US20130125895A1 - Nasal interface device - Google Patents

Nasal interface device Download PDF

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US20130125895A1
US20130125895A1 US13/742,520 US201313742520A US2013125895A1 US 20130125895 A1 US20130125895 A1 US 20130125895A1 US 201313742520 A US201313742520 A US 201313742520A US 2013125895 A1 US2013125895 A1 US 2013125895A1
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configured
user
nostril
adaptor
nose
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US13/742,520
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Robert W. Daly
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PERIODIC BREATHING FOUNDATION A DELAWARE LLC LLC
PERIODIC BREATHING FOUNDATION
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PERIODIC BREATHING FOUNDATION
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Priority to US11/405,948 priority Critical patent/US7900626B2/en
Priority to US11/787,854 priority patent/US8074646B2/en
Priority to US7030308P priority
Priority to US12/383,316 priority patent/US8381732B2/en
Application filed by PERIODIC BREATHING FOUNDATION filed Critical PERIODIC BREATHING FOUNDATION
Priority to US13/742,520 priority patent/US20130125895A1/en
Assigned to THE PERIODIC BREATHING FOUNDATION, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY reassignment THE PERIODIC BREATHING FOUNDATION, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: DALY, ROBERT W.
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    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
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Abstract

A nasal interface device and a method of use are disclosed. The device includes a facial adaptor configured to be secured to the nose of a user and having two nostril pads having open channels configured to be inserted into nostrils of the use and a piercing/swivel adaptor configured to interact with the facial adaptor through the two nostril prongs. The piercing/swivel adaptor is further configured to be coupled to an airway tube, the airway tube is configured to supply air/gas to the user.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • The present application claims priority to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/383,316, filed Mar. 23, 2009 which claims priority from U.S. Patent Provisional Patent Application No. 61/070,303 to Daly, filed Mar. 21, 2008, and entitled “Nasal Interface Device”, and incorporates its disclosure herein by reference in its entirety.
  • The present application also relates to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/405,948, filed on Apr. 17, 2006, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/787,854, filed on Apr. 17, 2007, and International Patent Application No. PCT/US2007/009454, filed on Apr. 17, 2007, the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entireties.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates generally to treatment of breathing disorders. In particular, the present invention relates to a nasal interface device that is relatively small, lightweight, easy to use, and can be connectable to a breathing apparatus.
  • 2. Background of the Invention
  • Sleep-disordered breathing (“SDB”) includes all syndromes that pose breathing difficulties during sleep. These include obstructive sleep apnea (“OSA”), mixed sleep apnea (“MSA”), central sleep apnea (“CSA”), Cheyne-Stokes respiration (“CSR”), and others. Some form of SDB occurs in approximately 3-5% of the U.S. population.
  • Anatomical problems such as obesity or an abnormally narrow upper airway are known to cause obstructive forms of SDB, in which the airway is vulnerable to collapse as a result of fluid dynamic stresses imposed by breathing. These stresses produce collapse during sleep, especially during rapid-eye-movement (“REM”) sleep, when there is a reduction in the tone of muscles holding the airway open. An appropriate interface is required in order to deliver continuous positive airway pressure (“CPAP”) therapy, during which air pressure in the range of 4-25 cm H2O is delivered from a pressure generator, via delivery hosing, and through the interface in order to pressurize the airway so that it will resist such collapse. Various types of interfaces are known, including nasal masks covering and creating a seal with the skin surrounding the nose, oro-nasal masks covering and creating a seal with the skin surrounding the nose and mouth, and “nasal pillow” devices which directly engage the nares of the nose by inserting soft, expandable elastomer tubes just inside the entrance to the nostrils. Small leaks are acceptable in such devices, which in any ease usually incorporate an exhalation orifice producing a fixed leak in the range of 30-50 liters per minute to provide bias flow for the pressure generator and to prevent rebreathing of exhaled gases.
