US20180141624A1 - Aquatic sports board - Google Patents

Aquatic sports board Download PDF

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Publication number
US20180141624A1
US20180141624A1 US15/574,723 US201615574723A US2018141624A1 US 20180141624 A1 US20180141624 A1 US 20180141624A1 US 201615574723 A US201615574723 A US 201615574723A US 2018141624 A1 US2018141624 A1 US 2018141624A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
board
hull
rider
deck
keel
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US15/574,723
Inventor
Justin Walter Schroenn
Matthew Bernhard Schroenn
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Zambezi Sports Inc
Original Assignee
Zambezi Sports Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Zambezi Sports Inc filed Critical Zambezi Sports Inc
Priority to US15/574,723 priority Critical patent/US20180141624A1/en
Publication of US20180141624A1 publication Critical patent/US20180141624A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • B63B35/7909
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63BSHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
    • B63B32/00Water sports boards; Accessories therefor
    • B63B32/57Boards characterised by the material, e.g. laminated materials
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63BSHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
    • B63B32/00Water sports boards; Accessories therefor
    • B63B32/20Boards specially adapted for use in a prone position, e.g. wild-water sledges
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63BSHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
    • B63B32/00Water sports boards; Accessories therefor
    • B63B32/50Boards characterised by their constructional features
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63BSHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
    • B63B32/00Water sports boards; Accessories therefor
    • B63B32/50Boards characterised by their constructional features
    • B63B32/53Sectionalised boards, e.g. modular, dismountable or foldable boards
    • B63B35/7916
    • B63B35/7926
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63CLAUNCHING, HAULING-OUT, OR DRY-DOCKING OF VESSELS; LIFE-SAVING IN WATER; EQUIPMENT FOR DWELLING OR WORKING UNDER WATER; MEANS FOR SALVAGING OR SEARCHING FOR UNDERWATER OBJECTS
    • B63C11/00Equipment for dwelling or working underwater; Means for searching for underwater objects
    • B63C11/48Means for searching for underwater objects
    • B63C11/49Floating structures with underwater viewing devices, e.g. with windows ; Arrangements on floating structures of underwater viewing devices, e.g. on boats
    • B63B2035/7903
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63BSHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
    • B63B32/00Water sports boards; Accessories therefor
    • B63B32/60Board appendages, e.g. fins, hydrofoils or centre boards
    • B63B35/7923

Definitions

  • This application relates to boards and crafts for supporting a rider.
  • the application relates to aquatic sports boards and personal watercrafts which are designed for human-powered propulsion.
  • Surf boards and body boards are generally designed for riding waves, from which much of the propulsion power for the board is derived. They are not generally designed for use in water where there are no significant waves. Consequently, they have not been optimized to be propelled by the arms and legs of the rider.
  • body boards and kick boards do allow for the use of the rider's legs, but because the rider's pelvis is not well supported, the power of the kick stroke is reduced, and the board must be held with the arms in order for the legs to generate more power.
  • body boards and kick boards tend to be of roughly equal thickness throughout most of their length, and lack substantial thickness and buoyancy at their stern, where much of the rider's weight bears down on the board, it is very difficult for the rider to raise their hips up and lower their shoulders to create more power, without the weight of the rider sinking the board too deeply into the water to be effective.
  • the overall flatness of the decks of surf boards, body boards and kick boards does not facilitate the effective use of the rider's torso muscles, commonly referred to as core muscles, to aid in the propulsion of the board.
  • the present application relates to a buoyant aquatic sports board on which the rider is more effectively supported in a wide variety of positions, is able to pivot the angle of the board more effectively, for example about its stern, and can use their arms, legs, abdominal muscles, torso and spine in a more natural, powerful and effective way to propel the board forward.
  • One aspect of the invention provides an aquatic sports board deployable in water and having a bow end and a stern end, wherein the board comprises a buoyant hull having a lower portion which is at least partially curved between the bow end and said stern end, and wherein the board comprises a primary load supporting region having a sufficient volume for buoyantly supporting a substantial proportion of the weight of a rider at or near the surface of the water.
  • the primary load supporting region comprises at least part of the hull and has a vertical dimension larger than other parts of the hull.
  • the primary load supporting region may be substantially larger in volume than other regions of the board.
  • the primary load supporting region may be located toward the stern end of the board.
  • the board may be pivotable relative to an axis aligned with the primary load supporting region to cause pitching, rolling and/or yawing motion of the board.
  • the primary load supporting region When the board is deployed in water, the primary load supporting region may be configured to support the rider in a riding position wherein the rider is able to move both their arms and legs through the water to propel the board using swimming motions. In one aspect, in at least some of the riding positions, the primary load supporting region is configured to support the hips of the rider at an elevation approximately even with the chest of the rider.
  • the primary load supporting region may also comprise a deck located on an upper surface of the hull and at least part of a keel projecting from the lower surface of the hull.
  • the hull may include a rear portion comprising an enlarged portion of the hull and a forward portion which curves upwardly from the rear portion to a nose located at the bow end of the board.
  • FIG. 1 is a side view of an embodiment of the applicant's aquatic sports board deployed in water showing a rider in an exemplary riding position.
