US20230173319A1 - Folding Exercise Rack - Google Patents

Folding Exercise Rack Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20230173319A1
US20230173319A1 US18/162,400 US202318162400A US2023173319A1 US 20230173319 A1 US20230173319 A1 US 20230173319A1 US 202318162400 A US202318162400 A US 202318162400A US 2023173319 A1 US2023173319 A1 US 2023173319A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
rack
squat
support
storage position
legs
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Pending
Application number
US18/162,400
Inventor
Craig BALLARD
Johno ELLISON
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Lift Science Inc
Original Assignee
Lift Science Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Lift Science Inc filed Critical Lift Science Inc
Priority to US18/162,400 priority Critical patent/US20230173319A1/en
Assigned to LIFT SCIENCE INC. reassignment LIFT SCIENCE INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BALLARD, Craig Richard, ELLISON, Johno
Publication of US20230173319A1 publication Critical patent/US20230173319A1/en
Pending legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B21/00Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices
    • A63B21/06User-manipulated weights
    • A63B21/078Devices for bench press exercises, e.g. supports, guiding means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B1/00Horizontal bars
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B21/00Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices
    • A63B21/00047Exercising devices not moving during use
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B21/00Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices
    • A63B21/06User-manipulated weights
    • A63B21/072Dumb-bells, bar-bells or the like, e.g. weight discs having an integral peripheral handle
    • A63B21/0724Bar-bells; Hand bars
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B23/00Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body
    • A63B23/035Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously
    • A63B23/04Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously for lower limbs
    • A63B23/0405Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously for lower limbs involving a bending of the knee and hip joints simultaneously
    • A63B2023/0411Squatting exercises
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2210/00Space saving
    • A63B2210/50Size reducing arrangements for stowing or transport
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B23/00Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body
    • A63B23/035Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously
    • A63B23/12Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously for upper limbs or related muscles, e.g. chest, upper back or shoulder muscles
    • A63B23/1209Involving a bending of elbow and shoulder joints simultaneously
    • A63B23/1218Chinning, pull-up, i.e. concentric movement

