US20140238683A1 - Integrated Arctic Fracking Apparatus and Methods - Google Patents

Integrated Arctic Fracking Apparatus and Methods Download PDF

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Publication number
US20140238683A1
US20140238683A1 US14/161,002 US201414161002A US2014238683A1 US 20140238683 A1 US20140238683 A1 US 20140238683A1 US 201414161002 A US201414161002 A US 201414161002A US 2014238683 A1 US2014238683 A1 US 2014238683A1
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fracking
integrated
fluid
piping
pumps
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US14/161,002
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Donovan M. Korach
Zachary T. Huff
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Nabors Alaska Drilling Inc
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Nabors Alaska Drilling Inc
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Priority to US14/161,002 priority patent/US20140238683A1/en
Assigned to NABORS ALASKA DRILLING, INC. reassignment NABORS ALASKA DRILLING, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: HUFF, ZACHARY T., KORACH, DONOVAN M.
Publication of US20140238683A1 publication Critical patent/US20140238683A1/en
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/25Methods for stimulating production
    • E21B43/26Methods for stimulating production by forming crevices or fractures
    • E21B43/267Methods for stimulating production by forming crevices or fractures reinforcing fractures by propping
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B21/00Methods or apparatus for flushing boreholes, e.g. by use of exhaust air from motor
    • E21B21/01Arrangements for handling drilling fluids or cuttings outside the borehole, e.g. mud boxes
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B7/00Special methods or apparatus for drilling
    • E21B7/008Drilling ice or a formation covered by ice

Abstract

An apparatus includes a frame structure and one or more fracking fluid tanks carried by the frame structure. The one or more fracking fluid tanks arranged to contain a fracking fluid usable during a fracking procedure. One or more fracking pumps may be carried by the frame structure, the one or more fracking pumps being configured to pump the fracking fluid to a wellhead of a wellbore at high pressure. An integrated piping system connects with the one or more fracking pumps to carry fracking fluid that was contained in the one or more fracking fluid tanks toward the one or more fracking pumps. Mobility-enabling structure supports the frame structure, the one or more fracking fluid tanks, the one or more fracking pumps, and the integrated piping system, the mobility enabling-structure being configured to enable conveyance of the apparatus to a fracking site.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • This application claims priority to and the benefit of the filing date of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/770,157, filed Feb. 27, 2013, titled, “Integrated Arctic Fracking Apparatus and Methods” the entire content of which is incorporated herein by reference thereto.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The apparatus, systems, and methods described herein relate to an integrated fracking system that includes a frame structure that carries one or more fracking fluid tanks and one or more fracking pumps, and an integrated piping system connected to each fracking pump, and a mobility-enabling structure supporting the frame structure.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE
  • Hydraulic fracturing to stimulate a subterranean formation includes injecting a fracturing fluid through a wellbore into the formation at a pressure and flow rate at least sufficient to overcome the pressure of the reservoir and extend fractures into the formation. A high pressure line directs the fracturing fluid through a wellhead and into the wellbore. The fracturing fluid is a mixture of a liquid and a media, and is typically injected into the wellbore at high pressures, for example, in the range of 5,000 psi to 15,000 psi.
  • A typical frack site includes a plurality of individual fracking equipment components that are typically individually hauled or transported to a frack site. Some of these components include a pump trailer or skid, hydration trailer or skid, a blending unit trailer or skid, sand trailers or skids, chemical tank trailers or skids, water tank trailers or skids, a control house truck or skid, a manifold trailer or skid, among others. These trailers or skids are brought to the well sight location in individual loads, and they are connected together at the well site. While separate trailers and skids may appear to simplify transportation, assembly of the equipment in harsh arctic weather conditions may present particular challenges.
  • For example, the equipment must be configured on location, and must be connected to each other by inter-piping in the arctic conditions. Since the units are configured on site, the interpiping connections are exposed to the arctic environment. Because of this, the interpiping connections present more opportunity for leaking, damage, and spills.
  • In addition, the harsh environment can make connecting the different equipment pieces difficult, which slows down operations and results in a less efficient set up. Further, when the fracking process is complete, the individual units then need to be disconnected from each other for transportation from the site. Disconnection often results in additional spills. Further exposure to harsh arctic elements may result in a higher chance of freeze up, further slowing processing. In addition, because the fracking system is assembled on-site, a significant investment in time may be required. This can increase the number of personnel needed to transport, set-up, and take down fracking systems. In addition, because the assembly is done in the potentially harsh arctic conditions, there is an increased chance of crossed lines, mistakes, personnel accidents, and even spills.
  • The present disclosure is directed to systems and methods that overcome one or more of the shortcomings of the prior art.
  • SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE
  • In an exemplary aspect, the present disclosure is directed to an apparatus, including a frame structure and one or more fracking fluid tanks carried by the frame structure and arranged to contain a fracking fluid usable during a fracking procedure. The one or more fracking pumps that are carried by the frame structure may be configured to pump the fracking fluid at high pressure to a wellhead of a wellbore. The apparatus also may comprise an integrated piping system fluidically coupled with the one or more fracking pumps and the one or more fluid tanks to transfer fracking fluid therebetween. A mobility-enabling structure supports and is operably coupled to the frame structure, the one or more fracking fluid tanks, the one or more fracking pumps, and the integrated piping system, so as to enable conveyance of the apparatus to a fracking site.
  • In an aspect, the integrated piping system comprises a first integrated piping system connected to the one or more fracking pumps to feed fluid thereto, and a second integrated piping system connected with the one or more fluid tanks to carry fracking fluid from the one or more tanks. In an aspect, the first integrated piping system comprises a first integrated manifold system connecting the one or more pumps in a parallel relationship with each other. In an aspect, the second integrated piping system comprises a second integrated manifold system connecting the one or more fluid tanks in a parallel relationship with each other.
  • In another exemplary aspect, the present disclosure is directed to an apparatus, comprising a first level including one or more fracking fluid tanks arranged to contain a fracking fluid and a second level vertically offset from the first level and including one or more fracking pumps configured to pump the fracking fluid from the tanks. An integrated piping system is connectable to the one or more fracking pumps at the second level to receive the fracking fluid from the one or more fracking fluid tanks. A mobility-enabling structure is adapted to carry the first level, the second level, and the piping system to and from a fracking site.
  • In another exemplary aspect, the present disclosure is directed to method including providing a plurality of a high pressure fracking pumps on a first level of a mobile structure; fluidly coupling the plurality of high-pressure fracking pumps to an integrated piping system provided on the mobile structure, the integrated piping system comprising a first integrated manifold system connecting the one or more pumps in a parallel relationship with each other, the integrated piping system being arranged to convey fracking fluid to the plurality of fracking pumps; providing the mobile structure with a fracking fluid tank holding fracking fluid on a second level of the mobile structure; and transporting the mobile structure to a fracking site.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present disclosure is best understood from the following detailed description when read with the accompanying figures. It is emphasized that, in accordance with the standard practice in the industry, various features are not drawn to scale. In fact, the dimensions of the various features may be arbitrarily increased or reduced for clarity of discussion.
