springs 25 are surrounded by the border springs Il these latter springs resting as in the first instance on a border frame I9 The center springs 25 are relatively short in length and are supported on a floating support designated generally by the reference character 10. This support comprises a pad or the like 35 which is supported on cross bars H. connected by a longitudinally extending channel member 12 which is secured to the cross members in any desired manner as, for example, by welding or the like.

Rotatably supported below the support ID are shafts 40 and fixed to'each shaft is a worm wheel 55*- adapted to be rotated by a worm 56 fixed on the end of an actuating rod 51. p

In this instance, however, there is rotatably supported on each shaft a lever 5|, this lever being disposed centrally "of the shaft and there being only one of these levers rather than two of the same disposed at the ends of the shaft. Torsion springs 45 coiled on the. shaft 40 are secured at their opposite ends to collars l5 and I6 fix'ed to the shaft, the latter collar being preferably integral with the worm wheel 55. The hub 50 of the lever 5W is provided with slots 11 in which the adjacent ends of the springs 45 are anchored. Pivotally secured to the end of the lever 5H is a link 52 which is pivotally connected as by a pin 53 to the channel member 12.

It will be understood that the levers 5| and the springs 35 constitute means for yieldably supporting the supportifl. The force exerted by the springs 45 may be adjusted by rotating the shaft 40, rotation of the shaft in one direction tending to wind the springs and rotation of the shaft in the other direction actlng to unwind the springs. As in the first described form of construction, counterbalancing springs of any desired type maybe associated with the levers 5| for counterbalancing the springs 45.

In Figs. 8 to 10, inclusve, a further modification of the inventive idea is disclosed as comprising a floating support 90 for supporting the springs 25. In this case the support 99 comprises a suitable pad or the like 9| which in turn is supported on cross channel members 92. Fixed to the under faces .of these channel members are longitudinally extending rods 93, there being preferably two of these rods and these rods being circular in cross sectional shape. a I

The cushion is' provided with a border base frame l9", and fixed to this base frame and extending transversely of the cushion are rods 9E. Two of these rods are provided, one being disposed adjacent either end of the cushion, and rotatably mounted on each rod is the hub 95 of a lever 96. Each lever is prevented from movement longitudinally of its respective suporting rod by collars 91 fixed to the rod on opposite sides of the hub of the lever.

Each lever carries at its upper end a cross arm 98, and rotatably journaled on each cross arm are rollers 99 arranged to roll on the rods or tracks 93.

Spanning the chamber 26 and disposed between the rods 94 are supports I00, there being These bars-arein turn integrallytwo of these supports. Fixed at its ends to these supports and spanning the space between the same is a plate-like supporting member I0 I. This supporting member is provided with a central body portion I02 offset upwardly from the supports I00, the plate-like member being provided with inclined portions 13 connecting the supporting-fianges I04 thereof to the body portion I 02. This body portion is provided on one side with a downwardly extending flange I05.

Rotatabl'y journaled in each inclined portion I03 of the plate [0| is a stem or stud III) which is fixedly secured against rotation to one end of a spring Ill. The opposite end of the spring is secured to an ear 2 formed on the side of its adjacentlever 96.

Threaded on the-stem H0 is a pinion H3 having a beveled portion arranged to engage a beveled pinion H4 secured to the end of a rod H5. The rod extends forwardly through the front of the cushion and is provided with a suitable actuating knob or the like 6.

It will be understood that as the rods H5 are rotated, the pinions 3 will be threadedly adjusted on the studs 0 to move these studs longitudinally and to thus adjust the tension of their respective springs I H. It will be understood that the springs HI constitute the yieldable means supporting the support 90 so that adjustment of these springs will vary the yieldability of the sup port. As in the first described form of construction, either one.or both of the springs HI may be adjusted, the entire support fulcruming about one set of rollers 99 if one spring only is ad'- justed.

In use it will be apparent that the yieldability of the support may be adjusted to vary the firmness of the cushion. When the center, springs 25 are forced downwardly, the downward movement of the support will be resiliently resisted by the springs H l, the rollers 99 rolling on the rods 93 during downward movement of the support.- As

in the first described'form of construction, suitable counterbalancing springs may be associated with the levers 96 if desired.

' In Fig. 11 a slightly'modified form of supporting frame is disclosed, which frame may be substituted for the frame disclosed in the previously described forms of construction. This frame is designated generally by the reference character HI and comprises longitudinally extending side.

members I22 and transversely extending end members H1. these members being preferably integral and being U-shaped in cross section with the open part of the U facing upwardly. Im I bedded in the U-shaped frame is a packingof fibrous material H8 to which the screen H9 on which the springsare supported may be readily secured as by staples or the like I20.

In this form of construction it is preferable to provide the longitudinally extending side frame of the drawings. The last described frame member possesses the advantage that by exposing the packing of fibrous material in the manner de-- scribed, a supporting screen may be easily secured to this frame member.