Definitions

  • the following pertains to a folding exercise rack. In particular, it pertains to a folding squat rack.
  • Squat racks are used in gym environments for a variety of different exercises. In particular they can be used to support barbells to allow a user to set up for exercises such as front squats, back squats, bench press, overhead press, deadlifts, barbell bent over rows, and barbell lunges. Squat racks also typically include an overhead bar which can be used for pullups, chin-ups, hanging leg raises and the like.
  • Traditional free-standing squat racks include 4 upright posts arranged in a box formation coupled at the base thereof with at least 3 horizontal supports to complete a base of support.
  • the uprights are also coupled together at a top end thereof, with two adjustable bar catches or cups for support the barbell at different vertical heights.
  • a squat stand also referred to as a half rack
  • the uprights are typically coupled together at a top end thereof for stability.
  • squat racks can be wall-mounted such that support beams are mounted to a wall with at least two horizontal support bars extending outwardly from the wall-mounted support beams.
  • Each horizonal support bar is coupled to an upright, which are further coupled by a horizonal support bar at the top end thereof.
  • squat racks are a valuable apparatus in a gym setting, many users are reluctant to include them in their own home gym or use them anywhere outside of a commercial gym setting.
  • Traditional squat racks take up a substantial amount of space, are very heavy, are unsightly and can not be easily assembled or disassembled as they typically require special tools. Furthermore, they are difficult to move or transport.
  • folding squat racks are wall mounted racks which are permanently fixed to the wall.
  • the top horizontal support between the uprights is detached and the horizonal support beams along with an upright pivot outwardly from a position parallel with the wall when stored, to a position perpendicular to the wall when in use.
  • Free standing squat racks of a similar design are also known.
  • the squat rack is comprised of a rear support frame having a base and two rear uprights.
  • a pair of horizonal support extend perpendicularly from each of the rear uprights and are coupled at a second end thereof to a front upright.
  • each horizonal support and associated upright pivot around the rear upright to lie in a parallel plane to the plane formed between the two rear uprights.
  • an exercise rack comprising two frames, each frame having a rack leg coupled at one end thereof to a support leg.
  • the rack legs are adapted to be coupled with at least one support cup for a supporting a barbell.
  • the exercise rack is movable between an operating position wherein the two frames are spaced from each other and a storage position wherein said two frames are in closer proximity to each other.
  • the operating position has a width direction and a length direction
  • the storage position has a width direction and length direction.
  • the width direction and the length direction of the exercise rack in the storage position is substantially reduced compared to the width direction and length direction of the exercise rack in the operating position.
  • FIG. 1 is top front perspective view of a first embodiment of the squat rack in the operating position
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the first embodiment of the squat rack in the storage position
  • FIG. 2 a is a detail view of the pivot connection between the support leg and rack leg of the squat rack;
  • FIG. 3 is a bottom back perspective view of the first embodiment of the squat rack in the operating position
  • FIG. 4 is a back top perspective view of the first embodiment of the squat rack in the operating position
  • FIG. 4 a is a detail view of a foot of the first embodiment of the squat rack
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the first embodiment of the squat rack in transition to the storage position
  • FIG. 6 is a detail view of the connection of the chin up bar
  • FIG. 7 a shows a detailed view of a c-shaped spring clip for holding the chin up bar
  • FIG. 7 b shows a detailed view of a cup for holding the chin up bar
  • FIG. 7 c shows a detailed view of the c-shaped spring clip securing holding the chin up bar
  • FIG. 7 d shows a detailed view of the cup holding the chin up bar
  • FIG. 8 shows a detailed view of the cross bar connection
  • FIG. 9 shows a detailed view of the sliding connection between the cross bar and the support leg
  • FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the squat rack in a partially open operating position
  • FIG. 11 is a perspective view of a second embodiment of the squat rack in an open position.
  • FIG. 12 is a perspective view of a second embodiment of the squat rack in a storage position.
  • the description pertains to a squat rack 2 that is movable between an operating position, and example of which is shown in FIG. 1 and a storage position, an example of which is shown in FIG. 2 .
  • FIG one depicts a first embodiment of a folding squat rack 2 shown in the open position.
  • the squat rack 2 comprises two frames 3 a and 3 b each comprising a rack leg 4 a and 4 b coupled at a top end thereof to a support leg 6 a and 6 b , respectively.
  • the support legs, 6 a and 6 b are coupled by a set of cross bars 8 a and 8 b which provide stability of the folding squat rack in a width direction of the squat rack (also referred to as, and shown in the figures as, the x direction).
  • the x-direction, or width direction is defined as the vector between the two support legs, while the y-direction or length direction is defined by the vector between a rear support leg and the corresponding rack leg. These directions are also depicted on FIG. 1 .
  • the rack leg 4 a and support leg 6 a are braced in the forward/back direction (also referred to as the y-direction) by a brace 10 a .
  • the rack leg 4 b and support leg 6 b are braced in the y-direction by brace 10 b .
  • Braces 10 a and 10 b each have a first end 12 a and 12 b respectively coupled to the corresponding support leg, and a second end 14 a and 14 b respectively, coupled to the corresponding rack leg.
  • the braces 10 a and 10 b are preferably rotatably coupled to the support leg via a pivotable connection while the second end is preferably coupled to the rack leg with a spring-loaded pin.
