US20160110577A1 - Apparatus operative for capture of image data - Google Patents

Apparatus operative for capture of image data Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20160110577A1
US20160110577A1 US14979765 US201514979765A US2016110577A1 US 20160110577 A1 US20160110577 A1 US 20160110577A1 US 14979765 US14979765 US 14979765 US 201514979765 A US201514979765 A US 201514979765A US 2016110577 A1 US2016110577 A1 US 2016110577A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
image
imaging
data
module
reader
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US14979765
Inventor
William H. Havens
Charles P. Barber
Colleen Gannon
Robert C. Gardiner
Robert J. Hennick
John A. Pettinelli
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Hand Held Products Inc
Original Assignee
Hand Held Products Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06KRECOGNITION OF DATA; PRESENTATION OF DATA; RECORD CARRIERS; HANDLING RECORD CARRIERS
    • G06K7/00Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns
    • G06K7/10Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation
    • G06K7/10544Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation by scanning of the records by radiation in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum
    • G06K7/10712Fixed beam scanning
    • G06K7/10722Photodetector array or CCD scanning
    • G06K7/10732Light sources
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06KRECOGNITION OF DATA; PRESENTATION OF DATA; RECORD CARRIERS; HANDLING RECORD CARRIERS
    • G06K7/00Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns
    • G06K7/10Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation
    • G06K7/10544Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation by scanning of the records by radiation in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum
    • G06K7/10712Fixed beam scanning
    • G06K7/10722Photodetector array or CCD scanning
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06KRECOGNITION OF DATA; PRESENTATION OF DATA; RECORD CARRIERS; HANDLING RECORD CARRIERS
    • G06K7/00Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns
    • G06K7/10Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation
    • G06K7/10544Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation by scanning of the records by radiation in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum
    • G06K7/10821Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation by scanning of the records by radiation in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum further details of bar or optical code scanning devices
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06KRECOGNITION OF DATA; PRESENTATION OF DATA; RECORD CARRIERS; HANDLING RECORD CARRIERS
    • G06K7/00Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns
    • G06K7/10Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation
    • G06K7/10544Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation by scanning of the records by radiation in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum
    • G06K7/10821Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation by scanning of the records by radiation in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum further details of bar or optical code scanning devices
    • G06K7/10841Particularities of the light-sensitive elements
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06KRECOGNITION OF DATA; PRESENTATION OF DATA; RECORD CARRIERS; HANDLING RECORD CARRIERS
    • G06K7/00Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns
    • G06K7/10Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation
    • G06K7/10544Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation by scanning of the records by radiation in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum
    • G06K7/10821Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation by scanning of the records by radiation in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum further details of bar or optical code scanning devices
    • G06K7/10881Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation by scanning of the records by radiation in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum further details of bar or optical code scanning devices constructional details of hand-held scanners
    • G06K7/109Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation by scanning of the records by radiation in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum further details of bar or optical code scanning devices constructional details of hand-held scanners adaptations to make the hand-held scanner useable as a fixed scanner
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06KRECOGNITION OF DATA; PRESENTATION OF DATA; RECORD CARRIERS; HANDLING RECORD CARRIERS
    • G06K7/00Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns
    • G06K7/10Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation
    • G06K7/10544Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation by scanning of the records by radiation in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum
    • G06K7/10821Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation by scanning of the records by radiation in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum further details of bar or optical code scanning devices
    • G06K7/1098Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation by scanning of the records by radiation in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum further details of bar or optical code scanning devices the scanning arrangement having a modular construction
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06KRECOGNITION OF DATA; PRESENTATION OF DATA; RECORD CARRIERS; HANDLING RECORD CARRIERS
    • G06K7/00Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns
    • G06K7/10Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation
    • G06K7/14Methods or arrangements for sensing record carriers, e.g. for reading patterns by electromagnetic radiation, e.g. optical sensing; by corpuscular radiation using light without selection of wavelength, e.g. sensing reflected white light
    • G06K7/1404Methods for optical code recognition
    • G06K7/146Methods for optical code recognition the method including quality enhancement steps
    • G06K7/1465Methods for optical code recognition the method including quality enhancement steps using several successive scans of the optical code

