US20130012367A1 - Ergonomically shaped kettlebell - Google Patents

Ergonomically shaped kettlebell Download PDF

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Publication number
US20130012367A1
US20130012367A1 US13/531,482 US201213531482A US2013012367A1 US 20130012367 A1 US20130012367 A1 US 20130012367A1 US 201213531482 A US201213531482 A US 201213531482A US 2013012367 A1 US2013012367 A1 US 2013012367A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
kettlebell
handle
user
cutouts
wrist
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13/531,482
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Ryan Williams
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Ryan Williams
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Publication date
Priority to US201161505823P priority Critical
Application filed by Ryan Williams filed Critical Ryan Williams
Priority to US13/531,482 priority patent/US20130012367A1/en
Publication of US20130012367A1 publication Critical patent/US20130012367A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B21/00Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices
    • A63B21/06User-manipulated weights
    • A63B21/072Dumb-bells, bar-bells or the like, e.g. weight discs having an integral peripheral handle
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B23/00Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body
    • A63B23/035Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously
    • A63B23/03516For both arms together or both legs together; Aspects related to the co-ordination between right and left side limbs of a user
    • A63B23/03525Supports for both feet or both hands performing simultaneously the same movement, e.g. single pedal or single handle

Abstract

The present invention relates to an ergonomically shaped kettlebell apparatus that saves the user's hands and wrists from common injuries that occur during kettlebell workouts. The kettlebell includes one or more handle cutouts and an angled backside. The handle cutouts are shaped to reduce the heavy friction that kettlebells apply to the user's hands, especially the outside of the pinky fingers during a two handed kettlebell swing, which typically causes friction hotspots. The angled backside shaves down between approximately a quarter of an inch to two inches off the back half of the kettlebell, such that it is shaped to reduce the stress and impact placed on the back of the user's wrist and forearm during a kettlebell flipping motion such as a one handed kettlebell snatch or when the kettlebell is held in an upright position, which typically causes wrist and forearm injuries.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) to U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/505,823, filed Jul. 8, 2011, and entitled “Ergonomic cutouts or indentations in the handle of a kettlebell,” the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of Invention
  • The present invention relates generally to kettlebells and specifically to kettlebells having an ergonomically shaped handle and bell portion.
  • 2. Description of Related Art
  • FIGS. 1-4 illustrate conventional prior art kettlebells. As illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, a kettlebell is a dumbbell-like weight looking somewhat like a cannonball with a handle. Kettlebells are believed to have originated in Russia, where the first recorded mention of a kettlebell occurred in a Russian dictionary around the early 1700s. Historically, kettlebells were manufactured from cast iron. Today, some conventional kettlebells feature adjustable weights or are rubber coated to improve safety. There are sizes that range from about 5 to 175 pounds, where the traditional Russian kettlebell weighs about 35 pounds.
  • Unlike traditional dumbbells, a kettlebell's center of mass is extended beyond the handle. This allows for swinging movements not possible with dumbbells. Swinging movements utilize more muscle groups than dumbbell lifts. As such, a kettlebell workout is said to be more effective and to yield better results in less time. Also, more micro muscles and core muscles are developed during kettlebell swings compared to traditional dumbbell workouts. Further, the existence of a handle allows for release moves, which are not available with dumbbells.
  • Kettlebells are great workout tools, but they can be dangerous, especially since the movements are very dynamic and involve swinging motions unlike dumbbell exercises. A common problem with kettlebells is wrist injuries. The user can bang up his hands, wrists, and forearms, during a one handed kettlebell snatch, a two handed kettlebell swing, clean and press, and other exercises.
  • In the one handed kettlebell snatch, the kettlebell is raised vertically and flipped over the handle as it is lifted, making sharp contact with the user's wrist and/or forearm leading to injury, especially with heavier weight. In the two handed kettlebell swing, the kettlebell is raised and lowered vertically in front of the user, creating friction between the kettlebell handle and the user's hands and wrists which lead to friction hotspots, blisters, skin tears, and injuries.
  • Some users have taken precautionary steps to reduce these injuries. For example, the users may use tape, gloves, chalk, less weight, or a longer warm-up. However, these precautions are often inconvenient and therefore not taken. Other users deal with the problems after the injuries occur, including using lotions, callus filers, callus shavers, emery boards, and pumice stones.