  • the second end can be selectively released from the rack leg and pivoted to a position parallel with the support leg to move the rack into a storage configuration. While the preferred embodiment of the braces 10 a and 10 b are described above, it can be appreciated that other configurations, orientations and coupling mechanisms would be known to a person skilled in the art.
  • braces 10 a and 10 b are shown in a preferred embodiment of being located generally centrally along the length of the support legs 6 a and 6 b and the rack legs 4 a and 4 b respectively, it can be appreciated that the position of the braces could be varied.
  • the braces 100 are situated close to, or on, the ground. This embodiment is shown in the storage position in FIG. 12 .
  • the rack legs 4 a and 4 b are coupled to the corresponding support legs 6 a and 6 b via a pivot connection 16 a and 16 b , respectively.
  • This allows the rack leg to move closer to and towards parallel to, the corresponding support leg when moved from the operating position to the storage position.
  • a pivot connection is shown in the figures, it can be appreciated by a person skilled in the art, that other suitable connections such as, but not limited to, a sliding connection, a removable pin and slot connection, or any other suitable connection.
  • the pivot connection 16 is offset from the longitudinal axis of the support leg to allow the rack leg to lie generally parallel to the support leg in the storage position.
  • the pivot connection can optionally include a guide bar 15 which is coupled on one end to the support leg 6 and the other end slides through a slot in the rack leg 4 . This feature can help ensure that the support leg and rack leg maintain aligned in the length direction.
  • Each of the rack legs 4 a and 4 b and the support legs 6 a and 6 b preferably have a foot 20 affixed to the end thereof. These feet provide an enlarged contact area with the ground compared to the size of the rack legs or support lets and provide increased stability to the squat rack.
  • each foot includes a rubber pad on the underside thereof to prevent slipping of the legs or damage to the floor upon which the squat rack 2 is assembled.
  • the feet can be fitted with wheels 24 mounted such that when the squat rack is tipped, it can be supported on the wheels 24 and moved with relative ease and without requiring lifting of the entire apparatus.
  • these wheels 24 are located on the support legs and mounted on a rear side 26 of the support leg 6 by means of bracket 28 . It can be appreciated that other mounting arrangements would be known to a person skilled in the art. This preferred embodiment allows the wheels to be free from contact with the ground when the squat rack 2 is in the operating position.
  • the rack legs 4 a and 4 b include a series of cup like projections, commonly called J-cups 18 spaced longitudinally along the length of the rack leg.
  • the j-cups are formed having a base portion 19 with upwardly projecting j-cups extending outwardly therefrom.
  • the j-cups could also be formed by a detachable cup with a pin connection to be inserted into one of a series of holes in a rack leg, simple pins to be inserted into one of a series of holes in each rack leg and extending outwardly therefrom to support a barbell, or could include individual projections coupled to the rack leg at various intervals along the length thereof (as shown in FIG. 11 ). These individual projections could be attached to the rack leg in any suitable manner, including, but not limited to welded, or bolted to the rack leg.
  • the J-cups 18 are sized to receive a standard barbell and are coupled to the rack leg in a manner that would be suitable to hold a substantial amount of weight, for example, up to approximately 1000 lbs. it can be appreciated that the location of the cups could be varied to any position on the rack legs 4 a and 4 b .
  • the support legs extend above the pivot connections 16 a and 16 b and are configured to allow for the mounting of a chin up bar 24 therebetween.
  • a first end 32 of the pull up bar is inserted through a first hole 34 in an upper portion of the second support leg 6 b of a second frame and is fed through the first hole 34 .
  • the first end 32 of the chin up bar 24 meets the first frame, it is inserted through a second hole 36 in an upper portion of the first support leg 6 a .
  • a fixation device 38 is coupled to the chin up bar to fix the chin up bar to the support legs 6 a and 6 b .
  • the chin up bar could include internal threading and a bolt with external threading could be rotated into engagement with the chin up bar.
  • the head of the bolt would be of a diameter which would prevent the bolt head from slipping through the hole.
  • the head of the bolt would further be configured to be easily attached and removed with out the need for tools, as shown in FIG. 6 .
  • a washer 40 could be used between the bolt head and the side of the support leg.
  • the chin up bar could be secured in place with a spring pin on each end.
  • chin up bar shown in the figures is mounted on the support legs, it can be appreciated that it would be possible to mount the chin up bar on the rack legs.
  • a support leg 6 b When not in use, a support leg 6 b can be fitted with a retaining mechanism to retain the chin up bay 24 in a position generally parallel to the support leg 6 b . While there are various mechanisms that could be used to secure the chin up bar to the squat rack, in a preferred embodiment, the support leg 6 b is out fitted with a cup 42 sized to receive one end of the chin up bar and a c-shaped spring clip to contain the bar at a position part way along the length of said bar. This preferred embodiment is shown in FIGS. 7 a and 7 b without the bar in the storage position and in FIGS. 7 c and 7 d with the chin up bar 24 in storage position. In a preferred embodiment, the c-shaped spring clip is located a distance of over 50% of the length of the bar.
  • the cross bars 8 a and 8 b allow for a scissor action that allows the first support leg 6 a and second support leg 6 b to move in the x-direction or width direction.
  • the cross bars, 8 a and 8 b are pivotably coupled at the midpoint thereof to facilitate the scissor action, as shown in FIG. 8 .
  • a pivot connection is a blot or pin which extends through a whole in each of the pivot bars, although other methods of creating a connection would be known to a person skilled in the art.
  • brackets 51 can be fixed to the cross bars to provide a mechanical stop that indicates the squat rack is in the fully open, operating position.