Abstract

There is set forth an apparatus for capturing image data. In one embodiment, an apparatus is operative for capture of a first frame of image data and a second frame of image data. In one embodiment, an apparatus is operative for processing the first frame of image data and the second frame of image data.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    The present application claims the benefit of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 14/093,624 for an Apparatus Operative for Capture of Image Data, filed Dec. 2, 2013 (and published Mar. 20, 2014 as U.S. Patent Publication No. 2014/0076974), now U.S. Pat. No. 9,224,023, which claims the benefit of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/323,147 for an Apparatus Operative for Capture of Image Data, filed Dec. 12, 2011 (and published Jun. 21, 2012, as U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2012/0153022), now U.S. Pat. No. 8,596,542, which is a division of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/187,608 for an Optical Reader Having A Plurality Of Imaging Modules, filed Jul. 22, 2005 (and published Dec. 22, 2005 as U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2005/0279836), now U.S. Pat. No. 8,074,887, which is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/453,796 for an Optical Reader Having A Plurality Of Imaging Modules, filed Jun. 3, 2003 (and published Feb. 5, 2004, as U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2004/0020990), now U.S. Pat. No. 7,219,843, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/161,950 for an Optical Reader Having A Plurality Of Imaging Modules, filed Jun. 4, 2002 (and published Dec. 4, 2003, as U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2003/0222147), now abandoned. The aforementioned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/453,796 is also a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/252,484 for a Long Range Optical Reader, filed Sep. 23, 2002 (and published Dec. 11, 2003, as U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2003/0226895), now U.S. Pat. No. 7,055,747, which claims priority to U.S. Patent Application No. 60/387,842 for a Long Range Optical Reader, filed Jun. 11, 2002. The aforementioned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/453,796 also claims priority to U.S. Patent Application No. 60/387,842. The aforementioned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/187,608 is also a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/782,569 for an Optical Reader Having A Plurality Of Imaging Modules, filed Feb. 19, 2004 (and published Aug. 26, 2004, as U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2004/0164165), now abandoned, which is a continuation of aforementioned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/161,950. Each of the foregoing patent applications, patent publications, and patents is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • [0002]
    The present application is also related to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/440,729 for a Long Range Optical Reader, filed May 19, 2003 (and published Feb. 26, 2004, as U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2004/0035933), now U.S. Pat. No. 7,090,132, which is a continuation-in-part of aforementioned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/252,484. The aforementioned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/440,729 also claims priority to the aforementioned U.S. Patent Application No. 60/387,842. Each of the foregoing patent applications, patent publication, and patent is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • [0003]
    The present application is also related to International Application No. PCT/US03/17564 for an Optical Reader Having A Plurality Of Imaging Modules, filed Jun. 4, 2003 (and published Dec. 11, 2003, as International Publication No. WO 2003/102859) claims priority to the aforementioned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/440,729, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/252,484, U.S. Patent Application No. 60/387,842, and U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/161,950. Each of the foregoing patent applications and patent publication is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • [0004]
    The present application is also related to International Application No. PCT/US03/18557 for a Long Range Optical Reader, filed Jun. 11, 2003 (and published Dec. 18, 2003, as International Publication No. WO 2003/10485) claims priority to the aforementioned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/440,729, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/252,484, and U.S. Patent Application No. 60/387,842. Each of the foregoing patent applications and patent publication is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0005]
    The invention relates to an optical apparatus in general and particularly to an optical apparatus having an image sensor.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0006]
    Decodable indicia such as bar codes and OCR decodable characters are finding increased use in an ever expanding variety of applications. Bar codes are being applied not only to paper substrate surfaces but other surfaces as well such as plastic bags, glass, and directly on finished articles. The affixing of a decodable indicia directly to an article is referred to as “direct part marking.” Where decodable symbols or characters have been applied to particularly reflective “shiny” surfaces (glass, plastic, metallic surfaces), “specular reflection” decode failures have been observed.
  • [0007]
    “Specular reflection” occurs where a light ray incident on a highly reflective (mirror) surface is reflected substantially at an angle measured from the surface that is substantially normal with respect to the incident ray. In optical readers, light sources are positioned to emit light along a path closely adjacent a centrally located imaging axis. An optical reader light is directed at a reflective target and, therefore, the illumination light tends to be reflected specularly in the direction of the reader's photodetector elements. Specular reflection can result in the captured image data failing to exhibit adequate contrast between dark and light markings of a decodable indicia. With the increased miniaturization of optical readers, light sources for illuminating a target are being positioned in closer proximity with a photodetector element of the reader, thereby rendering the modem reader more susceptible to specular reflection read failures.
  • [0008]
    The proliferation of the use of decodable markings has brought to light additional problems with presently available optical readers. It has become more common to encode more information into single decodable indicia. e.g. with use of “high density” bar codes, to affix more than one decodable indicia onto an article or package in need of decoding, and to make bar codes wider so that they can encode more information. “High density” bar codes are best decoded with the use of a high resolution optical reader which is configured to have a short “best focus” position. Extra wide code bar codes and scenes having more than one bar code are best decoded with use of readers having a longer best focus position. Commercially available optical readers cannot easily read high density extra wide decodable symbols or multiple symbols from a scene which are encoded in high density.
  • [0009]
    There is a need for an optical reader which is impervious to decode failures resulting from specular reflection, and which is adapted to read large or multiple high density decodable symbols formed on a target.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0010]
    There is set forth an apparatus for capture of image data. In one embodiment an apparatus is operative for capture of a first frame of image data and a second frame of image data. In one embodiment, an apparatus is operative for processing the first frame of image data and the second frame of image data.
  • [0011]
    These and other details and advantages will become apparent from the detailed description of the preferred embodiment herein below.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0012]
    For a further understanding of these and objects of the invention, reference will be made to the following detailed description of the invention which is to be read in connection with the accompanying drawing, wherein:
  • [0013]
    FIGS. 1a-1n show various physical views of optical readers incorporating a plurality of imaging modules while FIG. 1o is a diagram illustrating an imaging module illumination pattern spanning a two-dimensional area that encompasses a target corresponding to a field of view of an image module;
  • [0014]
    FIGS. 2a and 2b are electrical block diagrams of electrical circuits which may be utilized with a reader incorporating a single imaging module;
  • [0015]
    FIGS. 2c-2f show block diagrams of various electrical circuits which may be utilized with readers according to the invention incorporating a plurality of imaging modules;
  • [0016]
    FIG. 2g is a timing diagram for illustrating control of aiming LEDs;
  • [0017]
    FIGS. 2h and 2i are electrical block diagrams illustrating exemplar) embodiments of an FPGA as shown in the block diagram of FIG. 2 d:
  • [0018]
    FIG. 2j is an electrical block diagram illustrating an FPGA as shown in FIG. 2 e:
  • [0019]
    FIGS. 3a and 3b show, respectively, front and rear perspective views of a 2D optical reader according to the invention;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 3c is an exploded perspective view of the imaging module of FIGS. 3a and 3 b;
  • [0021]
    FIG. 3d illustrates a perspective view of an exemplary 2D support assembly for an exemplary 2D imaging module according to the invention:
  • [0022]
    FIG. 3e illustrates a perspective view of a 1D imaging module according to the invention;
  • [0023]
    FIGS. 4a-4c are flow diagrams illustrating exemplary control methods which may be incorporated in a multiple imaging assembly reader according to the invention;
  • [0024]
    FIGS. 4d-4e are image frame diagrams illustrating various image combination methods which may be incorporated in a multiple imaging module reader according to the invention:
  • [0025]
    FIG. 5a is a physical schematic view of a compact flash card incorporating a 2D imaging module;
  • [0026]
    FIG. 5b is an electrical block diagram illustrating a system comprising a device as shown in FIG. 5a in electrical communication with a host processor assembly:
  • [0027]
    FIGS. 5c and 5d are physical views of a the device shown in FIG. 5a as received in a personal data assistant;
  • [0028]
    FIG. 5e is a physical view illustrating a device as shown in FIG. 5a in communication with a personal computer and operating in free standing mode of operation.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0029]
    There is set forth an apparatus for capture of image data. In one embodiment an apparatus is operative for capture of a first frame of image data and a second frame of image data. In one embodiment, an apparatus is operative for processing the first frame of image data and the second frame of image data.
  • [0030]
    The invention in one major aspect relates to an optical reader having more than one imaging module, wherein each imaging module typically includes a combination of a support assembly, an image sensor, imaging optics, and at least one illumination light source.
  • [0031]
    In one embodiment the reader includes a gun style housing which houses a pair of 2D imaging modules. In another embodiment, the reader includes a gun style housing having three 2D imaging modules. The modules may have imaging axes that are in parallel, diverging or converging relation. One or more of the 2D imaging modules can be replaced with a 1D imaging module.
  • [0032]
    In another embodiment the reader module may include a “dumbbell” style housing having a central handle portion and a pair of laterally disposed head portions, each of the head portions housing an imaging module. The head portions can be made adjustable so that the relative position of the imaging axes of the two imaging modules can be adjusted. The dumbbell reader can be mounted on a presentation stand which further includes a third head portion which houses a third imaging module.
  • [0033]
    In another aspect, an optical reader of the invention can be operated using a control circuit which comprises a multi-functional processor IC chip which, in addition to having a central processing unit (CPU) includes a programmable integrated frame grabber block.
  • [0034]
    A control circuit of the invention can be adapted to carry out a variety of routines involving coordinated capture of image data utilizing more than one imaging module. In one example of the invention, a frame of image data is captured by actuation of a first imaging module and light sources from a first imaging module. The frame is then subjected to a decoding attempt. If the decoding attempt involving the first captured frame fails, a second frame of image data is captured by actuation of an image sensor of the first imaging module and actuation of a light source from a second imaging module and subjected to decoding. The second frame of image data captured utilizing a spaced apart illumination light source and image sensor from two spaced apart imaging modules can be expected to be free of image degradation problems attributable to specular reflection.
  • [0035]
    In another aspect of the invention, a control circuit can be configured to combine image data captured by a reader of the invention having more than one imaging module. Because the relative positions of imaging modules in a multiple imaging module reader of the invention are known, first and second frames of image data captured via actuation of first and second imaging modules of a reader of the invention can readily be combined according to an image frame combination method.
  • [0036]
    In a still further aspect of the invention, various imaging modules of a multiple imaging module optical reader can be configured to have different best focus positions. Configuring different imaging modules of a multiple imaging module optical reader to have different best focus positions improves the overall depth of field of the multiple imaging module optical reader.
  • [0037]
    These and other details and advantages will become apparent from the detailed description of the preferred embodiment herein below.
  • [0038]
    Embodiments of optical readers having more than one imaging module are shown in FIGS. 1a-1l . In FIGS. 1a-1b a gun style optical reader 5-1 is shown including first and second imaging modules 10 a and 10 b incorporated in housing 7. Imaging modules 10 can be of the type shown in FIGS. 3a-3d . Imaging module 10, 10-1 as shown in FIGS. 3a and 3c includes a support assembly 80 having a containment section 81 and a retainer section 82, a first circuit board 14 a carrying an image sensor 32, a second circuit board 14 b, illumination LEDs 16 aiming LEDs 18, an optical plate 26 carrying aiming and illumination optics 25, 27, and support posts 84 holding the various components of the module together. Image sensor 32 as shown in FIGS. 1a-1e includes an area array of photosensitive elements, such as an area (RO) photodiode array. Further details of imaging module 10-1 are described in application Ser. No. 10/092,789, filed Mar. 7, 2002, entitled “Optical Reader Imaging Module,” incorporated herein by reference. As indicated by FIGS. 3a and 3b imaging modules 10 can be built as a modularly installable self-contained unit. That is, module 10 can be assembled into the packaged form shown in FIGS. 3a and 3b at an assembly location prior to being installed in a cavity defined by reader housing 7. Imaging module 10 may be configured so that illumination LEDs 16 together with light diffusing illumination optics 27 disposed on plate 26 and wedges (disposed on a rear surface of plate 26) project an illumination pattern 520, while aiming LEDs 18 together with aiming optics 25 disposed on plate 26 projects an aiming pattern 630, as is shown in FIG. 1o . Illumination pattern 520 spans a two-dimensional area that encompasses target, T, corresponding to a field of view of imaging module 10 and which is substantially coincident with a target corresponding to a field of view of imaging module 10. Aiming pattern 630 includes a portion that is projected within target area T, corresponding to a field of view of imaging module 10. In a further aspect, imaging module 10 can also be configured to have a fixed best focus position by fixably securing an imaging lens assembly 40 within a lens retainer 82. Lens assembly 40 focuses an image of a target onto image sensor 32.
  • [0039]
    Imaging module 10 can be screw mounted on any rigid member within housing 7 in the manner described in application Ser. No. 10/092,789 filed Mar. 7, 2002, entitled “Optical Reader Imaging Module,” incorporated herein by reference hereinabove. Module 10 can include screw holes 810 for facilitating mounting of module 10 on a rigid member. As indicated by support assembly 80 of FIG. 3d , support assembly 80 can include wings 80 w having screw holes 810. Reader 5 can include a main circuit board 15 or “mother board” which includes control circuit circuitry as described in detail in connection with FIGS. 2a-2f . In one embodiment, as indicated by reader 5-2 of FIG. 1d , a plurality of imaging modules 10 can be mounted to a rigid member provided by a common main circuit board 15. Imaging modules 10 can be interfaced with mother board 15 with use standardly known flex strip connectors 17.
  • [0040]
    Module 10 a and module 10 b are disposed in a common cavity 6. A wall 8 formed in housing 7 dividing cavity 6 into two spaces would not create two separate cavities since cavity 6 of reader 5-1 would still be delimited by the common outer peripheral wall of housing 7.
  • [0041]
    Incorporating more than one imaging module 10 in an optical reader housing 7 yields a number of advantages. For example, if an attempt to decode a decodable indicia by capturing and subjecting to decoding an image captured via actuation of first module 10 a fails, a second decoding an attempt can be made by capturing and subjecting to decoding image captured via actuation of second imaging module 10 b. Further, reader 5 can be actuated to capture and subject to decoding a frame of image data captured by actuation of an image sensor 32 of a first module 10 a and illumination LEDs 16 of a second imaging module 10 b. The spacing between illumination LEDs 16 of a second module 10 b and an image sensor 32 of a first imaging module 10 a renders the frame of image data capture by the described method substantially impervious to specular reflection image degradation.
  • [0042]
    In addition, image data of several frames captured by actuation of several different imaging modules can be combined, by one of several possible image frame combination methods, to yield a larger frame of image data. The larger image representation is yielded by combining multiple frames of image data and can be subjected to decoding, thereby facilitating decoding of larger decodable indicia or multiple decodable indicia printed over a large area of a target substrate. Specular reflection avoidance and frame image combination methods will be described in greater detail herein.
  • [0043]
    In the embodiment of FIGS. 1c and 1d , reader 5-2 comprises three imaging modules including a first imaging module 10 a, second imaging module 10 b and third imaging module 10 c each having a respective imaging axis 11 a, 11 b, and 11 c. Like reader 5-1 (FIGS. 1a and 1b ) the imaging axes of reader 5-2 of FIGS. 1c and 1d are in converging relation. Configuring reader 5-2 so that modules 10 are in converging relation assures that each of a reader's imaging modules (10 a. 10 b, and 10 c in reader 5-2) are positioned to capture images corresponding to substantially the same area of a target substrate. Accordingly, as will be explained in further detail herein readers 5-1 and 5-2 as shown in FIGS. 1a-1d are particularly well suited for reducing specular reflection misreads.
  • [0044]
    In FIGS. 1e-1h multiple imaging module optical readers 5 are shown which are particularly well-suited for applications wherein frames of image data generated by actuation of several imaging modules are configured to develop large field image representations. In the embodiment of FIGS. 1e and 1f , reader 5-3 including gun style housing 7 has installed therein three imaging modules 10 a, 10 b, and 10 c wherein the imaging axes 11 a, 11 b, and 11 c, of the three modules are in substantially parallel relation.
  • [0045]
    In the embodiment of FIGS. 1g and 1h reader 5-4 comprising gun style housing 7 has installed therein three imaging modules, wherein the imaging axes 11 a, 11 b, and 11 c of the three modules are in diverging relation. Reader 5-3 and reader 5-4 are especially well suited for applications requiring an enlarged field of view. By way of routines which will be described in greater detail herein, frames of image data captured by actuation of three modules can be combined to yield a larger frame of image data comprising an image representation of an enlarged decodable symbol or character or of multiple decodable indicia.
  • [0046]
    Referring now to FIGS. 1i and 1j , dumbbell style multiple imaging module optical reader 5-5 is described.
  • [0047]
    Dumbbell reader 5-5 is a reader including three housing portions 7 and each defining a cavity 6. Reader 5-5 of FIGS. 1i and 1j includes a central handle 19 which supports a pair of laterally disposed head sections 20. Handle 19 may include a thumb-actuated trigger 13 t. Installed in each head section 20 is an imaging module 10 which may be of the type described in connection with FIGS. 3a-3d . Imaging module 10 of reader 5-5 as in the case of readers 5-1, 5-2, 5-3, and 5-4 may be screw mounted on any rigid member within head sections 20. Head sections 20 of housing 7 are mounted to the major body of housing 7 by ball and socket type connectors 21. Ball and socket connectors 21 may be provided, for example, by a ball and socket connector of a type available from R-A-M Mounting Systems, Inc. of Chandler Ariz. Ball and socket connectors 21 may include mechanical detent mechanisms providing feel feedback as to the position of head section 20 so that a user may click head sections 20 into one or more normally defined positions. Flexible cable 18 as shown in FIGS. 1i and 1j can be disposed to provide electrical communication between modules 10 and a main circuit board 15 within a cavity defined by a handle portion of housing 7. Main circuit board 15 of reader 5-5 may carry components of a multiple module electrical circuit, e.g. circuit 105 described with reference to FIG. 2 f.
  • [0048]
    In the embodiment of FIG. 1n , handle 19 of dumbbell style reader 5-7 includes a central aperture 19 a which is fittable about post 45. Handle 19 includes knob actuated bolt 46 for securing dumbbell style reader 5-6 against post 45. Post 45 in the embodiment of FIG. 1k is part of a presentation style reader 5-7 which, in addition to including detachable dumbbell style reader 5-6 further includes stand 47 including knob actuated bolt 48 for enabling a vertical position of post 45 to be adjusted, and top head section 20 a disposed at a top of post 45. Head section 20 a may be mounted to post 45 with use of ball and socket connector 21. Dumbbell style optical reader 5-6 may be removed from post 45 so that dumbbell style reader 5-6 can be used in a hand held mode. For realization of a hand held mode, knob actuated bolt 48 is loosened and post 45 is removed from stand 47. Knob actuated bolt 46 is then loosened and dumbbell style reader 5-6 is removed from post 45 to allow hand held use.
  • [0049]
    A dumbbell style reader e.g. 5-5 and 5-6 is particularly well suited for use in applications wherein specular reflection read failures can be expected. In the example of FIG. 1j , dumbbell style reader 5-5 is shown in a mode wherein head sections 20 are canted in a position such that imaging axes 11 a and 11 b of module 10 a and module 10 b are in converging relation and positioned so the imaging modules 10 a and 10 b generate image data corresponding to substantially the same scene at a target substrate, S, when reader 5-5 is at certain reader-to-target distance. If module 10 a is positioned with respect to a reflective target T such that specular reflection from target T results in a decode failure, a frame of image data captured by actuation of illumination light sources 16 and an image sensor 32 of second module 10 b can be subjected to a second decoding attempt. In addition, an expectedly specular reflection-free frame of image data can be captured by actuation of image sensor 32 of first imaging module 10 a in combination with actuation of illumination of second imaging module 10 b in place of illumination from first imaging module. The term “target” herein refers to subject matter (e.g. decodable indicia) presently in a field or view of at least one module of reader 5. The term “target substrate” refers to a member (e.g. a piece of paper, an equipment part) bearing subject matter to which reader may be directed.
  • [0050]
    The multiple imaging module optical readers as shown in FIGS. 1a-1j and 1m include 2D imaging modules, which may be for example Model IT 4200, Model IT 4250, or Model IT 4000 imaging modules of the type available from HHP, Inc. of Skaneateles Falls, N.Y. It will be understood that a 2D imaging module of any of the readers shown could be replaced by a 1D imaging module having a 1D image sensor. An example of a 1D imaging module which can be incorporated in any one of readers 5-1, 5-2, 5-3, 5-4, 5-5, 5-6, and 5-7 is shown in FIG. 3e . Imaging module 10-2 includes a 1D image sensor 32 including a linear array of photosensitive elements, a support assembly or frame 80, imaging optics 40, illumination light sources 18, and illumination optics including lens 25 carried by plate 26 and aiming apertures 43. Further details of an exemplary 1D imaging module are described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,119,939, entitled “Optical Assembly For Bar Code Scanner” incorporated herein by reference. In an image sensor array based 1D imaging module e.g. module 10-2 illumination and aiming light sources are normally provided by the same light sources which project a single illumination pattern which also serves as an aiming pattern. However, a 1D imaging module can also include light sources which project different illumination and aiming patterns. An imaging module of the invention can also comprise a laser diode based 1D imaging engine including a single photodetector, a laser diode and means for sweeping the laser beam projected by the laser diode across a target area.
  • [0051]
    Referring now to reader 5-9 of FIG. 1m , center module 10 c of reader 5-9 is a 1D imaging module while laterally disposed modules 10 a and 10 b are 2D modules. Configuring reader 5-9 so that reader 5-9 includes a center 1D imaging module 10 c, 10-2 and laterally disposed 2D imaging modules 10-1 provides certain advantages. Reader 5-9 can be programmed in accordance with a decode operation control program wherein a reader (1) first captures and subjects to decoding an image captured via actuation of first imaging module 10 c, and if the decoding attempt fails, (2) automatically captures and subjects to decoding a second image captured via actuation of an image sensor and illumination of one of laterally disposed 2D modules 10 a and 10 b.
  • [0052]
    One-dimensional bar code symbols are more common than 2D bar code symbols. Further, 1D bar code symbols are generally decoded more quickly and more accurately by capturing and processing 1D slice image data captured via actuation of a 1D image sensor than capturing and processing 2D image data captured via actuation of a 2D image sensor. Still further, an imaging axis 11 c of center imaging module 10 c disposed in a gun-style housing 7 can more readily be aligned with an indicia of a target, T, than lateral imaging modules 10 a and 10 b. Accordingly, it can be seen that reader 5-9 programmed in accordance with the above-described decode program is a reader which is both mechanically configured and programmed for optimization of the decoding of 1D symbols, while still having the capacity to decode matrix 2D symbols where matrix 2D symbols are present within a target, T.
  • [0053]
    Referring to FIGS. 1K-1L a hand held “gun style” reader having a plurality of imaging modules with imaging axes 11 a and 11 b aligned in the vertical plane is described. In the embodiment of FIGS. 1K-1L, reader 5, 5-10 includes a one dimensional imaging module 10, 10 a, 10-2 as shown in and described in connection with FIG. 3e and a two dimensional imaging module 10, 10 b, and 10-1 as shown in FIG. 3e . As best seen from the side view FIG. 1L two dimensional imaging module 10 a is mounted on a bottom surface of printed circuit board 15 and one dimensional imaging module 10 a is mounted on a top surface of printed circuit board 15. Printed circuit board 15 carries both of imaging module 10 a and imaging module 10 b. Printed circuit board 15 further carries circuitry 1040 for operating both of imaging module 10 a and imaging module 10 b. Printed circuit board 15 may carry for example, components of circuit 104 to be described in connection with FIG. 2e . In the embodiment of FIGS. 1K-1L imaging modules 10 a, 10 b are configured so that imaging axes 11 a, 11 b are in converging relation in the manner described in connection with the embodiment of FIG. 1 b.
  • [0054]
    In one variation of the embodiment of FIGS. 1K-1L, imaging modules 10 a. 10 b are disposed in reader housing 7 so that imaging axes 11 a, 11 b are in parallel relation in the manner of the embodiment of FIG. 1 f.
  • [0055]
    In another variation of the embodiment of FIGS. 1K-11L, imaging modules 10 a, 10 b are disposed so that imaging axes 11 a, 11 b are in diverging relation in the manner of the embodiment of FIG. 1 h.
  • [0056]
    In another variation of the embodiment of FIGS. 1K-1L, one dimensional imaging module 10 a is replaced with a two dimensional imaging module. In another variation of the embodiment of FIGS. 1K-1L two dimensional imaging module 10 b is replaced with a one dimensional imaging module. In a variation of the embodiments described an additional one or more one dimensional or two dimensional imaging module is disposed in reader housing 7 in the vertical plane including imaging axis 11 a and imaging axis 11 b.
  • [0057]
    Various electrical circuits 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, and 105 which can be utilized to control optical readers are shown and described with reference to FIGS. 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e , and 2 f. While the present invention relates in a major aspect to optical readers having more than one imaging module, FIGS. 2a and 2b show electrical circuits for operating optical readers having a single imaging module. Numerous principles of circuit operation discussed in relation to circuits 100, 101 are incorporated into multiple imaging module electrical circuits 102, 103, 104, 105 discussed in relation to FIGS. 2c -2 f.
  • [0058]
    In FIG. 2a a block diagram of an optical reader electrical circuit is shown having a multi-functional processor IC chip 180 including an integrated frame grabber block 148. Electrical circuit 100 shown in FIG. 2a can be utilized for control of a single 2D imaging module optical reader as is shown for example in U.S. application Ser. No. 09/954,081 filed Sep. 17, 2001, entitled “Optical Reader Having Image Parsing Mode,” incorporated herein by reference.
  • [0059]
    In the specific embodiment of FIG. 2a , electrical circuit 100 includes a control circuit 140 comprising CPU 141, system RAM 142 and system ROM 143 and frame grabber block 148. Electrical circuit 100 further includes an image sensor 32 typically provided by a photosensitive array and an illumination block 160 having illumination LEDs 16 and aiming LEDs 18 as shown in the physical form view of FIGS. 3a-3c . Image sensor 32 of FIG. 2a is shown as being provided by a 2D photo diode array. If image sensor 32 is replaced by a 1D image sensor, then aiming LEDs 18 and illumination LEDs 16 may be constituted by one set of LEDs. In the embodiment shown, image sensor 32 incorporated in an image sensor IC chip 182 which typically further includes an image sensor electrical circuit block 134. Image sensor electrical block 134 includes control circuit 135 for controlling image sensor 32, an A/D conversion circuit 136, for converting analog signals received from image sensor 32 into digital form and integrated clock 137 sometimes referred to as an oscillator.
  • [0060]
    In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2a , CPU 141 and frame grabber block 148 are incorporated in a multi-functional IC chip 180 which in addition to including CPU 141 includes numerous other integrated hardware components. Namely, multifunctional IC chip 180 may include a display control block 106, several general purpose I/O ports 116, several interface blocks such as a USB circuit block 107 and a UART block 108 for facilitating RS 232 communications, a UART block 109 for facilitating Irda communications, and a pulse width modulation (PWM) output block 110. Multi-functional processor IC chip 180 can also have other interfaces such as a PCMCIA interface 111, a compact flash interface 112, and a multimedia interface 113. If reader 5 includes a display 13 d, display 13 d may be in communication with chip 180 via display interface 106. Trigger 13 t and keypad 13 k may be in communication with chip 180 via general purpose I/O interface 116. Physical form views of readers having displays and keyboards are shown for example in U.S. application Ser. No. 10/137,484, filed May 2, 2002, entitled “Optical Reader Comprising Keyboard,” incorporated herein by reference. Multi-functional processor IC chip 180 may be one of an available type of multifunctional IC processor chips which are presently available such as a Dragonball IC processor chip available from Motorola, an Anaconda IC processor chip available from Motorola, a DSC IC chip of the type available from Texas Instruments, an O-Map IC chip also of the type available from Texas Instruments or a multifunctional IC processor chip of a variety available from Clarity, Inc.
  • [0061]
    Frame grabber block 148 of IC chip 180 replaces the function of a frame grabbing field programmable gate array (FPGA) as discussed in commonly assigned application Ser. No. 09/954,081, filed Sep. 17, 2001, entitled “Imaging Device Having Indicia-Controlled Image Parsing Mode.” incorporated herein by reference and application Ser. No. 09/904,697, filed Jul. 13, 2001, entitled “An Optical Reader Having a Color Imager” incorporated herein by reference. More particularly, frame grabber block 148 is specifically adapted collection of hardware elements programmed to carry out, at video rates or higher, the process of receiving digitized image data from image sensor chip 182 and writing digitized image data to system RAM 142 which in the embodiment shown is provided on a discreet IC chip. Frame grabber block 148 includes hardware elements preconfigured to facilitate image frame capture. Frame grabber block 148 can be programmed by a user to capture images according to a user's system design requirements. Programming options for programming frame grabber block 148 include options enabling block 148 to be customized to facilitate frame capture that varies in accordance with image sensor characteristics such as image sensor resolution, clockout rating, and fabrication technology (e.g. CCD, CMOS, CID), dimension (1D or 2D) and color (monochrome or color).
  • [0062]