  • Neurological difficulties in controlling levels of blood gases, such as carbon dioxide (“CO2”) and oxygen (“O2”), are increasingly being recognized as important contributors to other forms of SDB. This is especially true of the “central” syndromes, MSA, CSA and CSR, which may account for as much as 20% of all SDB. Changes in the neurological system that control blood gases often produce cyclic fluctuations in blood gases, and thus, unsteady respiratory patterns that cause arousals from sleep. These changes are accompanied by spikes in blood pressure and release of stress hormones that can cause long-term damage to a number of organ systems. Additionally, some SDB syndromes involve not only fluctuations in levels of blood gases, but also abnormal average levels of blood gases. For example, low levels of dissolved CO2 in arterial blood are frequently encountered in CSR, making the blood alkaline and posing a clinical problem. Therapies directed towards the central SDB syndromes may Involve modulation of breathing gases or control of exhalation of carbon dioxide. These therapies are able to stabilize respiration and establish appropriate blood gas levels by restoring normal control of blood gases. When such therapies are in use substantially leak-proof interfaces are required in order to permit careful control of the gases being exchanged between the therapy devices and the user. Leaks as small as one liter per minute, which would equate to the amount of flow that would pass through a hole as small as 1 millimeter in diameter, may negate the effects of the therapy. Thus, many conventional interface designs currently in use for delivery of CPAP therapy would not be suitable for use in treatment of the central SDB syndromes, and a much more secure interface design is needed for optimum therapy.
  • Respiratory interfaces typically provide gaseous substance(s) to a user in a variety of applications, including treatment of the above referenced illnesses, anesthesiology, and assistance in breathing.
  • Many respiratory therapies attempt to manage precisely the inhaled, mixed and exhaled gases for a user. This may be achieved through a tight seal between the interface and facial contours of the user. A tight seal may be necessary not only in order to provide precise control of gases exchanged with the user, but also to prevent escape of inhalational agents into ambient air where they may affect clinical personnel. For example, when a respiratory interface is utilized in treating complex sleep apnea, a closed system is required to control the amount of carbon dioxide that is exhaled by the user.
  • in the past, a tight seal has usually been achieved through the use of straps and harnesses to pull the interface tightly against the user's face. Since facial geometries vary, the amount of pressure applied to the skin by the interface will vary from place to place on the face, creating “hot spots” where pressure may be quite high. In some instances, the pressure may be high enough to prevent effective blood perfusion at the hot spots, causing long-term skin breakdown and damage to the face of the user. Therefore, it may be desirable to have an interface that conforms to a users face and puts little or no positive pressure on the user's face while providing a sufficient seal.
  • The hoses and tubes associated with many respiratory therapies apply various torque forces to the interface, making desirable for the interface to be sufficiently rigid or stiff to provide a stable physical platform to resist such forces, and to provide the user with the perception of security and stability of the interface and seal when in use. In the case of respiratory interfaces that create a seal by engaging the nares of the nose with nasal pillows, it is essential that interface provide a geometrically stable platform to hold the nasal pillows securely in relationship to the nose, otherwise there is a risk that torque forces will cause one or both of the nasal pillows to disengage from the nare, creating a large air leak.
  • A competing concern to the rigidity of an interface is its ability to conform to user's individual facial features while providing comfort to the user. Compliance with continuous positive airway pressure therapy is reported to be less than 50% after one year, primarily as a result of interface discomfort. The ability of an interface to conform a user's thee comfortably is generally provided by a cushion. However, the cushion also serves to distribute forces applied to the interface such as pulling caused by the attached hoses and tubing, thereby limiting the degree of conformity with the face and the degree of comfort.
  • Further, conventional CPAP masks an other interface devices are bulky, heavy, and are difficult operate. Thus, there is a need for a light-weight nasal interface device that can provide air-tight connection to a breathing apparatus and allow flexibility of movement to its user.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • A nasal interface device and a method of use are disclosed. In some embodiments, the device includes a facial adaptor configured to be secured to the nose of a user and incorporating pads configured to be secured inside the nostrils of a user and further configured to extend into the interior of one or both nostrils of the user (for illustrative purposes and ease of description only, also referred to as “nostril pads”). Each nostril pad is configured to be manufactured from a soft, elastomeric material. In some embodiments, the pad is configured to conform to the interior geometry of the user's nostril and to substantially follow the typical interior architecture of the nostril, especially the inner curvature of the nostril, wherein the inner circumference of the nostril at approximately 2-3 millimeters inside the nostril is substantially greater than the inner circumference at the opening of the nostril. In some embodiments, the nostril pads further include pilot holes disposed in each nostril pad. Each pilot hole is configured to be pierced using an appropriately-sized tube or a “nostril prong” by placing the nostril prong through the pilot hole after the nostril pad is inserted into the nostril. Upon insertion into the user's nostril, the nostril prongs provide a breathing passage through which air could be inhaled and exhaled without excessive resistance by the user. In some embodiments, the nostril prongs can be configured to be coupled to a piercing/swivel adaptor configured to interact with a facial adaptor via the two nostril prongs. Insertion of the nostril prongs into the pilot holes in the facial adaptor would expand the soft nostril pads, causing them to flare out and form a tight seal with the inner wall of the nostril, thereby “locking” the facial adaptor into the nose and providing an airtight seat due to the larger diameter of the inside of the nostril relative to the opening of the nostril. The piercing/swivel adaptor is further configured to be coupled to an airway tube, the airway tube is configured to supply air/gas to the user.