  • FIG. 1 is an illustration of an exemplary apparatus according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 2 is an illustration of an end view of the apparatus of FIG. 1 according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 3 is a partial sectional view through a lower level from the top of the apparatus of FIG. 1 according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 4 is a partial sectional view of an off-operations side of the apparatus of FIG. 1 taken through lines 4-4 in FIG. 3 according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 5 is a partial sectional view of an off-operations side of the apparatus of FIG. 1 taken through lines 5-5 in FIG. 3 according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 6 is a partial sectional view of an operations side of the apparatus of FIG. 1 taken through lines 6-6 in FIG. 3 according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 7 is a partial sectional view of an operations side of the apparatus of FIG. 1 taken through lines 7-7 in FIG. 3 according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 8 is a partial sectional view of an end of the apparatus of FIG. 1 taken through lines 8-8 in FIG. 3 according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 9 is a partial sectional view of an end of the apparatus of FIG. 1 taken through lines 9-9 in FIG. 3 according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 10 is a partial sectional view through a lower level of an apparatus having a plurality of modular elements according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 11 is a partial sectional view of an elevation of the apparatus of FIG. 10 according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 12 is a partial sectional view of an operations side of another apparatus according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 13 is a partial sectional view of an end of the apparatus of FIG. 12 according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 14 is a partial sectional view from the top of an apparatus through a lower level including the apparatus of FIG. 12 according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 15 is a partial sectional view from the top of an apparatus through an upper level including the apparatus of FIG. 12 according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 16 is a flow chart showing a method according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 17 is a flow chart showing a method according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 18 is a flow chart showing a method according to one or more aspects of the present disclosure.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • It is to be understood that the following disclosure provides many different embodiments, or examples, for implementing different features of various embodiments. Specific examples of components and arrangements are described below to simplify the present disclosure. These are, of course, merely examples and are not intended to be limiting. In addition, the present disclosure may repeat reference numerals and/or letters in the various examples. This repetition is for the purpose of simplicity and clarity and does not in itself dictate a relationship between the various embodiments and/or configurations discussed. Moreover, the formation of a first feature over or on a second feature in the description that follows may include embodiments in which the first and second features are formed in direct contact, and may also include embodiments in which additional features may be formed interposing the first and second features, such that the first and second features may not be in direct contact.
  • The apparatus, systems, and methods described herein relate to an integrated fracking system that may simplify transportation of equipment and supplies to and from a fracking site, may simplify site set-up and/or take down, and may more fully protect equipment and operators from the outside environment, e.g., during set-up, take-down, and during the fracking process. The apparatus, systems, and methods may have particular utility in harsh arctic environments, where workers face extreme temperatures and equipment icing. The system includes a mobile structure, referred to herein as a carrier, configured to simultaneously carry fracking components and supplies that are traditionally separately handled and transported to a fracking site. For example, a single carrier may include one or more integrated tanks for fracking liquid and/or a proppant, an integrated piping system such as a piping manifold, integrated sand conveying and handling equipment, integrated electrical and monitoring systems, and an integrated heating system, among other equipment or systems. Furthermore, integrated piping systems in the carrier may connect the tanks, pumps, and/or other equipment in a manner that reduces rig set up times, resulting in more efficient fracking site setup and fewer on-hand required personnel. All this may result in increased cost savings for a fracking operation. Some embodiments of the mobile structures disclosed herein are modular systems that connect to other systems to perform the desired functions.
  • As used herein, the term “integrated” means built-in or forming a fixture of the apparatus or system. Accordingly, reference to integrated piping comprises piping that is built-in to the apparatus or system. That is, it forms a fixture of the system.
  • FIGS. 1 and 2 show an embodiment of an exemplary fracking system disclosed herein as a carrier 100. FIG. 1 shows an elevation view of the carrier and FIG. 2 shows an end view of the carrier 100. The carrier 100 includes a frame structure 102 forming a plurality of compartments, includes an outer wall structure 104, and includes a mobility-enabling structure 106. The outer wall structure 104 encloses the frame structure 102 and separates and protects various fracking equipment and supplies on the carrier 100 from the outside environment.
  • The mobility-enabling structure 106 in this embodiment includes one or more wheels 108 carrying the frame structure 102. In the embodiment shown, and as will be seen best in FIG. 3, the mobility-enabling structure 106 includes a system of eight sets of dual tires at a front end of the carrier 100 and eight sets of dual tires at a back end. Accordingly, the mobility-enabling structure may be formed as a trailer that may be towed to the fracking site. Some embodiments have a mobility-enabling structure 106 formed of a self-propelled system that may be drivable. Other embodiments have mobility-enabling structure 106 formed as rails or skids and these embodiments may be lifted, such as by a crane for example, onto an independent moving system, such as a trailer, a train car, or other moving system. These embodiments may be configured to cooperate with an independent moving structure that slides under and picks up, hangs or suspends, or otherwise moves the carrier 100. While some embodiments include wheels, other embodiments include mobility-enabling structure 106 formed of tracks or other mobility-enabling structures. In this embodiment, the carrier 100 is in the form of a trailer since the wheels form an integral part of the carrier 100. A trailer tongue or hitch may also be included to enable the carrier 100 to attach to a truck or other moving system. In the embodiment shown, the mobility enabling structure 106 may be configured to permit the carrier 100 to travel to a frack site, whether by road or off-road with or without the use of rails that guide the carrier 100. As discussed above, the carrier 100 is arranged to simultaneously carry fracking equipment that has been conventionally independently hauled to a frack site. For example, the carrier 100 may include integrated fluid tanks that carry fracking supplies, such as flowable fracking materials, carry fracking pumps configured to pressurize and pump fracking material from the carrier 100 to the well site, carry blender units and hydration trailers, and other equipment and supplies. Integrated piping systems, such as integrated piping manifolds, extend between and connect different compartments and levels to direct fracking material from the fluid tanks directly or indirectly to the pumps, or to other fracking equipment. When the integrated piping systems are manifolds, the integrated piping manifolds connect, for example, the fracking pumps in a parallel relationship with each other so that the fracking pumps can all draw fluid from the same source. In addition the integrated piping manifolds may connect the fluid tanks in a parallel relationship with each other, in a manner permitting fluid to be drawn from or pumped into the fluid tanks in a parallel manner.
  • In order to perform its function of supporting fracking equipment and supplies, the carrier 100 may, in some embodiments, be sized with a width greater than about 30 ft, a height greater than about 24 ft, and a length greater than about 40 ft. Other embodiments have a width greater than about 40 ft, a height greater than about 30 ft, and a length greater than about 50 ft. One embodiment has a width of about 45 ft, a height of about 40 ft, and a length of about 60 ft.
  • The exemplary carrier 100 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 has three levels, with a first level 110, a second level 112, and a third level 114. Other embodiments have two levels, while yet other embodiments have more than three levels. In the embodiment shown, the outer wall structure 104 has a length less than that of the first and third levels in a manner forming an exterior catwalk or gangway at the second level. In FIG. 1, the exterior catwalk is accessed by a first set of stairs from ground level, while a second set of stairs provides access to the third level. These stairs are not visible in FIG. 2. The sets of stairs may be moveable from a travel position to a working position, including attaching and detaching the stairs or raising and lowering the stairs, for example.
  • The wall structure 104 may be winterized to protect the equipment and supplies, as well as operators tasked with maintaining the equipment and supplies, from the outside environment. A winterized wall structure 104 includes insulation attached to a wall or disposed been wall panels in order to maintain heat within the carrier 100. Insulation may include, for example, fiber-glass insulation, foam insulation, polystyrene insulation, and other types of insulation. This may protect components and supplies from freezing when in very cold environments, as may be found in arctic areas.