  • FIG. 2 is a side view of the board of FIG. 1 showing the rider in a more body-forward riding position.
  • FIG. 3 is a top isometric view of an embodiment of the applicant's sports board
  • FIG. 4 is a bottom isometric view of the board of FIG. 3 ;
  • FIG. 5 is a top plan view of the board of FIG. 3 ;
  • FIG. 6 is a bottom plan view of the board of FIG. 3 ;
  • FIG. 7 is a right side elevational view of the board of FIG. 3 ;
  • FIG. 8 is a left side elevational view of the board of FIG. 3 ;
  • FIG. 9 is a front elevational view of the board of FIG. 3 ;
  • FIG. 10 is a rear elevational view of the board of FIG. 3 ;
  • FIG. 11 is an enlarged, exploded view of a mounting slot and plug
  • FIG. 12 is an enlarged, exploded view of a mounting slot and tail accessory
  • FIG. 13 is a bottom isometric view of a first tail accessory
  • FIG. 14 is a top isometric view of the first tail accessory of FIG. 13 ;
  • FIG. 15 is a bottom isometric view of a second tail accessory
  • FIG. 16 is a top, isometric view of the second tail accessory of FIG. 15 ;
  • FIG. 17 is a bottom isometric view of a third tail accessory
  • FIG. 18 is a top isometric view of the tail accessory of FIG. 17 ;
  • FIG. 19 is a top isometric view of the board of FIG. 3 fitted with the first tail accessory of FIG. 13 ;
  • FIG. 20 is a bottom isometric view of the board of FIG. 19 ;
  • FIG. 21 is a top plan view of the board of FIG. 19 ;
  • FIG. 22 is a bottom plan view of the board of FIG. 19 ;
  • FIG. 23 is a right side elevational view of the board of FIG. 19 ;
  • FIG. 24 is a left side elevational view of the board of FIG. 19 ;
  • FIG. 25 is a front elevational view of the board of FIG. 19 ;
  • FIG. 26 is a rear elevational view of the board of FIG. 19 ;
  • FIG. 27 is a top isometric view of the board of FIG. 3 fitted with the second tail accessory of FIG. 15 ;
  • FIG. 28 is a bottom isometric view of the board of FIG. 27 ;
  • FIG. 29 is a top plan view of the board of FIG. 27 ;
  • FIG. 30 is a bottom plan view of the board of FIG. 27 ;
  • FIG. 31 is a right side elevational view of the board of FIG. 27 ;
  • FIG. 32 is a left side elevational view of the board of FIG. 27 ;
  • FIG. 33 is a front elevational view of the board of FIG. 27 ;
  • FIG. 34 is a rear elevational view of the board of FIG. 27 ;
  • FIG. 35 is a top isometric view of the board of FIG. 3 fitted with the third tail accessory of FIG. 17 ;
  • FIG. 36 is a bottom isometric view of the board of FIG. 35 ;
  • FIG. 37 is a top plan view of the board of FIG. 35 ;
  • FIG. 38 is a bottom plan view of the board of FIG. 35 ;
  • FIG. 39 is a right side elevational view of the board of FIG. 35 ;
  • FIG. 40 is a left side elevational view of the board of FIG. 35 ;
  • FIG. 41 is a front elevational view of the board of FIG. 35 ;
  • FIG. 42 is a rear elevational view of the board of FIG. 35 ;
  • FIG. 43 is a top isometric view of another embodiment of the applicant's aquatic sports board.
  • FIG. 44 is a bottom isometric view of the board of FIG. 43 ;
  • FIG. 45 is a top plan view of the board of FIG. 43 ;
  • FIG. 46 is a bottom plan view of the board of FIG. 43 ;
  • FIG. 47 is a right side elevational view of the board of FIG. 43 ;
  • FIG. 48 is a left side elevational view of the board of FIG. 43 ;
  • FIG. 49 is a front elevational view of the board of FIG. 43 ;
  • FIG. 50 is a rear elevational view of the board of FIG. 43 ;
  • FIG. 51 is a top isometric view of another embodiment of the applicant's aquatic sports board.
  • FIG. 52 is a bottom isometric view of the board of FIG. 51 ;
  • FIG. 53 is a top plan view of the board of FIG. 51 ;
  • FIG. 54 is a bottom plan view of the board of FIG. 51 ;
  • FIG. 55 is a right side elevational view of the board of FIG. 51 ;
  • FIG. 56 is a left side elevational view of the board of FIG. 51 ;
  • FIG. 57 is a front elevational view of the board of FIG. 51 ;
  • FIG. 58 is a rear elevational view of the board of FIG. 51 ;
  • FIG. 59 is a top isometric view of another embodiment of the applicant's aquatic sports board.