  • In some embodiments, the present invention relates to a method of applying a nasal interface device to a nose of a user. The method includes securing a facial adaptor to the nose of the user, wherein the facial adaptor includes soft elastomeric nasal pads with pilot holes. The nasal pads are configured to he inserted into the nostrils of the user The method further includes inserting a piercing/swivel adaptor incorporating tubular nostril prongs through the pilot holes in order to lock the facial adaptor inside the nostrils and to establish an air channel, and coupling an airway tube to the piercing/swivel adaptor, wherein the airway tube is configured to supply air/gas to the user.
  • In some embodiments, the present invention relates to a nasal interface device having a facial adaptor configured to be secured to the nose of a user and having a nostril pad configured to be inserted into a nostril of the user. The nostril pad is configured to substantially conform to an interior geometry of the nostril upon insertion of the pad into the nostril and includes an open channel protruding through the nostril pad. A nostril tube is configured to be placed through the open channel in order to supply air/gas to the user.
  • In some embodiments, the present invention relates to a method of using a nasal interface device for supplying air/gas to a user. The method includes securing a facial adaptor to the nose of the user, wherein the facial adaptor includes a nostril pad configured to be inserted into a nostril of the nose of the user, the nostril pad is configured to substantially conform to an interior geometry of the nostril upon insertion of the pad into the nostril and includes an open channel protruding through the nostril pad. A nostril tube is configured to be placed through the open channel in order to supply air/gas to the user.
  • In some embodiments, the present invention relates to a nasal interface device having a facial adaptor configured to he secured to the nose of a user and having two nostril pads configured to he inserted into nostrils of the user, and a piercing/swivel adaptor configured to interact with the facial adaptor through the two nostril pads. The piercing/swivel adaptor is further configured to be coupled to an airway tube, the airway tube is configured to supply air/gas to the user.
  • In some embodiments, the present invention relates to a method of using a nasal interface device. The method includes securing a facial adaptor to the nose of the user, wherein the facial adaptor includes nostril pads configured to be inserted into nostrils of the user, inserting a piercing/swivel adaptor into the nostrils of the user through the nostril pads of the facial adaptor, and coupling an airway tube to the piercing/swivel adaptor, wherein the airway tube is configured to supply air/gas to the user.
  • In some embodiments, the present invention relates to a system for controlling breathing of a patient. The system includes a nasal interface device. The device includes a facial adaptor configured to be secured to the nose of a user and having two nostril pads configured to be inserted into nostrils of the user, a piercing/swivel adaptor configured to interact with the facial adaptor through the two nostril pads. The piercing/swivel adaptor is further configured to be coupled to an airway tube, the airway tube is configured to supply air/gas to the user.
  • Further features and advantages of the invention, as well as structure and operation of various embodiments of the invention, are disclosed in detail below will reference to the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present invention is described with reference to the accompanying drawings. In the drawings, like reference numbers indicate identical or functionally similar element Additionally, the left-most digit(s) of a reference number identifies the drawing in which the reference number first appears.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary nasal interface device, according to some embodiments of the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 is a side view from beneath the nose of the nasal interface device shown FIG. 1.
  • FIGS. 3-4 illustrate various views of an exemplary facial adaptor of the nasal interface device shown in FIG. 1 according to some embodiments of the present invention.
  • FIGS. 5-8 illustrate various views of the facial adaptor shown in FIGS. 3-4 being applied to the nose of the user.
  • FIGS. 9 a-e illustrate in exemplary piercing/swivel adaptor of the nasal interface device show in FIG. 1, according to some embodiments of the present invention.
  • FIGS. 10-11 illustrate various views of the piercing/swivel adaptor shown in FIGS. 9 a-c being applied to the nose of the user.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • In some embodiments, the present invention relates to a respiratory interface device that can be attached to the face of a user (or a patient) order to allow the user to breathe through the device, where the device can be coupled to a breathing apparatus providing positive air pressure to the user.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary nasal interface apparatus 100, according to some embodiments of the present invention. The nasal interface device 100 includes a facial adaptor 102 and a swivel/piercing element 104. The nasal interface device 100 is configured to be coupled to a swivel 106. The tubing 106 can be further coupled to a system for controlling breathing of a patient (not shown in FIG. 1), such as those described in the co-owned/co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/405,948, filed on Apr. 17, 2006, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/787,854, filed on Apr. 17, 2007, and International Patent Application No. PCT/US2007/009454, filed on Apr. 17, 2007, the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entireties.