  • FIGS. 3-9 show the system 90 without the wall structure 104. FIG. 3 shows a cross-sectional view taken between the first level 110 and the second level 112, and looking down into the first level 110, FIGS. 4 and 5 show a view from a first side or an off-operations side of the carrier 100, FIGS. 6 and 7 show a view from a second side or an operations side of the carrier 100, FIG. 8 shows a cross-sectional view taken in a middle region, and FIG. 9 shows a view from an end of the carrier 100.
  • Referring to FIG. 4, each level may include one or more individual compartments used for storage of fracking equipment and supplies. For example, FIG. 4 includes a blender unit compartment 120 on the first level 110, one or more fluid tanks 122 on the second level 112, and one or more pump compartments 124 with fracking pumps 125 on the third level 114. FIG. 4 shows a view taken along the lines 4-4 in FIG. 3, but including the second and third levels of the carrier.
  • FIG. 3 shows the layout of the first level 110, including the blender unit compartment 120 at one side of the carrier 100 containing a blender unit 121, a hydration unit compartment 126 on the opposing side of the carrier 100 (also shown in FIG. 7) containing a hydration unit 127, and a number of different compartments disposed between the blender unit compartment 120 and the hydration unit compartment 126. In this example, the different compartments include a boiler compartment 128 with a boiler 129, a boiler control compartment 130, a hot well compartment 132, an engine-generator or genset compartment 134 with a genset 135, a genset control compartment 136, and a fuel compartment 138. In this example, the genset control compartment 136 also includes an air receiver 140 disposed therein for providing air to the genset, although it could be disposed elsewhere in the carrier 100. In addition, this exemplary carrier 100 includes a change room 142, a multipurpose room 144 that may be used as an overflow or storage room, a stairwell 146 with internal stairs leading to the second level, and a shop compartment 148 that may be arranged in any manner desired, and may include supplies, additional equipment or other items or be used for other purposes. Although the exemplary carrier 100 is arranged with the layout described, it would be apparent that other embodiments include a different arrangement of compartments.
  • FIG. 5 shows a cross-section taken through a central part of the carrier 100 along the lines 5-5 in FIG. 3, through the boiler control compartment 130, the genset control compartment 136, the shop compartment 148, and the stairwell 146. As can be seen in FIG. 5, the first level 110 in this portion of the carrier 100 includes sublevels, with the compartments mentioned above forming a lower sublevel 160 and with a manifold and pump room 164 forming an upper sublevel 162. The manifold and pump room 164 may include an integrated manifold 165 in communication with the fluid tanks 122. The integrated tank piping system 165 connects each of the fluid tanks 122 and in some embodiments, extends to the sides of the carrier 100 in a manner permitting connection to adjacent carriers or other equipment. The integrated tank piping system 165 may also connect the fluid tanks 122 to other equipment, such as the blender unit 121. In some embodiments, the tank piping system 165 is configured to place the fluid tanks 122 in communication with the fracking pumps 125 either directly or through additional fracking equipment, such as the blender unit. In this example, the stairwell 146 also includes a change room and bathroom 166. As indicated above however, other arrangements are contemplated. Adjacent the pump compartments 124 on the third level at each end of the carrier 100 are utilidoors 168, forming doors that may be opened or closed to connect equipment to adjacent carriers as discussed further below.
  • FIGS. 6 and 7 show the carrier 100 taken from the operations side. FIG. 7 shows the carrier 100 with the outer wall structure removed and FIG. 6 shows a cross-section showing the compartment layout in a more central portion, through lines 6-6 in FIG. 3. FIG. 6 shows the sublevels 160, 162 in a manner similar to but opposite the view in FIG. 5
  • As can be seen in FIG. 7, the operations side includes the hydration trailer compartment 126 for carrying and storing the hydration trailer 127. It includes the fluid tanks 122 on the second level 112, and includes the pump compartments 124 with fracking pumps 125 on the third level 114.
  • FIGS. 8 and 9 show views of the carrier 100 taken respectively along lines 8-8 and 9-9 in FIG. 3. In these figures, the hydration trailer compartment 126 and the blender unit compartment 120 form the opposing sides of the first level 110. The fluid tanks 122 on the second level 112 are shown in this embodiment as extending the entire width of the carrier 100. The fracking pump 125 on the third level 114 is shown within the pump compartment 124. The first level 110 shows the lower sub level 160 for the boiler and the upper sub level 162 for the pump and utility room 164.
  • The exemplary carrier 100 includes integrated five fluid tanks 122 extending laterally across the complete width of the carrier 100. These fluid tanks 122 are supported by the frame structure 102. In some example, these fluid tanks 122 are sized to carry more than 30,000 gallons, and in some examples, about 50,000 gallons. In one aspect, the carrier as a whole is configured to carry more than about 150,000 gallons and in other embodiments, more than about 250,000 gallons. Other fluid tank sizes and total volumes are contemplated. While five fluid tanks 122 are shown in the exemplary embodiment in the Figures, a greater number of fluid tanks may be used or a smaller number of fluid tanks may be used. In some embodiments, a single, large-capacity fluid tank is used. In other embodiments, multiple fluid tanks are used for easier management. The third level 114 includes five pump compartments 124. In this example, only four of the compartments 124 include fracking pumps 125. There may be a greater number of fracking pumps 125 or a fewer number of fracking pumps 125.
  • The carrier 100 comprises integrated pump piping systems 170 and integrated conveying structure 172 supported by the frame structure 102 that may be used to connect the different equipment to each other. The integrated pump piping system 170 can be seen in FIGS. 4, 5, 8, and 9. In this embodiment, the integrated pump piping system 170 is an integrated piping manifold running along an end of the pump compartments 124, connecting adjacent pump compartments 124. In the example shown, the integrated pump piping system 170 extends along all the pump compartments in the carrier 100, and extends to the utilidoors 168 disposed at either end. The integrated pump piping systems 170 are built-in, forming a fixture of the carrier 100. The integrated pump piping systems 170 may be configured to connect to the fracking pumps 125 in the pump compartments 124 and may also be configured to connect to the blender unit 121 or the hydration trailer 126. In some examples, the integrated pump piping systems 170 extend to the utilidoors 168. As such, by opening the utilidoors 168, the pump piping system 170 can be accessed for attachment to pump piping systems carried on other carriers 102 or to other equipment disposed about the well site.
  • Since the integrated pump piping systems 170 are integrated in the carrier 100, the set up time of the frack site may be reduced because the blender unit 121 and the fluid tanks 122, and the blender unit 121 and the fracking pumps 125 may be placed in fluid communication even before the carrier 100 arrives at the site. Even if connected at the site, the integrated pump piping systems 170 may permit the technicians to attach the pipings and connections in a controlled environment within the compartments instead of outside the carrier 100. Accordingly, rig set-up time may be greatly reduced. Additional integrated piping may extend from one level of the carrier 100 to another level of the carrier 100. For example, in the embodiments shown, the piping may extend from the fluid tanks 122 on the second level 112 of the carrier to the blender unit 121 on the first level 110 of the carrier 100, and from the blender unit 121 on the first level of the carrier 100 to the manifold 170 connected to the fracking pumps 125 on the third level 114 of the carrier.