  • Each cross bars 8 a and 8 b has a base pivot connection 46 a and 46 b which couples a first end of each cross bar to a predetermined point on the support legs 6 b and 6 a , respectively. In the preferred embodiment, these base pivot connections are located hear the foot of the support leg. Each of the second ends of each cross bar 8 a and 8 b slidably engage a higher portion of each support leg 6 a and 6 b respectively.
  • FIG. 9 A detail view of the slidable engagement is shown in FIG. 9 .
  • the cross bar 8 is fitted with a pivotable connection 52 which pivotably couples the cross bar 8 to a sliding foot 54 .
  • the sliding foot 54 engages a slot 56 within the support bar 6 .
  • a locking mechanism 58 is also fitted to the sliding foot 54 to prevent the sliding foot 54 from moving within the slot 56 once the supports are at the desired distance apart.
  • the sliding mechanism has a plurality of positions where the sliding foot 54 could be locked in position within the slot 56 .
  • This embodiment allows for the user to choose from a variety of distances between the two support legs 6 a and 6 b and adjust the width of the squat rack in the x-direction. While any distance between the two legs could be used, a preferred embodiment allows for locking at predetermined positions, and particularly at positions such that the distance between the rack legs would be sized to accommodate a 4 ft, 5 ft, 6 ft and full sized 7 ft Olympic bar.
  • FIG. 10 shows the squat rack configured to one such intermediate width.
  • the user When transitioning the squat rack from the operating position, as shown in FIG. 1 to the storage position, as shown in FIG. 2 , the user removes the optional chin up bar (if present) and unlocks the cross bar mechanisms. This allows for the two frames of the squat rack 2 to be brought in close proximity to each other as shown in FIG. 5 , and results in a reduction in width of the squat rack.
  • the braces 10 a and 10 b can then be disengaged from the rack leg and moved to the storage position which is preferably generally parallel to the support legs 6 a and 6 b respectively. The disengagement of the braces 10 a and 10 b allows the rack legs to be pivoted into the storage position.
  • This step results in a substantial reduction in the length direction or y-direction of the squat rack. While the above specifies that the width direction of the squat rack is reduced before the length direction, it can be appreciated that the rack legs could be moved into the storage position first and then the two frames of the squat rack can be moved into closer proximity with each other as a second step.
  • the cross bar arrangement is one embodiment of showing an example mechanism to allow for the squat rack to be reduced in the width direction or x-direction
  • other mechanisms could be used to achieve this result.
  • a telescoping horizontal brace between the support legs could also be used.
  • a horizontal bar could be positioned and removably coupled between the two support legs when in the operating position and stored in a similar manner to the chin up bar in the storage position.
  • the two sides of the squat rack could be strapped together in the storage position.
  • at least one or more split rail horizontal bars could be mounted between the two support legs.
  • a cable bracing mechanism with a central cylinder is used to brace the support legs.
  • a cable bracing mechanism is found in “Theoretical Assessment of the Behavior of Cable Bracing System with Central Steel Cylinder” (Fanaie, N. Aghajani, S., Dizaj, E. A. (2016) Theoretical Assessment of the Behavior of Cable Bracing System with Central Steel Cylinder. Advances in Structural Engineering 19(3): 463-472. DOI: 10.1177/1369433216630052), the contents of which are incorporated by reference herein. Other mechanisms would be known to a person skilled in the art.
  • the squat rack 2 is reduced by at least 60 percent in the width direction when it is moved from the operating position to the storage position. Similarly, it is reduced by at least 70 percent in the length direction when it is moved from the operating position to the storage position. In a further preferred embodiment, the squat rack 2 is reduced by at least 90 percent in the width direction when it is moved from the operating position to the storage position. Similarly, it is reduced by at least 90 percent in the length direction when it is moved from the operating position to the storage position. In yet a further preferred embodiment, the width direction is reduced by 87 percent and the length direction is reduced by 78 percent. This reduction ratio has been found to be compact and show stability and strength when in the operating position.
  • the substantial reduction in width and length when moved from the operating position to the storage position allows for the squat rack to be easily moved and stored. This allows for the squat rack 2 to be set up in the operating position temporarily a user can remove the squat rack from a space after their exercise session. Thus, it is not required that a user have a dedicated semi-permanent space for their squat rack.
  • the reduction in width and length also allows for the squat rack to be easily stored, for example, in a closet, without taking up a large volume of space and with a relatively small footprint compared to the operating footprint. It also allows for the relatively easy transport of the squat rack from one location to another, for example, while traveling, as complete disassembly is not necessary to achieve this reduction in the length and width directions.
  • the support legs and rack legs could be made to varying specifications, however in a preferred embodiment, of aluminum to reduce weight. In a further preferred embodiment, they are made of 3 ⁇ 3 gage steel.
  • the squat rack disclosed herewith has is particularly advantageous to people who prefer work outs at home, in the outdoors, or in smaller private settings.
  • a squat rack which can move be easily collapsed or folded into a smaller, portable configuration provides a convenient and mobile option to utilize the benefits of a traditional stationary squat rack in a flexible range of indoor and outdoor environments.
  • the folding exercise rack can be used effectively by sports teams or personal trainers, coaches, and physiotherapist as they can set it up at their training facility, their client’s home, or in a local park, or at any facility or location that is convenient to their team or clients.