  • FIG. 2 is a side view of the nasal interface apparatus 100 shown in FIG. 1. FIG. 2 further illustrates that the swivel/piercing element 104 allows the tubing 106 to rotate as the user moves his/her head the user rolls to the side on his/her bed during sleep). In some embodiments, the tubing 106 is configured to be coupled to the system for controlling breathing (not shown in FIGS. 1 and 2) that can he discretely disposed above the user's head or away from sight to sustain an aesthetic appearance of the room and prevent formation of the tubing clutter around the user.
  • FIGS. 3-4 illustrate exemplary facial adaptor 102, according to some embodiments of the present invention. The facial adaptor 102 is configured to be coupled to the user's nose at various locations on the nose, as illustrated in FIGS. 5-8. The facial adaptor 102 includes nose attachment portions 304 and 308. The first portion 304 is configured to be attached to the bridge of the user's nose. The first portion 304 includes a strip 314 and side flaps 306 a and 306 b. The strip 314 includes a proximate end 322 and a distal end 324. The side 306 are configured to be coupled at or substantially adjacent to the distal end 324 of the strip 314. The strip 314 is figured to be bendably coupled to the second portion 308 of the facial adaptor 102 at the bendable connection 326.
  • The side flaps 306 of the strip 314 are configured to bend around the axis strip 314. The side flaps 306 are configured to have a curved shape. The width, length, and height of the side flaps 306 are configured to accommodate the height of the bridge of the user's nose. The length of the strip 314 can be configured to accommodate length of bridge the user's nose. Thus, the present invention can be manufactured in way to accommodate child and adult users having varying facial parameters.
  • In some embodiments, the strip 314 and the side flaps 306 can be configured to include various means of attachment (shown in FIGS. 3-4) to allow further securing of the strip 314 and the flaps 306 to the nose of the use. In some embodiments, the strip 314 and the flaps 306 can be configured to form a friction clamp, whereby upon placement of the snip 314 and the flaps 306 on the bridge of the nose, the flaps 306 are bent toward the nose in a pinching-type motion, thus, gently squeezing the nose and preventing slippage of the facial adaptor 102 from the nose. In some embodiments, the flaps 306 can include various materials that can be configured to retain a certain shape once they are bent into a particular configuration and/or subject to a certain temperatures. In some embodiments, the flaps 306 can be configured to include any other means for attaching the flaps to the nose of the user, including but not limited to, adhesives, glue, friction devices, straps, or any other suitable devices. In some embodiments, the strip 314 is configured to be placed over the top of the bridge of the user's nose (or over the skin covering cartilage of the septum). The strip 314 is attached to the bridge of the user's nose in a way so that the proximate end 322 of the strip 314 is configured to coincide with the tip of the user's nose. Such attachment allows bending of the facial adaptor 102 at the bendable connection 326. Such attachment further allows the user to bend second portion 308 in a downward direction toward nasal airways of the user. Once the strip 314 is placed on the bridge of the user's nose, the side flaps 306 are forced in a downward direction toward the skin of the nose and are further attached to the nose as discussed above. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the art, the facial adaptor 102 can be manufactured from materials that can be configured to allow the adaptor 102 to retain a certain shape upon bending or twisting the adaptor 102 in a particular way.
  • The second portion 308 is configured to cover a bottom portion of the user's nose underneath the tip of the nose. In some embodiments, the second portion 308 can be shaped substantially similar to the bottom portion of the user's nose. In some embodiments, the second portion 308 has a substantially triangular shape. The second portion 308 has a substantially flat interior surface 332 that is configured to interact with the bottom portion of the nose. In some embodiments, the interior surface 332 is configured to cover the bottom edges of the user's nostrils upon adaptor 102 being installed on the user's nose. In some embodiments, the interior surface 332 can include glue, adhesives, friction-type devices, straps or any other types of mechanisms that are configured to further secure the facial adaptor 102 to the nose of the user. The second portion 308 further includes nostril pads, protrusions, or otherwise extensions (winch will be referred to as “pads” in the following description) 312 a and 312 b. In some embodiments, the nostril pads 312 are configured to have substantially teardrop shape and protrude substantially vertically away from the interior surface 332. In some embodiments, the nostril pads 312 can be configured to protrude at an angle with regard to the interior surface 332. Further, the nostril pads 312 can be configured to have any desired shape. In some embodiments, the nostril pads 312 can be configured to create a substantially hermetic fit inside user's nostrils. As such, no air/gas can escape from the nostrils while the user is using the above device. As can be understood by one skilled in the art, the sizes of the nostril pads 312 can differ in order to accommodate varying size nostrils (e.g., children and adults). As can be further understood by one skilled in the art, the pads 312 can have any desired shape, including teardrop, cylindrical, oval, or any other suitable shape.