  • FIG. 60 is a bottom isometric view of the board of FIG. 59 ;
  • FIG. 61 is a top plan view of the board of FIG. 59 ;
  • FIG. 62 is a bottom plan view of the board of FIG. 59 ;
  • FIG. 63 is a right side elevational view of the board of FIG. 59 ;
  • FIG. 64 is a left side elevational view of the board of FIG. 59 ;
  • FIG. 65 is a front elevational view of the board of FIG. 59 ;
  • FIG. 66 is a rear elevational view of the board of FIG. 59 ;
  • FIG. 67 is a top isometric view of another embodiment of the applicant's aquatic sports board similar to the embodiment of FIG. 59 and including a rail cover;
  • FIG. 68 is a bottom isometric view of the board of FIG. 67 ;
  • FIG. 69 is a top plan view of the board of FIG. 67 ;
  • FIG. 70 is a bottom plan view of the board of FIG. 67 ;
  • FIG. 71 is a right side elevational view of the board of FIG. 67 ;
  • FIG. 72 is a left side elevational view of the board of FIG. 67 ;
  • FIG. 73 is a front elevational view of the board of FIG. 67 ;
  • FIG. 74 is a rear elevational view of the board of FIG. 67 ;
  • FIG. 75 is a top isometric view of another embodiment of the applicant's aquatic sports board configured as a stand-up paddle board;
  • FIG. 76 is a bottom isometric view of the board of FIG. 75 ;
  • FIG. 77 is a top plan view of the board of FIG. 75 ;
  • FIG. 78 is a bottom plan view of the board of FIG. 75 ;
  • FIG. 79 is a right side elevational view of the board of FIG. 75 ;
  • FIG. 80 is a left side elevational view of the board of FIG. 75 ;
  • FIG. 81 is a front elevational view of the board of FIG. 75 ;
  • FIG. 82 is a rear elevational view of the board of FIG. 75 ;
  • FIG. 83 is a rear elevational view of the board of Figure X having a closeable compartment
  • FIG. 84 is a bottom isometric view of the board of Figure Y fitted with hydrofoil accessories.
  • board 10 includes a hull 12 , a keel 14 projecting from an undersurface of hull 12 and a deck 16 located on an upper surface of hull 12 for supporting a rider.
  • hull 12 , keel 14 and deck 16 are buoyant for supporting the rider in a wide variety of riding positions when board 10 is deployed in water.
  • FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate board 10 in two exemplary riding positions.
  • riding positions include positions where the rider is actively propelling board 10 using swimming motions and also positions where the rider is at rest and/or is harnessing waves, current, wind or other external forces for causing motion of board 10 .
  • FIG. 1 illustrates board 10 in a riding position with the rider's head slightly raised.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates board 10 in a riding position with the rider's body shifted forwardly on board 10 and the rider's head in a less raised posture.
  • board 10 in a riding position with the rider's body shifted forwardly on board 10 and the rider's head in a less raised posture.
  • many other orientations of board 10 are possible depending upon the particular riding position adopted by the rider and the prevailing water conditions.
  • board 10 includes a primary load supporting region 18 for supporting a substantial proportion of the weight of the rider, such as the weight of the rider's lower torso, hips (pelvis) and upper legs at or near the surface of the water ( FIGS. 1 and 2 ).
  • a primary load supporting region 18 for supporting a substantial proportion of the weight of the rider, such as the weight of the rider's lower torso, hips (pelvis) and upper legs at or near the surface of the water ( FIGS. 1 and 2 ).
  • primary load supporting region 18 is configured to be substantially larger in volume and consequentially substantially more buoyant than other regions of board 10 .
  • primary load supporting region 18 is preferably configured to have a vertical dimension greater than other regions of board 10 .
  • buoyant refers to a structure which produces a buoyant force when it is at least partially immersed in water.
  • primary load supporting region 18 may comprise a portion of hull 12 , keel 14 and/or deck 16 which produces a buoyant force directed to load supporting region 18 sufficient to support a substantial proportion of the weight of rider, such as their lower torso, hips and upper legs, in a riding position at or near the surface of the water.
  • board 10 is designed to be semi-submersible. That is, a substantial proportion of board 10 , including a substantial proportion of load supporting region 18 , is ordinarily immersed below the waterline when the rider is positioned on board 10 in a riding position. Board 10 may also include one or more secondary load supporting regions 20 for supporting other portions of a rider's body in a riding position, such as their upper torso.
  • primary load supporting region 18 can be controllably pivoted or articulated by a rider.
  • region 18 includes a curved portion of hull 12 , a deck 16 positioned on hull 12 for supporting the rider, and an enlarged portion of keel 14 projecting downwardly from hull 12 beneath deck 16 and in line with the longitudinal centerline of board 10 .
  • the enlarged portion of the buoyant keel 14 is sized and shaped to resist depression. The arrangement provides board 10 with a degree of deliberate instability.
  • the rockered curvature of the hull 12 and the centrally located buoyant keel 14 gives board 10 a tendency to pitch, roll and/or yaw about an axis aligned with the load supporting region.
  • a rider can cause pivoting motion of board 10 , for example for purposes of propulsion and/or steering.
  • the controlled movements of the rider on deck 16 can be compared to an athlete engaging their core muscles to controllably shift their centre of gravity relative to an unstable exercise ball on which they are at least partially supported.
  • board 10 is optimized for self-propulsion. That is, a rider can effectively propel board 10 by using their arms and legs in swimming motions, and/or by shifting the centre of gravity of the core region of their body, rather than relying on waves, current, wind or other external forces for motive force. Further, as described herein, board 10 may optionally be fitted with accessories such as tail fins and the like for translating pitching, rolling and/or yawing movement of board 10 into propulsive force. In some embodiments board 10 is designed so that it is sufficiently short in length (e.g.