    Aspects of the operation of circuit 100 when circuit 100 captures image data into RAM 140 are now described. When trigger 13 t is pulled, CPU 141, under the operation of a program stored in system ROM 143, writes an image capture enable signal to image sensor chip 182 via communication line 151. Line 151, like the remainder of communication lines described herein represents one or more physical communication lines. In the embodiment shown, wherein image sensor chip 182 is of a type available from IC Media Corp., I2C interface 115 of chip 180 is utilized to facilitate communication with chip 182 (if another image sensor chip is selected another type of interface e.g. interface 116 may be utilized). Other types of signals may be sent over line 151 during the course of image capture. Line 151 may carry, for example, timing initialization, gain setting and exposure setting signals.
  • [0063]
    When control block 135 of image sensor chip 182 receives an image capture enable instruction, control block 135 sends various signals to frame grabber block 148. Image sensor control block 135 typically sends various types of synchronization signals to frame grabber block 148 during the course of capturing frames of image data. In particular, control block 135 may send to frame grabber block 148 “start of frame signals” which inform frame grabber block 148 that chip 182 is ready to transmit a new frame of image data, “data valid window” signals which indicate periods in which a row of image data is valid and “data acquisition clock” signals as established by clock 137 controlling the timing of image data capture operations. In the embodiment described, line 152 represents three physical communication lines, each carrying one of the above types of signals. In an alternative embodiment, vertical and horizontal synchronization signals are processed by frame grabber 148 to internally generate a data valid window signal. Frame grabber block 148 appropriately responds to the respective synchronization signals, by establishing buffer memory locations within integrated RAM 149 of block 148 for temporary storage of the image data received from image sensor chip 182 over data line 159. At any time during the capture of a frame of image data into system RAM 142, buffer RAM 149 of frame grabber block 148 may store a partial (e.g., about 0.1 to 0.8) or a full line of image data.
  • [0064]
    Referring to further aspects of electrical circuit 100, circuit 100 includes a system bus 150. Bus 150 may be in communication with CPU 141 via a memory interface such as EIM interface 117 of IC chip 180. System RAM 142 and system ROM 143 are also connected to bus 150 and in communication with CPU 141 via bus 150. In the embodiment shown, RAM 142 and ROM 143 are provided by discreet IC chips. System RAM 142 and system ROM 143 could also be incorporated into processor chip 180.
  • [0065]
    In addition to having system RAM 142, sometimes referred to as “working” RAM, electrical circuit 100 may include one or more long term storage devices. Electrical circuit 100 can include for example a “flash” memory device 120. Several standardized formats are available for such flash memory devices including: “Multimedia” (MMC), “Smart Media,” “Compact Flash,” and “Memory Stick.” Flash memory devices are conveniently available in card structures which can be interfaced to CPU 141 via an appropriate “slot” electromechanical interface in communication with IC chip 180. Flash memory devices are particularly useful when reader 5 must archive numerous frames of image data. Electrical circuit 100 can also include other types of long term storage such as a hard drive which may be interfaced to bus 150 or to an appropriate I/O interface of processor IC chip 180.
  • [0066]
    In a further aspect of electrical circuit 100, control circuit 140 is configured to control the turning off and turning on of LEDs 16, 18 of illumination block 160. Control circuit 140 preferably controls illumination block 160 in a manner that is coordinated with the capturing of the frames of image data. Illumination LEDs 16 are typically on during at least a portion of frame capture periods. Configuring circuit 140 so that LEDs 16, 18 have off periods significantly reduces the power consumption of circuit 100.
  • [0067]
    In a further aspect of the electrical circuit 100, electrical circuit 100 can be configured so that PWM output interface 114 of IC chip 180 controls illumination LEDs of an imaging module such as illumination LEDs 16 of module 10-1 or aiming/illumination LEDs 18 of module 10-2.
  • [0068]
    In one embodiment, illumination block 160 is in communication with PWM output interface 114 and configured in such manner that LEDs 16 are turned on at a leading edge of PWM pulses output at PWM interface 114, and are turned off at falling edges of PWM pulses output at PWM interface 114. PWM interface 114 should be configured so that several pulses are generated and sent over communication line 153 i during the time that a single row of pixels of image data are exposed to light prior to clocking out of pixel values corresponding to that row. Thus, illumination LEDs 16 would be turned on and off several times during the exposure period for exposing a row of pixels to light. Further, the number of pulses output by PWM output 114 during the time that a single row of pixels are exposed should not van, substantially from row to row. The pixel clock signal received at frame grabber block 148 of IC chip 180 can be utilized to generate the PWM output. It can be seen, therefore, that multifunctional IC chip 180 including frame grabber block 148 and PWM output 114 greatly simplifies the task of developing PWM signals for use in controlling illumination LEDs 16 of module 10.
  • [0069]
    In another embodiment, PWM output 114 and illumination block 160 are configured so that PWM output 114 controls the intensity of illumination, not the on time/off time of illumination. Illumination LED block 160 in such an embodiment can include a power supply circuit which is interfaced to PWM output 114 such that the PWM signal output at PWM output 114 varies the voltage or current supplied to LEDs 16.
  • [0070]
    In a further aspect of electrical circuit 100, aiming LEDs 18 of circuit 100 can be controlled by a signal transmitted by a general purpose I/O port 116 of IC chip 180 over communication line 153 a. Multifunctional processor IC chip 180 can be programmed so that an aiming LED control signal 168, as is shown in the timing diagram of FIG. 2g , is caused to change to an “on” state when frame grabber block 148 completes the process of capturing a complete frame of image data. In the time line of FIG. 2g , frame exposure periods P1, P2, and P3 are plotted against an aiming LED control signal 168. Frame grabber block 148 may be configured to generate an “end of acquisition” or “end of frame” signal when frame grabber block 148 completes the process of capturing a complete frame of image data into RAM 142. When CPU 141 receives an “end of acquisition” signal, CPU 141 controls I/O port 116 to change the state of LED control signal 168. Control circuit 140 may also change the state of LED control signal 168 when generating a start of frame signal. As indicated by the time line of FIG. 2g , control circuit 140 may execute a delay prior to changing the state of signal 168. Control circuit 140 is programmed so that LED control signal 168 remains in an “ON” state known to be sufficiently short duration so as not to cause actuation of an aiming LED 18 during a succeeding frame exposure period. Configured in the manner described, aiming LEDs 18 are selectively pulsed on for a short duration during intermediate successive frame exposure periods, e.g. frame exposure periods P1 and P2.
  • [0071]
    Referring now to FIG. 2b , electrical circuit 101 is described. Electrical circuit 101 controls operation of a single imaging module optical reader comprising a low cost 1D CCD image sensor 32 incorporated on IC chip 183. Image sensor 32 of FIG. 2b may be provided for example by a Toshiba Model TCD 1304 AP linear image sensor. Further aspects of an exemplary 1D imaging module are described, for example, in application Ser. No. 09/658,811, filed Sep. 11, 2000, entitled “Optical Assembly for Barcode Scanner,” incorporated herein by reference.
  • [0072]
    Referring to aspects of electrical circuit 101 in detail, electrical circuit 101 includes a control circuit 140 which, like control circuit 140 of circuit 100 is partially incorporated in a multifunctional processor IC chip 180 including CPU 141 and a frame grabber block 148. Control circuit 140 of circuit 101 further includes system RAM 142 system ROM 143 and supplementary central processor unit (CPU) 147, integrated on processor IC chip 179. System RAM 142 and system RAM 143 are in communication with EIM interface 117 of IC chip 180 via bus 150.
  • [0073]
    Processor IC chip 179 provides control and timing operations similar to that provided by electrical block 134 of image sensor chip 182 described in FIG. 1a . Processor IC chip 179, in general, sends synchronization signals and digital clocking signals to IC chip 180, and sends digital clocking signals to A/D conversion circuit 136 and image sensor 32. Processor IC chip 179 of circuit 101 may be a relatively low power processor IC chip such as an 8 BIT Cyprus PSOC CY8C26Z33-24PZI Microcontroller processor IC chip.
  • [0074]
    Aspects of the operation of IC chip 179 in during the course of capturing slice image data will now be described in detail. When trigger 13 t is pulled, CPU 141 transmits enable image capture instructions over communication line 151. In response to receipt of an image capture enable instructions received from chip 180, processor IC chip 179 performs a variety of operations. Via communication line 152, processor IC chip 179 may send synchronization signals, such as “start of scan,” “data valid window,” and “data acquisition clock” signals to frame grabber block 148. Processor IC chip 179 may also send timing signals and digital clocking signals (e.g. master clock, integration clear gate, and shift gate pulse) to image sensor 32. Processor IC chip 179 typically also transmits a master clock signal to A/D conversion circuit 136. Referring to further aspects of IC chip 180 of circuit 101, CPU 141 of chip 180, may also send e.g. gain setting, exposure setting, and timing initialization signals via line 151 to IC chip 179. Communication between IC chip 180 and IC chip 179 may be made via an SPI interface or I/O interface 116 of chip 180 and chip 179.
  • [0075]
    As will be explained with reference to circuit 104, shown in FIG. 2e , processor IC chip 179 may be replaced by a programmable logic circuit, e.g. a PLD, CPLD, or an FPGA. IC chip 179 could also be replaced by an ASIC. Electrical circuit 101 of FIG. 2b includes what may be termed a “digital digitizer” in that analog voltage levels transmitted by CCD image sensor 32 on line 155 are converted into gray scale pixel values by A/D converter 136 and transmitted via line 159 to frame grabber block 148. Circuit 101 could also include an analog digitizer which processes an analog signal generated by image sensor 32 to generate a two-state output signal that changes state in accordance with light-to-dark and dark-do-light transitions of the image sensor analog output signal.
  • [0076]
    Processor IC chip 179 also controls LED bank 160. LED bank 160 of a 1D image sensor reader typically includes a single bank of LEDs which simultaneously illuminates a target area and provides an aiming pattern facilitating aligning of the reader with a target indicia. LEDs 18 of 1D imaging module 10-2 like LEDs 16 of module 10-1 can be pulsed so as to reduce energy consumption by LEDs 18.
  • [0077]
    Electrical circuit 100 and electrical circuit 101 form a family of 1D and 2D optical readers electrical circuits, which may be manufactured by a single manufacturing entity wherein both of the 1D and 2D readers include the same main processor chip, namely, multifunctional processor IC chip 180. Multifunctional processor IC chip 180 of circuit 100 and circuit 101 can both be provided by e.g. a Dragonball IC chip or an Anaconda IC chip of the type available from Motorola. Inc. Multifunctional processor IC chip 180 of electrical circuit 101 includes far more processing power than is necessary to provide the functionality of a 1D optical reader. Nevertheless, the inventors discovered that the overall cost of electrical circuit 101 would be reduced by incorporating frame grabbing multifunctional IC chip 180 in circuit 101 in that such incorporation reduces overall engineering cost relative to that which would ensue from the development of two different 1D and 2D electrical circuits comprising two different main processor types.
  • [0078]
    Various electrical circuit architectures for operating a reader having more than one imaging module 10 are shown in FIGS. 2c -2 f.
  • [0079]
    In the architecture of FIG. 2c , electrical circuit 102 includes a pair of imaging modules 10 and a control circuit 140. Control circuit 140 includes a field programmable gate array (FPGA) 161, a multifunctional processor IC Chip 180 including a CPU 141 and frame grabber block 148, a system RAM 142 and a system ROM 143. Processor IC chip 180 may be, for example, a Dragonball or Anaconda processor chip of the type available from Motorola, Inc. Imaging modules 10 a and 10 b shown in block form in FIG. 2c correspond to the physical 2D imaging module 10-1 shown in FIGS. 3a-3c . System RAM 142 and system ROM 143 are in communication with processor IC Chip 180 via system bus 150. In general, FPGA 161 of circuit 102 is programmed to execute a multiplexer function indicated by block 155. In response to module select signals received from multifunctional processor IC chip 180, multiplexer 155 receives image data over one of data lines 159 a. 159 b from a selected one of module 10 a and module 10 b and sends the data to frame grabber block 148 of processor IC chip 180. Multiplexer 155 can be deleted if imaging modules 10 are selected to include image sensor IC chips which generate high impedance (tri-statable) synchronization signals when not actuated. FPGA 161, like all other FPGAs described herein could be replaced by another programmable circuit such as a programmable logic device (PLD), or a complex programmable logic device (CPLD) or another device such as an ASIC or processor chip (e.g. such as chip 179 or chip 180).
  • [0080]
    Referring to the operation of electrical circuit 102 in further detail, processor IC chip 180 sends an image capture enable signal to FPGA 161 via line 170 when trigger 13 t is actuated and to an appropriate one of modules 10 a and 10 b via one of lines 151 a, 151 b. The selected module, 10 a or 10 b, then sends synchronization signals, and the digital clocking signals as described previously to FPGA 161 and IC chip 180, over the appropriate one of lines 152 a, 152 b.
  • [0081]
    FPGA 161 transmits image data to multifunctional processor IC Chip 180 over data line 171 which in turn transmits image data to RAM 142 over system bus 150. Lines 151 a. 151 b may carry PWM interface illumination control signals as described previously in connection with electrical circuit 100.
  • [0082]
    In the architecture of FIG. 2d , electrical circuit 103 includes a plurality of N imaging modules 10, which may be incorporated in a single housing 7. Electrical circuit 103 includes a control circuit 140 having an FPGA 162, a processor IC Chip 179, a system RAM 142 and a system ROM 143. FPGA 162 is in communication with processor IC Chip 179 via system bus 150. Processor IC chip 179 and FPGA 162 are also in communication via bus arbitration communication line 167 which carries bus hand shaking (e.g. bus request, bus grant) signals.
  • [0083]
    Various embodiments of FPGA 162 are described with reference to FIGS. 2h and 2i . In the embodiment of FIG. 2h , FPGA 162 c is programmed to include multiplexer block 162 m, control register 162 c, and a solitary frame grabber block 162 f. Image capture enable signals for actuating image capture via one of modules e.g. 10 a are received at control register 162 in response to an actuation of trigger 13 t. Control register 162 c on receipt of an image capture enable signal sends the image capture enable signal to the selected one module 10 and utilizes the signal to associate frame grabber block 162 f to the selected module e.g. 10 a. It will be understood that control register 162 c can be adapted to send during one type of frame capture method, e.g. illumination actuation signals to a second imaging module, 10 c while actuating an image sensor 32 of a first module, e.g. 10 a without sending illumination actuation signals to first module 10 a.
  • [0084]
    In the embodiment of FPGA 162 illustrated in FIG. 2i , multiplexer block 162 m is deleted. FPGA 162 of FIG. 2i includes N frame grabber blocks 162 f. With use of FPGA 162 configured as shown in FIG. 2i , electrical circuit 103 can be operated to capture several frames of image data contemporaneously by contemporaneous actuation of each of several imaging modules e.g. 10 a and 10 c.
  • [0085]
    Referring to further aspects of electrical circuit 103, of FIG. 2d processor IC chip 179 can be provided by general purpose processor IC chip such as a Power PC IC chip of the type available from Motorola. Other suitable IC chips for providing the function of IC chip 179 of circuit 103 include, for example, an Intel SA1110 chip and an Xscale family of processor IC chips, also available from Intel.
  • [0086]
    Referring now to FIG. 2e , electrical circuit 104 controls a pair of imaging modules wherein a first imaging module 10-1 is a 2D imaging module and a second imaging module 10-2 is a 1D imaging module. Control circuit 140 includes CPU 141, 2D frame grabber block 148, FPGA 164, system RAM 142 and system ROM 143. Frame grabber block 148 and CPU 141 are both incorporated on multifunctional processor IC chip 180 (e.g. a Motorola Dragonball IC chip), as described previously in connection with FIG. 2a . A main program executed by CPU 141 of multifunctional processor IC chip 180 controls operation of both first imaging module 10-1 and second imaging module 10-2.
  • [0087]
    For capture of a 2D image, processor IC chip 180 in response to actuation of trigger 13 t sends an image capture enable signal to module 10-1 via a communication line 151. During image capture, 2D imaging module 10-1 sends synchronization and digital clocking signals to frame grabber block 148 via communication line 152 which as explained previously and like all lines represented herein may represent a plurality of physical lines. Further, 2D imaging module 10-1 sends digitized image data to frame grabber block 148 via data line 159 a. Processor IC chip 180 stores image data in RAM 142 by writing image data stored in buffer memory locations of frame grabber block 148 to RAM 142 via system bus 150. An illumination control signal communication line is also typically interposed between IC chip 180 and module 10-1. An illumination signal communication line can be considered to be represented by line 151.
  • [0088]
    For capture of a 1D “slice” image representation, processor IC chip 180 sends a 1D image capture enable signal to FPGA 164 via system bus 150. Processor IC chip 180 and FPGA 164 are further in communication via communication line 167 which carries bus handshaking (e.g. bus request and bus grant) signals. On receipt of an image capture enable signal from processor IC chip 180, FPGA 164 sends digital clocking signals to A/D converter 136 via line 156, to image sensor 32 via line 154, and illumination control signals to illumination LEDs 18 as shown in the physical form view of FIG. 3e via line 153. Image sensor 32 sends analog image signals to A/D converter 136 via output line 155 and A/D converter 136 in turn converts the signals into N (typically 8) bit grey scale pixel values. A/D converter 136 sends the digitized image data to FPGA 164 which stores the image data to RAM 142.
  • [0089]
    As indicated by the block diagram of FIG. 2j , FPGA 164 of electrical circuit 104 includes frame grabber block 164 f for fast transfer of image data into system RAM 142, image sensor illumination and control block 164 c for controlling LEDs 18 and for developing synchronization signals, and clock 164 k for generating digital clocking pulses.
  • [0090]
    Another electrical circuit for controlling a plurality of imaging modules is described with reference to FIG. 2f . Electrical circuit 105 includes a pair of frame grabbing FPGAs 165, 166. First FPGA 165 is dedicated for frame capture of image data generated by first imaging module 10 a while second frame grabbing FPGA 166 is dedicated for capture of image data generated by second imaging module 10 b. The architecture of FIG. 2f is especially well suited for contemporaneous capture of multiple frames of image data via contemporaneous actuation of image sensors of two separate imaging modules 10 a and 10 b.
  • [0091]
    Control circuit 140 of electrical circuit 105 includes CPU 141 which may be incorporated on a general purpose 32 bit processor IC chip 179, frame grabbing FPGAs 165 and 166, system RAM 142 and system ROM 143. Processor IC chip 179 may transmit image capture enable instruction via communication lines 151 a and 151 b. Processor IC chip 179 may also send illumination control signals via lines 151 a and 151 b. For example, in a mode of operation that will be described herein processor IC chip may send an image capture enable signal to module 10 a over line 151 a (and an illumination disabling signal over line 151 a), and an illumination control signal to module 10 b over line 151 b with use of a specific image capture method wherein images are captured in such a manner so as to be substantially impervious to specular reflection decode failures.
  • [0092]
    In a further aspect of electrical circuit 105, imaging modules 10 a and 10 b send synchronization and digital clocking signals to FPGAs 165 and 166 respectively, via lines 152 a and 152 b, and image data to FPGAs 165 and 166 respectively over, data lines 159 a and 159 b. Processor IC chip 179 is in communication with frame grabbing FPGAs 165 and 166 via system bus 150 and via bus arbitration communication lines 167 a and 167 b over which bus handshaking signals (e.g. bus request, bus grant) are sent. While the invention in a major aspect relates to optical readers having multiple imaging modules, another commercial optical product according to another aspect of the invention is described with reference to FIGS. 5a -5 e.
  • [0093]
    In FIG. 5a an optical reader is shown having an electrical circuit 100 as described in FIG. 2a wherein an imaging module 10 is incorporated on a compact flash card 510. Compact flash card 510 carrying circuit 100 as will be explained herein may be interfaced with a host processor assembly such as a personal data assistant (PDA) 540 or a personal computer (PC) 550.
  • [0094]
    As best seen in FIG. 5c or 5 d, PDA 540 can include a compact flash slot 544 for receiving a compact flash card 510, which incorporates an imaging module 10.
  • [0095]
    Various features of compact flash card 510 incorporating module 10 are described with reference to FIG. 5a . As seen in FIG. 5a , electrical circuit 100 including multifunctional frame grabbing IC chip 180, system RAM 142, and system ROM 143 are incorporated on compact flash card 510 which further carries imaging module 10. Imaging module 10 may be a 2D imaging module as described with reference to FIG. 3a-3c , or a 1D module, e.g. as described with reference FIG. 3e . Card 510 typically further comprises a protective cover (not shown).
  • [0096]
    Compact flash card 510 including electrical circuit 100 as indicated by block diagram FIG. 5b , is interfaced to a host processor system 68. As will be explained further herein, host processor system 68 can be included in e.g. a personal data assistant (PDA) 540 as shown in FIG. 5b or a personal computer (PC) 550 as shown in FIG. 5 e.
  • [0097]
    Referring to further aspects of the block diagram of FIG. 5b , circuit 515 includes FPGA 520 which facilitates communication between electrical circuit 100 and host system 68. A physical form view of FPGA 520 is shown in physical form diagram of FIG. 5a . FPGA 520 may be programmed to perform a variety of functions. FPGA 520 may be programmed to (1) communicate with host 68 to inform host 68 that compact flash card 510 is connected to host 68 when it is first connected, (2) to perform all compact flash bus timing, and (3) to provide all buffer interfaces required to receive from circuit 100 data in a form supported by electrical circuit 100 and to allow that data to be received in a compact flash format as is required by host 68.
  • [0098]
    FPGA 520 can be connected via a communication line 504 to UART interface 108 of multifunctional processor IC chip 180. UART interface 108 may transmit data in e.g. an RS 232 format while FPGA 520, appropriately programmed, converts that data into a compact flash format. Further connected to FPGA 520 via line 526 is a compact flash female connector 530, which is formed on an edge of compact flash card 510, and comprises a plurality of sockets 530 s as indicated in the exploded section view of FIG. 5 a.
  • [0099]
    Compact flash card 510 including an electrical circuit 100 having imaging module 10 can operate in a first integrated mode or a second “free-standing” which in one specific embodiment can be considered a “tethered” mode. An integrated mode of operation of card 510 is described with reference to FIGS. 5c and 5d . In an integrated mode, card 510 is integrated into a device such as a PDA 540. To electrically and mechanically connect card 510 to a host, device female end 530 is connected to male end compact flash connector 531, comprising a plurality of pins, within a housing of the host device.
  • [0100]
    A free-standing mode of operation is illustrated with reference to FIG. 5e . In a free-standing mode of operation, compact flash card 510 including module 10 is positioned in a position spaced apart from a host device e.g. device 550. Compact flash card 510 may rest on a table top or else may be mounted to a fixed member spaced apart from the host device e.g. PC 550. In a free-standing mode, card 510 may be connected to a host device via a flexible cable connector 560. When card 510 is connected to a host assembly via a flexible connector, card 510 may be considered to be operating in a “tethered” mode. Card 510 may also be wirelessly connected to a host via e.g., a RF link. In the embodiment of FIG. 5e cable connector 560 is interfaced to host device 550 on one end and to compact flash card 510 on another end. Cable connector 560 includes male compact flash connector 531 for facilitating communication between connector 560 and card 510. Card 510 can further include feet 565 of height substantially the same as connector 531 disposed on an under surface thereof so that card 510 can rest substantially horizontally on a table surface when operating in a free-standing mode. Host device 550 in the free-standing mode diagram illustrated by FIG. 5e is shown as a PC. It will be understood that a host device in a free-standing mode could also be provided by PDA 540 or another mobile or non-mobile computer device.
  • [0101]
    The multiple-module electrical circuits 102, 103, 104, and 105 described herein can be implemented for operation of imaging modules spread out over several housings or for operation of imaging modules incorporated in a housing 7 of multiple imaging module reader 5-1, 5-2, 5-3, 5-4, 5-5, 5-6, and 5-7, 5-8 and 5-9 as shown in physical form views 1 a-1 m.
  • [0102]
    Additional aspects of electrical circuits which may be used with the invention are describe in U.S. Patent Application No. 60/470,016, filed May 12, 2003, incorporated by reference and U.S. application Ser. No. 10/339,439, filed Jan. 9, 2003 is also incorporated by reference.
  • [0103]
    Methods for operating a multiple imaging module optical reader according to the invention will now be described in greater detail. Flow diagrams of FIGS. 4a-4c illustrate operation of a multiple imaging module optical reader having at least two imaging modules 10 a, 10 b.
  • [0104]
    In the reader methods described herein “actuation of an image sensor” generally refers to at least one step in the process of sending appropriate signals to an image sensor 32 to cause exposure of image sensor pixels image sensor to light and to cause clocking out of electrical signals corresponding to light received at pixels of the array. These steps are described in greater detail in for example, U.S. application Ser. No. 09/766,922, filed Jan. 22, 2001, entitled “Optical Reader Having Reduced Parameter Determination Delay,” incorporated herein by reference. “Actuation of illumination” herein generally refers to the step of sending electrical current to a light source e.g. 16, 18 to turn on the light source.
  • [0105]
    Referring to the reader operating method of FIG. 4a , at block 404 after a trigger 13 t is pulled (block 402) control circuit 140 actuates image sensor 32 of first imaging module 10 a and illumination light sources 16 of first imaging module 10 a during a frame capture period in which a first frame of image data is captured. At block 406 control circuit 406 subjects the first captured frame of image data to a decode attempt. If the decode attempt is not successful (block 408), control circuit 140 executes block 410 to capture a second frame of image data. Control circuit 140 actuates image sensor 32 and illumination light sources 16 of second imaging module 10 b when capturing a second frame of image data. Instead of capturing a second frame of image subsequent to subjecting a first frame to a decode attempt (406) control circuit 140 can capture a second frame as described in connection with block 410 prior to the decode attempt of block 406. Control circuit 140 can capture a first frame as described in connection with block 404 and a second frame as described in connection with block 410 in any order and can capture the frames contemporaneously. At block 412 control circuit 140 subjects the indicia representation of the second frame to a decode attempt, and at block 410 outputs a decoded out data message if decoding is successful (block 414). The attempt to decode a decodable indicia may be in accordance with a method for decoding decodable indicia such as are described in U.S. application Ser. No. 09/904,697, filed Jul. 13, 2001, entitled “Applying a Color Imager To A Hand Held Reader For Indicia Reading Image Capture,” incorporated by reference. The reader control method described with reference to the flow diagram of FIG. 4a is highly useful wherein specular reflection decode failures can be expected. Referring to the example of two module reader 5-1 shown in FIGS. 1a and 1b note that if there may be a specular reflection decode failure when a first frame corresponding to a mirrored planar surface is captured via actuation of first module 10 a then there likely will not be a specular reflection decode failure when a second frame captured via actuation of second module 10 b is subjected to decoding.
  • [0106]
    A “wait for trigger pull” control loop, as described in connection with block 402, FIG. 4a , block 420, FIG. 4b , block 444, FIG. 4c will now be described in greater detail. When a trigger 13 t of reader 5 is actuated, control circuit 140 generates a trigger signal to cause branching of program control as described in FIGS. 4a, 4b, and 4c . According to the invention, a trigger signal can also be generated automatically in response to a decodable indicia being presented in a field of view of a module of reader 5. A method of automatically generating what can be considered a trigger signal based on detected edge transitions without a physical trigger pull is described in co-pending application Ser. No. 09/432,282, filed Nov. 2, 1999, entitled “Indicia Sensor System for Optical Reader,” incorporated by reference. It will be understood that any of the control loops indicated by blocks 402, 420, and 440 can be substituted for by a control loop wherein control circuit 140 waits for trigger signal automatically generated when a decodable indicia 15 moved into a field of view of a module of reader 5.
  • [0107]
    In one possible variation of the invention, first and second imaging modules 10 a, 10 b, and possibly all N modules of an N imaging module optical reader are configured so that each module has a different best focus distance. For example, module 10 c of reader 5-2 can be configured to a best focus distance of about 3 inches, module 10 a can be configured to have a best focus distance of about 6 inches, while module 10 b can be configured to have a best focus distance of about 9 inches. In another example, one dimensional imaging module 10 a of reader 5-10 (FIG. 1k ) can have a best focus distance at least one inch longer or shorter than a best focus distance of two dimensional imaging module 10 b of reader 5-10. It will be seen that configuring a reader of the invention so that each of the modules has a different best focus distance increases the overall depth of field of the reader.
  • [0108]
    A multiple module reader of the invention wherein each module has a different best focus distance can be operated in accordance with the flow diagram of FIG. 4a to the end that the reader automatically reads target indicia disposed at a wide range of reader-to-target distance. If an object being read is disposed at a distance closer to the best focus distance of a second module but a substantial distance from a best focus distance of a first module, the reader operating in accordance with the flow diagram of FIG. 4a may successfully decode the indicia at block 412 (second frame decode attempt) after failing to decode the indicia at block 406 (first frame decode attempt).
  • [0109]
    While block 404 of the flow diagram of FIG. 4a and other operating blocks herein refers to capturing a “first” frame of image data, it will be understood that a “first” captured frame as referred to herein is not necessarily the initial frame captured by a reader subsequent to actuation of trigger 13 t. For example, as explained in application Ser. No. 09/766,922, filed Jan. 22, 2001, entitled “Optical Reader Having Reduced Parameter Determination Delay,” and incorporated herein by reference, optical readers commonly process one or more “test” frames of image data to establish exposure levels and other operating parameters. “Frame” herein refers either to a two dimensional frame of image data or a one dimensional “slice” frame of image data.
  • [0110]
    Another method for operating a multiple imaging module optical reader is described with reference to the flow diagram of FIG. 4b . After trigger 13 t is pulled at block 420 control circuit 140 captures a first frame of image data at block 422. Control circuit 140 captures a first frame image data via actuation of an image sensor 32 of first module 10 a and illumination light source 16 of first imaging module 10 a. That is, image sensor 32 of first module 10 a is actuated to generate image signals while a target is illuminated by illumination light sources 16 of first imaging module 10 a. At block 424 control circuit 140 subjects the first frame of capture image data to a decoding attempt. If decoding is not successful (block 426), then control circuit 140 automatically proceeds to block 428 to capture a second frame of image data. Control circuit 140 can also capture a second frame of image data as described in connection with block 428 prior to subjecting a first frame of image data to a decode attempt (block 424). Control circuit 140 can capture a first frame as described in connection with block 422, a second frame as described in block 428, and a third frame (block 434) in any order. Control circuit 140 can capture first, second, and third frames of image data (blocks 422, 428 and 434) contemporaneously. When control circuit 140 captures a second frame of image data at block 428 control circuit 140 once again actuates image sensor 32 of first imaging module 10 a as in the step of block 422. However, when capturing a second frame of image data via actuation of first image sensor, control circuit 140 actuates illumination light sources 16 of second imaging module 10 b without actuating illumination sources 16 of first imaging module 10 a. Because image sensor 32 of first module 10 a and illumination sources 16 of second module 10 b are substantially spaced apart, the frame of image data captured at block 428 is substantially impervious to specular reflection read failures. The operating method described with reference to FIG. 4b can be utilized with any use of readers 5-1, 5-2, 5-3, 5-4, 5-5, 5-6, 5-7, 5-8, and 5-9. As indicated by block 434 a reader having three imaging modules 10 a, 10 b, and 10 c e.g. of reader 5-2 can be further configured so that the control circuit 140 captures a third frame of image by actuation of image sensor 32 of first module e.g., 10 a together with actuation of illumination light sources of third module 10 c.