  • The integrated conveying structure 172 is shown in FIGS. 3 and 4 and may be used to connect the blender unit 121 to proppant storage tanks on the carrier 100, on another separate carrier, or on a trailer. The integrated conveying structure 172 extends from one end of the carrier 100, as shown in FIG. 3, to a receiving end of the blender unit 121. In some embodiments, the integrated conveying structure comprises one or more conveyers, while in other embodiments, the integrated conveying structure comprises one or more augers. Other conveying structure is also considered. In some examples, large doors disposed at the ends of the blender unit compartment 120 may be opened to allow the conveying structure 172 to extend out of the carrier 100. In one example, the conveying structure 172 is not integrated with the carrier 100, but is configured to operationally cooperate with the blender unit 121 to convey proppant to the blender unit from a location spaced from the blender unit.
  • While the pump piping system 170 is disclosed as integrated in this exemplary embodiment, the equipment and supplies on the carrier 100 shown in the embodiment in FIGS. 3-9 may not be integrated. For example, one or more of the fracking pumps 125, the blender unit 121, and the hydration trailer 127 may be removable from the carrier 100 as desired. Accordingly, while the carrier is configured to enable fracking with equipment on the carrier, the equipment may also be removed from the carrier as desired, and positioned or connected to piping during the site setup. As can be seen in FIGS. 8 and 9, for example, the fracking pumps 125 are carried on and form a part of trailers. Accordingly, these may be removed from the carrier 100 at the frack site and positioned as desired about the site. In one embodiment, a crane is used to remove the fracking pumps 125 from the third level, while the blender unit 121 and the hydration trailer 127 may be driven off the carrier 122 or removed from their respective compartments using ramps that provide access to the carrier. The fracking pumps 125 disclosed herein are high-pressure pumps configured to pressurize fracking slurry to pressures greater than 5,000 psi. In some embodiments, the fracking pumps 125 pressurize greater than 10,000 psi. Some fracking pumps pressurize to even greater pressures.
  • In some embodiments, the boiler may operate as an integrated heating system that may provide heating to the different compartments of the carrier 100. While a boiler 129 is shown, the integrated heating system may also include ducting or piping to provide heat where desired throughout the carrier. In some examples, the integrated heating system allows portions or the entire carrier 100 to stay warm even during the transportation portion of a fracking set-up. For example, chemicals and proppants on the carrier may be maintained at suitable temperature during transportation and during storage.
  • While a single carrier 100 having an exemplary set-up is shown and described above, other carriers may also be employed to carry similar equipment and supplies or to carry alternatively equipment and supplies. FIGS. 10 and 11 show the carrier 100 as a single module forming a part of a modular fracking system 200. In this embodiment, the fracking system 200 may include a plurality of modular, mobile carriers for transporting fracking equipment and supplies. The exemplary system 200 in FIGS. 10 and 11 include the carrier 100, a carrier 202, and a carrier 204. The carriers 202, 204 may include any of the features and arrangements discussed above. In one aspect, they include an exterior wall to protect carried equipment and supplies from the outer environment, such as an arctic environment, and to protect fracking operators from the arctic condition, easing transportation to the fracking site, and simplifying site set-up and take-down.
  • The carriers 202, 204 are similar in many respects to the carrier 100, but each includes a proppant storage compartment 210 in place of a blender unit compartment and includes a chemical and equipment storage compartment 212 in place of the hydration trailer unit. As can be seen, the carriers 202, 204 also include integrated fracking fluid tanks 122 on their second levels and fracking pumps 125 on their third levels in a manner similar to that described above.
  • In this example, the carriers 102, 202, 204 are disposed adjacent to each other and are interconnected at their ends so that operators may pass from one carrier to another without exiting the system 200 into the outside environment. The ends may each include a door that may be opened, such as a roll-up utilidoor. In addition, the system 200 may be arranged so that the integrated pump piping system 170 in the carrier 100 may be coupled to corresponding integrated pipe manifolds in the carrier 202. Accordingly, fracking pumps in the carriers 202, 204 may be connected to the fracking pumps in the carrier 100 through the integrated pump piping systems.
  • The integrated proppant storage compartments 210 in FIGS. 10 and 11 are configured to and arranged to carry proppant for the fracking operation, and are carried or supported by the frame structure 102. The integrated proppant storage compartments 210 may include an integrated conveying structure 220 (FIG. 11), such as conveyer or auger for example, configured to transport proppant from the storage compartment 210 to adjacent proppant storage compartments or to the conveying structure 172 in the carrier 100, connected with the blender unit 121. In the embodiment shown, the proppant storage compartments 210 are sized about 65 ft×13 ft×9 ft, with a total capacity of about 7600 cubic feet. Other embodiments have larger proppant storage compartments 210 while yet other embodiments have smaller proppant storage compartments 210. In the exemplary embodiment shown, the proppant storage compartments 210 form the off-operations side of the first level of the carriers 202, 204. Some embodiments have a plurality of proppant storage compartments, or include a plurality of one or more proppant storage compartments 210. In some embodiments, the proppant storage compartment 210 accommodates greater than about 3800 cubic feet of sand or other proppant. In some embodiments, the proppant storage compartment carries sand as the proppant. Other types of proppant that may be carried in the proppant storage compartments include, for example, silica sand, resin-coated sand, and man-made ceramics or other particulates. Because each of the carriers 102, 202, 204 includes a door at the end, workers can connect the integrated conveying structures 172, 220 without being exposed to the harsh weather environment outside the carriers. In addition, the proppant can be maintained at a relatively warm temperature to provide effective movement of the proppant.
  • As can be seen in FIG. 10, the operations side of the carrier 202 includes the chemical and equipment storage compartment 212 with a plurality of chemical storage tanks 214 and a control center truck 216. In the embodiment shown, the chemical storage tanks are each sized about 6 ft×8 ft×15 ft having a volume of about 5,300 gallons (all gallons noted herein are U.S. Gallons). Other sizes of storage tanks may be used however. Exemplary chemicals in the storage tanks 214 on the carrier may include, for example, acids such as hydrochloric acid or acetic acid, sodium chloride, polyacrylamide, ethylene glycol, borate salts, sodium and potassium carbonates, glutaraldehyde, guar gum and other water-soluble gelling agents, citric acid, isopropanol, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, 2-butoxyethanol, and ethylene glycol.
  • The control center truck 216 may be in electrical communication with the various compartments of the system 200 and may be arranged to electronically control systems and equipment on one or more of the carriers and equipment off the carriers at the fracking site. In one embodiment, the carriers include integrated wiring and cabling that connects the integrated wiring system of the carrier to the control center truck 216. In yet other embodiments, the control center truck 216 communicates via wireless transmission with one or more of the components of the frack site. Accordingly, the control center truck 216 may monitor and control operation of the system 200 while disposed within the system 200. In some embodiments, rather than being a part of a truck, the control center is permanently integrated in the carrier. As such, operation can take place without rig set-up at the frack site, saving time and effort and reducing expense.
  • Still referring to the carriers 202, 204, the first levels 112 may include some rooms having a different utility than the rooms discussed above with reference to the carrier 100. For example, each of the carriers 202, 204 includes an office 218 and a meeting room 219. However, other arrangements are contemplated. Although specific examples of carriers are shown, other embodiments have the equipment and supplies arranged in different manners. For example, the control center truck may be disposed within the carrier 100 and the hydration trailer may be carried on the carrier 202, and so on.