  • primary load supporting region 18 may comprise a rear portion of board 10 which is substantially larger in volume and consequentially substantially more buoyant than the remainder of board 10 .
  • hull 12 may include a rear portion 22 adjacent a stern end 24 of board 10 which is substantially larger in volume than a forward portion 26 of hull 12 adjacent a bow end 28 of board 10 . Therefore the buoyancy of board 10 varies significantly along its length between stern end 24 and bow end 28 .
  • hull 12 includes lateral gunnels or side rails 30 which extend longitudinally on opposite sides of hull 12 from rear portion 22 to forward portion 26 ( FIGS. 7 and 8 ).
  • Side rails 30 may extend substantially the entire distance from stern end 24 to bow end 28 .
  • side rails 30 include resilient rail covers 32 to enable a rider to more easily grip rails 30 near bow end 28 and to protect rails 30 from damage.
  • Rail covers 32 comprise a plurality of spaced slots 34 for enhanced slip-resistance.
  • side rails 30 In forward portion 26 of hull 12 , side rails 30 have a pronounced upward curve and taper inwardly to merge at a nose 36 of board 10 at bow end 28 . As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 , when a rider is positioned on board 10 in a typical riding position in calm water, the terminal height of nose 36 is above the elevation of deck 16 .
  • an opening 38 is defined between side rails 30 in forward portion 26 of hull 12 (e.g. FIGS. 5 and 6 ). As explained below, opening 38 permits a rider to see through forward portion 26 of hull 12 to visualize the water conditions beneath board 10 .
  • opening 38 may be covered with a transparent or semi-transparent window 40 .
  • opening 38 may be omitted and forward portion 26 of hull 12 may be enclosed between side rails 30 .
  • forward portion 26 of hull 12 may include a central member 42 extending along a longitudinal centerline of board 10 between side rails 30 . As shown in FIG. 5 , central member 42 may subdivide opening 38 into first and second lateral portions 38 A and 38 B.
  • first and second lateral portions 38 A, 38 B may vary.
  • central member 42 is omitted and opening 38 is not subdivided.
  • Rear portion 22 of hull 12 includes an enlarged body 44 located between side rails 30 .
  • body 44 may be generally oval-shaped or teardrop-shaped in side profile ( FIGS. 7 and 8 ). Throughout most of its length, body 44 provides hull rear portion 22 with a much larger transverse circumferential dimension or “girth” than hull forward portion 26 .
  • Body 44 has an upper surface 46 which defines a platform for supporting deck 16 and lateral side surfaces 48 .
  • a rear section of body surface 46 curves downwardly at stern end 24 to form a rounded rear tail 50 of board 10 .
  • a forward section of body surface 46 is inclined downwardly to merge with forward portion 26 of hull 12 .
  • Lateral surfaces 48 of body 38 also taper downwardly on opposite sides of board 10 to merge with corresponding side rails 30 .
  • lateral surfaces 48 may taper inwardly to form a recessed portion at the base of body 44 adjacent side rails 30 .
  • hull 12 comprises an undersurface 52 which curves longitudinally from stern end 24 to bow end 28 .
  • an uninterrupted curve of a hull is known as a continuously curved rocker, or continuous rocker.
  • Alternative embodiments of board 10 may include portions of hull 12 which are flattened. In the terminology of surf boards, paddle boards and the like, this is known as an interrupted rocker. This flattening or interrupting of portions of the overall curve of hull 12 will influence the performance of board 10 when in use, particularly the case where board 10 rocks forward and aft.
  • the curvature of hull 12 in forward portion 26 is very pronounced.
  • the pronounced curvature of hull 12 , particularly in forward portion 26 distinguishes it from conventional body boards and surf boards which are substantially flat or have a modest longitudinal rocker.
  • hull 12 may also have a lateral rocker.
  • a lateral rocker may increase the instability of board 10 , requiring more skill and effort for a rider to controllably propel board 10 in use.
  • keel 14 projects downwardly from at least part of hull undersurface 52 .
  • keel 14 extends along the longitudinal centerline of hull 12 substantially the entire length between stern end 24 and bow end 28 .
  • the profile of keel 14 including its length, depth, width, thickness and shape, may vary in different embodiments of board 10 .
  • keel 14 follows the arc of hull undersurface 52 .
  • keel 14 may include enlarged portions to confer enhanced buoyancy at specific longitudinal locations thereof.
  • keel 14 may include a primary thruster 54 located underneath rear portion 22 of hull 12 and one or more secondary thrusters 56 located forwardly of primary thruster 54 .
  • one secondary thruster 56 may be located underneath the forward end of body 44 where hull rear portion 22 merges with hull forward portion 26 (shown, for example, in FIGS. 7 and 8 ).
  • a further secondary thruster 56 may project from keel 14 adjacent nose 36 at bow end 28 ( FIGS. 43-50 ).
  • deck 16 , rear portion 22 of hull 12 and primary thruster 54 of keel 14 may together comprise elements of primary load supporting region 18 of board 10 .