  • [0111]
    A still further method for operating an optical reader having a plurality of imaging modules is described with reference to the flow diagram of FIG. 4c . Referring to the flow diagram of FIG. 4c control circuit 140 at block 446 captures first and second frames of image data. The first frame of image data captured at block 446 may be captured via actuation of image sensor and illumination light sources of first imaging module e.g., module 10 a of reader 503, FIG. 1e . The second frame of image data captured at block 446 may be captured via actuation of image sensor 32 and illumination light sources 16 of second imaging module 10 c. Referring to further aspects of image capture block 446, control circuit 140 may capture first and second frames at block 446 sequentially (the first frame is captured in its entirety and then the second frame is captured) or contemporaneously (the capture of the second frame begins before capture of the first frame is complete). At block 448 control circuit 140 subjects the first captured frame to a decode attempt. If decoding fails, control circuit 140 proceeds to block 456 to combine the first captured frame captured by actuation of an image sensor of a first module 10 a with a second captured frame of image data captured via actuation of a second imaging module 10 c to generate a third image representation. At block 458 control circuit 140 subjects the third image representation derived from the first and second frames to a decoding attempt. If decoding is successful, control circuit 140 outputs the decoded out message at block 462.
  • [0112]
    At several stages of the operating methods described herein, multiple imaging module reader 5 executes the steps of attempting to decode decodable indicia and branching control of an operating program if the decoding attempt is not successful. In a further aspect of the invention, the step of attempting to decode in any one of the operating programs described with reference to FIGS. 4a, 4b, and 4c can be substituted for or supplemented with the step of preliminarily evaluating image data to determine whether decoding will likely be successful. A step of preliminarily evaluating image data can eliminate the need to actually launch decoding processing to determine whether indicia representation(s) within a frame of image data can be decoded.
  • [0113]
    The step of preliminarily evaluating image data to determine whether decoding will be successful can take on a variety of forms. In one example of the preliminary image data evaluating step, a preliminary image data evaluating step can include the step of examining gray scale values of a frame of image data to determine if the image data has become saturated. If a saturation condition (sometimes referred to as a “white out” condition) is present there is a substantial likelihood of specular reflection misread or other type of misread attributable to excessive illumination. A saturated condition can be considered to be present for example if a sum total of all gray scale values exceeds a predetermined value, or if an average gray scale value exceeds a predetermined threshold white level. All pixel values may be evaluated during the preliminary evaluation step. More typically, however, a sample of pixel values comprising less than all pixel values of a frame are evaluated to speed processing. The sampling of pixels may be predetermined and/or adaptive.
  • [0114]
    The step of preliminarily evaluating image data to determine whether decoding will be successful can also include the step of estimating a module-to-target distance. If an estimated module-to-target distance exceeds a best focus distance by a threshold amount (which may be a predetermined threshold), control circuit 140 may preliminarily determine that decoding will likely not be successful without actually subjecting image data of a frame to a decode attempt. A method for generating a signal that varies with module to target distance is described in commonly assigned U.S. Pat. No. 5,773,810, entitled “Method of Generating Real Time Degree of Focus Signal For Hand Held Imaging Device,” incorporated herein by reference.
  • [0115]
    Referring to the operating method described with reference to FIG. 4c in further detail, a number of different methods may be utilized to execute block 456 (combining the first and second frame of image data).
  • [0116]
    In one method for combining a first frame and a second frame of image data, cross correlation image combination methods can be utilized. In a cross correlation image combination method statistical analyses are executed to compare two or more frames of image data and frames of image data are shifted relative to one another until correlation is optimized.
  • [0117]
    In another method for combining first and second frames of image data, areas of overlap between two frames of image data e.g. 610, 614 are determined and then the image data contribution from one of the frames corresponding to the overlapping area is deleted or modified in a manner depending on the overlapping region image data of the other frame to generate a third image representation 630. In the example of FIG. 4d , showing first, second, and third frames of image data 610, 612, and 614, overlapping regions 619 and 621 are defined between the first and third frames 610 and 614 and between the third and second frames 614 and 612. Overlapping regions of image data 619, 621 are regions e.g. of image data from two separate frames of image data that correspond to a common region of a target substrate, s.
  • [0118]
    The area of overlap between frames of image data captured via actuation of the image sensors of neighboring imaging modules can be determined based on known characteristics of the neighboring imaging modules 10 of reader 5, such as the spacing between imaging modules of reader 5 (e.g. modules 10 a and 10 c of reader 5-3), power of imaging optics 40 of the particular imaging module 10, and the respective module-to-target distances of the neighboring modules. A distance of a module to a target can be estimated via analysis of captured image data, for example by a method for developing a degree of focus signal as is described in commonly assigned U.S. Pat. No. 5,773,810, entitled “Method For Generating Real Time Degree of Focus Signal For Hand Held Imaging Device,” incorporated herein by reference. It can be seen that the image frame diagram of FIG. 4d may correspond to parallel-axis reader 5-3 as shown in FIG. 1e having a plurality of imaging modules comprising parallel imaging axes while the image frame diagram of FIG. 4e (wherein frames 652 and 654 are distorted) may correspond to the diverging axis three module reader 5-4 as shown in FIGS. 1g and 1 h.
  • [0119]
    Referring to the frame diagram of FIG. 4e in further detail, overlapping regions 659 and 661 are defined between first frame 652 and third frame 656 and between third frame 656 and second frame 654. When combining two frames of image data in the example of FIG. 4e , it is particularly important to correct for skew errors (sometimes referred to as distortion errors) when combining frames of image data and when calculating regions of overlap between two frames of image data. In the example of FIG. 4e , skew errors can readily be corrected for by, in part, utilizing a skew correction factor determined from the known relative angles between two imaging axes of a multiple module reader such axes 11 a and 11 c of reader 5-4, and the spacing between modules of a multiple module reader such as reader 5-4. Further skew correction of a frame of image data can be carried out in a manner described in copending application Ser. No. 09/954,081, filed Sep. 17, 2001, entitled “Imaging Device Having Indicia-Controlled Image Parsing Mode,” incorporated herein by reference. In that application, a method is described wherein graphical analysis and interpolation processing are employed to determine a distortion factor affecting a frame of image data, and further wherein the determined distortion factor is utilized to back out distortion from an image.
  • [0120]
    Still further, graphical feature analysis can be utilized in combining frames of image data. If a common graphical feature (e.g., a straight line, a bulls eye, a circle, a character) is found in two frames of image data, the common graphical feature can be utilized to establish a common orientation, spacing, and skew basis between the frames of image data to be combined.
  • [0121]
    A small sample of systems methods and apparatus that are described herein is as follows:
  • [0000]
    A1. An optical reader comprising:
  • [0122]
    a housing defining at least one cavity;
  • [0123]
    a first imaging module mounted in said at least one cavity;
  • [0124]
    a second imaging module mounted in said at least one cavity;
  • [0125]
    wherein each of said first and second modules includes an image sensor, a support assembly, and at least one illumination LED:
  • [0126]
    a control circuit in communication with each of said first and second imaging modules;
  • [0127]
    wherein said control circuit is programmed, in response to receipt of a trigger signal, to:
  • [0128]
    (a) capture a first frame of image data via actuation of said at least one illumination LED and said image sensor of said first imaging module;
  • [0129]
    (b) determine whether said first frame of image data includes decodable indicia;
  • [0130]
    (c) automatically subject to a decode attempt a second frame of image data if said determination step (b) indicates that decodable indicia is not or is likely not represented in said first frame of image data, wherein said second frame of image data is captured via actuation of said at least one LED and said image sensor of said second imaging module.
  • [0000]
    A2. The reader of A1, wherein said control circuit in determining whether decodable indicia is represented in said first frame of image data attempts to decode decodable indicia represented in said first frame of image data.
    A3. The reader of A1, wherein said control circuit 140 captures said second frame of image data contemporaneously while capturing said first frame of image data.
    A4. The reader of A1, wherein said control circuit in determining whether decodable indicia is represented in said first frame of image data preliminarily evaluates image data of said first frame without attempting to decode decodable indicia represented therein.
    A5. The reader of A4, wherein said control circuit in preliminarily evaluating said image data evaluates said image data to determine whether a saturation condition is present.
    A6. The reader of A1, wherein said first imaging module is a 1D imaging module and wherein said second imaging module is a 2D imaging module.
    A7. The reader of A1, wherein said first and second imaging modules are configured to have first and second best focus distances, wherein said first best focus distance is at least 1 inch apart from said second best focus distance.
    A8. The reader of A1, wherein said trigger signal is an automatically generated trigger signal generated by decodable indicia being moved in a field of view of said reader.
    A9. The reader of A1, further comprising a trigger, wherein said trigger signal is generated when said trigger is pulled.
    B1. An optical reader comprising:
  • [0131]
    a housing defining at least one cavity;
  • [0132]
    a first imaging module mounted in said at least one cavity,
  • [0133]
    a second imaging module mounted in said at least one cavity;
  • [0134]
    wherein each of said first and second modules includes an image sensor, a support assembly, and at least one illumination LED:
  • [0135]
    a control circuit in communication with each of said first and second imaging modules;
  • [0136]
    wherein said control circuit is programmed, in response to receipt of a trigger signal to:
  • [0137]
    (a) capture a first frame of image data via actuation of said illumination LED and said image sensor of said first imaging module;
  • [0138]
    (b) determine whether said first frame of image data includes decodable indicia:
  • [0139]
    (c) automatically subject to a decode attempt a second frame of image data if said determination step (b) indicates that decodable indicia is not or is likely not represented in said first frame, wherein said second frame of image data is captured via actuation of said at least one LED of said second imaging module and said image sensor of said first imaging module, wherein no illumination LED of said first imaging module is actuated when said second frame of image data is captured.
  • [0000]
    B2. The reader of B1, wherein said control circuit in determining whether decodable indicia is represented in said first frame of image data attempts to decode decodable indicia represented in said first frame of image data.
    B3. The reader of B1, wherein said control circuit captures said second frame of image data contemporaneously while capturing said first frame of image data.
    B4. The reader of B1, wherein said control circuit in determining whether decodable indicia is represented in said first frame of image data preliminarily evaluates image data of said first frame without attempting to decode decodable indicia represented therein.
    B5. The reader of B4, wherein said control circuit in preliminarily evaluating said image data evaluates said image data to determine whether a saturation condition is present.
    B6. The reader of B1, wherein said first imaging module is a 1D imaging module and wherein said second imaging module is a 2D imaging module.
    B7. The reader of B1, wherein said first and second imaging modules are configured to have first and second best focus distances, wherein said first best focus distance is at least 1 inch apart from said second best focus distance.
    B8. The reader of B1, wherein said trigger signal is an automatically generated trigger signal generated by decodable indicia being moved in a field of view of said reader.
    B9. The reader of B1, further comprising a trigger, wherein said trigger signal is generated when said trigger is pulled.
    C1. An optical reader comprising:
  • [0140]
    a housing defining a cavity;
  • [0141]
    a first imaging module mounted in said cavity:
  • [0142]
    a second imaging module mounted in said cavity:
  • [0143]
    wherein each of said first and second imaging modules includes an image sensor, a support assembly, and at least one illumination LED;
  • [0144]
    a control circuit in communication with each of said first and second imaging modules;
  • [0145]
    wherein said control circuit is programmed, in response to receipt of a trigger signal, to:
  • [0146]
    (a) capture a first and second frame of image data, wherein said first frame of image data is captured via actuation of said at least one LED and said image sensor of said first imaging module, and said second frame of image data is captured via actuation of said at least one LED and said image sensor of said second imaging module,
  • [0147]
    (b) determine whether said first and second frames include decodable indicia:
  • [0148]
    (c) automatically combine said first frame and said second frame to generate a third image representation if said determination step (b) indicates that decodable indicia is not or is likely not represented in said first and second frames of image data and to
  • [0149]
    (d) subject said third image representation to a decode attempt.
  • [0000]
    C2. The reader of C1, wherein said control circuit in determining whether decodable indicia is represented in said first and second frames of image data attempts to decode decodable indicia represented in said first and second frames of image data.
    C3. The reader of C1, wherein said control circuit captures said second frame of image data contemporaneously while capturing said first frame of image data.
    C4. The reader of C1, wherein said control circuit in determining whether decodable indicia is represented in said first and second frames of image data preliminarily evaluates image data of said first and second frames of image data without attempting to decode decodable indicia represented therein.
    C5. The reader of C4, wherein said control circuit in preliminarily evaluating said image data evaluates gray scale pixel values of said image data to determine whether a saturation condition is present.
    C6. The reader of C1, wherein said control circuit in combining said first and second frames of image data determines an area of overlap between said first and second frames of image data.
    C7. The reader of C1, wherein said control circuit in combining said first and second frames of image data generates a signal indicative of a module-to-target distance of at least one of said modules.
    C8. The reader of C1, wherein said control circuit in combining said first and second frames of image data combines said first and second frames in a manner dependent on an angle between imaging axes of said first and second imaging modules.
    C9. The reader of C1, wherein said control circuit in combining said first and second frames of image data identifies a common graphical element commonly represented in said first and second frames of image data.
    C10. The reader of C1, wherein said first and second imaging modules are configured to have first and second best focus distances, wherein said first best focus distance is at least 1 inch apart from said second best focus distance.
    C11. The reader of C1, wherein said trigger signal is an automatically generated trigger signal generated by decodable indicia being moved in a field of view of said reader.
    C12. The reader of C1, further comprising a trigger, wherein said trigger signal is generated when said trigger is pulled.
    D1. An optical reader comprising:
  • [0150]
    a first imaging module having a first imaging axis and a first best focus distance;
  • [0151]
    a second imaging module having a second imaging axis and a second best focus distance, said second best focus distance being at least one inch apart from said first best focus distance;
  • [0152]
    wherein each of said first and second imaging modules includes an image sensor having an array of photosensitive elements, a support assembly, and at least one illumination LED;
  • [0153]
    wherein one of said imaging modules is a one dimensional imaging module including a linear array of photosensitive elements and one of said imaging modules is a two dimensional imaging module including a two dimensional array of photosensitive elements;
  • [0154]
    a control circuit in communication with each of said first and second imaging modules;
  • [0155]
    a hand held housing encapsulating said first imaging module, said second imaging module, and said control circuit;
  • [0156]
    wherein said control circuit is programmed, in response to receipt of a trigger signal, to:
  • [0157]
    (a) capture a first frame of image data via actuation of said at least one illumination LED and said image sensor of said first imaging module;
  • [0158]
    (b) determine whether said first frame of image data includes decodable indicia:
  • [0159]
    (c) automatically subject to a decode attempt a second frame of image data if said determination step (b) indicates that decodable indicia is not or is likely not represented in said first frame of image data, wherein said second frame of image data is captured via actuation of said at least one LED and said image sensor of said second imaging module.
  • [0000]
    D2. The reader of D1, wherein said control circuit in determining whether decodable indicia is represented in said first frame of image data attempts to decode decodable indicia represented in said first frame of image data.
    D3. The reader of D1, wherein said first and second imaging modules are disposed in vertical relation to one another.
    D4. The reader of D1, wherein said first and second imaging modules are disposed in horizontal relation to one another.
    D5. The reader of D1, wherein said imaging modules are disposed so that said first and second imaging axes converge toward one another forward of said reader.
    D6. The reader of D1, wherein said imaging modules are disposed so that said first and second imaging axes diverge apart from one another forward of said reader.
    D7. The reader of D1, wherein said control circuit captures said second frame of image data contemporaneously while capturing said first frame of image data.
    D8. The reader of D1, wherein said control circuit in determining whether decodable indicia is represented in said first frame of image data preliminarily evaluates image data of said first frame without attempting to decode decodable indicia represented therein.
    D9. The reader of D8, wherein said control circuit in preliminarily evaluating said image data evaluates said image data to determine whether a saturation condition is present.
    D10. The reader of D1, wherein said trigger signal is an automatically generated trigger signal generated by decodable indicia being moved in a field of view of said reader.
    D11. The reader of D1, further comprising a trigger, wherein said trigger signal is generated when said trigger is pulled.
    D12. The reader of D1, wherein said housing is a gun-style housing.
    E1. An optical reader comprising:
  • [0160]
    a first imaging module having a first imaging axis:
  • [0161]
    a second imaging module having a second imaging axis;
  • [0162]
    wherein each of said first and second imaging modules includes an image sensor having an array of photosensitive elements, a support assembly, and at least one illumination LED;
  • [0163]
    a control circuit in communication with each of said first and second imaging modules;
  • [0164]
    a hand held housing encapsulating said first imaging module, said second imaging module, and said control circuit;
  • [0165]
    wherein said control circuit is programmed, in response to receipt of a trigger signal, to:
  • [0166]
    (a) capture a first frame of image data via actuation of said at least one illumination LED and said image sensor of said first imaging module:
  • [0167]
    (b) determine whether said first frame of image data includes decodable indicia;
  • [0168]
    (c) automatically subject to a decode attempt a second frame of image data if said determination step (b) indicates that decodable indicia is not or is likely not represented in said first frame of image data, wherein said second frame of image data is captured via actuation of said at least one LED and said image sensor of said second imaging module.
  • [0000]
    E2. The reader of E1, wherein said control circuit in determining whether decodable indicia is represented in said first frame of image data attempts to decode decodable indicia represented in said first frame of image data.
    E3. The reader of E1, wherein said first and second imaging modules are disposed in vertical relation to one another.
    E4. The reader of E1, wherein said first and second imaging modules are disposed in horizontal relation to one another.
    E5. The reader of E1, wherein said imaging modules are disposed so that said first and second imaging axes converge toward one another forward of said reader.
    E6. The reader of E1, wherein said imaging modules are disposed so that said first and second imaging axes diverge apart from one another forward of said reader.
    E7. The reader of E1, wherein said control circuit captures said second frame of image data contemporaneously while capturing said first frame of image data.
    E8. The reader of E1, wherein said control circuit in determining whether decodable indicia is represented in said first frame of image data preliminarily evaluates image data of said first frame without attempting to decode decodable indicia represented therein.
    E9. The reader of E7, wherein said control circuit in preliminarily evaluating said image data evaluates said image data to determine whether a saturation condition is present.
    E10. The reader of E1, wherein said first imaging module is a 1D imaging module and wherein said second imaging module is a 2D imaging module.
    E11. The reader of E1, wherein said first and second imaging modules are configured to have first and second best focus distances, wherein said first best focus distance is at least 1 inch apart from said second best focus distance.
    E12. The reader of E1, wherein said trigger signal is an automatically generated trigger signal generated by decodable indicia being moved in a field of view of said reader.
    E13. The reader of E1, wherein said housing is a gun-style housing.
    E14. The reader of E1, further comprising a trigger, wherein said trigger signal is generated when said trigger is pulled.
    F1. An optical reader comprising:
  • [0169]
    a portable housing;
  • [0170]
    a first imaging module having a first imaging axis:
  • [0171]
    a second imaging module having a second imaging axis, wherein said first and second imaging modules are disposed so that said first and second imaging axes converge toward one another;
  • [0172]
    wherein each of said first and second modules includes an image sensor having an array of photosensitive elements, a support assembly, and at least one illumination LED;
  • [0173]
    a control circuit in communication with each of said first and second imaging modules:
  • [0174]
    wherein said first and second imaging modules are encapsulated in said portable gun style housing, and
  • [0175]
    wherein said control circuit is programmed, in response to receipt of a trigger signal to:
  • [0176]
    (a) capture a first frame of image data via actuation of said illumination LED and said image sensor of said first imaging module:
  • [0177]
    (b) determine whether said first frame of image data includes decodable indicia:
  • [0178]
    (c) automatically subject to a decode attempt a second frame of image data if said determination step (b) indicates that decodable indicia is not or is likely not represented in said first frame, wherein said second frame of image data is captured via actuation of said at least one LED of said second imaging module and said image sensor of said first imaging module, wherein no illumination LED of said first imaging module is actuated when said second frame of image data is captured.
  • [0000]
    F2. The reader of F1, wherein said control circuit in determining whether decodable indicia is represented in said first frame of image data attempts to decode decodable indicia represented in said first frame of image data.
    F3. The reader of F1, wherein said control circuit captures said second frame of image data contemporaneously while capturing said first frame of image data.
    F4. The reader of F1, wherein said control circuit in determining whether decodable indicia is represented in said first frame of image data preliminarily evaluates image data of said first frame without attempting to decode decodable indicia represented therein.
    F5. The reader of F1, wherein said control circuit in preliminarily evaluating said image data evaluates said image data to determine whether a saturation condition is present.
    F6. The reader of F1, wherein said first imaging module is a 1D imaging module and wherein said second imaging module is a 2D imaging module.
    F7. The reader of F1, wherein said first and second imaging modules are configured to have first and second best focus distances, wherein said first best focus distance is at least 1 inch apart from said second best focus distance.
    F8. The reader of F1, wherein said trigger signal is an automatically generated trigger signal generated by decodable indicia being moved in a field of view of said reader.
    F9. The reader of F1, further comprising a trigger, wherein said trigger signal is generated when said trigger is pulled.
    F10. The reader of F1, wherein said first portable housing is a gun-style housing.
  • [0179]
    While the present invention has been explained with reference to the structure disclosed herein, it is not confined to the details set forth and this invention is intended to cover any modifications and changes as may come within the scope of the following claims.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. An optical reader, comprising:
    an image sensor operative to capture frames comprising decodable indicia;
    a first light source operative to project light;
    a second light source operative to project light;
    wherein the optical reader is operative to project light with the first light source and capture a first frame comprising a decodable indicia via the image sensor;
    wherein the optical reader is operative to process the captured first frame to determine whether the captured first frame is saturated, thereby indicating excessive illumination; and
    wherein the optical reader is operative to project light with the second light source and capture a second frame comprising the decodable indicia via the image sensor.
  2. 2. The optical reader of claim 1, comprising a hand held housing, wherein the image sensor, the imaging optics, the first light source, and the second light source are within the hand held housing.
  3. 3. The optical reader of claim 1, wherein the image sensor comprises a color image sensor.
  4. 4. The optical reader of claim 1, wherein the first light source comprises a plurality of LEDs.
  5. 5. The optical reader of claim 1, wherein the second light source comprises a plurality of LEDs.
  6. 6. The optical reader of claim 1, comprising:
    a first imaging module comprising the image sensor and the first light source; and
    a second imaging module comprising a second image sensor and the second light source.
  7. 7. The optical reader of claim 1, wherein the optical reader is configured for:
    processing the captured first frame to determine whether the captured first frame is saturated; and
    in response to the processing of the captured first frame, projecting light with the second light source and capturing a second frame via the image sensor.
  8. 8. The optical reader of claim 1, wherein the optical reader is configured for:
    attempting to decode the captured first frame; and
    in response to a failed attempt to decode the first frame, projecting light with the second light source and capturing a second frame via the image sensor.
  9. 9. An apparatus, comprising:
    a first image sensor operative to generate a first image signal, the first image sensor having a first image axis extending in a first direction, wherein a portion of the first image signal is representative of decodable indicia;
    a first light source operative to project light;
    a second image sensor operative to generate a second image signal, the second image sensor having a second image axis extending in a second direction that is different than the first direction, wherein a portion of the second image signal is representative of decodable indicia;
    a second light source operative to project light;
    a first converter operative to convert image signals generated by the first image sensor into first image data;
    a second converter operative to convert image signals generated by the second image sensor into second image data;
    a random access memory;
    an integrated circuit, the integrated circuit comprising:
    a first frame grabber for receiving the first image data and transmitting the first image data to the random access memory; and
    a second frame grabber for receiving the second image data and transmitting the second image data to the random access memory;
    wherein the apparatus is operative to:
    project light with the first light source;
    process a first frame of the first image data generated while the first light source is projecting light to determine whether the first frame is saturated, thereby indicating excessive illumination, wherein the first frame comprises a decodable indicia;
    project light with the second light source; and
    capture a second frame of the second image data generated while the second light source is projecting light, wherein the second frame comprises the decodable indicia.
  10. 10. The apparatus of claim 9, wherein:
    the first image sensor comprises an area image sensor; and
    the second image sensor comprises a linear image sensor.
  11. 11. The apparatus of claim 9, wherein the first image sensor comprises a color area image sensor.
  12. 12. The apparatus of claim 9, comprising:
    a first imaging module comprising the first image sensor and the first light source; and
    a second imaging module comprising the second image sensor and the second light source.
  13. 13. The apparatus of claim 9, wherein the first light source comprises a plurality of LEDs.
  14. 14. The apparatus of claim 9, wherein the apparatus is configured for attempting to decode the first frame or the second frame.
  15. 15. An optical reader, comprising:
    a first image sensor operative to generate first image data, the first image sensor having a first image axis extending in a first direction, wherein a portion of the first image signal is representative of decodable indicia;
    a second image sensor operative to generate second image data, the second image sensor having a second image axis in a vertical plane with the first image axis and extending in a second direction that is different than the first direction, wherein a portion of the second image signal is representative of decodable indicia:
    a first light source operative to project light;
    a second light source operative to project light;
    wherein the reader is operative to:
    project with the first light source;
    while projecting light with the first light source, generate first image data with the first image sensor, wherein the first image data comprises data representative of a decodable indicia;
    process a first frame of the first image data to determine whether the first frame is saturated, thereby indicating excessive illumination;
    project light with the second light source; and
    while projecting light with the second light source, generate second image data with the second image sensor, wherein the second image data comprises data representative of the decodable indicia.
  16. 16. The optical reader of claim 15, wherein the first image sensor comprises a CMOS image sensor.
  17. 17. The optical reader of claim 15, wherein the first image sensor comprises a color area image sensor.
  18. 18. The optical reader of claim 15, wherein:
    the first image sensor comprises a one-dimensional image sensor; and
    the second image sensor comprises a two-dimensional image sensor.
  19. 19. The optical reader of claim 15, wherein the optical reader is operative to:
    project light with the first light source;
    while projecting light with the first light source, generate first image data with the first image sensor;
    attempt to decode the generated first image data:
    while projecting light with the first light source, generate second image data with the second image sensor; and
    attempt to decode the generated second image data.
  20. 20. The optical reader of claim 15, wherein the optical reader is operative to attempt to decode the generated first image data or the generated second image data.
US14979765 2002-06-04 2015-12-28 Apparatus operative for capture of image data Abandoned US20160110577A1 (en)