  • FIGS. 12-15 show an alternative integrated fracking system according to an exemplary aspect of the present disclosure including a carrier 300. Like the carrier 100, the carrier 300 includes fracking equipment and supplies. The carrier 300 includes a frame structure 302 that may form a plurality of compartments for carrying the equipment and supplies, includes an outer wall structure 304, and includes a mobility-enabling structure 306. In the Figures, the outer wall structure 304 is partially removed to show the compartments making up the carrier 300. The mobility enabling structure 306 in this embodiment comprises a semi-trailer with landing gear 308 and a king-pin 310 for connecting with a fifth-wheel coupling on a tractor or towing truck. The carrier 300 includes a first level 314 and a second level 316, with the first level 314 being formed of a plurality of fluid tanks 122 and the second level being formed of a plurality of pump compartments 122 housing fracking pumps 125. In this example, the fluid tanks 122 are each sized, for example, with a volume of 50,000 gallons, for a total tank volume of 150,000 gallons. Other embodiments have different sized fluid tanks or different numbers or shapes of tanks sized and dimensioned to fit the configuration of each particular integrated fracking system. For example, some embodiments have total tank volumes greater than about 50,000 gallons, some embodiments have total tank volumes greater than about 100,000 gallons, and still others have total tank volumes greater than about 150,000 gallons.
  • Adjacent each of the fluid tanks on the first level, the carrier 202 includes a manifold compartment 328 containing an integrated tank piping system 330, such as an integrated piping manifold. This can be seen in both FIGS. 12 and 14. The integrated tank piping system 330 connects each of the fluid tanks 122 and extends to the sides of the carrier 202 in a manner permitting connection to adjacent carriers or other equipment. In some embodiments, the manifold compartment 328 includes utilidoors that may be opened to provide access to the manifold 330. The integrated tank piping system 330 is disposed in the manifold compartment 328 and is configured to place the fluid tanks 122 in communication with the fracking pumps 125 either directly or through additional fracking equipment, such as a blender unit that may be carried on a different carrier or may be disposed outside of a carrier, but in communication with the fluid tanks 122 and the fracking pumps 125. The integrated tank piping system may enable easy frack system set-up and take-down because there is minimal to no rig-up.
  • The second level 316 comprises three fracking pumps 125 shown here disposed on trailers that may be removed from the carrier 300 for operation or may be operated in place on the carrier 300. The second level 316 also includes an integrated pump piping system 334, disclosed herein as a piping manifold, extending along each of the pump compartments 124. The integrated pump piping system 334 may place the fracking pumps in fluid communication and may permit the fracking pumps to operate while maintained within the carrier 202. Because the pump piping system 334 is integrated within the carrier 300, the pumps can be set up and run while being maintained within the protected environment of the carrier. In addition, as can be seen in FIG. 15, the pump piping system 334 may extend to and connect adjacent carriers. The pump piping system 334 may connect in the manner discussed above, using a door or opening through which the pump piping system 334 may extend, or may connect some other method. When a door is used, workers may travel through the manifold room along the manifold from carrier to carrier without leaving the protected environment of the carriers.
  • FIGS. 14 and 15 show a modular system 300 including the carrier 300, adjacent a plurality of additional identical carriers, also labeled 302, and against some different carriers 350, 352. FIG. 14 shows the first level of the carriers, and FIG. 15 shows the second level of the carriers. In this example, four identical carriers 302 are aligned adjacent each other and are interconnected via the integrated manifold and piping 330 (FIG. 12). Although shown as abutting against one another, some examples include a site setup where carriers are spaced apart and are connected via additional piping. By abutting against each other, workers may pass from carrier to carrier without leaving the protected environment. It should be noted as used herein, piping is intended to encompass rigid pipes, tubes including flexible tubes, hoses, or other and liquid carrying conduits.
  • Carriers 350 and 352 differ from the carriers 302 shown in FIGS. 12 and 13. Carrier 350, for example, may be considered a hydration and blender module with proppant tanks 370, and includes a blender unit compartment 356 and a hydration trailer compartment 358 along its lower level, as shown in FIG. 14. The blender unit compartment 356 may house or is configured to house a blender unit 360 that may be integrated or may be operable inside or outside the carrier. The hydration trailer compartment 358 may house or is configured to house a hydration trailer 362 disposed therein for transportation to the worksite, where it may be operate from within the hydration unit compartment 358 or it may be removed from the carrier for operation outside the carrier. On the first level between the blender unit compartment 356 and the hydration trailer compartment 358 is a control center 366 for operating equipment across all the carriers of the system. Adjacent the control center 366 is a changing room 368 with a stairway to the second level.
  • The second level of the carrier 350 includes a plurality of proppant tanks 370 along the outer edges and a plurality of chemical storage tanks 372 disposed in the center region between the proppant tanks. In this embodiment, the carrier includes eight proppant tanks 370, each sized about 14 ft×11 ft×10.5 ft and having a volume of about 1,610 cubic feet. In the embodiment in FIG. 14, an integrated proppant conveying structure 361 is configured to transport proppant from a supply or storage proppant tank 370 to the blender unit in the carrier 350. The integrated carrier enables the proppant to be transported without additional full-site set-up. As discussed above, both larger and smaller tanks may be employed. The chemical storage tanks 372 are sized about 6 ft×8 ft×10 ft and may store about 3,600 gallons each. The embodiments shown include six chemical storage tanks 372, but any number of chemical storage tanks may be employed.
  • The carrier 352 is disposed adjacent the carrier 350 and may be considered to be a control and utility module. As shown in FIG. 14, its first level includes along one side a genset compartment 380 with a genset 382 therein and a repair shop compartment 384. On the opposing side, the carrier 350 includes a second genset compartment 386 with a genset 388 and two boilers compartments 390 with boilers 392. Along the middle portion, the carrier 352 includes a shop space compartment 394, a fuel tank 396, stairs 398 leading to a second level, and septage and potable water 400, and the air receiver 402. The second level is shown in FIG. 14 and includes along one side a parts storage compartment 410 having a number of cabinets that contain the parts and tools and bathrooms. The opposing side includes office space 412 and a meeting room 414. The central area 416 includes a changing room with lockers and a stairwell to the lower level.
  • The integrated fracking system may simplify transportation of equipment and supplies to and from a fracking site, may simplify site set-up and take down, and may more fully protect equipment and operators from the harsh environment during set-up, take-down, and during a fracking procedure. The apparatus, systems, and methods may have particular utility in harsh arctic environments, where workers face extreme temperatures and icing of equipment.
  • While the carriers disclosed herein provide many advantages over conventional systems, some of these include one or more integrated piping systems already in place, reducing or eliminating rig up; integrated sand conveying and handling equipment; integrated electrical and monitoring systems in place, reducing or eliminating rig up; integrated heating system that keeps carriers warm while being moved down the road. With the components installed in and on an integrated moving system, loads are reduced to minimal loads. Instead of having 15 to 30 loads including a hydration unit, a sand mixer, sand carrying trailers, water tanks, and other various loads to haul, the system disclosed herein reduces loads down to a minimum. In addition, the modular nature of the system enables the system to be used for any size frack job. Depending on size of frack job, system can be expanded by adding modules with more fracking pumps and water storage that are designed to easily integrate in to frack system. Some embodiments have a complete backup containment system of chemicals and fluids hazardous to environment. The carriers also may include on-board heated chemical and sand storage and enclosed and heated water storage. In addition, the set up arrangement minimizes connections between carriers and all connections are in doors in a heated environment.