From the above it will be upper-mt that the invention provides a spring unit formed of a plu-= rality of coil springs or the like and having means providing a yieldable support for certain of these springs. The yieldability of the support may be readily adjusted so that the firmness of the cushion may be varied. The adjustment is attached claims.

What we claim as our invention is:

1. In a cushion construction, a plurality of. coil springs grouped to form a unit, means including a shaft and a pair of torsional springs on said shaft providing a yieldable support for said springs, and means projecting beyond one edge of said cushion for rotating said shaft to adjust said torsional springs to vary the yieldability of the support for said coil springs.

2. In a cushion construction, a plurality of coil springs grouped to form a unit, a frame disposed below said group of coil springs, a screen secured to said frame and constituting a support for said coil springs, the cross members of said frame at the ends thereof being downwardly oifset, and means for supporting said frame including a shaft disposed below said frame, a pair of levers rotatably mounted on said shaft, links connecting said levers to said frame for supporting the latter' from the former, torsional springs on said shaft, each of said springs having one end secured to one of said levers, a collar fixed to said shaft,

each of said springs having its other end fixed to said collar, and means 'forrotating said shaft to adjust the torsional springs on said shaft to vary the force with which they act on said levers.

3. In a cushion construction, a plurality of springs grouped to form a unit, a series of border springs surrounding said group of springs, a rigid support for the lower ends of said border springs. an upholstery cover secured to said rigid support and enclosing said border springs and said group of springs, a yieldable support for the lower ends I said group of springs of less height, a platform ing on said yieldable support and being operable to vary the yieldability of said support and to adjust said support to vary the initial compression of the springs supported thereby.

5. In a cushion construction, a base frame, 5 border springs supported on the base frame, a group of springs of less height than the border springs disposed within the border springs, the upper ends of said last mentioned springs being disposed in substantially the plane of said border springs whereby a space is provided within said border springs and below said group of springs of less height, a platform on which the lower ends oi said group of springs of less height are supported, pivoted levers disposed in the space below said group of springs for supporting said platform, resilient means acting on said levers to urge the same to their supporting positions, and means for adjusting said resilient means to vary the force exerted by said levers on said platform.

6. In a cushion construction, a base frame, border springs supported on the base frame, a group of springs disposed within the border springs, the upper ends of said last mentioned springs being disposed in substantially the plane of the upper ends of said border springs, yieldable means constituting the sole support for the lower ends of said grpnp of springs, and means-for adlusting the yieldability of said yieldabie means.

'1. In a cushion OOIIStIliOtlOILS. base frame, border springs-supported on said base frame, a group of springs of less height than the border springs disposed within the border springs, the upper ends of said last mentioned springs being disposed in substantially the plane of the upper ends of said border springs whereby a space is provided within said border springs and below on which the lower ends of said group of springs of less height are supported, yieldable means constituting the sole support for said platform, and means for adjusting the yieldability of said yieldable means. I;- g

8. In a cushion construction, a base frame, border spriuss'fi-supported on the base frame, a group of springs of less height than the border springs disposdd within the border springs, the upper ends of Fgaid last mentioned springs being disposed-in substantially the plane of the upper ends 6! said librder springs whereby a space is provided within said border springs and below saidgroup of springs of less height, a platform on which the lpwer ends of said group of springs of less height are supported, resilient means disposed in the space below said group of springs for supporting-said platform, and means for adlusting said resilient means to vary the force ex erted thereby on said platform.

- WIILIAM C. VAN DRESSER.

WESLEY B. (AN DRESSER.

US592116A 1932-02-10 1932-02-10 Cushion construction Expired - Lifetime US2049550A (en)