Priority Applications (7)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10161950 US20030222147A1 (en) 2002-06-04 2002-06-04 Optical reader having a plurality of imaging modules
US10453796 US7219843B2 (en) 2002-06-04 2003-06-03 Optical reader having a plurality of imaging modules
US10782569 US20040164165A1 (en) 2002-06-04 2004-02-19 Optical reader having a plurality of imaging modules
US11187608 US8074887B2 (en) 2002-06-04 2005-07-22 Optical reader having a plurality of imaging modules
US13323147 US8596542B2 (en) 2002-06-04 2011-12-12 Apparatus operative for capture of image data
US14093624 US9224023B2 (en) 2002-06-04 2013-12-02 Apparatus operative for capture of image data
US14979765 US20160110577A1 (en) 2002-06-04 2015-12-28 Apparatus operative for capture of image data

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14979765 US20160110577A1 (en) 2002-06-04 2015-12-28 Apparatus operative for capture of image data

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14093624 Continuation US9224023B2 (en) 2002-06-04 2013-12-02 Apparatus operative for capture of image data

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20160110577A1 true true US20160110577A1 (en) 2016-04-21

Family

ID=35500575

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13323147 Active US8596542B2 (en) 2002-06-04 2011-12-12 Apparatus operative for capture of image data
US14093624 Active US9224023B2 (en) 2002-06-04 2013-12-02 Apparatus operative for capture of image data
US14979765 Abandoned US20160110577A1 (en) 2002-06-04 2015-12-28 Apparatus operative for capture of image data

Family Applications Before (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13323147 Active US8596542B2 (en) 2002-06-04 2011-12-12 Apparatus operative for capture of image data
US14093624 Active US9224023B2 (en) 2002-06-04 2013-12-02 Apparatus operative for capture of image data

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (3) US8596542B2 (en)

Families Citing this family (206)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8596542B2 (en) * 2002-06-04 2013-12-03 Hand Held Products, Inc. Apparatus operative for capture of image data
US20070063048A1 (en) * 2005-09-14 2007-03-22 Havens William H Data reader apparatus having an adaptive lens
US8794526B2 (en) * 2007-06-04 2014-08-05 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia reading terminal processing plurality of frames of image data responsively to trigger signal activation
WO2009060942A1 (en) * 2007-11-09 2009-05-14 B-Core Inc. Optical recognition code, its marking method, its reading-out method, article marked with optical recognition code, color recognition method, program, automatic recognition code by color arrangement and its attached article
US20110163165A1 (en) * 2010-01-07 2011-07-07 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Terminal having illumination and focus control
WO2011088590A1 (en) 2010-01-21 2011-07-28 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Indicia reading terminal including optical filter
US8387881B2 (en) 2010-12-01 2013-03-05 Hand Held Products, Inc. Terminal with screen reading mode
US9418270B2 (en) 2011-01-31 2016-08-16 Hand Held Products, Inc. Terminal with flicker-corrected aimer and alternating illumination
US8561903B2 (en) 2011-01-31 2013-10-22 Hand Held Products, Inc. System operative to adaptively select an image sensor for decodable indicia reading
US8537245B2 (en) 2011-03-04 2013-09-17 Hand Held Products, Inc. Imaging and decoding device with quantum dot imager
US8640960B2 (en) 2011-06-27 2014-02-04 Honeywell International Inc. Optical filter for image and barcode scanning
US8636215B2 (en) 2011-06-27 2014-01-28 Hand Held Products, Inc. Decodable indicia reading terminal with optical filter
US8985459B2 (en) 2011-06-30 2015-03-24 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Decodable indicia reading terminal with combined illumination
US8646692B2 (en) 2011-09-30 2014-02-11 Hand Held Products, Inc. Devices and methods employing dual target auto exposure
US8608071B2 (en) 2011-10-17 2013-12-17 Honeywell Scanning And Mobility Optical indicia reading terminal with two image sensors
US8881983B2 (en) 2011-12-13 2014-11-11 Honeywell International Inc. Optical readers and methods employing polarization sensing of light from decodable indicia
US8628013B2 (en) 2011-12-13 2014-01-14 Honeywell International Inc. Apparatus comprising image sensor array and illumination control
US8777108B2 (en) 2012-03-23 2014-07-15 Honeywell International, Inc. Cell phone reading mode using image timer
US9779546B2 (en) 2012-05-04 2017-10-03 Intermec Ip Corp. Volume dimensioning systems and methods
US9007368B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2015-04-14 Intermec Ip Corp. Dimensioning system calibration systems and methods
US8752766B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2014-06-17 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Indicia reading system employing digital gain control
US9053380B2 (en) * 2012-06-22 2015-06-09 Honeywell International, Inc. Removeable scanning module for mobile communication terminal
US8978981B2 (en) 2012-06-27 2015-03-17 Honeywell International Inc. Imaging apparatus having imaging lens
US8840025B2 (en) * 2012-06-27 2014-09-23 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Arrangement for and method of preventing symbol misreads in electro-optical readers
US9939259B2 (en) 2012-10-04 2018-04-10 Hand Held Products, Inc. Measuring object dimensions using mobile computer
US9841311B2 (en) 2012-10-16 2017-12-12 Hand Held Products, Inc. Dimensioning system
CN103780847A (en) 2012-10-24 2014-05-07 霍尼韦尔国际公司 Chip on board-based highly-integrated imager
US9239147B2 (en) * 2012-11-07 2016-01-19 Omnivision Technologies, Inc. Apparatus and method for obtaining uniform light source
US9494617B2 (en) 2012-11-07 2016-11-15 Omnivision Technologies, Inc. Image sensor testing probe card
WO2014110495A3 (en) 2013-01-11 2014-09-25 Hand Held Products, Inc. Managing edge devices
US9080856B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2015-07-14 Intermec Ip Corp. Systems and methods for enhancing dimensioning, for example volume dimensioning
US9070032B2 (en) 2013-04-10 2015-06-30 Hand Held Products, Inc. Method of programming a symbol reading system
US9037344B2 (en) 2013-05-24 2015-05-19 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and method for display of information using a vehicle-mount computer
US9930142B2 (en) 2013-05-24 2018-03-27 Hand Held Products, Inc. System for providing a continuous communication link with a symbol reading device
US8918250B2 (en) 2013-05-24 2014-12-23 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and method for display of information using a vehicle-mount computer
US9141839B2 (en) 2013-06-07 2015-09-22 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and method for reading code symbols at long range using source power control
US9104929B2 (en) 2013-06-26 2015-08-11 Hand Held Products, Inc. Code symbol reading system having adaptive autofocus
US8985461B2 (en) 2013-06-28 2015-03-24 Hand Held Products, Inc. Mobile device having an improved user interface for reading code symbols
US9239950B2 (en) 2013-07-01 2016-01-19 Hand Held Products, Inc. Dimensioning system
US9250652B2 (en) 2013-07-02 2016-02-02 Hand Held Products, Inc. Electronic device case
US9773142B2 (en) 2013-07-22 2017-09-26 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and method for selectively reading code symbols
US9297900B2 (en) 2013-07-25 2016-03-29 Hand Held Products, Inc. Code symbol reading system having adjustable object detection
US9672398B2 (en) 2013-08-26 2017-06-06 Intermec Ip Corporation Aiming imagers
US9464885B2 (en) 2013-08-30 2016-10-11 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and method for package dimensioning
US9082023B2 (en) 2013-09-05 2015-07-14 Hand Held Products, Inc. Method for operating a laser scanner
US9572901B2 (en) 2013-09-06 2017-02-21 Hand Held Products, Inc. Device having light source to reduce surface pathogens
US8870074B1 (en) 2013-09-11 2014-10-28 Hand Held Products, Inc Handheld indicia reader having locking endcap
US9251411B2 (en) 2013-09-24 2016-02-02 Hand Held Products, Inc. Augmented-reality signature capture
US9165174B2 (en) 2013-10-14 2015-10-20 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia reader
US9800293B2 (en) 2013-11-08 2017-10-24 Hand Held Products, Inc. System for configuring indicia readers using NFC technology
US9530038B2 (en) 2013-11-25 2016-12-27 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia-reading system
CN204009928U (en) 2013-12-12 2014-12-10 手持产品公司 Laser scanner
US9373018B2 (en) 2014-01-08 2016-06-21 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia-reader having unitary-construction
US9665757B2 (en) 2014-03-07 2017-05-30 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia reader for size-limited applications
US9224027B2 (en) 2014-04-01 2015-12-29 Hand Held Products, Inc. Hand-mounted indicia-reading device with finger motion triggering
US9412242B2 (en) 2014-04-04 2016-08-09 Hand Held Products, Inc. Multifunction point of sale system
US9258033B2 (en) 2014-04-21 2016-02-09 Hand Held Products, Inc. Docking system and method using near field communication
US9224022B2 (en) 2014-04-29 2015-12-29 Hand Held Products, Inc. Autofocus lens system for indicia readers
US9280693B2 (en) 2014-05-13 2016-03-08 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia-reader housing with an integrated optical structure
US9301427B2 (en) 2014-05-13 2016-03-29 Hand Held Products, Inc. Heat-dissipation structure for an indicia reading module
US9277668B2 (en) 2014-05-13 2016-03-01 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia-reading module with an integrated flexible circuit
US9478113B2 (en) 2014-06-27 2016-10-25 Hand Held Products, Inc. Cordless indicia reader with a multifunction coil for wireless charging and EAS deactivation
US9794392B2 (en) 2014-07-10 2017-10-17 Hand Held Products, Inc. Mobile-phone adapter for electronic transactions
US9443123B2 (en) 2014-07-18 2016-09-13 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and method for indicia verification
US9310609B2 (en) 2014-07-25 2016-04-12 Hand Held Products, Inc. Axially reinforced flexible scan element
US9823059B2 (en) 2014-08-06 2017-11-21 Hand Held Products, Inc. Dimensioning system with guided alignment
US20160057230A1 (en) 2014-08-19 2016-02-25 Hand Held Products, Inc. Mobile computing device with data cognition software
US20160062473A1 (en) 2014-08-29 2016-03-03 Hand Held Products, Inc. Gesture-controlled computer system
EP3001368A1 (en) 2014-09-26 2016-03-30 Honeywell International Inc. System and method for workflow management
US9779276B2 (en) 2014-10-10 2017-10-03 Hand Held Products, Inc. Depth sensor based auto-focus system for an indicia scanner
US20160102975A1 (en) 2014-10-10 2016-04-14 Hand Held Products, Inc. Methods for improving the accuracy of dimensioning-system measurements
US9443222B2 (en) 2014-10-14 2016-09-13 Hand Held Products, Inc. Identifying inventory items in a storage facility
EP3009968A1 (en) 2014-10-15 2016-04-20 Vocollect, Inc. Systems and methods for worker resource management
US9557166B2 (en) 2014-10-21 2017-01-31 Hand Held Products, Inc. Dimensioning system with multipath interference mitigation
US9752864B2 (en) 2014-10-21 2017-09-05 Hand Held Products, Inc. Handheld dimensioning system with feedback
US9762793B2 (en) 2014-10-21 2017-09-12 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and method for dimensioning
US9897434B2 (en) 2014-10-21 2018-02-20 Hand Held Products, Inc. Handheld dimensioning system with measurement-conformance feedback
US20160125873A1 (en) 2014-10-29 2016-05-05 Hand Held Products, Inc. Method and system for recognizing speech using wildcards in an expected response
CN204256748U (en) 2014-10-31 2015-04-08 霍尼韦尔国际公司 Scanner with lighting system
US9924006B2 (en) 2014-10-31 2018-03-20 Hand Held Products, Inc. Adaptable interface for a mobile computing device
EP3016023A1 (en) 2014-10-31 2016-05-04 Honeywell International Inc. Scanner with illumination system
US20160125342A1 (en) 2014-11-03 2016-05-05 Hand Held Products, Inc. Directing an inspector through an inspection
US20160125217A1 (en) 2014-11-05 2016-05-05 Hand Held Products, Inc. Barcode scanning system using wearable device with embedded camera
US9984685B2 (en) 2014-11-07 2018-05-29 Hand Held Products, Inc. Concatenated expected responses for speech recognition using expected response boundaries to determine corresponding hypothesis boundaries
US9767581B2 (en) 2014-12-12 2017-09-19 Hand Held Products, Inc. Auto-contrast viewfinder for an indicia reader
US20160180713A1 (en) 2014-12-18 2016-06-23 Hand Held Products, Inc. Collision-avoidance system and method
US9761096B2 (en) 2014-12-18 2017-09-12 Hand Held Products, Inc. Active emergency exit systems for buildings
US9743731B2 (en) 2014-12-18 2017-08-29 Hand Held Products, Inc. Wearable sled system for a mobile computer device
US9678536B2 (en) 2014-12-18 2017-06-13 Hand Held Products, Inc. Flip-open wearable computer
US20160179378A1 (en) 2014-12-22 2016-06-23 Hand Held Products, Inc. Delayed trim of managed nand flash memory in computing devices
US20160180594A1 (en) 2014-12-22 2016-06-23 Hand Held Products, Inc. Augmented display and user input device
US9727769B2 (en) 2014-12-22 2017-08-08 Hand Held Products, Inc. Conformable hand mount for a mobile scanner
US9564035B2 (en) 2014-12-22 2017-02-07 Hand Held Products, Inc. Safety system and method
US20160180130A1 (en) 2014-12-23 2016-06-23 Hand Held Products, Inc. Mini-barcode reading module with flash memory management
US20160179143A1 (en) 2014-12-23 2016-06-23 Hand Held Products, Inc. Tablet computer with interface channels
US20160180136A1 (en) 2014-12-23 2016-06-23 Hand Held Products, Inc. Method of barcode templating for enhanced decoding performance
US9679178B2 (en) 2014-12-26 2017-06-13 Hand Held Products, Inc. Scanning improvements for saturated signals using automatic and fixed gain control methods
US20160189092A1 (en) 2014-12-26 2016-06-30 Hand Held Products, Inc. Product and location management via voice recognition
US9652653B2 (en) 2014-12-27 2017-05-16 Hand Held Products, Inc. Acceleration-based motion tolerance and predictive coding
US9774940B2 (en) 2014-12-27 2017-09-26 Hand Held Products, Inc. Power configurable headband system and method
US20160189088A1 (en) 2014-12-28 2016-06-30 Hand Held Products, Inc. Dynamic check digit utilization via electronic tag
US20160189447A1 (en) 2014-12-28 2016-06-30 Hand Held Products, Inc. Remote monitoring of vehicle diagnostic information
US9843660B2 (en) 2014-12-29 2017-12-12 Hand Held Products, Inc. Tag mounted distributed headset with electronics module
US20160189284A1 (en) 2014-12-29 2016-06-30 Hand Held Products, Inc. Confirming product location using a subset of a product identifier
US9898635B2 (en) 2014-12-30 2018-02-20 Hand Held Products, Inc. Point-of-sale (POS) code sensing apparatus
US9685049B2 (en) 2014-12-30 2017-06-20 Hand Held Products, Inc. Method and system for improving barcode scanner performance
US9230140B1 (en) 2014-12-30 2016-01-05 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and method for detecting barcode printing errors
US20160188939A1 (en) 2014-12-30 2016-06-30 Hand Held Products, Inc. Visual feedback for code readers
US9830488B2 (en) 2014-12-30 2017-11-28 Hand Held Products, Inc. Real-time adjustable window feature for barcode scanning and process of scanning barcode with adjustable window feature
US20160188943A1 (en) 2014-12-30 2016-06-30 Hand Held Products, Inc. Augmented reality vision barcode scanning system and method
CN204706037U (en) 2014-12-31 2015-10-14 手持产品公司 Slide of reshuffling and mark of mobile device read system
US9879823B2 (en) 2014-12-31 2018-01-30 Hand Held Products, Inc. Reclosable strap assembly
US9811650B2 (en) 2014-12-31 2017-11-07 Hand Held Products, Inc. User authentication system and method
EP3043235B1 (en) 2014-12-31 2018-06-20 Hand Held Products, Inc. Reconfigurable sled for a mobile device
US9734639B2 (en) 2014-12-31 2017-08-15 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and method for monitoring an industrial vehicle
US9997935B2 (en) 2015-01-08 2018-06-12 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and method for charging a barcode scanner
US20160204623A1 (en) 2015-01-08 2016-07-14 Hand Held Products, Inc. Charge limit selection for variable power supply configuration
US20160203429A1 (en) 2015-01-09 2016-07-14 Honeywell International Inc. Restocking workflow prioritization
US9861182B2 (en) 2015-02-05 2018-01-09 Hand Held Products, Inc. Device for supporting an electronic tool on a user's hand
US20160232891A1 (en) 2015-02-11 2016-08-11 Hand Held Products, Inc. Methods for training a speech recognition system
US9390596B1 (en) 2015-02-23 2016-07-12 Hand Held Products, Inc. Device, system, and method for determining the status of checkout lanes
US9250712B1 (en) 2015-03-20 2016-02-02 Hand Held Products, Inc. Method and application for scanning a barcode with a smart device while continuously running and displaying an application on the smart device display
US20160292477A1 (en) 2015-03-31 2016-10-06 Hand Held Products, Inc. Aimer for barcode scanning
US9930050B2 (en) 2015-04-01 2018-03-27 Hand Held Products, Inc. Device management proxy for secure devices
US9852102B2 (en) 2015-04-15 2017-12-26 Hand Held Products, Inc. System for exchanging information between wireless peripherals and back-end systems via a peripheral hub
US9521331B2 (en) 2015-04-21 2016-12-13 Hand Held Products, Inc. Capturing a graphic information presentation
US9693038B2 (en) 2015-04-21 2017-06-27 Hand Held Products, Inc. Systems and methods for imaging
US9891612B2 (en) 2015-05-05 2018-02-13 Hand Held Products, Inc. Intermediate linear positioning
US9954871B2 (en) 2015-05-06 2018-04-24 Hand Held Products, Inc. Method and system to protect software-based network-connected devices from advanced persistent threat
US9978088B2 (en) 2015-05-08 2018-05-22 Hand Held Products, Inc. Application independent DEX/UCS interface
US9786101B2 (en) 2015-05-19 2017-10-10 Hand Held Products, Inc. Evaluating image values
USD771631S1 (en) 2015-06-02 2016-11-15 Hand Held Products, Inc. Mobile computer housing
US9507974B1 (en) 2015-06-10 2016-11-29 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia-reading systems having an interface with a user's nervous system
US9892876B2 (en) 2015-06-16 2018-02-13 Hand Held Products, Inc. Tactile switch for a mobile electronic device
US9949005B2 (en) 2015-06-18 2018-04-17 Hand Held Products, Inc. Customizable headset
US9857167B2 (en) 2015-06-23 2018-01-02 Hand Held Products, Inc. Dual-projector three-dimensional scanner
CN106332252A (en) 2015-07-07 2017-01-11 手持产品公司 WIFI starting usage based on cell signals
US9835486B2 (en) 2015-07-07 2017-12-05 Hand Held Products, Inc. Mobile dimensioner apparatus for use in commerce
EP3118576A1 (en) 2015-07-15 2017-01-18 Hand Held Products, Inc. Mobile dimensioning device with dynamic accuracy compatible with nist standard
US20170018094A1 (en) 2015-07-16 2017-01-19 Hand Held Products, Inc. Dimensioning and imaging items
USD808076S1 (en) * 2015-07-23 2018-01-16 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Flash lamp epilator
US9488986B1 (en) 2015-07-31 2016-11-08 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and method for tracking an item on a pallet in a warehouse
US9853575B2 (en) 2015-08-12 2017-12-26 Hand Held Products, Inc. Angular motor shaft with rotational attenuation
US9911023B2 (en) 2015-08-17 2018-03-06 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia reader having a filtered multifunction image sensor
US9781681B2 (en) 2015-08-26 2017-10-03 Hand Held Products, Inc. Fleet power management through information storage sharing
US9798413B2 (en) 2015-08-27 2017-10-24 Hand Held Products, Inc. Interactive display
US9490540B1 (en) 2015-09-02 2016-11-08 Hand Held Products, Inc. Patch antenna
US9781502B2 (en) 2015-09-09 2017-10-03 Hand Held Products, Inc. Process and system for sending headset control information from a mobile device to a wireless headset
US9659198B2 (en) 2015-09-10 2017-05-23 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and method of determining if a surface is printed or a mobile device screen
US9652648B2 (en) 2015-09-11 2017-05-16 Hand Held Products, Inc. Positioning an object with respect to a target location
CN205091752U (en) 2015-09-18 2016-03-16 手持产品公司 Eliminate environment light flicker noise's bar code scanning apparatus and noise elimination circuit
US9646191B2 (en) 2015-09-23 2017-05-09 Intermec Technologies Corporation Evaluating images
US20170091904A1 (en) 2015-09-25 2017-03-30 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and process for displaying information from a mobile computer in a vehicle
US9767337B2 (en) 2015-09-30 2017-09-19 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia reader safety
US20170094238A1 (en) 2015-09-30 2017-03-30 Hand Held Products, Inc. Self-calibrating projection apparatus and process
US9844956B2 (en) 2015-10-07 2017-12-19 Intermec Technologies Corporation Print position correction
US9656487B2 (en) 2015-10-13 2017-05-23 Intermec Technologies Corporation Magnetic media holder for printer
EP3156825A1 (en) 2015-10-16 2017-04-19 Hand Held Products, Inc. Dimensioning system with multipath interference mitigation
US9727083B2 (en) 2015-10-19 2017-08-08 Hand Held Products, Inc. Quick release dock system and method
US9876923B2 (en) 2015-10-27 2018-01-23 Intermec Technologies Corporation Media width sensing
US9684809B2 (en) 2015-10-29 2017-06-20 Hand Held Products, Inc. Scanner assembly with removable shock mount
US20170124396A1 (en) 2015-10-29 2017-05-04 Hand Held Products, Inc. Dynamically created and updated indoor positioning map
US9680282B2 (en) 2015-11-17 2017-06-13 Hand Held Products, Inc. Laser aiming for mobile devices
US9697401B2 (en) 2015-11-24 2017-07-04 Hand Held Products, Inc. Add-on device with configurable optics for an image scanner for scanning barcodes
US9864891B2 (en) 2015-11-24 2018-01-09 Intermec Technologies Corporation Automatic print speed control for indicia printer
US9935946B2 (en) 2015-12-16 2018-04-03 Hand Held Products, Inc. Method and system for tracking an electronic device at an electronic device docking station
CN106899713A (en) 2015-12-18 2017-06-27 霍尼韦尔国际公司 Battery cover locking mechanism for mobile terminal, and manufacturing method for battery cover locking mechanism
US9729744B2 (en) 2015-12-21 2017-08-08 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and method of border detection on a document and for producing an image of the document
US9727840B2 (en) 2016-01-04 2017-08-08 Hand Held Products, Inc. Package physical characteristic identification system and method in supply chain management
US9805343B2 (en) 2016-01-05 2017-10-31 Intermec Technologies Corporation System and method for guided printer servicing
US20170199266A1 (en) 2016-01-12 2017-07-13 Hand Held Products, Inc. Programmable reference beacons
US9945777B2 (en) 2016-01-14 2018-04-17 Hand Held Products, Inc. Multi-spectral imaging using longitudinal chromatic aberrations
US20170213064A1 (en) 2016-01-26 2017-07-27 Hand Held Products, Inc. Enhanced matrix symbol error correction method
US9990784B2 (en) 2016-02-05 2018-06-05 Hand Held Products, Inc. Dynamic identification badge
US9674430B1 (en) 2016-03-09 2017-06-06 Hand Held Products, Inc. Imaging device for producing high resolution images using subpixel shifts and method of using same
EP3220369A1 (en) 2016-09-29 2017-09-20 Hand Held Products, Inc. Monitoring user biometric parameters with nanotechnology in personal locator beacon
US20170299851A1 (en) 2016-04-14 2017-10-19 Hand Held Products, Inc. Customizable aimer system for indicia reading terminal
EP3232367A1 (en) 2016-04-15 2017-10-18 Hand Held Products, Inc. Imaging barcode reader with color separated aimer and illuminator
US20170308779A1 (en) 2016-04-26 2017-10-26 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia reading device and methods for decoding decodable indicia employing stereoscopic imaging
US20170318206A1 (en) * 2016-04-28 2017-11-02 Symbol Technologies, Llc Imaging module and reader for, and method of, reading a target by image capture with a visually enhanced aiming light pattern
US9727841B1 (en) 2016-05-20 2017-08-08 Vocollect, Inc. Systems and methods for reducing picking operation errors
US20170351891A1 (en) 2016-06-03 2017-12-07 Hand Held Products, Inc. Wearable metrological apparatus
US9940721B2 (en) 2016-06-10 2018-04-10 Hand Held Products, Inc. Scene change detection in a dimensioner
US20170365060A1 (en) 2016-06-15 2017-12-21 Hand Held Products, Inc. Automatic mode switching in a volume dimensioner
US9990524B2 (en) 2016-06-16 2018-06-05 Hand Held Products, Inc. Eye gaze detection controlled indicia scanning system and method
US9876957B2 (en) 2016-06-21 2018-01-23 Hand Held Products, Inc. Dual mode image sensor and method of using same
US9955099B2 (en) 2016-06-21 2018-04-24 Hand Held Products, Inc. Minimum height CMOS image sensor
US9864887B1 (en) 2016-07-07 2018-01-09 Hand Held Products, Inc. Energizing scanners
US9662900B1 (en) 2016-07-14 2017-05-30 Datamax-O'neil Corporation Wireless thermal printhead system and method
US9902175B1 (en) 2016-08-02 2018-02-27 Datamax-O'neil Corporation Thermal printer having real-time force feedback on printhead pressure and method of using same
US9919547B2 (en) 2016-08-04 2018-03-20 Datamax-O'neil Corporation System and method for active printing consistency control and damage protection
US9940497B2 (en) 2016-08-16 2018-04-10 Hand Held Products, Inc. Minimizing laser persistence on two-dimensional image sensors
US9805257B1 (en) 2016-09-07 2017-10-31 Datamax-O'neil Corporation Printer method and apparatus
US9946962B2 (en) 2016-09-13 2018-04-17 Datamax-O'neil Corporation Print precision improvement over long print jobs
US9881194B1 (en) 2016-09-19 2018-01-30 Hand Held Products, Inc. Dot peen mark image acquisition
US9701140B1 (en) 2016-09-20 2017-07-11 Datamax-O'neil Corporation Method and system to calculate line feed error in labels on a printer
US9785814B1 (en) 2016-09-23 2017-10-10 Hand Held Products, Inc. Three dimensional aimer for barcode scanning
US9931867B1 (en) 2016-09-23 2018-04-03 Datamax-O'neil Corporation Method and system of determining a width of a printer ribbon
US9936278B1 (en) 2016-10-03 2018-04-03 Vocollect, Inc. Communication headsets and systems for mobile application control and power savings
US9892356B1 (en) 2016-10-27 2018-02-13 Hand Held Products, Inc. Backlit display detection and radio signature recognition
US9827796B1 (en) 2017-01-03 2017-11-28 Datamax-O'neil Corporation Automatic thermal printhead cleaning system
US9802427B1 (en) 2017-01-18 2017-10-31 Datamax-O'neil Corporation Printers and methods for detecting print media thickness therein
US9849691B1 (en) 2017-01-26 2017-12-26 Datamax-O'neil Corporation Detecting printing ribbon orientation
US9908351B1 (en) 2017-02-27 2018-03-06 Datamax-O'neil Corporation Segmented enclosure
US9937735B1 (en) 2017-04-20 2018-04-10 Datamax—O'Neil Corporation Self-strip media module
US9984366B1 (en) 2017-06-09 2018-05-29 Hand Held Products, Inc. Secure paper-free bills in workflow applications