  • In some embodiments, the nostril pads 312 can be configured to have a greater diameter (or otherwise be larger) at the end distal from the interior surface 332 than the diameter of the nostril pads at the end proximate to the interior surface 332. This allows for the nostril pads to better conform to the interior geometry of the user's nose, whereby the diameter of a nostril may be greater at a point distal from the opening of the nostril than the diameter of the nostril at its opening.
  • In some embodiments, the nostril pads 312 include pilot holes 342 (a, b), respectively, formed along the axis of the nostril pads 312. The pilot holes 342 create open or pilot channels and allow insertion of tubes or nostril prongs disposed on the swivel/piercing element 104 (as shown and discussed below with regard to FIGS. 9 a-c).
  • Side flaps 310(a) and 310(b) are coupled to the second portion 308 via bendable connections 344. As illustrated in FIG. 4, side flaps 310 are configured to fit immediately adjacent to the sides of the bottom of the nose of the user, e.g., along the side of the nose where the nose meets the face. Once the user places the facial adaptor 102 on the nose, the flaps 310 are configured to be bent up from the interior surface 332 of the adaptor 102 and be placed on the side of the user's nose in such a manner as to provide a clamping action that further secures adaptor 102 to the bottom portion of the nose. In some embodiments, the interior surface of side flaps 310 can be configured to include various means of attachment, including but not limited to, friction-type mechanisms and clamps, adhesives, glues, straps and any other suitable devices that that allow side flaps 310 to attach to the side of the nose.
  • In some embodiments, the facial adaptor 102 can he configured to be formed from a suitable biomedically compatible grade of soft elastomer such as polyurethane plastic. As can be understood by one skilled in the art, the facial adaptor 102 can be formed from any suitable material. Further, the facial adaptor 102 (with the exception of the nostril pads 312) can have a thickness on the order of 3-5 millimeters. In some embodiments, a friction-type mechanism, a glue, a thin-film adhesive, or any other suitable attachment means can be applied to the above-described parts of the facial adaptor 102. In some embodiments, the attachment means can be configured to create a non-permanent attachment to the skin of the user, thus, allowing the user to temporarily apply the facial adaptor 102 to user's face and remove it as necessary. Further, the attachment means can be such that same facial adaptor 102 can be removed from the user's face and then re-applied, e.g., the facial adaptor can use a repositionable attachment means that allows the user to remove and reapply the adaptor. In some embodiments, the facial adaptor 102 can be a single or as multi-use device. In some exemplary embodiments, the weight of the facial adaptor 102 can be on order of 2 to 7 grams (“g”).
  • The nostril pads 312 can be manufactured from a soft elastomeric material, such as medical grade polyurethane or any other suitable material. The elastomeric material can be configured to have a varying hardness coefficient that determines how flexible/hard this material can be. The hardness coefficient can be measured using a Shore-A scale having values between A 00, corresponding to the softest material, and A 100, corresponding to the hardest material. As can be understood by one skilled in the art, the nostril pads 312 can have a hardness coefficient in the range of approximately A 00 to approximately A 60. In some embodiments, the nostril pads 312 can be injection molded and attached (by any methods, including gluing, stapling, welding, thermo-gluing, or any other methods) to the interior surface 312 of the second portion 308. In some embodiments, the entire facial adaptor 102 can be manufactured from a single material, such as polyethylene, polyurethane, polyester, and an other plastic polymers.
  • The nostril pads 312 are configured to be disposed substantially in the center of the second portion 308 of the facial adaptor 102 and further match the location of user's nostrils so that upon insertion of the nostril pads 312 into the user's nostrils, the nostril pads 312 are comfortably disposed inside user's nostrils. In some embodiments, the nostril pads 312 can be disposed at an angle with regard to each other, as illustrated in FIGS. 3-4. With just the nostril pads 312. (i.e., without the breathing tubes or nostril prongs) being inserted into the user's nostrils, the user may be able to breathe through the nose. However, upon insertion, of the breathing tubes, the nostril pads 312 expand inside the nostrils to provide a hermetic seal and, as stated above, do not allow leaking of air/gas between the interior walls of the nostrils and the pads.