  • An exemplary method of transporting fracking equipment to a fracking site employing the systems described above is set out in a flow chart as FIG. 16. The method includes loading the carrier with equipment and supplies for transport to the fracking site. Loading the carrier may include, at a step 502, loading fuel and boiler water onto the carrier. At a step 504, the genset and boiler systems may be started to provide power and heat to the carrier. Accordingly, the interior of the carrier may be maintained at a desired temperature protected from the outside environment. The wall structure forming an enclosure for the carrier may insulate the carrier from the outside environment. Accordingly, the chemicals, the proppant storage tanks, and the fluid tanks may all be maintained within a heated, protected environment along with any additional loaded fracking equipment.
  • At a step 506, fracking pumps may be loaded into the pump compartments on the carrier. In one aspect, this may include placing a fracking pump into a pump compartment on an upper level of the carrier. This also may include locating an exhaust pipe of the fracking pump outside the carrier so that the fracking pump can be run while contained inside the carrier. At a step 508, the fracking pumps are connected to an integrated pump piping system on the carrier. In some embodiments, the integrated pump piping system is an integrated manifold on the carrier. Because the manifold is integrated in the carrier, workers may connect the fracking pumps without leaving the protected environment of the carrier.
  • At a step 510, a blender unit is introduced into a blender unit compartment. This may include driving the blender unit into the blender unit compartment on the carrier. In some aspects, the blender unit is introduced to the same carrier having the proppant tanks. In some embodiments, the blender unit is introduced into a side compartment on the ground level compartment.
  • At a step 512, the blender unit is connected or coupled to the integrated piping system. In some embodiments, it is placed in fluid communication with the fracking pumps through the integrated manifold system. At a step 514, the blender unit is connected to the integrated proppant conveying structure that may be integrated with the proppant storage tanks. In some embodiments, this includes connecting the blender unit to one or more conveyers or augers or other proppant conveyer system such as sand conveyer system integrated into the carrier.
  • At a step 516, a hydration trailer may be introduced into a hydration trailer compartment. In some embodiments, the hydration trailer is disposed on the same carrier as the blender unit and may be disposed on an opposite side of the carrier. Accordingly, this may include introducing the hydration trailer into a side compartment on the ground level compartment. At a step 518, the hydration unit is connected to the integrated piping system. As discussed above, this may include connecting the hydration unit to the integrated pump manifold.
  • A control center may be loaded at a step 522. This may include driving a mobile control center onto the carrier. The control center is then connected to the operating equipment, including the fracking pumps at a step 524. The control center also may be connected to the blender unit, the hydration unit, and other fracking equipment. In some embodiments, the control center is maintained on the same carrier as the fracking pumps and fluid tanks, while in other embodiments, the carrier is on a separate carrier. In some embodiment, the control center is removed from the carrier to the ground after the carrier conveys the control center to the fracking site. This may include merely driving a control center truck from the carrier. Other methods are contemplated.
  • With the equipment and supplies in place, the loaded carrier may be driven to the frack site at a step 526. This may include towing the carrier or driving the carrier when the carrier is a self-powered vehicle. In some embodiments, the carrier is formed as a trailer, while in other embodiments, the carrier is formed as semi-trailer. In yet other embodiments, the carrier is on a skid that may be placed on a transport, such as on a trailer, semi-trailer, or rail-car. When the carrier arrives at the frack site, it may be parked or located in a desired location for site set up. Additional steps would be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art based on the disclosure herein. Additionally, the order of preparing the carrier may also be changed.
  • An exemplary method of setting up a frack site and fracking using the systems described herein is set out in a flow chart as FIG. 17. It's worth noting that any of the steps described above relating to setup may be performed in the method below, such as coupling and connecting equipment to piping, for example.
  • At a step 602 in FIG. 17, integrated piping systems are connected between carriers. This may include aligning or orienting carriers adjacent each other so that the integrated piping of one carrier aligns with integrated piping of another carrier. In some embodiments, this may include aligning doors of one carrier with doors of another carrier to enable free passage from one carrier to another without leaving the protected environment of the adjacent carriers. Connecting the piping systems may include connecting or coupling piping manifolds, such as pump manifolds to place pumps from different carriers in fluid communication with each other. At a step 604, the carrier may be loaded with injection water, proppant such as sand, and chemicals for the fracking process. This may include filling the integrated fracking tanks on the carrier with a fracking fluid and may include filling integrated chemical tanks. In some embodiments, loading chemicals may include filling non-integrated tanks on or off the carrier and placing the tanks on the carrier. Loading the proppant may include filling integrated proppant tanks or containers already disposed on the carrier, or may include placing a filled container on a skid or trailer on the carrier so that the proppant may be conveyed from the proppant tanks to the blender by the proppant conveying system.
  • At a step 606, the high pressure manifold is placed in communication with the wellhead of the well to be fracked. With the wellhead in fluid communication with the carrier, the fracking process may begin. This may include, at a step 608, conveying fracking fluid from the integrated fluid tanks on carrier to the hydration unit though an integrated piping system in communication with the integrated fluid tanks. At a step 610, polymers are added to the hydration unit, and at a step 612, the polymerized water is conveyed to the blender unit over an integrated piping system. At a step 614, the proppant and chemicals are injected as prescribed on mixing unit. The proppant, such as sand, may be conveyed from the sand storage unit on the carrier through the integrated conveying structure to the blender unit. At a step 706, fracking chemicals are conveyed from a storage tank on the carrier to the blender, and at a step 708, the blender creates slurry including the fracking fluid and the proppant.
  • The blended water is then conveyed to an integrated piping system feeding the high-pressure fracking pumps. When the integrated piping systems are manifolds, the integrated piping manifolds connect, for example, the fracking pumps in a parallel relationship with each other so that the fracking pumps can all draw fluid from the same source. As discussed above, in some embodiments, the fracking pump is disposed at the top level of the carrier.
  • In some embodiments, the integrated piping system is a fixed feed piping manifold system. The slurry is introduced into the wellbore under high pressure at a step 618. After subterranean fracking, the fracking pumps may pump the fluid from the well bore, through the integrated pump piping system, and into discard tanks. The discard tanks may be the same fluid tanks used to carry the fluid to the fracking site or may be different tanks on or off the carrier. The discard fluid therefore may also flow through the integrated tank piping system.
  • FIG. 18 is a flow chart showing an exemplary method of taking down the frack site. At a step 702, after the fracking process is complete, the well is cleared and the system is disconnected from the well bore. At a step 704, piping between different carriers is disconnected so that each individual carrier or module of the larger system may be independently moved from the fracking site. This may include closing doors and openings on the carriers. At a step 706, the carriers are moved on to the next site. Because the carriers are mobile, they may be moved without disconnecting each pump, the blender unit, the hydration unit from the integrated piping and integrated conveying systems. Accordingly, site take-down is rendered much more efficient than prior systems and the equipment is protected from the outside environment. At a step 708, the carriers are reassembled to form a system at the next frack site by connecting integrated piping systems, such as manifolds between carriers. Frack water, proppant, and chemicals are loaded at a step 710, and the fracking process discussed above is repeated for the current well at step 712.