Landscapes

  • Health & Medical Sciences (AREA)
  • General Health & Medical Sciences (AREA)
  • Physical Education & Sports Medicine (AREA)
  • Life Sciences & Earth Sciences (AREA)
  • Biophysics (AREA)
  • Orthopedic Medicine & Surgery (AREA)
  • Combinations Of Kitchen Furniture (AREA)
  • Chair Legs, Seat Parts, And Backrests (AREA)
  • Assembled Shelves (AREA)
  • Warehouses Or Storage Devices (AREA)
  • Extensible Doors And Revolving Doors (AREA)

Abstract

A folding exercise rack, particularly a squat rack, is provided. The squat rack is movable between an operating position having a width and length to a storage position having a substantially reduced width and length. This allows for the squat rack to be set up in the operating position temporarily which allows for a user to remove the squat rack from a space after their exercise session and thus does not require that a user have a dedicated semi-permanent space for their squat rack. The reduction in width and length also allows for the squat rack to be easily stored, for example, in a closet, without taking up a large volume of space and with a relatively small footprint compared to the operating footprint. It also allows for the relatively easy transport of the squat rack from one location to another, for example, while traveling as complete disassembly is not necessary to achieve this reduction in the length and width directions.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • The present application is a continuation of International PCT Application No. PCT/CA2021/051072 filed Jul. 30, 2021, which claims priority from U.S. Provisional Application No. 63/059,770 filed Jul. 31, 2020 both incorporated herein by reference in their entireties.
  • FIELD OF THE DESCRIPTION
  • The following pertains to a folding exercise rack. In particular, it pertains to a folding squat rack.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Squat racks are used in gym environments for a variety of different exercises. In particular they can be used to support barbells to allow a user to set up for exercises such as front squats, back squats, bench press, overhead press, deadlifts, barbell bent over rows, and barbell lunges. Squat racks also typically include an overhead bar which can be used for pullups, chin-ups, hanging leg raises and the like.
  • Traditional free-standing squat racks (often referred to as a power rack or full racks) include 4 upright posts arranged in a box formation coupled at the base thereof with at least 3 horizontal supports to complete a base of support. Generally, the uprights are also coupled together at a top end thereof, with two adjustable bar catches or cups for support the barbell at different vertical heights.
  • Another type of rack is a squat stand (also referred to as a half rack) which includes only two uprights on a 3 sided based of support. The uprights are typically coupled together at a top end thereof for stability.
  • Furthermore, squat racks can be wall-mounted such that support beams are mounted to a wall with at least two horizontal support bars extending outwardly from the wall-mounted support beams. Each horizonal support bar is coupled to an upright, which are further coupled by a horizonal support bar at the top end thereof.
  • While squat racks are a valuable apparatus in a gym setting, many users are reluctant to include them in their own home gym or use them anywhere outside of a commercial gym setting. Traditional squat racks take up a substantial amount of space, are very heavy, are unsightly and can not be easily assembled or disassembled as they typically require special tools. Furthermore, they are difficult to move or transport.
  • Squat racks which fold are known. Typically, folding squat racks are wall mounted racks which are permanently fixed to the wall. In these embodiments, the top horizontal support between the uprights is detached and the horizonal support beams along with an upright pivot outwardly from a position parallel with the wall when stored, to a position perpendicular to the wall when in use. Free standing squat racks of a similar design are also known. In these designs, the squat rack is comprised of a rear support frame having a base and two rear uprights. Similarly, to the wall-mounted folding squat rack, a pair of horizonal support extend perpendicularly from each of the rear uprights and are coupled at a second end thereof to a front upright. To fold into a storage position, each horizonal support and associated upright pivot around the rear upright to lie in a parallel plane to the plane formed between the two rear uprights.
  • All of these folding designs allow for the squat rack to be converted to a storage position that occupies less space, however they are still somewhat permanent or semi-permanent fixtures in a room, which can not be easily moved without disassembly. Furthermore, they only fold to reduce the footprint in one direction. Particularly, in the storage position the length of the rack is reduced compared to the operating position, but the width of the rack remains the same.
  • There remains a need for folding and/or transportable squat rack that is easy to assemble and disassemble and move or transport on a regular basis.
  • SUMMARY OF THE DESCRIPTION
  • In one aspect, there is provided an exercise rack comprising two frames, each frame having a rack leg coupled at one end thereof to a support leg. The rack legs are adapted to be coupled with at least one support cup for a supporting a barbell. The exercise rack is movable between an operating position wherein the two frames are spaced from each other and a storage position wherein said two frames are in closer proximity to each other. The operating position has a width direction and a length direction, and the storage position has a width direction and length direction. The width direction and the length direction of the exercise rack in the storage position is substantially reduced compared to the width direction and length direction of the exercise rack in the operating position.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • The features of certain embodiments will become more apparent in the following detailed description in which reference is made to the appended figures wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is top front perspective view of a first embodiment of the squat rack in the operating position;
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the first embodiment of the squat rack in the storage position;
  • FIG. 2 a is a detail view of the pivot connection between the support leg and rack leg of the squat rack;
  • FIG. 3 is a bottom back perspective view of the first embodiment of the squat rack in the operating position;
  • FIG. 4 is a back top perspective view of the first embodiment of the squat rack in the operating position;
  • FIG. 4 a is a detail view of a foot of the first embodiment of the squat rack;
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the first embodiment of the squat rack in transition to the storage position;
  • FIG. 6 is a detail view of the connection of the chin up bar;
  • FIG. 7 a shows a detailed view of a c-shaped spring clip for holding the chin up bar;
  • FIG. 7 b shows a detailed view of a cup for holding the chin up bar;
  • FIG. 7 c shows a detailed view of the c-shaped spring clip securing holding the chin up bar;
  • FIG. 7 d shows a detailed view of the cup holding the chin up bar;
  • FIG. 8 shows a detailed view of the cross bar connection;
  • FIG. 9 shows a detailed view of the sliding connection between the cross bar and the support leg;
  • FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the squat rack in a partially open operating position;
  • FIG. 11 is a perspective view of a second embodiment of the squat rack in an open position; and
  • FIG. 12 is a perspective view of a second embodiment of the squat rack in a storage position.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The description pertains to a squat rack 2 that is movable between an operating position, and example of which is shown in FIG. 1 and a storage position, an example of which is shown in FIG. 2 .