Citations (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5331176A (en) * 1992-04-10 1994-07-19 Veritec Inc. Hand held two dimensional symbol reader with a symbol illumination window
US5572006A (en) * 1994-07-26 1996-11-05 Metanetics Corporation Automatic exposure single frame imaging systems
US5648650A (en) * 1994-09-07 1997-07-15 Alps Electric Co., Ltd. Optical bar code reading apparatus with regular reflection detecting circuit
US5783811A (en) * 1995-06-26 1998-07-21 Metanetics Corporation Portable data collection device with LED targeting and illumination assembly
US5992744A (en) * 1997-02-18 1999-11-30 Welch Allyn, Inc. Optical reader having multiple scanning assemblies with simultaneously decoded outputs
US20010042789A1 (en) * 2000-05-17 2001-11-22 Mark Krichever Bioptics bar code reader
US6328213B1 (en) * 1998-06-12 2001-12-11 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Method of processing an analog electrical signal containing information representative of reflected light from coded indicia, wherein the electrical signal contains edge transitions
US6571189B2 (en) * 2001-05-14 2003-05-27 Hewlett-Packard Company System and method for scanner calibration
US20030226895A1 (en) * 2002-06-11 2003-12-11 Hand Held Products, Inc. Long range optical reader
US20040020990A1 (en) * 2002-06-04 2004-02-05 Havens William H. Optical reader having a plurality of imaging modules
US20040031848A1 (en) * 2002-08-15 2004-02-19 Leach Robert J. Positioning of photodetectors in optical scanning modules for use in bar code readers for reducing specular reflection
US20040164165A1 (en) * 2002-06-04 2004-08-26 Havens William H. Optical reader having a plurality of imaging modules
US20050023356A1 (en) * 2003-07-29 2005-02-03 Microvision, Inc., A Corporation Of The State Of Washington Method and apparatus for illuminating a field-of-view and capturing an image
US20060043194A1 (en) * 2004-08-31 2006-03-02 Edward Barkan Scanner and method for eliminating specular reflection
US20060163355A1 (en) * 2005-01-26 2006-07-27 Psc Scanning, Inc. Data reader and methods for imaging targets subject to specular reflection
US20070164115A1 (en) * 2006-01-17 2007-07-19 Symboltechnologies, Inc. Automatic exposure system for imaging-based bar code reader
US20080223933A1 (en) * 2005-05-03 2008-09-18 Datalogic Scanning, Inc. Methods and systems for forming images of moving optical codes
US20090001175A1 (en) * 2007-06-28 2009-01-01 Goren David P Control of specular reflection in imaging reader
US20110142371A1 (en) * 2006-09-08 2011-06-16 King Martin T Optical scanners, such as hand-held optical scanners
US20120153022A1 (en) * 2002-06-04 2012-06-21 Hand Held Products, Inc. Apparatus operative for capture of image data
US20140166851A1 (en) * 2012-12-18 2014-06-19 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Optical input apparatus