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Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2542366A (en) * 1946-06-24 1951-02-20 Walter L Scott Adjustable seat section for chairs
US2558288A (en) * 1947-03-06 1951-06-26 Backus Carl Adjustable spring tensioning of bed springs
US2595072A (en) * 1948-03-22 1952-04-29 Victor H Gottschalk Adjustable resiliency bedspring
US2630585A (en) * 1950-07-03 1953-03-10 Clyde B Reese Adjustable bedspring
US2633903A (en) * 1951-01-08 1953-04-07 Ford Motor Co Spring seat structure
US2641309A (en) * 1949-09-15 1953-06-09 Bostrom Mfg Company Torsion spring supported pedestal seat mounting
US2663360A (en) * 1951-05-03 1953-12-22 Englander Co Inc Seat
US2667209A (en) * 1950-12-06 1954-01-26 Coach & Car Equipment Corp Resiliently supported locomotive seat
US2675566A (en) * 1950-03-03 1954-04-20 Leonard Chicago Corp Bedspring construction
US2685324A (en) * 1952-04-03 1954-08-03 Ford Motor Co Vehicular seat
US2740468A (en) * 1954-04-22 1956-04-03 Rockwell Spring & Axle Co Seat having adjustable deflection rate
US2818105A (en) * 1956-05-22 1957-12-31 Rockwell Spring And Axle Co Spring seat assembly
US2836226A (en) * 1953-04-23 1958-05-27 John S Fridolph Vehicle seat
US2889868A (en) * 1954-12-28 1959-06-09 Seenberg Leo Torsion type seat support
US2985895A (en) * 1958-04-24 1961-05-30 Bloom Abraham Adjustable box springs
US3153249A (en) * 1961-06-12 1964-10-20 Wortso Corp Firmness control for mattress
US3287745A (en) * 1964-10-21 1966-11-29 Robert B Maddox Associates Inc Adjustable support for bed spring
US4566733A (en) * 1983-11-28 1986-01-28 Compton Arthur M Chair for work environment
US4652049A (en) * 1981-06-26 1987-03-24 Toyota Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Device for adjusting height of front part of seat cushion of seat
US4722569A (en) * 1985-09-13 1988-02-02 Robin L. Morgenstern Power and manually actuated lumbosacral backrest
US5232266A (en) * 1989-07-24 1993-08-03 Mork William J Upholstered article of furniture with interchangeable seating module
WO2005020760A1 (en) * 2003-08-29 2005-03-10 A Harrison (Bedding) Limited Beds and mattresses
US20050275269A1 (en) * 2004-05-14 2005-12-15 Tim Fookes Tilt tension mechanism for chair
US20150320229A1 (en) * 2013-02-01 2015-11-12 Stjernfjädrar Ab Mattress arrangement, such as a bed, having zones with adjustable height/firmness
WO2019086155A1 (en) * 2017-10-31 2019-05-09 Peter Meusburger Mattress

Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2542366A (en) * 1946-06-24 1951-02-20 Walter L Scott Adjustable seat section for chairs
US2558288A (en) * 1947-03-06 1951-06-26 Backus Carl Adjustable spring tensioning of bed springs
US2595072A (en) * 1948-03-22 1952-04-29 Victor H Gottschalk Adjustable resiliency bedspring
US2641309A (en) * 1949-09-15 1953-06-09 Bostrom Mfg Company Torsion spring supported pedestal seat mounting
US2675566A (en) * 1950-03-03 1954-04-20 Leonard Chicago Corp Bedspring construction
US2630585A (en) * 1950-07-03 1953-03-10 Clyde B Reese Adjustable bedspring
US2667209A (en) * 1950-12-06 1954-01-26 Coach & Car Equipment Corp Resiliently supported locomotive seat
US2633903A (en) * 1951-01-08 1953-04-07 Ford Motor Co Spring seat structure
US2663360A (en) * 1951-05-03 1953-12-22 Englander Co Inc Seat
US2685324A (en) * 1952-04-03 1954-08-03 Ford Motor Co Vehicular seat
US2836226A (en) * 1953-04-23 1958-05-27 John S Fridolph Vehicle seat
US2740468A (en) * 1954-04-22 1956-04-03 Rockwell Spring & Axle Co Seat having adjustable deflection rate
US2889868A (en) * 1954-12-28 1959-06-09 Seenberg Leo Torsion type seat support
US2818105A (en) * 1956-05-22 1957-12-31 Rockwell Spring And Axle Co Spring seat assembly
US2985895A (en) * 1958-04-24 1961-05-30 Bloom Abraham Adjustable box springs
US3153249A (en) * 1961-06-12 1964-10-20 Wortso Corp Firmness control for mattress
US3287745A (en) * 1964-10-21 1966-11-29 Robert B Maddox Associates Inc Adjustable support for bed spring
US4652049A (en) * 1981-06-26 1987-03-24 Toyota Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Device for adjusting height of front part of seat cushion of seat
US4566733A (en) * 1983-11-28 1986-01-28 Compton Arthur M Chair for work environment
US4722569A (en) * 1985-09-13 1988-02-02 Robin L. Morgenstern Power and manually actuated lumbosacral backrest
US5232266A (en) * 1989-07-24 1993-08-03 Mork William J Upholstered article of furniture with interchangeable seating module
US20060253994A1 (en) * 2003-08-29 2006-11-16 Spinks Simone P Beds and mattresses
WO2005020760A1 (en) * 2003-08-29 2005-03-10 A Harrison (Bedding) Limited Beds and mattresses
US20050275269A1 (en) * 2004-05-14 2005-12-15 Tim Fookes Tilt tension mechanism for chair
US7500718B2 (en) 2004-05-14 2009-03-10 Haworth, Inc. Tilt tension mechanism for chair
US20150320229A1 (en) * 2013-02-01 2015-11-12 Stjernfjädrar Ab Mattress arrangement, such as a bed, having zones with adjustable height/firmness
US10334957B2 (en) * 2013-02-01 2019-07-02 Starsprings Ab Mattress arrangement, such as a bed, having zones with adjustable height/firmness
WO2019086155A1 (en) * 2017-10-31 2019-05-09 Peter Meusburger Mattress

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