  • Figure one depicts a first embodiment of a folding squat rack 2 shown in the open position. The squat rack 2 comprises two frames 3 a and 3 b each comprising a rack leg 4 a and 4 b coupled at a top end thereof to a support leg 6 a and 6 b, respectively. The support legs, 6 a and 6 b are coupled by a set of cross bars 8 a and 8 b which provide stability of the folding squat rack in a width direction of the squat rack (also referred to as, and shown in the figures as, the x direction). The x-direction, or width direction is defined as the vector between the two support legs, while the y-direction or length direction is defined by the vector between a rear support leg and the corresponding rack leg. These directions are also depicted on FIG. 1 . The rack leg 4 a and support leg 6 a are braced in the forward/back direction (also referred to as the y-direction) by a brace 10 a. Likewise, the rack leg 4 b and support leg 6 b are braced in the y-direction by brace 10 b. Braces 10 a and 10 b each have a first end 12 a and 12 b respectively coupled to the corresponding support leg, and a second end 14 a and 14 b respectively, coupled to the corresponding rack leg. The braces 10 a and 10 b are preferably rotatably coupled to the support leg via a pivotable connection while the second end is preferably coupled to the rack leg with a spring-loaded pin. Thus, the second end can be selectively released from the rack leg and pivoted to a position parallel with the support leg to move the rack into a storage configuration. While the preferred embodiment of the braces 10 a and 10 b are described above, it can be appreciated that other configurations, orientations and coupling mechanisms would be known to a person skilled in the art.
  • While the braces 10 a and 10 b are shown in a preferred embodiment of being located generally centrally along the length of the support legs 6 a and 6 b and the rack legs 4 a and 4 b respectively, it can be appreciated that the position of the braces could be varied. For example, in an alternative embodiment shown in FIG. 11 , the braces 100, are situated close to, or on, the ground. This embodiment is shown in the storage position in FIG. 12 .
  • In the preferred embodiment shown in the figures, the rack legs 4 a and 4 b are coupled to the corresponding support legs 6 a and 6 b via a pivot connection 16 a and 16 b, respectively. This allows the rack leg to move closer to and towards parallel to, the corresponding support leg when moved from the operating position to the storage position. While a pivot connection is shown in the figures, it can be appreciated by a person skilled in the art, that other suitable connections such as, but not limited to, a sliding connection, a removable pin and slot connection, or any other suitable connection. In the preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 2 a , the pivot connection 16 is offset from the longitudinal axis of the support leg to allow the rack leg to lie generally parallel to the support leg in the storage position. The pivot connection can optionally include a guide bar 15 which is coupled on one end to the support leg 6 and the other end slides through a slot in the rack leg 4. This feature can help ensure that the support leg and rack leg maintain aligned in the length direction.
  • Each of the rack legs 4 a and 4 b and the support legs 6 a and 6 b preferably have a foot 20 affixed to the end thereof. These feet provide an enlarged contact area with the ground compared to the size of the rack legs or support lets and provide increased stability to the squat rack. In the preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 3 each foot includes a rubber pad on the underside thereof to prevent slipping of the legs or damage to the floor upon which the squat rack 2 is assembled.
  • In another preferred embodiment, the feet can be fitted with wheels 24 mounted such that when the squat rack is tipped, it can be supported on the wheels 24 and moved with relative ease and without requiring lifting of the entire apparatus. In a preferred embodiment, shown in FIGS. 4 and 4 a , these wheels 24 are located on the support legs and mounted on a rear side 26 of the support leg 6 by means of bracket 28. It can be appreciated that other mounting arrangements would be known to a person skilled in the art. This preferred embodiment allows the wheels to be free from contact with the ground when the squat rack 2 is in the operating position.
  • The rack legs 4 a and 4 b include a series of cup like projections, commonly called J-cups 18 spaced longitudinally along the length of the rack leg. In the preferred embodiment shown in the figures, the j-cups are formed having a base portion 19 with upwardly projecting j-cups extending outwardly therefrom. However, as would be know to a person skilled in the art, the j-cups could also be formed by a detachable cup with a pin connection to be inserted into one of a series of holes in a rack leg, simple pins to be inserted into one of a series of holes in each rack leg and extending outwardly therefrom to support a barbell, or could include individual projections coupled to the rack leg at various intervals along the length thereof (as shown in FIG. 11 ). These individual projections could be attached to the rack leg in any suitable manner, including, but not limited to welded, or bolted to the rack leg. The J-cups 18 are sized to receive a standard barbell and are coupled to the rack leg in a manner that would be suitable to hold a substantial amount of weight, for example, up to approximately 1000 lbs. it can be appreciated that the location of the cups could be varied to any position on the rack legs 4 a and 4 b.
  • As an optional feature, the support legs extend above the pivot connections 16 a and 16 b and are configured to allow for the mounting of a chin up bar 24 therebetween. A person skilled in the art would appreciate that there are various methods for coupling the chin up bar 24 between the support legs 6 a and 6 b, however in the preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 5 , a first end 32 of the pull up bar is inserted through a first hole 34 in an upper portion of the second support leg 6 b of a second frame and is fed through the first hole 34. When the first end 32 of the chin up bar 24 meets the first frame, it is inserted through a second hole 36 in an upper portion of the first support leg 6 a. Once the chin up bar 24 is in position, as shown in FIG. 1 , a fixation device 38 is coupled to the chin up bar to fix the chin up bar to the support legs 6 a and 6 b.
  • In the preferred embodiment shown in the figures, the chin up bar could include internal threading and a bolt with external threading could be rotated into engagement with the chin up bar. The head of the bolt would be of a diameter which would prevent the bolt head from slipping through the hole. The head of the bolt would further be configured to be easily attached and removed with out the need for tools, as shown in FIG. 6 . Optionally a washer 40 could be used between the bolt head and the side of the support leg. Similarly, the chin up bar could be secured in place with a spring pin on each end.
  • While the chin up bar shown in the figures is mounted on the support legs, it can be appreciated that it would be possible to mount the chin up bar on the rack legs.
  • When not in use, a support leg 6 b can be fitted with a retaining mechanism to retain the chin up bay 24 in a position generally parallel to the support leg 6 b. While there are various mechanisms that could be used to secure the chin up bar to the squat rack, in a preferred embodiment, the support leg 6 b is out fitted with a cup 42 sized to receive one end of the chin up bar and a c-shaped spring clip to contain the bar at a position part way along the length of said bar. This preferred embodiment is shown in FIGS. 7 a and 7 b without the bar in the storage position and in FIGS. 7 c and 7 d with the chin up bar 24 in storage position. In a preferred embodiment, the c-shaped spring clip is located a distance of over 50% of the length of the bar.
  • The cross bars 8 a and 8 b allow for a scissor action that allows the first support leg 6 a and second support leg 6 b to move in the x-direction or width direction. The cross bars, 8 a and 8 b are pivotably coupled at the midpoint thereof to facilitate the scissor action, as shown in FIG. 8 . One example of a pivot connection is a blot or pin which extends through a whole in each of the pivot bars, although other methods of creating a connection would be known to a person skilled in the art. Optionally, brackets 51 can be fixed to the cross bars to provide a mechanical stop that indicates the squat rack is in the fully open, operating position. Each cross bars 8 a and 8 b has a base pivot connection 46 a and 46 b which couples a first end of each cross bar to a predetermined point on the support legs 6 b and 6 a, respectively. In the preferred embodiment, these base pivot connections are located hear the foot of the support leg. Each of the second ends of each cross bar 8 a and 8 b slidably engage a higher portion of each support leg 6 a and 6 b respectively.