Family Cites Families (351)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1233038B (en) 1962-04-27 1967-01-26 Siemens Ag Electrical device, in which are the electrical connections between its components produced by circuit boards
US3262023A (en) 1964-03-19 1966-07-19 Int Resistance Co Electrical circuit assembly having wafers mounted in stacked relation
NL164685C (en) 1974-02-26 1981-01-15 Matsushita Electric Ind Co Ltd Read-out device for scanning information on a record carrier.
JPS5855567B2 (en) 1975-06-06 1983-12-10 Hitachi Ltd
US4057784A (en) 1976-09-27 1977-11-08 Sperry Rand Corporation Bi-directional scanner assembly
US4333187A (en) 1980-10-20 1982-06-08 Schuler Bob A Shower curtain
US4330583A (en) 1981-02-05 1982-05-18 Rca Corporation High density information record lubricants
US4542528A (en) 1981-04-09 1985-09-17 Recognition Equipment Incorporated OCR and bar code reader with optimized sensor
US4758717A (en) 1982-01-25 1988-07-19 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Narrow-bodied, single-and twin-windowed portable laser scanning head for reading bar code symbols
US4818847A (en) 1982-07-29 1989-04-04 Nippondenso Co., Ltd. Apparatus for optically reading printed information
GB2128549B (en) 1982-10-13 1986-02-12 Standard Telephones Cables Ltd Debit/credit card
US5668364A (en) 1985-02-28 1997-09-16 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Target finder in electro-optical scanners
CA1256205A (en) 1985-02-28 1989-06-20 Jerome Swartz Portable laser diode scanning head
US4721849A (en) 1985-10-02 1988-01-26 Videx, Inc. Portable programmable optical code reader
US4945216A (en) 1985-11-06 1990-07-31 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Wireless bar code reader
JPH07107688B2 (en) 1986-03-18 1995-11-15 日本電装株式会社 Optical information reading apparatus
US4841132A (en) 1986-07-21 1989-06-20 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Program recording scheduling apparatus using an optical reader
US4877949A (en) 1986-08-08 1989-10-31 Norand Corporation Hand-held instant bar code reader system with automated focus based on distance measurements
US5841121A (en) 1988-08-31 1998-11-24 Norand Technology Corporation Hand-held optically readable character set reader having automatic focus control for operation over a range of distances
US5640001A (en) 1986-08-08 1997-06-17 Norand Technology Corporation Hand-held instant bar code reader having automatic focus control for operation over a range of distances
US5576529A (en) * 1986-08-08 1996-11-19 Norand Technology Corporation Hand-held optically readable information set reader focus with operation over a range of distances
US5949056A (en) 1986-09-10 1999-09-07 Norand Corporation Method and apparatus for optically reading an information pattern
US5059778A (en) 1986-09-29 1991-10-22 Mars Incorporated Portable data scanner apparatus
DE3788734D1 (en) 1986-10-24 1994-02-17 Sumitomo Electric Industries An apparatus for scanning an optical code.
CA1290020C (en) 1987-02-09 1991-10-01 Steven Messenger Wireless local area network
US4774715A (en) 1987-03-11 1988-09-27 Telesystems Slw Inc. Device for demodulating a spread spectrum signal
GB2207027B (en) 1987-07-15 1992-01-08 Matsushita Electric Works Ltd Voice encoding and composing system
US4866257C1 (en) 1987-11-19 2001-01-09 Spectra Physics Scanning Syst Bar code scanner and method
KR920002926B1 (en) 1988-01-08 1992-04-10 고바야시 쥰 Optical image reading apparatus
US6681994B1 (en) 1988-08-31 2004-01-27 Intermec Ip Corp. Method and apparatus for optically reading information
US5340972A (en) 1991-05-13 1994-08-23 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Hands-free bar code scanner with finger activated optical control
US5479002A (en) 1988-05-11 1995-12-26 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Bar code scanner with scanning beam and/or field of view adjustable about three mutually orthogonal axes
US6688523B1 (en) 1988-08-31 2004-02-10 Intermec Ip Corp. System for reading optical indicia
US5019699A (en) 1988-08-31 1991-05-28 Norand Corporation Hand-held optical character reader with means for instantaneously reading information from a predetermined area at an optical sensing area
US5235167A (en) 1988-10-21 1993-08-10 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Laser scanning system and scanning method for reading bar codes
US5504316A (en) 1990-05-08 1996-04-02 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Laser scanning system and scanning method for reading 1-D and 2-D barcode symbols
US6330973B1 (en) 1989-10-30 2001-12-18 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Integrated code reading systems including tunnel scanners
CA1331808C (en) 1988-11-01 1994-08-30 Edward Barkan Laser diode scanner with minimized power consumption, minimized dead zone, and increased safety
US5280164A (en) 1988-11-01 1994-01-18 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Laser diode scanner with minimized dead zone
US4920255A (en) 1988-10-31 1990-04-24 Stephen C. Gabeler Automatic incremental focusing scanner system
US5280161A (en) 1988-11-18 1994-01-18 West Electric Company, Ltd. Apparatus for optically reading a bar code
JPH02183879A (en) * 1989-01-10 1990-07-18 Sumitomo Electric Ind Ltd Bar code reader
US5010241A (en) 1989-01-12 1991-04-23 Hewlett-Packard Company Sensor array and illumination system for a large depth-of-field bar code scanner
US5872354A (en) 1989-01-31 1999-02-16 Norand Corporation Hand-held data capture system with interchangable modules including autofocusing data file reader using the slope of the image signal to determine focus
US6389010B1 (en) 1995-10-05 2002-05-14 Intermec Ip Corp. Hierarchical data collection network supporting packetized voice communications among wireless terminals and telephones
CA1329263C (en) 1989-03-01 1994-05-03 Mark Krichever Bar code scanner
US5780034A (en) 1989-03-14 1998-07-14 Yeda Research And Development Co. Ltd. Diagnosis and treatment of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus using heat shock protein determinents
US5410141A (en) 1989-06-07 1995-04-25 Norand Hand-held data capture system with interchangable modules
US5254977A (en) 1989-06-12 1993-10-19 Crosfield Electronics Ltd. Color display
US5059779A (en) 1989-06-16 1991-10-22 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Scan pattern generators for bar code symbol readers
US5668803A (en) 1989-06-29 1997-09-16 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Protocol for packet data communication system
US5815811A (en) 1989-06-29 1998-09-29 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Preemptive roaming in a cellular local area wireless network
CA1312656C (en) 1989-08-24 1993-01-12 Aironet Canada Limited Wireless communications systems
US5034619A (en) 1989-09-21 1991-07-23 Welch Allyn, Inc. Optical reader with dual vertically oriented photoemitters
US5552592A (en) 1989-10-30 1996-09-03 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Slim scan module with dual detectors
US5367151A (en) 1989-10-30 1994-11-22 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Slim scan module with interchangeable scan element
US5177346A (en) 1989-12-13 1993-01-05 Computer Identics Bar code reader system for reading bar code labels with a highly specular and low contrast surface
US5837986A (en) 1990-01-05 1998-11-17 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Modification of software files in a microprocessor-controlled device via two-dimensional bar code symbols
US5646389A (en) 1990-11-13 1997-07-08 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Inventory management system using coded re-order information
US5149948A (en) 1990-07-16 1992-09-22 Computer Identics Improved bar code reader system for reading bar codes under high specular reflection conditions with a variety of surface effects
US6076733A (en) 1993-11-24 2000-06-20 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Web-based system and method for enabling a viewer to access and display HTML-encoded documents located on the world wide web (WWW) by reading URL-encoded bar code symbols printed on a web-based information resource guide
US6732929B2 (en) 1990-09-10 2004-05-11 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Led-based planar light illumination beam generation module employing a focal lens for reducing the image size of the light emmiting surface of the led prior to beam collimation and planarization
US6068188A (en) 1993-11-24 2000-05-30 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. System and method for composing menus of URL-encoded bar code symbols while using internet browser program
US6085978A (en) 1994-08-17 2000-07-11 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Holographic laser scanners of modular construction and method and apparatus for designing and manufacturing the same
US6027024A (en) 1994-08-17 2000-02-22 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Hand-held portable WWW access terminal with visual display panel and GUI-based WWW browser program integrated with bar code symbol reader
US6412699B1 (en) 1990-09-11 2002-07-02 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Method of and system for producing transaction-enabling graphical user interfaces at internet-enabled terminals in response to reading bar code symbols pointing to html-encoded documents embedded with java-applets and stored on http information servers
US6830189B2 (en) * 1995-12-18 2004-12-14 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Method of and system for producing digital images of objects with subtantially reduced speckle-noise patterns by illuminating said objects with spatially and/or temporally coherent-reduced planar laser illumination
US5905251A (en) 1993-11-24 1999-05-18 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Hand-held portable WWW access terminal with visual display panel and GUI-based WWW browser program integrated with bar code symbol reader in a hand-supportable housing
US6073846A (en) 1994-08-17 2000-06-13 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Holographic laser scanning system and process and apparatus and method
US5233171A (en) 1990-09-13 1993-08-03 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Optical reader with power isolation
JP2790206B2 (en) 1990-09-14 1998-08-27 富士写真フイルム株式会社 Film image input device
US5777315A (en) 1991-09-17 1998-07-07 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Method and apparatus for programming system function parameters in programmable code symbol readers
US5616908A (en) 1991-09-17 1997-04-01 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Automatic countertop laser scanner with flickering laser scanner beam for improved visibility thereof during bar code symbol reading
US5340971A (en) 1990-09-17 1994-08-23 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Automatic bar code reading system having selectable long range and short range modes of operation
US5859417A (en) 1991-06-14 1999-01-12 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Optical scanners having dual surface optical elements for dual working ranges
JP2785534B2 (en) 1990-12-20 1998-08-13 株式会社デンソー Information reading device
US5200597A (en) 1991-02-07 1993-04-06 Psc, Inc. Digitally controlled system for scanning and reading bar codes
DE4108916C2 (en) 1991-03-19 1994-11-17 Data Logic Optik Elektronik Bar code system
CA2056272C (en) 1991-06-14 2001-10-16 Patrick Salatto, Jr. Combined range laser scanner
US5378883A (en) 1991-07-19 1995-01-03 Omniplanar Inc. Omnidirectional wide range hand held bar code reader
US5208449A (en) 1991-09-09 1993-05-04 Psc, Inc. Portable transaction terminal
US5491328A (en) 1991-09-24 1996-02-13 Spectra-Physics Scanning Systems, Inc. Checkout counter scanner having multiple scanning surfaces
US5371347A (en) 1991-10-15 1994-12-06 Gap Technologies, Incorporated Electro-optical scanning system with gyrating scan head
JP3190448B2 (en) 1991-10-25 2001-07-23 オリンパス光学工業株式会社 Two-dimensional bar code symbol reading device
DE69232291D1 (en) 1991-10-29 2002-01-24 Denso Corp Information reading device
US5308962A (en) 1991-11-01 1994-05-03 Welch Allyn, Inc. Reduced power scanner for reading indicia
US5347113A (en) 1991-11-04 1994-09-13 Spectra-Physics Scanning Systems, Inc. Multiple-interface selection system for computer peripherals
US5286960A (en) 1991-11-04 1994-02-15 Welch Allyn, Inc. Method of programmable digitization and bar code scanning apparatus employing same
US5610595A (en) 1991-12-09 1997-03-11 Intermec Corporation Packet radio communication system protocol
EP1028381A3 (en) 1991-12-10 2001-08-08 Khyber Technologies Corporation Portable messaging and scheduling device with homebase station
EP0587115B1 (en) 1992-09-07 1999-02-10 Denso Corporation Communication system
US5294783A (en) 1992-01-10 1994-03-15 Welch Allyn, Inc. Analog reconstruction circuit and bar code reading apparatus employing same
US5291008A (en) 1992-01-10 1994-03-01 Welch Allyn, Inc. Optical assembly and apparatus employing same using an aspherical lens and an aperture stop
JPH06506788A (en) 1992-01-17 1994-07-28
US5659778A (en) 1992-02-03 1997-08-19 Tm Patents, L.P. System and method of mapping an array to processing elements
US5756981A (en) 1992-02-27 1998-05-26 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Optical scanner for reading and decoding one- and-two-dimensional symbologies at variable depths of field including memory efficient high speed image processing means and high accuracy image analysis means
US5296689A (en) 1992-02-28 1994-03-22 Spectra-Physics Scanning Systems, Inc. Aiming beam system for optical data reading device
US5319182A (en) 1992-03-04 1994-06-07 Welch Allyn, Inc. Integrated solid state light emitting and detecting array and apparatus employing said array
US6092728A (en) 1992-03-30 2000-07-25 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Miniature laser diode focusing module using micro-optics
US5206881A (en) 1992-04-15 1993-04-27 Telesystems Slw Inc. Wireless local area network
US5406062A (en) 1992-07-31 1995-04-11 Alps Electric Co., Ltd. Sensitivity adjustment circuit for bar code scanner and method therefor
US5579487A (en) 1992-10-02 1996-11-26 Teletransaction, Inc. Portable work slate computer with multiple docking positions for interchangeably receiving removable modules
JP3235249B2 (en) 1992-12-18 2001-12-04 株式会社デンソー The optical information reading device
US5389917A (en) 1993-02-17 1995-02-14 Psc, Inc. Lapel data entry terminal
US5510606A (en) 1993-03-16 1996-04-23 Worthington; Hall V. Data collection system including a portable data collection terminal with voice prompts
US5602376A (en) 1993-05-07 1997-02-11 Psc Inc. Hand-mounted optical scanner system
US5406063A (en) 1993-05-07 1995-04-11 Telxon Corporation Hand-held data scanner having adjustable keyboard panel
WO1994027246A1 (en) 1993-05-10 1994-11-24 Psc, Inc. Bar code decoding system
US5591955A (en) 1993-05-11 1997-01-07 Laser; Vadim Portable data file readers
US5404002A (en) 1993-05-17 1995-04-04 At&T Global Information Solutions Company Backup method for multiple source optical scanner
JPH06333074A (en) 1993-05-25 1994-12-02 Nippondenso Co Ltd Optical information reader
US5623137A (en) 1993-08-20 1997-04-22 Welch Allyn, Inc. Illumination apparatus for optical readers
US5697699A (en) 1993-09-09 1997-12-16 Asahi Kogaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Lighting apparatus
JP2740727B2 (en) 1993-09-27 1998-04-15 株式会社テック Symbol reader
JPH07203400A (en) 1993-10-15 1995-08-04 Matsushita Electric Ind Co Ltd Multimedia rendering marker and its usage
US6321992B1 (en) 1997-03-19 2001-11-27 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Internet-based system and method for tracking objects bearing URL-encoded bar code symbols
US5504317A (en) 1994-01-05 1996-04-02 Opticon, Inc. Optical reader
US5932862A (en) 1994-03-04 1999-08-03 Welch Allyn, Inc. Optical reader having improved scanning-decoding features
US5942741A (en) 1994-03-04 1999-08-24 Welch Allyn, Inc. Apparatus for optimizing throughput in decoded-output scanners and method of using same
US5929418A (en) 1994-03-04 1999-07-27 Welch Allyn, Inc. Optical reader having improved menuing features
US5825006A (en) 1994-03-04 1998-10-20 Welch Allyn, Inc. Optical reader having improved autodiscrimination features
US7387253B1 (en) 1996-09-03 2008-06-17 Hand Held Products, Inc. Optical reader system comprising local host processor and optical reader
US5965863A (en) 1994-03-04 1999-10-12 Welch Allyn, Inc. Optical reader system comprising local host processor and optical reader
WO1995025148A1 (en) 1994-03-17 1995-09-21 Hitachi Maxell, Ltd. Phosphor, phosphor composition, fluorescent mark carrier, and optical character reader
US5541419A (en) 1994-03-21 1996-07-30 Intermec Corporation Symbology reader wth reduced specular reflection
US5550364A (en) 1994-03-21 1996-08-27 Intermec Corporation Method and apparatus for spotter beam formation using a partitioned optical element
US5504367A (en) 1994-03-21 1996-04-02 Intermec Corporation Symbology reader illumination system
US5598007A (en) 1994-03-21 1997-01-28 Intermec Corporation Symbology reader with fixed focus spotter beam
DE4411536A1 (en) 1994-04-02 1995-10-05 Cassella Ag Water-swellable hydrophilic polymers
WO1995035506A3 (en) 1994-06-17 1996-03-14 Kensington Lab Inc Scribe mark reader
CA2150747A1 (en) 1994-06-30 1995-12-31 Yajun Li Multiple laser indicia reader optionally utilizing a charge coupled device (ccd) detector and operating method therefor
US5672858A (en) 1994-06-30 1997-09-30 Symbol Technologies Inc. Apparatus and method for reading indicia using charge coupled device and scanning laser beam technology
US6019286A (en) 1995-06-26 2000-02-01 Metanetics Corporation Portable data collection device with dataform decoding and image capture capability
US5815200A (en) 1994-07-26 1998-09-29 Metanetics Corporation Extended working range dataform reader with reduced power consumption
US5521366A (en) 1994-07-26 1996-05-28 Metanetics Corporation Dataform readers having controlled and overlapped exposure integration periods
US5703349A (en) 1995-06-26 1997-12-30 Metanetics Corporation Portable data collection device with two dimensional imaging assembly
US5763864A (en) 1994-07-26 1998-06-09 Meta Holding Corporation Dataform reader including dual laser and imaging reading assemblies
US5635700A (en) * 1994-07-27 1997-06-03 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Bar code scanner with multi-channel light collection
JP3031202B2 (en) 1994-08-08 2000-04-10 株式会社デンソー Mobile radio station
US5834749A (en) 1994-08-30 1998-11-10 Durbin; Dennis A. Optical image capture system for reading targets at oblique angles
US5534684A (en) 1994-08-30 1996-07-09 Norand Corporation Portable optical reader with motion sensing system and method
JP3043239B2 (en) 1994-10-07 2000-05-22 シャープ株式会社 Image reading apparatus
EP0788634B1 (en) 1994-10-25 2000-03-08 United Parcel Service Of America, Inc. Automatic electronic camera for label image capture
JP2899113B2 (en) 1994-10-25 1999-06-02 ユナイテッド パーセル サービス オブ アメリカ,インコーポレイテッド Method and apparatus for a portable non-contact label imager
US6347163B2 (en) 1994-10-26 2002-02-12 Symbol Technologies, Inc. System for reading two-dimensional images using ambient and/or projected light
US5644601A (en) 1994-10-31 1997-07-01 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for bias suppression in a VCO based FM transmission system
US5786586A (en) 1995-01-17 1998-07-28 Welch Allyn, Inc. Hand-held optical reader having a detachable lens-guide assembly
US6045047A (en) 1995-01-17 2000-04-04 Welch Allyn Data Collection, Inc. Two-dimensional part reader having a focussing guide
US5612530A (en) 1995-01-24 1997-03-18 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Scanner with pre-programmed working ranges
JP3659675B2 (en) 1995-01-31 2005-06-15 オリンパス株式会社 Information reproducing apparatus
US5600121A (en) 1995-03-20 1997-02-04 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Optical reader with independent triggering and graphical user interface
US5585616A (en) 1995-05-05 1996-12-17 Rockwell International Corporation Camera for capturing and decoding machine-readable matrix symbol images applied to reflective surfaces
US6060722A (en) 1995-05-15 2000-05-09 Havens; William H. Optical reader having illumination assembly including improved aiming pattern generator
US5784102A (en) 1995-05-15 1998-07-21 Welch Allyn, Inc. Optical reader having improved interactive image sensing and control circuitry
US5780834A (en) 1995-05-15 1998-07-14 Welch Allyn, Inc. Imaging and illumination optics assembly
US5739518A (en) 1995-05-17 1998-04-14 Metanetics Corporation Autodiscrimination for dataform decoding and standardized recording
JP3086151B2 (en) 1995-05-18 2000-09-11 シャープ株式会社 Two-dimensional bar code processing function information processing apparatus
US5814827A (en) 1995-05-19 1998-09-29 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Optical scanner with extended depth of focus
US6029893A (en) 1995-05-22 2000-02-29 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Optical scanner having a reflected light collector including holographic optical elements
JP3187287B2 (en) 1995-06-21 2001-07-11 旭光学工業株式会社 Data symbol reader
US5714745A (en) 1995-12-20 1998-02-03 Metanetics Corporation Portable data collection device with color imaging assembly
US5811784A (en) 1995-06-26 1998-09-22 Telxon Corporation Extended working range dataform reader
US5780831A (en) 1995-07-12 1998-07-14 Asahi Kogaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha One-dimensional and two-dimensional data symbol reader
JPH0991368A (en) 1995-07-20 1997-04-04 Fujitsu Ltd Optical reader
US6155488A (en) 1995-08-25 2000-12-05 Psc Inc. Optical reader with adaptive exposure control
US5637854A (en) 1995-09-22 1997-06-10 Microscan Systems Incorporated Optical bar code scanner having object detection
US5744815A (en) 1995-10-05 1998-04-28 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Beam splitting optics in bar code readers
US6360949B1 (en) 1995-10-10 2002-03-26 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Retro-reflective scan module for electro-optical readers
US5745176A (en) 1995-10-12 1998-04-28 Ppt Vision, Inc. Machine-vision illumination system and method for delineating a lighted volume from an unlighted volume
US5949054A (en) 1995-10-23 1999-09-07 Welch Allyn, Inc. Bar code reader for reading high to low contrast bar code symbols
US5831254A (en) 1995-12-18 1998-11-03 Welch Allyn, Inc. Exposure control apparatus for use with optical readers
US7028899B2 (en) 1999-06-07 2006-04-18 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Method of speckle-noise pattern reduction and apparatus therefore based on reducing the temporal-coherence of the planar laser illumination beam before it illuminates the target object by applying temporal phase modulation techniques during the transmission of the plib towards the target
US6254003B1 (en) 1995-12-18 2001-07-03 Welch Allyn Data Collection, Inc. Optical reader exposure control apparatus comprising illumination level detection circuitry
US5743633A (en) 1995-12-27 1998-04-28 Physical Optics Corporation Bar code illuminator
US5850078A (en) 1996-01-16 1998-12-15 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Simplified assembly and automatic testing of components in electro-optical systems for reading coded indicia
US6575368B1 (en) 1996-01-31 2003-06-10 Psc Scanning, Inc. Multiple aperture data reader for multi-mode operation
US5804802A (en) 1996-02-14 1998-09-08 United Parcel Service Of America, Inc. Two-way data communication manager
US5838720A (en) 1996-02-23 1998-11-17 Teletransactions, Inc. Transceiver control with sleep mode operation
US6034379A (en) 1996-03-01 2000-03-07 Intermec Ip Corp. Code reader having replaceable optics assemblies supporting multiple illuminators
US5717195A (en) 1996-03-05 1998-02-10 Metanetics Corporation Imaging based slot dataform reader
US5955720A (en) 1996-03-21 1999-09-21 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Semi-retroreflective scanners
US5773810A (en) 1996-03-29 1998-06-30 Welch Allyn, Inc. Method for generating real time degree of focus signal for handheld imaging device
US5736726A (en) 1996-03-29 1998-04-07 Telxon Corporation Portable data collection device having removable handle and battery
US5793033A (en) 1996-03-29 1998-08-11 Metanetics Corporation Portable data collection device with viewing assembly
US6179208B1 (en) * 1997-01-31 2001-01-30 Metanetics Corporation Portable data collection device with variable focusing module for optic assembly
US5926581A (en) 1996-04-25 1999-07-20 Lockheed Martin Corporation System for topographic mapping from remotely sensed images
CN1311679C (en) 1996-05-31 2007-04-18 松下电器产业株式会社 Data transmitter and receiver and method thereof
US5794145A (en) 1996-06-07 1998-08-11 Telxon Corporation Mobile device multiband antenna system
US5988506A (en) 1996-07-16 1999-11-23 Galore Scantec Ltd. System and method for reading and decoding two dimensional codes of high density
US5962836A (en) 1996-07-29 1999-10-05 Asahi Kogaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Optical reader having placement detecting mechanism
US6507864B1 (en) 1996-08-02 2003-01-14 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Client-server software for controlling data collection device from host computer
US5848064A (en) 1996-08-07 1998-12-08 Telxon Corporation Wireless software upgrades with version control
US5859970A (en) 1996-08-27 1999-01-12 Telxon Corporation Portable computer with internal ethernet/token ring controller
JPH1069516A (en) 1996-08-28 1998-03-10 Asahi Optical Co Ltd Data symbol reader
WO1998016896A1 (en) * 1996-10-16 1998-04-23 Omniplanar, Inc. Hand-held bar code reader with laser scanning and 2d image capture
US5945660A (en) 1996-10-16 1999-08-31 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Communication system for wireless bar code reader
EP0873013A3 (en) 1996-11-05 2001-01-03 Welch Allyn, Inc. Decoding of real time video imaging
US5924040A (en) 1996-11-20 1999-07-13 Telxon Corporation Wireless communication system having base station with adjustable power transceiver for locating mobile devices
US5914478A (en) 1997-01-24 1999-06-22 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Scanning system and method of operation with intelligent automatic gain control
US5942762A (en) 1997-01-29 1999-08-24 Accu-Sort Systems, Inc. CCD scanner having improved specular reflection discrimination
US6119944A (en) 1997-02-03 2000-09-19 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Down-loadable hand-held optical reader
US5946344A (en) 1997-04-07 1999-08-31 Intermec Ip Corp. Multiple-rate direct sequence architecture utilizing a fixed chipping rate and variable spreading code lengths
DE69838714D1 (en) 1997-05-05 2007-12-27 Symbol Technologies Inc Optical scanning device and image reader for image reading and decoding optical information with a two-dimensional symbols and at varying depth field
US5920061A (en) 1997-05-29 1999-07-06 Metanetics Corporation Portable data collection device including imaging assembly with modular high density dataform reader assembly
JP2834113B1 (en) 1997-06-16 1998-12-09 日本電気精器株式会社 Code reading method and apparatus
JP3435311B2 (en) 1997-06-19 2003-08-11 松下電器産業株式会社 Information reading device
US6062475A (en) 1997-06-25 2000-05-16 Metanetics Corporation Portable data collection device including color imaging dataform reader assembly
US5912921A (en) 1997-08-20 1999-06-15 Intermec Ip Corp. Concurrent multiple data rate communications in a wireless local area network
JP3228193B2 (en) 1997-08-27 2001-11-12 日本電気株式会社 Negative photoresist composition and pattern forming method using the same
US6000612A (en) * 1997-10-10 1999-12-14 Metanetics Corporation Portable data collection device having optical character recognition
US6298176B2 (en) 1997-10-17 2001-10-02 Welch Allyn Data Collection, Inc. Symbol-controlled image data reading system
US5949052A (en) 1997-10-17 1999-09-07 Welch Allyn, Inc. Object sensor system for stationary position optical reader
US6561428B2 (en) 1997-10-17 2003-05-13 Hand Held Products, Inc. Imaging device having indicia-controlled image parsing mode
US6318635B1 (en) 1997-12-02 2001-11-20 Telxon Corporation Multi-focal length imaging based portable dataform reader
US6053408A (en) 1997-12-02 2000-04-25 Telxon Corporation Multi-focal length imaging based portable dataform reader
US6669093B1 (en) 1997-12-19 2003-12-30 Telxon Corporation Hand-held dataform reader having multiple target area illumination sources for independent reading of superimposed dataforms
US6178426B1 (en) 1998-01-15 2001-01-23 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Apparatus with extended markup language data capture capability
US6535493B1 (en) 1998-01-15 2003-03-18 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Mobile internet communication protocol
US6123263A (en) * 1998-01-29 2000-09-26 Meta Holdings Corporation Hand held dataform reader having strobing ultraviolet light illumination assembly for reading fluorescent dataforms
WO1999057649A3 (en) 1998-05-04 2000-03-09 Intermec Ip Corp Automatic data collection device having a network communications capability
US6199044B1 (en) 1998-05-27 2001-03-06 Intermec Ip Corp. Universal data input and processing device, such as universal point-of-sale device for inputting and processing bar code symbols, document images, and other data
US6155491A (en) 1998-05-29 2000-12-05 Welch Allyn Data Collection, Inc. Lottery game ticket processing apparatus
ES2162409T3 (en) * 1998-06-01 2001-12-16 Datalogic Spa Apparatus and method for reading an optical code.
US6352517B1 (en) 1998-06-02 2002-03-05 Stephen Thomas Flock Optical monitor of anatomical movement and uses thereof
US6340114B1 (en) 1998-06-12 2002-01-22 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Imaging engine and method for code readers
US6607128B1 (en) 1998-07-08 2003-08-19 Welch Allyn Data Collection Inc. Optical assembly for barcode scanner
US6164544A (en) 1998-07-08 2000-12-26 Welch Allyn Data Collection, Inc. Adjustable illumination system for a barcode scanner
US6119939A (en) 1998-07-08 2000-09-19 Welch Allyn, Inc. Optical assembly for barcode scanner
US6547139B1 (en) 1998-07-10 2003-04-15 Welch Allyn Data Collection, Inc. Method and apparatus for extending operating range of bar code scanner
US6191406B1 (en) 1998-07-24 2001-02-20 Eastman Kodak Company Data reader and reader system having visible centerless targeting
US6152371A (en) 1998-08-12 2000-11-28 Welch Allyn, Inc. Method and apparatus for decoding bar code symbols
US6098887A (en) 1998-09-11 2000-08-08 Robotic Vision Systems, Inc. Optical focusing device and method
US6066857A (en) 1998-09-11 2000-05-23 Robotic Vision Systems, Inc. Variable focus optical system
US6661521B1 (en) 1998-09-11 2003-12-09 Robotic Vision Systems, Inc. Diffuse surface illumination apparatus and methods
US6283374B1 (en) 1998-09-11 2001-09-04 Robotic Vision Systems, Inc. Symbology imaging and reading apparatus and method
US6036096A (en) 1998-09-11 2000-03-14 Robotic Vision Systems, Inc. Multi-modally grippable device and method of use
US6843417B1 (en) 1998-09-11 2005-01-18 L. V. Partners, L.P. Aiming indicia for a bar code and method of use
DE69834918T2 (en) 1998-11-02 2007-02-01 Datalogic S.P.A., Lippo Di Calderara Di Reno Arrangement for the automatic acquisition and processing of optical code
US6264105B1 (en) 1998-11-05 2001-07-24 Welch Allyn Data Collection, Inc. Bar code reader configured to read fine print barcode symbols
US7118481B2 (en) 1998-11-09 2006-10-10 Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd Video gaming with integral printer device
US6651888B1 (en) * 1999-02-02 2003-11-25 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Beam shaping system and diverging laser beam for scanning optical code
US6539360B1 (en) 1999-02-05 2003-03-25 United Parcel Service Of America, Inc. Special handling processing in a package transportation system
JP3662769B2 (en) * 1999-05-12 2005-06-22 株式会社東研 Color image corresponding code reader and methods
US6629641B2 (en) 2000-06-07 2003-10-07 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Method of and system for producing images of objects using planar laser illumination beams and image detection arrays
US6631842B1 (en) 2000-06-07 2003-10-14 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Method of and system for producing images of objects using planar laser illumination beams and image detection arrays
US8042740B2 (en) 2000-11-24 2011-10-25 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Method of reading bar code symbols on objects at a point-of-sale station by passing said objects through a complex of stationary coplanar illumination and imaging planes projected into a 3D imaging volume
US6595422B1 (en) 1999-06-23 2003-07-22 Assure Systems, Inc. Bar code reader
US6578767B1 (en) 1999-07-16 2003-06-17 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Low cost bar code reader
US6352204B2 (en) 1999-08-04 2002-03-05 Industrial Data Entry Automation Systems Incorporated Optical symbol scanner with low angle illumination
JP2001068182A (en) 1999-08-27 2001-03-16 Sony Computer Entertainment Inc Board connecting structure, electronic equipment, and connector
CN1391680A (en) 1999-10-04 2003-01-15 韦尔奇·埃林数据采集公司 Imaging module for optical reader
JP4649093B2 (en) 2001-03-08 2011-03-09 ハンド ヘルド プロダクツ インコーポレーティッド Optical reader imaging module
US20030034394A1 (en) * 1999-10-04 2003-02-20 Hand Held Products, Inc. Optical reader comprising finely adjustable lens assembly
US7270274B2 (en) 1999-10-04 2007-09-18 Hand Held Products, Inc. Imaging module comprising support post for optical reader
US6695209B1 (en) 1999-10-04 2004-02-24 Psc Scanning, Inc. Triggerless optical reader with signal enhancement features
US20030029917A1 (en) * 1999-10-04 2003-02-13 Hand Held Products, Inc. Optical reader for imaging module
US6832725B2 (en) * 1999-10-04 2004-12-21 Hand Held Products, Inc. Optical reader comprising multiple color illumination
US6585159B1 (en) 1999-11-02 2003-07-01 Welch Allyn Data Collection, Inc. Indicia sensor system for optical reader
US6888566B2 (en) 1999-12-14 2005-05-03 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Method and apparatus for uniform lineal motion blur estimation using multiple exposures
EP1396811B8 (en) 2000-02-23 2008-07-16 Datalogic S.P.A. Apparatus and method for reading and decoding optical codes with result indication
US7137555B2 (en) * 2000-02-28 2006-11-21 Psc Scanning, Inc. Multi-format bar code reader
WO2002015121A1 (en) 2000-08-16 2002-02-21 Webb Richard M Scannable barcode display and methods for using the same
JP2002150215A (en) 2000-11-13 2002-05-24 Canon Inc Information reader
US7203158B2 (en) 2000-12-06 2007-04-10 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. OFDM signal transmission system, portable terminal, and e-commerce system
US6749120B2 (en) 2000-12-11 2004-06-15 Cpo Technologies Corp. Method and apparatus for scanning electronic barcodes
US7268924B2 (en) 2001-01-22 2007-09-11 Hand Held Products, Inc. Optical reader having reduced parameter determination delay
US6637658B2 (en) 2001-01-22 2003-10-28 Welch Allyn, Inc. Optical reader having partial frame operating mode
US6601768B2 (en) 2001-03-08 2003-08-05 Welch Allyn Data Collection, Inc. Imaging module for optical reader comprising refractive diffuser
US20030206150A1 (en) 2001-05-02 2003-11-06 Hand Held Products, Inc. Optical reader comprising keyboard
US7308375B2 (en) 2001-05-14 2007-12-11 Jensen Nanette C System and method for determining light source current
US6476715B1 (en) 2001-05-15 2002-11-05 Nick Bromer Land vehicle identification by flickering lamps
US6834807B2 (en) 2001-07-13 2004-12-28 Hand Held Products, Inc. Optical reader having a color imager
US6722569B2 (en) 2001-07-13 2004-04-20 Welch Allyn Data Collection, Inc. Optical reader having a color imager
US7748620B2 (en) 2002-01-11 2010-07-06 Hand Held Products, Inc. Transaction terminal including imaging module
US20030222144A1 (en) * 2002-06-04 2003-12-04 Hand Held Products, Inc. Manufacturing methods for a decoder board for an optical reader utilizing a plurality of imaging formats
US7090132B2 (en) 2002-06-11 2006-08-15 Hand Held Products, Inc. Long range optical reader
CA2498366C (en) 2002-09-17 2010-03-09 Mobiqa Limited Optimised messages containing barcode information for mobile receiving devices
DE10246067B4 (en) 2002-10-02 2008-01-03 Robert Bosch Gmbh Method and device for calibrating an image sensor system in a motor vehicle
US6954197B2 (en) 2002-11-15 2005-10-11 Smart Technologies Inc. Size/scale and orientation determination of a pointer in a camera-based touch system
WO2004051182A1 (en) 2002-11-27 2004-06-17 Trology Llc Simultaneous phase shifting module for use in interferometry
US7118529B2 (en) 2002-11-29 2006-10-10 Given Imaging, Ltd. Method and apparatus for transmitting non-image information via an image sensor in an in vivo imaging system
WO2004054430A3 (en) 2002-12-16 2004-10-07 Tal Davidson Device, system and method for selective activation of in vivo sensors
US7195164B2 (en) 2003-01-03 2007-03-27 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Optical code reading device having more than one imaging engine
US7086596B2 (en) * 2003-01-09 2006-08-08 Hand Held Products, Inc. Decoder board for an optical reader utilizing a plurality of imaging formats
JP4258232B2 (en) 2003-03-03 2009-04-30 株式会社デンソーウェーブ Optical information reading apparatus
JP4333187B2 (en) 2003-04-07 2009-09-16 セイコーエプソン株式会社 Monitoring method of a network printer, a program to execute the method on a computer, a network printer monitoring devices and network printer monitoring system
US7637430B2 (en) * 2003-05-12 2009-12-29 Hand Held Products, Inc. Picture taking optical reader
EP1632729A4 (en) 2003-06-03 2009-11-11 Toshiba Carrier Corp Air-conditioner
WO2005027038A3 (en) 2003-09-08 2006-02-23 Hector H Gonzalez-Banos Systems and methods for directly generating a view using a layered approach
US7128266B2 (en) 2003-11-13 2006-10-31 Metrologic Instruments. Inc. Hand-supportable digital imaging-based bar code symbol reader supporting narrow-area and wide-area modes of illumination and image capture
US7464877B2 (en) 2003-11-13 2008-12-16 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Digital imaging-based bar code symbol reading system employing image cropping pattern generator and automatic cropped image processor
US7270272B2 (en) * 2003-11-13 2007-09-18 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Digital image-based bar code symbol reading system employing a multi-mode image-processing symbol reading subsystem
US7387250B2 (en) 2003-12-04 2008-06-17 Scanbuy, Inc. System and method for on the spot purchasing by scanning barcodes from screens with a mobile device
US7995178B2 (en) 2003-12-24 2011-08-09 Citizen Holdings Co., Ltd. Liquid-crystal-display panel and barcode reading system using the same
US7303126B2 (en) 2004-03-18 2007-12-04 Symbol Technologies, Inc. System and method for sensing ambient light in an optical code reader
US7172125B2 (en) * 2004-04-26 2007-02-06 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Gain control system and method for use in electro-optical readers
US20060011724A1 (en) 2004-07-15 2006-01-19 Eugene Joseph Optical code reading system and method using a variable resolution imaging sensor
US7083098B2 (en) 2004-08-24 2006-08-01 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Motion detection in imaging reader
US7201321B2 (en) * 2004-08-27 2007-04-10 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Electro-optically reading direct part markings on workpieces by image capture
US7527207B2 (en) 2004-12-01 2009-05-05 Datalogic Scanning, Inc. Triggering illumination for a data reader
US7234641B2 (en) 2004-12-01 2007-06-26 Datalogic Scanning, Inc. Illumination pulsing method for a data reader
US7564031B2 (en) 2005-03-08 2009-07-21 Rafael Advanced Defence Systems Ltd. System and method for wide angle optical surveillance
US7568628B2 (en) * 2005-03-11 2009-08-04 Hand Held Products, Inc. Bar code reading device with global electronic shutter control
US7611060B2 (en) * 2005-03-11 2009-11-03 Hand Held Products, Inc. System and method to automatically focus an image reader
US20060209015A1 (en) 2005-03-18 2006-09-21 Feldmeier David C Optical navigation system
JP2008535407A (en) 2005-03-30 2008-08-28 デルタ・デザイン・インコーポレイテッドDelta Design, Inc. led lighting system for a multiple data matrix scanner by the line scan camera
US7780089B2 (en) 2005-06-03 2010-08-24 Hand Held Products, Inc. Digital picture taking optical reader having hybrid monochrome and color image sensor array
US7770799B2 (en) 2005-06-03 2010-08-10 Hand Held Products, Inc. Optical reader having reduced specular reflection read failures
US7810720B2 (en) 2005-06-13 2010-10-12 Robert Lovett Account payment using barcode information exchange
JP4778755B2 (en) 2005-09-09 2011-09-21 株式会社日立ハイテクノロジーズ Defect inspection method and apparatus using the same
US7583258B2 (en) 2005-11-08 2009-09-01 Microsoft Corporation Optical tracker with tilt angle detection
US7357326B2 (en) 2005-11-30 2008-04-15 Industrial Data Entry Automation Systems Incorporated Fluorescent or luminescent optical symbol scanner
US7705309B1 (en) 2007-02-27 2010-04-27 Agiltron Corporation Radiation detector with extended dynamic range
US7516899B2 (en) 2006-03-06 2009-04-14 V.L. Engineering, Inc. Hand held wireless reading viewer of invisible bar codes
US7461790B2 (en) * 2006-04-04 2008-12-09 Datalogic Scanning, Inc. Data reader and methods for imaging targets exposed to high intensity illumination
US7755672B2 (en) * 2006-05-15 2010-07-13 Zoran Corporation Techniques for modifying image field data obtained using illumination sources
US20070267501A1 (en) * 2006-05-18 2007-11-22 Hand Held Products, Inc. Multipurpose optical reader
US20070284447A1 (en) 2006-05-25 2007-12-13 Datalogic Scanning, Inc. Variable illumination scanning
US7597263B2 (en) 2006-07-31 2009-10-06 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Imaging reader with target proximity sensor
US7857224B2 (en) * 2006-09-19 2010-12-28 Microscan Systems, Inc. Devices and/or systems for automatically imaging barcodes
US7813047B2 (en) 2006-12-15 2010-10-12 Hand Held Products, Inc. Apparatus and method comprising deformable lens element
US8369579B2 (en) 2006-12-21 2013-02-05 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Methods and apparatus for 3D surface imaging using active wave-front sampling
US7656556B2 (en) 2007-02-28 2010-02-02 Xerox Corporation Detection of a differential gloss region in a cluster-screen halftone image using filters each having a different polarization
US8794526B2 (en) 2007-06-04 2014-08-05 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia reading terminal processing plurality of frames of image data responsively to trigger signal activation
US8496177B2 (en) * 2007-06-28 2013-07-30 Hand Held Products, Inc. Bar code reading terminal with video capturing mode
US7735738B2 (en) * 2007-06-28 2010-06-15 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Thermal management in imaging reader
US7686223B2 (en) 2007-08-31 2010-03-30 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Selectable aiming pattern for an imaging-based bar code reader
FI120958B (en) * 2007-10-19 2010-05-31 Optomed Oy Illuminating body
US7967210B2 (en) 2007-11-30 2011-06-28 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Imaging bar code reader having light emitting diode for generating a field of view
US8152069B2 (en) 2007-12-28 2012-04-10 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Dual focus imaging based symbology reading system
US8072599B2 (en) 2008-03-14 2011-12-06 Teledyne Scientific & Imaging, Llc Real-time, hybrid amplitude-time division polarimetric imaging camera
US8336778B2 (en) 2008-08-19 2012-12-25 The Code Corporation Graphical code readers that provide sequenced illumination for glare reduction
US7646943B1 (en) 2008-09-04 2010-01-12 Zena Technologies, Inc. Optical waveguides in image sensors
US8794520B2 (en) 2008-09-30 2014-08-05 Hand Held Products, Inc. Method and apparatus for operating indicia reading terminal including parameter determination
US8628015B2 (en) 2008-10-31 2014-01-14 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia reading terminal including frame quality evaluation processing
US8783573B2 (en) 2008-12-02 2014-07-22 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia reading terminal having plurality of optical assemblies
US8083148B2 (en) 2008-12-16 2011-12-27 Hand Held Products, Inc. Indicia reading terminal including frame processing
US8315434B2 (en) 2009-01-06 2012-11-20 Avago Technologies Ecbu Ip (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Absolute tracking in a sub-pixel range
NL2005389A (en) 2009-10-21 2011-04-26 Asml Netherlands Bv Lithographic apparatus, device manufacturing method, and method of applying a pattern to a substrate.
US20110163165A1 (en) 2010-01-07 2011-07-07 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Terminal having illumination and focus control
US8573497B2 (en) 2010-06-30 2013-11-05 Datalogic ADC, Inc. Adaptive data reader and method of operating
US9514344B2 (en) 2010-11-10 2016-12-06 Datalogic ADC, Inc. Adaptive data reader and method of operating
US8387881B2 (en) 2010-12-01 2013-03-05 Hand Held Products, Inc. Terminal with screen reading mode
US9418270B2 (en) 2011-01-31 2016-08-16 Hand Held Products, Inc. Terminal with flicker-corrected aimer and alternating illumination
US8640960B2 (en) 2011-06-27 2014-02-04 Honeywell International Inc. Optical filter for image and barcode scanning
US8636215B2 (en) 2011-06-27 2014-01-28 Hand Held Products, Inc. Decodable indicia reading terminal with optical filter
US8985459B2 (en) 2011-06-30 2015-03-24 Metrologic Instruments, Inc. Decodable indicia reading terminal with combined illumination
US20130026235A1 (en) * 2011-07-29 2013-01-31 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Laser scanners having dynamic aiming-scanning mode
US8608071B2 (en) 2011-10-17 2013-12-17 Honeywell Scanning And Mobility Optical indicia reading terminal with two image sensors
US8881983B2 (en) * 2011-12-13 2014-11-11 Honeywell International Inc. Optical readers and methods employing polarization sensing of light from decodable indicia
US8777108B2 (en) 2012-03-23 2014-07-15 Honeywell International, Inc. Cell phone reading mode using image timer