  • In view of all of the above and the figures, one of ordinary skill in the art will readily recognize that the present disclosure introduces an apparatus, comprising: a frame structure and one or more fracking fluid tanks carried by the frame structure and arranged to contain a fracking fluid usable during a fracking procedure. The one or more fracking pumps that are carried by the frame structure are configured to pump the fracking fluid at high pressure to a wellhead of a wellbore. The apparatus also comprises an integrated piping system fluidically coupled with the one or more fracking pumps and the one or more fluid tanks to transfer fracking fluid therebetween. A mobility-enabling structure supports and is operably coupled to the frame structure, the one or more fracking fluid tanks, the one or more fracking pumps, and the integrated piping system, so as to enable conveyance of the apparatus to a fracking site. In an aspect, the integrated piping system comprises a first integrated piping system connected to the one or more fracking pumps to feed fluid thereto, and a second integrated piping system connected with the one or more fluid tanks to carry fracking fluid from the one or more tanks. In an aspect, the apparatus further comprises a blender unit configured to receive the fracking fluid from the second integrated piping system, with the blender unit in fluid communication with the first integrated piping system and configured to supply the fracking fluid therethrough to the one or more fracking pumps. In an aspect, the first integrated piping system comprises a first integrated manifold system connecting the one or more pumps in a parallel relationship with each other. In an aspect, the second integrated piping system comprises a second integrated manifold system connecting the one or more fluid tanks in a parallel relationship with each other. In an aspect, the frame structure comprises a winterized outer wall structure. In an aspect, the apparatus further comprises an integrated heating system that maintains an environment above a freezing temperature inside the winterized wall structure. In an aspect, the apparatus further comprises: a proppant storage tank; and a set of integrated proppant conveying and handling equipment configured to transport proppant from the proppant storage tank to a blender unit without leaving the apparatus, wherein the mobility enabling structure further supports and is operably coupled to the proppant storage tank and the set of integrated proppant conveying and handling equipment. In an aspect, the one or more tanks is disposed on a lower level of the apparatus and the one or more fracking pumps is disposed on an upper level of the apparatus. In an aspect, the one or more fracking pumps comprises a trailer providing mobility to the one or more fracking pumps independent of the frame structure, the one or more fracking pumps being removable from the upper level to a location apart from the apparatus. In an aspect, the apparatus further comprises a closable aperture disposed adjacent an end of the integrated piping system, with the piping system being configured to connect to an adjacent piping system through the closable aperture when it is in an open state.
  • The present disclosure also introduces an apparatus, comprising: a first level including one or more fracking fluid tanks arranged to contain a fracking fluid; a second level vertically offset from the first level and including one or more fracking pumps configured to pump the fracking fluid from the tanks; an integrated piping system connectable to the one or more fracking pumps at the second level to receive the fracking fluid from the one or more fracking fluid tanks; and a mobility-enabling structure adapted to carry the first level, the second level, and the piping system to and from a fracking site. In an aspect, the integrated piping system comprises a first integrated piping system connected to the one or more fracking pumps to feed the fracking fluid thereto, and a second integrated piping system connected with the one or more fluid tanks to carry fracking fluid from the one or more tanks toward the first integrated piping system. In an aspect, the apparatus further comprises a blender unit configured to receive the fracking fluid from the second integrated piping system, with the blender unit in fluid communication with the first integrated piping system and configured to supply the fracking fluid to the one or more fracking pumps therethrough. In an aspect, the first integrated piping system comprises a first integrated manifold system connecting the one or more pumps in a parallel relationship with each other. In an aspect, the second integrated piping system comprises a second integrated manifold system connecting the one or more fluid tanks in a parallel relationship with each other. In an aspect, the frame structure comprises a winterized outer wall structure. In an aspect, the outer wall structure encloses the piping system and protects the piping system from extreme weather conditions. In an aspect, the first level is below the second level. In an aspect, the one or more fracking pumps comprises a trailer providing mobility to the one or more fracking pumps independent of the frame structure, the one or more fracking pumps being removable from the upper level to a location apart from the apparatus. In an aspect, the apparatus further comprises an outer wall enclosing the first level and the second level to protect the one or more tanks and the one or more fracking pumps from arctic conditions. In an aspect, the apparatus further comprises a closable aperture disposed adjacent an end of the integrated piping system, with the piping system being configured to connect to an adjacent piping system through the closable aperture when it is in an open state. In an aspect, the apparatus further comprises a proppant storage tank; and integrated proppant conveying and handling equipment configured to transport proppant from a proppant storage tank to a blender unit without leaving the winterized enclosure, the mobility enabling structure carrying the proppant storage tank and the integrated proppant conveying and handling equipment.
  • The present disclosure also introduces a method comprising: providing a plurality of a high pressure fracking pumps on a first level of a mobile structure; fluidly coupling the plurality of high-pressure fracking pumps to an integrated piping system provided on the mobile structure, the integrated piping system comprising a first integrated manifold system connecting the one or more pumps in a parallel relationship with each other, the integrated piping system being arranged to convey fracking fluid to the plurality of fracking pumps; providing the mobile structure with a fracking fluid tank holding fracking fluid on a second level of the mobile structure; and transporting the mobile structure to a fracking site. In an aspect, the method further comprises filling a proppant storage tank on the mobile structure with a proppant, the mobile structure having an integrated conveying system for moving the proppant to the blender unit. In an aspect, the method further comprises: blending the proppant and the fracking fluid to create a fracking slurry; conveying the fracking slurry to the high pressure fracking pump on the mobile structure; and pressuring the fracking fluid with the fracking pump and introducing the solution to a wellbore to perform a fracking process. In an aspect, the method further comprises heating the mobile structure with an integrated heating system to maintain the fracking fluid and the integrated piping system in a controlled environment.
  • The foregoing outlines features of several embodiments so that a person of ordinary skill in the art may better understand the aspects of the present disclosure. Such features may be replaced by any one of numerous equivalent alternatives, only some of which are disclosed herein. One of ordinary skill in the art should appreciate that they may readily use the present disclosure as a basis for designing or modifying other processes and structures for carrying out the same purposes and/or achieving the same advantages of the embodiments introduced herein. One of ordinary skill in the art should also realize that such equivalent constructions do not depart from the spirit and scope of the present disclosure, and that they may make various changes, substitutions and alterations herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the present disclosure.
  • The Abstract at the end of this disclosure is provided to comply with 37 C.F.R. §1.72(b) to allow the reader to quickly ascertain the nature of the technical disclosure. It is submitted with the understanding that it will not be used to interpret or limit the scope or meaning of the claims.
  • Moreover, it is the express intention of the applicant not to invoke 35 U.S.C. §112, paragraph 6 for any limitations of any of the claims herein, except for those in which the claim expressly uses the word “means” together with an associated function.

Claims (27)

What is claimed is:
1. An apparatus, comprising:
a frame structure;
one or more fracking fluid tanks carried by the frame structure and arranged to contain a fracking fluid usable during a fracking procedure;
one or more fracking pumps that are carried by the frame structure and are configured to pump the fracking fluid at high pressure to a wellhead of a wellbore;
an integrated piping system fluidically coupled with the one or more fracking pumps and the one or more fluid tanks to transfer fracking fluid therebetween; and
a mobility-enabling structure supporting and operably coupled to the frame structure, the one or more fracking fluid tanks, the one or more fracking pumps, and the integrated piping system, so as to enable conveyance of the apparatus to a fracking site.
2. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the integrated piping system comprises a first integrated piping system connected to the one or more fracking pumps to feed fluid thereto, and a second integrated piping system connected with the one or more fluid tanks to carry fracking fluid from the one or more tanks.
3. The apparatus of claim 2, further comprising a blender unit configured to receive the fracking fluid from the second integrated piping system, with the blender unit in fluid communication with the first integrated piping system and configured to supply the fracking fluid therethrough to the one or more fracking pumps.
4. The apparatus of claim 3, wherein the first integrated piping system comprises a first integrated manifold system connecting the one or more pumps in a parallel relationship with each other.
5. The apparatus of claim 4, wherein the second integrated piping system comprises a second integrated manifold system connecting the one or more fluid tanks in a parallel relationship with each other.
6. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the frame structure comprises a winterized outer wall structure.
7. The apparatus of claim 6, comprising an integrated heating system that maintains an environment above a freezing temperature inside the winterized wall structure.
8. The apparatus of claim 1, comprising:
a proppant storage tank; and
a set of integrated proppant conveying and handling equipment configured to transport proppant from the proppant storage tank to a blender unit without leaving the apparatus,
wherein the mobility enabling structure further supports and is operably coupled to the proppant storage tank and the set of integrated proppant conveying and handling equipment.
9. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the one or more tanks is disposed on a lower level of the apparatus and the one or more fracking pumps is disposed on an upper level of the apparatus.
10. The apparatus of claim 9, wherein the one or more fracking pumps comprises a trailer providing mobility to the one or more fracking pumps independent of the frame structure, the one or more fracking pumps being removable from the upper level to a location apart from the apparatus.
11. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a closable aperture disposed adjacent an end of the integrated piping system, with the piping system being configured to connect to an adjacent piping system through the closable aperture when it is in an open state.
12. An apparatus, comprising:
a first level including one or more fracking fluid tanks arranged to contain a fracking fluid;
a second level vertically offset from the first level and including one or more fracking pumps configured to pump the fracking fluid from the tanks;
an integrated piping system connectable to the one or more fracking pumps at the second level to receive the fracking fluid from the one or more fracking fluid tanks; and
mobility-enabling structure adapted to carry the first level, the second level, and the piping system to and from a fracking site.
13. The apparatus of claim 12, wherein the integrated piping system comprises a first integrated piping system connected to the one or more fracking pumps to feed the fracking fluid thereto, and a second integrated piping system connected with the one or more fluid tanks to carry fracking fluid from the one or more tanks toward the first integrated piping system.
14. The apparatus of claim 13, further comprising a blender unit configured to receive the fracking fluid from the second integrated piping system, with the blender unit in fluid communication with the first integrated piping system and configured to supply the fracking fluid to the one or more fracking pumps therethrough.
15. The apparatus of claim 14, wherein the first integrated piping system comprises a first integrated manifold system connecting the one or more pumps in a parallel relationship with each other.
16. The apparatus of claim 15, wherein the second integrated piping system comprises a second integrated manifold system connecting the one or more fluid tanks in a parallel relationship with each other.
17. The apparatus of claim 12, wherein the frame structure comprises a winterized outer wall structure.
18. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein the outer wall structure encloses the piping system and protects the piping system from extreme weather conditions.
19. The apparatus of claim 12, wherein the first level is below the second level.
20. The apparatus of claim 12, wherein the one or more fracking pumps comprises a trailer providing mobility to the one or more fracking pumps independent of the frame structure, the one or more fracking pumps being removable from the upper level to a location apart from the apparatus.
21. The apparatus of claim 12, further comprising an outer wall enclosing the first level and the second level to protect the one or more tanks and the one or more fracking pumps from arctic conditions.
22. The apparatus of claim 12, further comprising a closable aperture disposed adjacent an end of the integrated piping system, with the piping system being configured to connect to an adjacent piping system through the closable aperture when it is in an open state.
23. The apparatus of claim 12, further comprising:
a proppant storage tank; and
integrated proppant conveying and handling equipment configured to transport proppant from a proppant storage tank to a blender unit without leaving the winterized enclosure, the mobility enabling structure carrying the proppant storage tank and the integrated proppant conveying and handling equipment.
24. A method comprising:
providing a plurality of a high pressure fracking pumps on a first level of a mobile structure;
fluidly coupling the plurality of high-pressure fracking pumps to an integrated piping system provided on the mobile structure, the integrated piping system comprising a first integrated manifold system connecting the one or more pumps in a parallel relationship with each other, the integrated piping system being arranged to convey fracking fluid to the plurality of fracking pumps;
providing the mobile structure with a fracking fluid tank holding fracking fluid on a second level of the mobile structure; and
transporting the mobile structure to a fracking site.
25. The method of claim 24, comprising filling a proppant storage tank on the mobile structure with a proppant, the mobile structure having an integrated conveying system for moving the proppant to the blender unit.
26. The method of claim 25, comprising:
blending the proppant and the fracking fluid to create a fracking slurry;
conveying the fracking slurry to the high pressure fracking pump on the mobile structure; and
pressuring the fracking fluid with the fracking pump and introducing the solution to a wellbore to perform a fracking process.
27. The method of claim 24, comprising heating the mobile structure with an integrated heating system to maintain the fracking fluid and the integrated piping system in a controlled environment.
US14/161,002 2013-02-27 2014-01-22 Integrated Arctic Fracking Apparatus and Methods Abandoned US20140238683A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201361770157P true 2013-02-27 2013-02-27
US14/161,002 US20140238683A1 (en) 2013-02-27 2014-01-22 Integrated Arctic Fracking Apparatus and Methods

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US10385643B2 (en) 2011-09-23 2019-08-20 Cameron International Corporation Fracturing manifold systems and methods
US10487637B2 (en) 2011-09-23 2019-11-26 Cameron International Corporation Adjustable fracturing system
US10385645B2 (en) 2011-09-23 2019-08-20 Cameron International Corporation Fracturing manifold systems and methods
US10385662B2 (en) 2012-01-11 2019-08-20 Cameron International Corporation Well fracturing manifold apparatus
US9115557B1 (en) * 2013-12-03 2015-08-25 Orteq Energy Technologies, Llc Dust collection system
US9903190B2 (en) 2014-10-27 2018-02-27 Cameron International Corporation Modular fracturing system
WO2016069390A1 (en) * 2014-10-27 2016-05-06 Cameron International Corporation Modular fracturing system
US10494172B2 (en) * 2015-04-07 2019-12-03 Rcm Equipment Company, Llc Portable asphalt emulsion storage system
US20160298303A1 (en) * 2015-04-07 2016-10-13 Rcm Equipment Company, Llc Portable asphalt emulsion storage system
US10323475B2 (en) 2015-11-13 2019-06-18 Cameron International Corporation Fracturing fluid delivery system
US10787879B2 (en) 2015-11-13 2020-09-29 Cameron International Corporation Fracturing fluid delivery system
WO2019006106A1 (en) * 2017-06-29 2019-01-03 Evolution Well Services, Llc Hydration-blender transport for fracturing operation
US10415332B2 (en) 2017-06-29 2019-09-17 Typhon Technology Solutions, Llc Hydration-blender transport for fracturing operation
US10519730B2 (en) 2017-06-29 2019-12-31 Typhon Technology Solutions, Llc Electric power distribution for fracturing operation

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