  • A detail view of the slidable engagement is shown in FIG. 9 . The cross bar 8 is fitted with a pivotable connection 52 which pivotably couples the cross bar 8 to a sliding foot 54. The sliding foot 54 engages a slot 56 within the support bar 6. A locking mechanism 58 is also fitted to the sliding foot 54 to prevent the sliding foot 54 from moving within the slot 56 once the supports are at the desired distance apart.
  • In one embodiment, the sliding mechanism has a plurality of positions where the sliding foot 54 could be locked in position within the slot 56. This embodiment allows for the user to choose from a variety of distances between the two support legs 6 a and 6 b and adjust the width of the squat rack in the x-direction. While any distance between the two legs could be used, a preferred embodiment allows for locking at predetermined positions, and particularly at positions such that the distance between the rack legs would be sized to accommodate a 4 ft, 5 ft, 6 ft and full sized 7 ft Olympic bar. FIG. 10 shows the squat rack configured to one such intermediate width.
  • When transitioning the squat rack from the operating position, as shown in FIG. 1 to the storage position, as shown in FIG. 2 , the user removes the optional chin up bar (if present) and unlocks the cross bar mechanisms. This allows for the two frames of the squat rack 2 to be brought in close proximity to each other as shown in FIG. 5 , and results in a reduction in width of the squat rack. The braces 10 a and 10 b can then be disengaged from the rack leg and moved to the storage position which is preferably generally parallel to the support legs 6 a and 6 b respectively. The disengagement of the braces 10 a and 10 b allows the rack legs to be pivoted into the storage position. This step results in a substantial reduction in the length direction or y-direction of the squat rack. While the above specifies that the width direction of the squat rack is reduced before the length direction, it can be appreciated that the rack legs could be moved into the storage position first and then the two frames of the squat rack can be moved into closer proximity with each other as a second step.
  • While the cross bar arrangement is one embodiment of showing an example mechanism to allow for the squat rack to be reduced in the width direction or x-direction, other mechanisms could be used to achieve this result. For example, a telescoping horizontal brace between the support legs could also be used. Alternatively, a horizontal bar could be positioned and removably coupled between the two support legs when in the operating position and stored in a similar manner to the chin up bar in the storage position. In this embodiment the two sides of the squat rack could be strapped together in the storage position. Alternatively, at least one or more split rail horizontal bars could be mounted between the two support legs. These bar would be hinged in the middle thereof, such that in the storage position, the two halves of the at least one or more horizontal bars would be in a bent position relative to each other and in the operating position, the two halves of the at least one or more horizontal bars would be straight or aligned. In yet a further alternative embodiment, a cable bracing mechanism with a central cylinder is used to brace the support legs. One example of a cable bracing mechanism is found in “Theoretical Assessment of the Behavior of Cable Bracing System with Central Steel Cylinder” (Fanaie, N. Aghajani, S., Dizaj, E. A. (2016) Theoretical Assessment of the Behavior of Cable Bracing System with Central Steel Cylinder. Advances in Structural Engineering 19(3): 463-472. DOI: 10.1177/1369433216630052), the contents of which are incorporated by reference herein. Other mechanisms would be known to a person skilled in the art.
  • In a preferred embodiment, the squat rack 2 is reduced by at least 60 percent in the width direction when it is moved from the operating position to the storage position. Similarly, it is reduced by at least 70 percent in the length direction when it is moved from the operating position to the storage position. In a further preferred embodiment, the squat rack 2 is reduced by at least 90 percent in the width direction when it is moved from the operating position to the storage position. Similarly, it is reduced by at least 90 percent in the length direction when it is moved from the operating position to the storage position. In yet a further preferred embodiment, the width direction is reduced by 87 percent and the length direction is reduced by 78 percent. This reduction ratio has been found to be compact and show stability and strength when in the operating position.
  • The substantial reduction in width and length when moved from the operating position to the storage position allows for the squat rack to be easily moved and stored. This allows for the squat rack 2 to be set up in the operating position temporarily a user can remove the squat rack from a space after their exercise session. Thus, it is not required that a user have a dedicated semi-permanent space for their squat rack. The reduction in width and length also allows for the squat rack to be easily stored, for example, in a closet, without taking up a large volume of space and with a relatively small footprint compared to the operating footprint. It also allows for the relatively easy transport of the squat rack from one location to another, for example, while traveling, as complete disassembly is not necessary to achieve this reduction in the length and width directions.
  • The support legs and rack legs could be made to varying specifications, however in a preferred embodiment, of aluminum to reduce weight. In a further preferred embodiment, they are made of 3×3 gage steel.
  • The squat rack disclosed herewith has is particularly advantageous to people who prefer work outs at home, in the outdoors, or in smaller private settings. A squat rack which can move be easily collapsed or folded into a smaller, portable configuration provides a convenient and mobile option to utilize the benefits of a traditional stationary squat rack in a flexible range of indoor and outdoor environments.
  • Furthermore, the folding exercise rack can be used effectively by sports teams or personal trainers, coaches, and physiotherapist as they can set it up at their training facility, their client’s home, or in a local park, or at any facility or location that is convenient to their team or clients.
  • Although the invention has been described with reference to certain specific embodiments, various modifications thereof will be apparent to those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as outlined in the claims appended hereto.
  • The terms “comprise”, “comprises”, “comprised” or “comprising” may be used in the present description. As used herein (including the specification and/or the claims), these terms are to be interpreted as specifying the presence of the stated features, integers, steps or components, but not as precluding the presence of one or more other feature, integer, step, component or a group thereof as would be apparent to persons having ordinary skill in the relevant art. Thus, the term “comprising” as used in this specification means “consisting at least in part of. When interpreting statements in this specification that include that term, the features, prefaced by that term in each statement, all need to be present but other features can also be present. Related terms such as “comprise” and “comprised” are to be interpreted in the same manner.
  • The term “and/or” can mean “and” or “or”.
  • Unless stated otherwise herein, the article “a” when used to identify any element is not intended to constitute a limitation of just one and will, instead, be understood to mean “at least one” or “one or more”
  • Although the above description includes reference to certain specific embodiments, various modifications thereof will be apparent to those skilled in the art. Any examples provided herein are included solely for the purpose of illustration and are not intended to be limiting in any way. Any drawings provided herein are solely for the purpose of illustrating various aspects of the description and are not intended to be drawn to scale or to be limiting in any way. The scope of the claims appended hereto should not be limited by the preferred embodiments set forth in the above description but should be given the broadest interpretation consistent with the present specification as a whole.