Patent Citations (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5331176A (en) * 1992-04-10 1994-07-19 Veritec Inc. Hand held two dimensional symbol reader with a symbol illumination window
US5572006A (en) * 1994-07-26 1996-11-05 Metanetics Corporation Automatic exposure single frame imaging systems
US5648650A (en) * 1994-09-07 1997-07-15 Alps Electric Co., Ltd. Optical bar code reading apparatus with regular reflection detecting circuit
US5783811A (en) * 1995-06-26 1998-07-21 Metanetics Corporation Portable data collection device with LED targeting and illumination assembly
US5992744A (en) * 1997-02-18 1999-11-30 Welch Allyn, Inc. Optical reader having multiple scanning assemblies with simultaneously decoded outputs
US6328213B1 (en) * 1998-06-12 2001-12-11 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Method of processing an analog electrical signal containing information representative of reflected light from coded indicia, wherein the electrical signal contains edge transitions
US20010042789A1 (en) * 2000-05-17 2001-11-22 Mark Krichever Bioptics bar code reader
US6571189B2 (en) * 2001-05-14 2003-05-27 Hewlett-Packard Company System and method for scanner calibration
US7219843B2 (en) * 2002-06-04 2007-05-22 Hand Held Products, Inc. Optical reader having a plurality of imaging modules
US20040020990A1 (en) * 2002-06-04 2004-02-05 Havens William H. Optical reader having a plurality of imaging modules
US8596542B2 (en) * 2002-06-04 2013-12-03 Hand Held Products, Inc. Apparatus operative for capture of image data
US20040164165A1 (en) * 2002-06-04 2004-08-26 Havens William H. Optical reader having a plurality of imaging modules
US20120153022A1 (en) * 2002-06-04 2012-06-21 Hand Held Products, Inc. Apparatus operative for capture of image data
US20140076974A1 (en) * 2002-06-04 2014-03-20 Hand Held Products, Inc. Apparatus operative for capture of image data
US8074887B2 (en) * 2002-06-04 2011-12-13 Hand Held Products, Inc. Optical reader having a plurality of imaging modules
US20050279836A1 (en) * 2002-06-04 2005-12-22 Havens William H Optical reader having a plurality of imaging modules
US20030226895A1 (en) * 2002-06-11 2003-12-11 Hand Held Products, Inc. Long range optical reader
US20040031848A1 (en) * 2002-08-15 2004-02-19 Leach Robert J. Positioning of photodetectors in optical scanning modules for use in bar code readers for reducing specular reflection
US20050023356A1 (en) * 2003-07-29 2005-02-03 Microvision, Inc., A Corporation Of The State Of Washington Method and apparatus for illuminating a field-of-view and capturing an image
US20060043194A1 (en) * 2004-08-31 2006-03-02 Edward Barkan Scanner and method for eliminating specular reflection
US20060163355A1 (en) * 2005-01-26 2006-07-27 Psc Scanning, Inc. Data reader and methods for imaging targets subject to specular reflection
US20080223933A1 (en) * 2005-05-03 2008-09-18 Datalogic Scanning, Inc. Methods and systems for forming images of moving optical codes
US20070164115A1 (en) * 2006-01-17 2007-07-19 Symboltechnologies, Inc. Automatic exposure system for imaging-based bar code reader
US20110142371A1 (en) * 2006-09-08 2011-06-16 King Martin T Optical scanners, such as hand-held optical scanners
US20090001175A1 (en) * 2007-06-28 2009-01-01 Goren David P Control of specular reflection in imaging reader
US20140166851A1 (en) * 2012-12-18 2014-06-19 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Optical input apparatus

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US8596542B2 (en) 2013-12-03 grant
US9224023B2 (en) 2015-12-29 grant
US20140076974A1 (en) 2014-03-20 application
US20120153022A1 (en) 2012-06-21 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5627366A (en) Optical scanner with extended depth of focus
US7261238B1 (en) Method of locating imaged bar codes for an imaging-based bar code reader
US7222793B2 (en) Arrangement and method of imaging one-dimensional and two-dimensional optical codes at a plurality of focal planes
US5814827A (en) Optical scanner with extended depth of focus
US8317105B2 (en) Optical scanning system having an extended programming mode and method of unlocking restricted extended classes of features and functionalities embodied therewithin
US5949052A (en) Object sensor system for stationary position optical reader
US8783573B2 (en) Indicia reading terminal having plurality of optical assemblies
US5414251A (en) Reader for decoding two-dimensional optical information
US8628015B2 (en) Indicia reading terminal including frame quality evaluation processing
US6398112B1 (en) Apparatus and method for reading indicia using charge coupled device and scanning laser beam technology
US7757955B2 (en) Bar code reader having multiple cameras
US8868802B2 (en) Method of programming the default cable interface software in an indicia reading device
US6283374B1 (en) Symbology imaging and reading apparatus and method
US5664229A (en) Accessory for conversion with housing with first connection includes host cable and host connector and second connection including a plug-in modular connector
US6824059B2 (en) Apparatus for capturing images and barcodes
US20010027999A1 (en) Focus and illumination analysis algorithm for imaging device
US8408468B2 (en) Method of and system for reading visible and/or invisible code symbols in a user-transparent manner using visible/invisible illumination source switching during data capture and processing operations
US20030089775A1 (en) Display-equipped optical reader having decode failure image display feedback mode
US5763864A (en) Dataform reader including dual laser and imaging reading assemblies
US6860428B1 (en) Optical symbologies imager
US5902988A (en) Reader for decoding two-dimensional optically readable information
US20060022051A1 (en) Point-of-transaction workstation for electro-optically reading one-dimensional and two-dimensional indicia by image capture
US5754670A (en) Data symbol reading system
US20060043191A1 (en) System and method for aiming an optical code scanning device
US20040069855A1 (en) Imaging bar code reader with moving beam simulation