  • In some embodiments, the nostril pads 312 can be used independently of the rest of adaptor 102 and configured to be individually inserted by the user into each nostril. In some embodiments, the nostril pads 312 can include a connector that connects the two pads 312. The connector allows the pads to be inserted into both nostrils simultaneously.
  • In order to put the facial adaptor 102 on the face, the user may perform the following steps. As discussed below, these steps may not necessarily be performed in the order that they are described. As can be understood by one skilled in the art, the steps can be performed in any order. In some embodiments, the user may first align the proximate end 322 of the first portion 304 with the tip of the user's nose and then apply the strip 314 along with wingtips 306 to the bridge and sides of the user's nose. Upon applying the strip 314 to the bridge of the user's nose, the wingtips 306 are bent in a downward direction and are applied to the sides of the user's nose. Then, the second portion 308 is bent in a downward direction toward the user's nostrils in order to cover the nose's airways. The nostril pads 312 are inserted into the nostrils. The side flaps 310 are then bent in an upward direction along the sloe of the user's nose. FIGS. 5-8 illustrate the facial adaptor 102 being placed over the user's nose.
  • In some embodiments, the facial adaptor 102 can be packaged by a manufacturer in a single-use sealed tray. The user would remove the adaptor 102 from the tray, (in embodiments using adhesives, the user also removes the adhesive liner coveting the adhesive on the facial adaptor 102), then insert the nostril pads 312 into the user's nostrils, and then apply other portions of the facial adaptor 102 to the user's face (i.e., the first portion 304 is applied to the bridge of the user's nose and the side flaps 310 to the side of the user's nose).
  • In some embodiments, the strip 314 of the first portion 304 can be stiffened with laminated elastomer/PET structures. The bendable connections 326 and 344 as well as those. between wingtips 306 and the strip 314 can be configured to be molded-in ridges that allow bending of the appropriate components of the facial adaptor 102. Further, the wingtips 306 as well as side flaps 310 can be configured to provide, some squeezing three to the user's nose, when the facial adaptor 102 is applied to the nose, in order to further secure the adaptor 102 to the nose.
  • FIGS. 9 a-c illustrate an exemplary swivel/piercing element 104, according to some embodiments of the present invention. The swivel/piercing element 104 includes a housing 902, nostril prongs or tubes 906(a, b), a connector tube 904, and a swivel adaptor 922. The housing 902 further includes an interior surface 912 and an exterior surface 914. The interior surface 912 is configured to interact with the facial adaptor 102 (not shown in FIGS. 9 a-c). The exterior surface 914 is facing away from the user's nostrils. In some embodiments, the shape and size of the housing 902 is configured to conform to the shape and size of the second portion 308 of the facial adaptor 102 (now shown in FIGS. 9 a-e) and can have a substantially triangular shape, as illustrated in FIGS. 9 b and 9 c. As can be understood by one skilled in the art, the element 104 can have any other desired shape and size.
  • The nostril tubes 906 are configured to protrude away from the interior surface 912. The tubes 906 are configured to be inserted into the openings or pilot holes 342 created in the nostril pads 312 (not shown in FIGS. 9 a-e). Upon insertion of the nostril tubes 906, the tubes 906 are configured to push the elastomeric material of the nostril pads 312 away from the outer surface of the tubes 906 and toward the interior surfaces of the user's nostrils. By pushing the elastomeric material in such manner, the tubes 906 along with the nostril pads 312 are configured to create an air-tight seal in the nostrils, so that the only air/gas that is able to travel into the user's nose would go through the tubes 906 of element 104 and no air/gas can leak between the nostrils and the nostril pads 312.
  • The connector tube 904 is configured to protrude away from the exterior surface 914 of the housing 902. The tube 904 is configured to connect to the airway tube 106 not shown in FIGS, 9 a-c, but is shown in FIG. 1). To allow such connection, the tube 904 includes a swivel adaptor 922. The swivel adaptor 922 allows the airway tube 106 to rotate in any desired direction, as indicated by directional arrows A and B. Such rotation provides flexibility to the user, for example, when the user is rolling around in bed, walking around, or any performing any other activities.