  • the relative size and shape of the constituent elements of primary load supporting region 18 of board 10 may vary in different embodiments of board 10 .
  • the volume or girth of hull 12 in load supporting region 18 could be more streamlined and the size of primary thruster 54 could be enlarged.
  • the girth of hull 12 in primary load supporting region 18 could be enlarged and primary thruster 54 of keel 14 could be reduced in size or omitted entirely.
  • the size of deck 16 could similarly vary or deck 16 could be omitted entirely in alternative embodiments.
  • the vertical dimension of primary load supporting region 18 e.g. from the riding surface of deck 16 to the bottom of keel thruster 54 ) exceeds the vertical dimension of other regions of board 10 .
  • the proportional size of secondary load supporting region 20 which may include a secondary keel thruster 56 , could similarly vary in different embodiments of board 10 .
  • primary keel thruster 54 is aligned beneath deck 16 to increase the buoyant up-thrust in primary load supporting region 18 of board 10 .
  • secondary thrusters 56 are provided to increase the buoyancy of forward portion 26 of hull 12 at a secondary load supporting region 20 or other selected locations to prevent “nose-diving” of board 10 as it is propelled or maneuvered through water, for example in a pitching motion and/or when the rider assumes a very body-forward riding position on board 10 .
  • keel 14 may vary to alter buoyancy or other performance characteristics of board 10 .
  • keel 14 may be relatively thick with a blunted or flat lower surface 58 .
  • segments of keel 14 bottom surface 58 may be convexly curved between primary and secondary thrusters 54 , 56 ( FIGS. 47-48 ).
  • Keel 14 also includes in some embodiments tapered side surfaces 60 which extend from keel bottom surface 58 to the undersurface 52 of hull 12 (e.g. FIG. 46 ).
  • keel 14 may include a cover 62 fixedly or removably secured to keel lower surface 58 (for example, as shown in FIGS. 1-2 and 3-10 ).
  • Cover 62 may include a plurality of longitudinally spaced-apart scales 64 each having a fixed end 66 and a free end 68 .
  • cover 62 is formed from a rubberized material. Cover 62 protects keel 14 from in-water damage in the event of contact with rocks, reefs and other hard, abrasive hazards. Cover 62 also protects keel 14 from damage during transport and storage.
  • cover 62 can alter the performance characteristics of board 10 in water.
  • cover 62 may aid in the forward propulsion of board 10 when the bow of board 10 is elevated and depressed alternately, either by the rider's actions, or by some water conditions, such as choppiness.
  • scales 64 When the board is articulated forcefully up and down in a vertical plane, such as when performing the butterfly stroke, scales 64 will flare outwards, helping to restrict rearwards movement or ‘slipping’ of board 10 , thereby accomplishing some conservation of energy of the rider's efforts, making forward propulsion of board 10 more efficient and coherent.
  • a following current, or rip tide, travelling faster than board 10 in the same direction as board 10 may to varying degrees engage scales 64 , causing them to flare outwards, thereby increasing the friction of board 10 by way of cover 62 , thereby, in turn, increasing the ability of a following current to help propel board 10 in the same direction
  • cover 62 could be secured to all or some of the undersurface 52 of hull 12 . In one example, this could significantly increase the number of scale 64 available to alter the performance characteristics of board 10 .
  • Deck 16 comprises an upper riding surface of hull 12 .
  • deck 16 is located on body 44 of hull rear portion 22 .
  • deck 16 is inclined toward forward portion 26 of hull 12 . That is, a longitudinal centerline 70 of deck 16 may extend in a generally linear or curved plane intersecting the upturned curved arc of forward portion 26 (e.g. FIG. 3 ).
  • lateral portions 72 of deck 16 taper inwardly and downwardly toward longitudinal centerline 70 such that deck 16 has a generally V-shaped or U-shaped profile in transverse section or end elevation ( FIG. 9 ).
  • deck 16 may include a partially rounded rear section 74 , a central portion 76 and a forward section 78 .
  • rear section 74 may support the rider's hips; central section 76 may support the rider's lower torso; and forward section 78 may support the rider's chest.
  • the rider's body position relative to deck 16 may vary depending upon rider characteristics and preference, including body size and shape, motion, speed and swimming strokes desired, and prevailing water conditions.
  • a rider may assume a forward riding position on deck 16 where the rider's chest is positioned at the forward end of deck 16 at an elevation approximately level with or below the rider's hips and the rider's head is directly above opening 38 .
  • the rider's hips are shifted rearwardly to be partly in the water and the rider's chest is somewhat raised.
  • the rider's thighs may be supported by rear section 74 of deck 12 rather than the rider's hips.
  • the rider's hips may be mostly in the water and the rider's lower torso may be supported by rear section 74 with the rider's chest in alignment with central section 76 .
  • the rider may assume many other riding positions, including positions wherein the small of the rider's back is supported by rear section 74 , for example where the rider is using board 10 for back stroke swimming motions.
  • the angle at which board 10 rests in the water will vary significantly.
  • the weight of the rider will ordinarily cause tail 50 to be depressed and nose 36 to be elevated.