Claims (7)

We claim:
1. An exercise rack comprising;
two frames, each frame comprising a rack leg coupled at one end thereof to a support leg;
said rack legs adapted to be coupled with at least one support cup for a supporting a barbell;
said exercise rack being movable between an operating position wherein the two frames are spaced from each other and a storage position wherein said two frames are in closer proximity to each other;
wherein said operating position has a width direction and a length direction and said storage position has a width direction and length direction; and
said width direction and said length direction of said exercise rack in said storage position is substantially reduced compared to said width direction and length direction of said exercise rack in said operating position.
2. An exercise rack as claimed in claim 1 wherein said width direction and said length direction of said exercise rack in said storage position is reduced by at least 60 percent compared to said width direction and length direction of said exercise rack in said operating position.
3. An exercise rack as claimed in claim 2 wherein said width direction and said length direction of said exercise rack in said storage position is reduced by at least 90 percent compared to said width direction and length direction of said exercise rack in said operating position.
4. An exercise rack as claimed in claim 3 where said support legs of each of said two frames are coupled by a bracing member configured to allow for adjustable distance between said frames.
5. An exercise rack as claimed in claim 4 wherein said two frames are slidably coupled.
6. An exercise rack as claimed in claim 5 wherein said rack legs are pivotably coupled to said support legs.
7. An exercise rack as claimed in claim 6 wherein in said storage position, said rack legs and said support legs are generally parallel.
US18/162,400 2020-07-31 2023-01-31 Folding Exercise Rack Pending US20230173319A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US18/162,400 US20230173319A1 (en) 2020-07-31 2023-01-31 Folding Exercise Rack

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US202063059770P 2020-07-31 2020-07-31
PCT/CA2021/051072 WO2022020965A1 (en) 2020-07-31 2021-07-30 Folding exercise rack
US18/162,400 US20230173319A1 (en) 2020-07-31 2023-01-31 Folding Exercise Rack

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/CA2021/051072 Continuation WO2022020965A1 (en) 2020-07-31 2021-07-30 Folding exercise rack

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20230173319A1 true US20230173319A1 (en) 2023-06-08

Family

ID=80038063

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US18/162,400 Pending US20230173319A1 (en) 2020-07-31 2023-01-31 Folding Exercise Rack

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (1) US20230173319A1 (en)
EP (1) EP4188561A1 (en)
CA (1) CA3187925A1 (en)
GB (1) GB2601966A (en)
WO (1) WO2022020965A1 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USD1006922S1 (en) * 2023-08-29 2023-12-05 Xiongwei Tao Belt squat machine

Family Cites Families (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5290209A (en) * 1991-10-04 1994-03-01 Wilkinson William T Push and pull exercise device
US9625081B2 (en) * 2012-11-04 2017-04-18 James D. Olander Stand for supporting a laptop computer
CN208193485U (en) * 2018-05-14 2018-12-07 胡兵 A kind of Portable movable dumbbell rack
US10905912B2 (en) * 2018-11-01 2021-02-02 Tristan Thomas Workout apparatus with telescoping legs

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USD1006922S1 (en) * 2023-08-29 2023-12-05 Xiongwei Tao Belt squat machine

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
EP4188561A1 (en) 2023-06-07
CA3187925A1 (en) 2022-02-03
GB202203083D0 (en) 2022-04-20
WO2022020965A1 (en) 2022-02-03
GB2601966A (en) 2022-06-15

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4431181A (en) Collapsible gym apparatus
US5046722A (en) Exercising device
US11596850B2 (en) Exercise rack enclosure system
RU2667298C1 (en) Portable ballet barre for exercises
US7125371B2 (en) Adjustable bodyweight exercise apparatus
US5242345A (en) Retractable exercise apparatus
US7294097B2 (en) Articulated bench
US3708167A (en) Exercising apparatus
US4960277A (en) Foldable weight lifter's bench
US6921355B2 (en) Exercise device
AU2004216195B2 (en) Exercise device and method of using same
US20070032357A1 (en) User-defined exercise apparatus
US20020091043A1 (en) Space efficient multi-use exercise apparatus
US20150065320A1 (en) Reformer
US3944219A (en) Multipositionable portable and collapsible horizontal bar exercising apparatus
US20140296037A1 (en) Portable Universal Gym System
US20060025285A1 (en) Heavy-bag and adjustable-position speed-bag workout stand
US9789347B2 (en) Folding exercise chair for resistance training
US11779792B2 (en) Foldable and movable fitness or weight rack
US20230173319A1 (en) Folding Exercise Rack
US20230057347A1 (en) Exercise apparatus
US11426619B1 (en) Exercise rack
US7815557B1 (en) Chest and arm exercising apparatus
RU2144406C1 (en) Exerciser
AU2021105946A4 (en) Exercise Apparatus Mounting System

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: LIFT SCIENCE INC., CANADA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BALLARD, CRAIG RICHARD;ELLISON, JOHNO;REEL/FRAME:062551/0906

Effective date: 20200809

STPP Information on status: patent application and granting procedure in general

Free format text: DOCKETED NEW CASE - READY FOR EXAMINATION