  • The housing 902 and the tubes 906 and 904 are further configured to contain interior connector tubing 910 and 916 that connects tubes 906 and 904. Such interior connector tubing 910 and 916 provides airways from the user's nostrils through the tips 908, into the tubes 906, through the housing 902, into the tube 904, and then into the airway tube 106 (not shown in FIGS. 9 a-c). When the nasal interface apparatus 100 is fully connected, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the air/gas can travel to/from user's nostrils and into the airway tube 106. Alternatively, the housing 902 can be substantially hollow, providing an internal connection between the tubes 906 and 904. In some embodiments, the airway tube 106 can connected to a CPAP machine, as disclosed in co-owned/co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/405,948, filed on Apr. 17, 2006, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/787,854, filed on Apr. 17, 2007, and International Patent Application No, PCT/US2007/009454, filed on Apr. 17, 2007, the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entireties.
  • Referring to FIGS. 9 a-c, once the user has attached the facial adaptor 102 to his/her nose, the element 104 is inserted, using its tubes 906, through the openings 342 (not shown in FIGS. 9 a-c). FIGS. 10-11 illustrate such element 104 being coupled to the facial adaptor 102. The airway tube 106 can then be coupled to the swivel adaptor 922, as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2. As can be understood by one skilled in the art, this assembly can be disconnected at will. In some embodiments, the element 104 can he manufactured from a light, semi-rigid Teflon material. As can be understood by one skilled in the art, the element 104 can be manufactured from any polyester, polyethylene, or any other polymer materials. The element 104 can be reusable or disposable. The swivel adaptor 922 can be any conventional swivel mechanism that allows rotation of the airway tube 106 once it is connected to the swivel adaptor 922.
  • In some embodiments, the thickness of the housing 902 can be on the order of 6-10 mm. Further, the length of the tubes 906 and 908 can be on the order of between approximately 4 mm to approximately 7 mm.
  • In some embodiments, each nostril pad 312 can be separately inserted into each respective nostril of the user, where nostril pads 312 are not attached to any external supporting devices, such as adaptor 102. In some embodiments, the nostril pads 312 can be configured to be coupled to a friction damp or any other fixation device, which can be similar to the pads 306 being coupled to the first portion 304, that is configured to further secure the nostril pads 312 to the nose of the user. Additionally, in some embodiments, each one of the nostril prongs 906 can be configured to be separately inserted through the pilot holes 342 of the nostril pads without being coupled to the housing 902, i.e., each prong 906 can be coupled to a tube, which is further connected to an airway device. The prongs 906 are configured to create a locking arrangement inside the user's nostrils once the prongs 906 are inserted through the pilot holes 342.
  • In some embodiments, the present invention can he used in connection with a system for controlling breathing of a patient. The exemplary system includes the facial adaptor discussed above coupled to an airway device for supplying air/gas to the patient via an airway tube. Such system can be employed anywhere, including user's home, hospital, clinic, or any other facility. The system and/or the nasal interface device can he operated by the user himself/herself or a medical professional (e.g., doctor, nurse, etc).
  • Example embodiments of the methods, circuits, and components of the present invention have been described herein. As noted elsewhere, these example embodiments have been described for illustrative purposes only, and are not limiting. Other embodiments are possible and are covered by the invention. Such embodiments will be apparent to persons skilled in the relevant art(s) based on the teachings contained herein. Thus, the breadth and scope of the present invention should not be limited by any of the above-described exemplary embodiments, but should be defined only in accordance with the following claims and their equivalents.

Claims (15)

1. A method of using a nasal interface device for supplying air/gas to a user, comprising:
securing a facial adaptor to the nose of the user, wherein the facial adaptor includes a nostril pad configured to be inserted into a nostril of the nose of the user, said nostril pad is configured to substantially conform to an interior geometry of the nostril upon insertion of the pad into the nostril and includes an open channel protruding through the nostril pad;
wherein a nostril tube is configured to be placed through said open channel in order to supply air/gas to the user.
2. The method according to claim 1, further comprising:
inserting a piercing/swivel adaptor into the nostrils of the user through the nostril pads of the facial adaptor; and
coupling an airway tube to the piercing/swivel adaptor, wherein the airway tube is configured to supply air/gas to the user.
3. The method according to claim 2, further comprising:
attaching the facial adaptor to the nose of the user using a friction clamp, wherein the friction clamp is configured to be coupled to at least one or both of a bridge of the nose and/or one or both sides of the nose.
4. The method according to claim 3, wherein the facial adaptor comprises:
a first portion configured to be secured to the bridge of the user's nose;
a second portion coupled to the first portion via a bendable connection and configured to cover the nostrils of the user's nose; and
a third portion coupled to the second portion via another bendable connection and configured to be secured by friction on the sides of the user's nose, the second portion is configured to be coupled to said nostril pad.