  • opening 38 (optionally covered by a window 40 ) enables the rider to see ahead of board 10 , even when nose 36 is raised.
  • the rider is able to see below the surface of the water to some extent, providing a pleasing sensation to the rider.
  • end board 10 may be used by a rider to comfortably view aquatic wildlife or the like.
  • deck 12 may not be inclined toward forward portion 26 of hull 12 , or may be inclined at a less pronounced angle than shown in the drawings (e.g. FIGS. 7 and 8 ). In such cases the rider's chest could be supported in a more upright posture in some swimming positions.
  • deck 12 may include depressions or cavities, for example to accommodate the rider's central abdomen or belly.
  • an upper surface of deck 16 is slip-resistant in nature. This may be achieved through the choice of materials used for deck 16 , or by the application of a slip-resistant veneer or coating to the upper surface of deck 16 .
  • Deck 16 may also include contours, ridges or additional anti-slip features.
  • deck 16 may include a slip-resistant, purchase-enhancing cover 80 which includes a plurality of spaced-apart transverse ribs 82 defining a plurality of transverse channels 84 therebetween (e.g. as shown in FIGS. 3, 5, 9 and 10 ). Ribs and channels 82 , 84 follow the contour of deck 16 and are inclined toward longitudinal centerline 70 .
  • ribs 82 may be tapered slightly forwardly to help restrain sliding rearward movement of a rider on deck 16 .
  • the thickness, contour and configuration of deck cover 80 may vary.
  • a plurality of apertured tabs 86 may be spaced on the lateral edges of cover 80 to act as gripping points for hoisting a rider on to deck 16 and/or attachment points for securing accessories to board 10 .
  • Board 10 may optionally include other attachment points similar to tabs 86 .
  • board 10 may include a hook 88 mounted on tail 50 .
  • Attachable accessories could vary based on performance, safety, and aesthetic preferences. For example, such accessories could include grab handles; locks and chains; tethering leashes; tethering straps or nets; stowage bags of varying size and shape; brackets for holding removable containers; camera mounting brackets; solar panels; rechargeable batteries; solar powered lights, and battery or solar powered location beacons and devices.
  • a lockable chain could be secured to hook 88 for locking board 10 to a secure structure when not in use.
  • deck cover 80 may extend rearwardly for securement to keel 14 , such as primary thruster 54 .
  • keel cover 62 and deck cover 80 may be one unitary rubberized attachment to board 10 .
  • one or more tail accessories 90 may be removably connected to a rear portion of keel 14 and/or hull 12 at stern end 24 for extending rearwardly of tail 50 ( FIGS. 12-42 ).
  • tail accessories 90 may be optionally coupled to a mounting slot 92 formed in a rear portion of keel 14 .
  • mounting slot 92 may be formed in a rear portion of primary thruster 54 of keel 14 at a point of maximum depth of board 10 .
  • the size, shape, elasticity and function of tail accessories 90 may vary.
  • accessories 90 extend behind and below the rider in a manner that will not impede the rider's legs or interfere with kicking motions.
  • a pair of flexible fin-shaped mounting flanges 94 may be positioned adjacent mounting slot 92 on opposite side surfaces 60 of keel 14 (e.g. FIG. 10 ).
  • Each flange 94 is secured to hull undersurface 52 and/or keel side surface 60 along an upper edge thereof and has a free lower end adjacent mounting slot 62 to define a narrow opening 96 between keel 14 and a respective flange 94 .
  • a removable plug 98 may be coupled to mounting slot 92 .
  • plug 98 includes an insert 100 which matingly fits within slot 92 and a retaining strap 102 having an apertured end 104 . End 104 of retaining strap 102 may be secured to hook 88 projecting rearwardly of tail 50 of board 10 . Removable plug 98 may thus be coupled to board 10 in a streamlined manner to minimize drag.
  • tail accessory 90 includes a mounting insert 106 , having a shape and profile similar to plug insert 100 , which projects from a mounting surface 108 .
  • a pair of spaced-apart side surfaces 110 extend from surface 108 on opposite sides of insert 106 .
  • Side surfaces 110 are joined by a stretchable mounting strap 112 .
  • side surfaces 110 merge rearwardly of mounting strap 108 to form a single fin 114 .
  • removable plug 98 is first removed from mounting slot 92 . More particularly, retaining strap 102 is disengaged from hook 88 and insert 100 is withdrawn from slot 92 . Mounting insert 106 of tail accessory 90 is then inserted into mounting slot 92 and side surfaces 110 of accessory 90 are snugly fitted on opposite sides of keel 14 into a narrow opening 96 defined between a mounting flange 94 and a respective side surface 60 of keel 14 . Mounting strap 112 is then stretched over mounting hook 88 of board 10 to secure accessory 90 in place with fin 114 extending rearwardly of tail 50 of board 10 . In order to remove tail accessory 90 the above mounting steps are reversed, namely strap 112 is disconnected from mounting hook 88 and insert 106 is removed from mounting slot 92 .
  • FIGS. 15-16 illustrate an alternative embodiment of tail accessory 90 where side surfaces 110 remain spaced-apart rearwardly of mounting strap 112 to form a pair of spaced-apart fins 114 .
  • fins 114 flare outwardly at their rearward end.