5. The method according to claim 2, wherein the piercing/swivel adaptor includes:
a housing having an interior surface and an exterior surface, the nostril tube configured to protrude away from the interior surface of the housing;
a connector tube configured to protrude away from the exterior surface of the housing, the nostril tube is configured to be located on an opposite side of the housing as the connector tube;
the connector tube further includes a swivel element configured to allow connection of the airway tube;
the nostril tube and the connector tubes are configured to be connected to each other via an airway passage disposed inside the housing of the piercing/swivel adaptor.
6. The method according to claim 5, further comprising:
inserting the nostril tube into the open channel of the nostril pad.
7. The method according to claim 6, wherein upon insertion of the nostril tubes into the open channels, the piercing/swivel adaptor is configured to create an airway passage between the nose of the user and the airway tube when the airway tube is coupled to the swivel element of the piercing/swivel adaptor.
8. The method according to claim 7, wherein the swivel element allows rotation of the airway tube when the airway tube is coupled to the swivel element.
9. The method according to claim 4, wherein the facial adaptor is manufactured from any biocompatible elastomeric material having a Shore A hardness rating in range of approximately Shore A 00 to approximately Shore A 60.
10. The method according to claim 1, wherein the nostril pads are manufactured from an elastomeric material.
11. The method according to claim 3, wherein the facial adaptor further comprises two nostril pads, wherein each nostril pad includes a respective open channel.
12. The method according to claim 11, wherein the piercing/swivel adaptor further comprises two nostril tubes configured to be inserted into each respective open channel in the nostril pads.
13. A nasal interface device, comprising:
a facial adaptor configured to be secured to the nose of a user and having two nostril pads configured to be inserted into nostrils of the user;
a piercing/swivel adaptor configured to interact with said facial adaptor through said two nostril pads;
wherein said piercing/swivel adaptor is further configured to be coupled to an airway tube, said airway tube is configured to supply air/gas to the user.
14. A method of using a nasal interface device, comprising:
securing a facial adaptor to the nose of the user, wherein the facial adaptor includes nostril pads configured to be inserted into nostrils of the user;
inserting a piercing/swivel adaptor into the nostrils of the user through the nostril pads of the facial adaptor; and
coupling an airway tube to the piercing/swivel adaptor, wherein the airway tube is configured to supply air/gas to the user.
15. A system for controlling breathing of a patient, comprising:
a nasal interface device, having
a facial adaptor configured to be secured to the nose of a user and having two nostril pads configured to be inserted into nostrils of the user;
a piercing/swivel adaptor configured to interact with said facial adaptor through said two nostril pads;
wherein said piercing/swivel adaptor is further configured to be coupled to an airway tube, said airway tube is configured to supply air/gas to the user.
US13/742,520 2006-04-17 2013-01-16 Nasal interface device Abandoned US20130125895A1 (en)

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US11/405,948 US7900626B2 (en) 2006-04-17 2006-04-17 Method and system for controlling breathing
US11/787,854 US8074646B2 (en) 2006-04-17 2007-04-17 Method and system for controlling breathing
US7030308P true 2008-03-21 2008-03-21
US12/383,316 US8381732B2 (en) 2008-03-21 2009-03-23 Nasal interface device
US13/742,520 US20130125895A1 (en) 2006-04-17 2013-01-16 Nasal interface device

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US11/787,854 Active 2029-05-17 US8074646B2 (en) 2006-04-17 2007-04-17 Method and system for controlling breathing
US13/041,783 Active - Reinstated 2026-09-14 US8485181B2 (en) 2006-04-17 2011-03-07 Method and system for controlling breathing
US13/742,520 Abandoned US20130125895A1 (en) 2006-04-17 2013-01-16 Nasal interface device
US13/933,255 Active 2027-08-05 US9884159B2 (en) 2006-04-17 2013-07-02 Method and system for controlling breathing
US14/013,774 Active 2027-01-02 US9878114B2 (en) 2006-04-17 2013-08-29 Method and system for controlling breathing

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US11/787,854 Active 2029-05-17 US8074646B2 (en) 2006-04-17 2007-04-17 Method and system for controlling breathing
US13/041,783 Active - Reinstated 2026-09-14 US8485181B2 (en) 2006-04-17 2011-03-07 Method and system for controlling breathing

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US14/013,774 Active 2027-01-02 US9878114B2 (en) 2006-04-17 2013-08-29 Method and system for controlling breathing

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