  • a person skilled in the art will recognize that the size, shape and orientation of fins 114 may vary in different embodiments.
  • FIGS. 17-18 illustrate a further alternative embodiment of tail accessory 90 where spaced-apart fins 114 are connected by an adjustable length strap 116 located rearwardly of fixed length mounting strap 112 .
  • the length of strap 116 can be adjusted for varying the distance between fins 114 and thereby alter the performance characteristics of tail accessory 90 .
  • the rider may choose to lengthen strap 116 to flare fins 114 outwardly to the maximum extent.
  • the rider may opt to shorten strap 116 to draw fins 114 together in order to minimize drag.
  • fins 114 may be drawn together or allowed to flare apart by a rider according to their personal physiology or preferred kicking style. For instance, a rider who tends to kick with their legs very close together may choose to adjust strap 116 so that fins 114 are closer together and therefore do not impede the movement of their legs.
  • FIGS. 19-26 show the tail accessory 90 of FIGS. 13-14 secured to a board 10 ;
  • FIGS. 27-34 show the tail accessory 90 of FIGS. 15-16 coupled to a board 10 ;
  • FIGS. 35-42 illustrate the tail accessory 90 of FIGS. 17-18 coupled to a board 10 .
  • Such tail accessories 90 may also optionally be coupled to other embodiments of board 10 described herein.
  • tail accessories 90 may be removably coupled to board 10 .
  • a tail accessory 90 could be configured for supporting the legs of a disabled paraplegic rider.
  • tail accessory 90 could include braces or supports designed to safely and ergonomically support the rider's legs when the rider's torso is positioned on deck 16 .
  • tail accessories 90 have been described as being removable, in some embodiments a tail accessory 90 or other extension could be integrally connected to tail 50 of board 10 .
  • board 10 could include a permanently mounted rear fin rather than a fin 114 comprising part of a removable tail accessory 90 .
  • tail accessory 90 is optional and not essential to the functioning of board 10 , it may be removed. For example, many riders may prefer the shorter length and more nimble maneuverability of a board 10 without a tail accessory 90 . In another example, board 10 without a tail accessory 90 may be more suitable for use in the close confines of a swimming pool. A rider may also choose to remove tail accessory 90 if they prefer to use a kicking style where their legs could potentially be impeded by accessory 90 .
  • tail accessories 90 including fins 114 may be constructed from a wide range of materials and may be either flexible or rigid.
  • accessories 90 are manufactured from materials commonly used in the production of swim fins, flippers and the like and may exhibit varying degrees of flexibility, spring, elasticity, recoil and buoyancy. Depending upon their shape, material, elastic recoil, mounting depth and other features, tail accessories 90 may impart a wide range of performance characteristics to board 10 .
  • board 10 could be coupled to board 10 in a manner similar to tail accessories 90 or in some other suitable manner.
  • board 10 could be adapted for use for a variety of lifesaving, search and rescue, and recreational functions.
  • mounting slot 92 and/or hook 88 could be used to secure specialty accessories having mating inserts, plugs and/or strap fasteners.
  • Specialty accessories could include, for example, sled runners, skis or boards securely connectable to keel 14 and/or hull undersurface 52 to adapt board 10 for travel over ice or snow.
  • board 10 could be configured for safe travel over both ice and water (which could be useful, for example, in rescuing an ice skater who has fallen through thin ice).
  • board 10 could be adapted for traversing both snow and water, such as during spring skiing competitions/spectacles where participants slide down a snowy slope and traverse at least partially across a pool of water formed from slushy snow melt.
  • Board 10 could find application in many similar lifesaving, search and rescue, and recreational activities where a rider is called upon to traverse different environmental substrates or conditions, such as water, ice or snow.
  • a specialty accessory could include a wheel assembly for adapting board 10 for travel over land.
  • a wheel assembly for adapting board 10 for travel over land.
  • a plurality of spaced-apart wheels could be coupled to keel 14 and/or hull undersurface 52 for rolling motion on solid ground.
  • board 10 would have the advantage of supporting the user's torso and legs well above the ground surface for optimal control and safety.
  • board 10 could be modified for movement in non-aquatic environments.
  • keel 14 could be omitted entirely and runners, skis, wheels or other ground-engaging supports could be coupled directly to the main body of hull 12 .
  • hydrofoil skegs 118 may be optionally coupled to keel 14 for modifying the ride characteristics of board 10 . Under conditions where board 10 is travelling at high speed, hydrofoil skegs 118 will tend to raise board 10 in water and may be suitable, for example, when using board 10 for wakeboarding or when traversing the face of a powerful wave.
  • FIGS. 75-82 illustrate an embodiment of board 10 configured as a stand-up paddle board, surf board, knee-board, surf-ski, sit-on-top kayak, paddle-ski or the like.
  • the riding position of the rider is ordinarily upright (standing, sitting or kneeling) rather than lying prone.
  • hull 12 has an enlarged rear portion 22 located between stern 24 and hull forward portion 26 .
  • Hull rear portion 22 supports an enlarged deck 16 .
  • deck 16 may be inclined generally downwardly in a plane intersecting hull forward portion 26 .
  • deck 16 is contoured in the shape of a shallow bowl and includes a central platform 120 and a peripheral wall 122 which slopes inwardly toward platform 120 .
  • Deck 16 also includes a plurality of spaced-apart upwardly projecting protuberances 124 surrounding platform 120 for bracing the feet or other body parts of a rider.
  • a central bulge or protuberance 125 may also be located within platform 120 (e.g. FIGS. 75 and 77 ).
  • board 10 includes a keel 14 extending along the longitudinal centerline of hull 12 and including an enlarged primary thruster 54 aligned below central platform 120 of deck 16 and a secondary thruster 56 aligned below a forward end of deck 16 where rear and forward portions 22 , 26 of hull 12 merge ( FIG. 79 ).
  • An enlarged tail accessory 90 comprising a plurality of fins 114 is coupled to primary keel thruster 54 , for example in the manner described above in respect of other tail accessories 90 .
  • hull 12 , keel 14 , and deck 16 define a primary load supporting region 18 in a rear portion of board 10 .
  • Primary load supporting region 18 has a much larger volume and is consequentially much more buoyant than other regions of board 10 .
  • primary load supporting region 18 supports substantially all of the weight of the rider in an upright riding position rather than a prone or semi-prone position.
  • the portion of board 10 of maximum transverse circumferential girth, corresponding to primary load supporting region 18 is aligned with support platform 120 .
  • the girth of tail 50 of board 10 at stern end 24 may be reduced.
  • primary load supporting region 18 comprises a rockered portion of hull 12 and an enlarged, highly buoyant primary keel thruster 54 aligned below deck 16 along the longitudinal centerline of board 10
  • board 10 is considerably less stable than conventional stand-up paddle boards and the like. That is, the rockered curvature of the hull 12 and the centrally located buoyant keel 14 gives board 10 a tendency to pitch, roll and/or yaw relative to an axis aligned with the primary load supporting region 18 .
  • a rider can control movement of board 10 at least in part by controllably shifting their centre of gravity on deck 16 . Because of the deliberate instability of board 10 , more athletic ability and effort will ordinarily be required for a rider to balance in an upright posture on support platform 120 and propel board 10 using a combination of paddling strokes and controlled weight transfer.
  • a rider could adopt a standing body position on platform 120 optionally with one or both feet braced against a selected protuberance 124 or 125 .
  • a rider may be braced or wedged between lateral portions 72 of deck 16 to maintain a preferred riding position in the embodiments of board 10 described above
  • the rider may be braced in position by engagement with protuberances 124 , 125 or by kneeling or sitting within the channels defined between protuberance 125 and peripheral wall 122 .
  • the rider While making paddling motions, the rider could shift their weight to a limited extent to initiate pivoting or rocking motion of board 10 .
  • board 10 can be engineered to achieve boards 10 of differing degrees of instability, such as by varying the size of deck 16 , the size or shape of hull rear portion 22 , the size or shape of primary keel thruster 54 , and/or the size or configuration of fins 114 .
  • board 10 of FIGS. 75-82 is configured as a surf board, knee-board, surf-ski, sit-on-top kayak, paddle-ski or the like rather than stand-up paddle board the same principles will apply.
  • the rider can position themselves on platform 120 and initiate controlled weight transfer to cause pitching, rolling or yawing movement of board 10 , or some combination thereof.
  • board 10 has a keel 14 comprising one primary thruster 54 and one secondary thruster 56 of a smaller size than primary thruster 54 .
  • Primary thruster 54 is aligned with a rear portion of deck 16 and comprises part of the primary load supporting region 18 .
  • Secondary thruster 56 is aligned underneath a forward end of deck 16 and comprises part of secondary load supporting region 20 .
  • Central member 42 in forward portion 26 of hull 12 subdivides opening 38 into first and second lateral portions 38 A and 38 B.
  • board 10 either has no tail accessory ( FIGS. 3-10 ) or includes a tail accessory 90 comprising one or more fins 114 ( FIGS. 19-42 ).
  • a forward portion 26 of hull 12 is relatively narrow and comprises a relatively pointed nose 36 having a high terminal height.
  • a board 10 having this configuration would be well-suited for high performance users seeking maximum speed and good trackability.
  • board 10 also has a keel 14 comprising one primary thruster 54 and two spaced-apart secondary thrusters 56 which are each smaller in size than primary thruster 54 .
  • Primary thruster 54 is aligned with a rear portion of deck 16 and comprises part of the primary load supporting region 18 .
  • one secondary thruster 56 is aligned underneath a forward end of deck 16 and comprises part of secondary load supporting region 20 ( FIGS. 47 and 48 ).
  • the second secondary thruster 56 is located adjacent nose 36 at bow end 28 of board 10 .
  • Central member 42 in forward portion 26 of hull 12 subdivides opening 38 into first and second lateral portions 38 A and 38 B.
  • board 10 does not include a tail accessory 90 although one could optionally be employed.
  • Keel 14 has a modified profile, best shown in side views 47 and 48 , where lower surface 58 of keel 14 is concave in segments between thrusters 54 , 56 , resulting in reduced keel buoyancy, particularly underlying opening 38 . This may cause this embodiment of b