  • The traditional kettlebell body illustrated in FIG. 2 is too curved, such that the kettlebell makes contact with the user's wrist and forearm when flipped during the one handed kettlebell swing or when held in a vertical position. FIG. 3 illustrates a conventional flat spot on kettlebells used to label the weight. The kettlebells in FIG. 3 would be worse on the user's wrist than the traditional kettlebell in FIG. 2, because of the edge 330 would make sharper contact with the user's wrist and/or hand. FIG. 4 illustrates another hypothetical design, but has an even sharper edge 430 than the kettlebells in FIGS. 1-3 and is even worse for the user's wrist and hand.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 7,883,452 to Chen is directed to a kettlebell having pivotal handle. The kettlebell includes a kettle member having a pivotal coupling member, and a handle having another pivotal coupling member pivotally engaged with the pivotal coupling member of the kettle member, and the kettle member and the handle include guide members engaged with each other for limiting and guiding the kettle member to rotate relative to the handle along a longitudinal axis of the handle and for preventing the kettle member from pivoting and rotating relative to the handle along the lateral axis of the handle, and for preventing the user from being twisted or hit or hammered or hurt by the kettle member of the kettlebell inadvertently. However, Chen and other conventional kettlebells do not disclose an ergonomically shaped kettlebell with handle cutouts to reduce friction hotspots, blisters, skin tears, and injuries or an angled backside to reduce stress and impact related injuries.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to ergonomic cutouts or indentations in the handle and an angled backside in the bell portion of a kettlebell. When a user exercises using kettlebells, the user develops friction hotspots from his hands rubbing in contact with the metal handles of conventional kettlebells. The user subsequently develops blisters and skin tears after repeated use. The user also develops impact injuries to the back of the wrist and forearm when the kettlebell is flipped. The kettlebell of the present invention has an ergonomically correct handle and bell portion, namely cutouts or indentations in the metal handle and an angled backside of the bell portion, to allow for freedom of movement of the user's hands, thus reducing friction hotspots and wrist injuries.
  • As an example, the user can do a two handed kettlebell swing. This is accomplished by the user initially holding the kettlebell in front of him below his hips and gripping the handle with both hands. Then, the user swings the kettlebell from below his hips to above his hips and then back below his hips. If the user continues this motion, the user will eventually feel friction hotspots on his hands after repeated use where his hands are rubbing against the metal. This is especially common if the user is exercising with a relatively heavy kettlebell. In one embodiment of the present invention, the metal is removed or shaved down from key areas of the handle, thus reducing hotspots and friction on the hands during use, allowing the user to continue the exercise for longer with less risk of injury, blisters or skin tears.
  • As another example, the user can do a one handed kettlebell snatch. This is accomplished by the user initially holding the kettlebell in front of him below his hips and gripping the handle with one hand. Then, the user swings the kettlebell from below his hips to above his head and flips the kettlebell over the user's hand. If the user continues this motion, the user will eventually feel discomfort on his hand, wrist, or forearm where the kettlebell makes contact. In one embodiment of the invention, the backside of the kettlebell bell portion is removed or shaved down to prevent the stress and impact on the back of the user's forearms.
  • In one embodiment, an apparatus comprises: a kettlebell handle comprising an inside and an outside; and a plurality of handle cutouts on the inside of the kettlebell handle, wherein the plurality of handle cutouts are configured to conform to the outside of the pinky fingers of the user. The apparatus may further comprise a kettlebell bell portion attached to the kettlebell handle, the kettlebell bell portion comprising an angled backside, the angled backside configured to conform to a forearm of the user holding the kettlebell handle in an upright position. The kettlebell handle may consist or comprise two or three handle cutouts. The kettlebell may consist of a single angled backside.
  • In another embodiment of the invention, a kettlebell comprises: a handle comprising an inside and an outside; and a handle cutout on the inside of the handle, wherein the handle cutouts is configured to conform to the outside of the pinky fingers of the user. The apparatus may further comprise a bell portion attached to the handle, the bell portion comprising an angled backside, the angled backside configured to conform to a forearm of the user holding the handle in an upright position. The handle may consist or comprise of two or three handle cutouts. The apparatus may consist of a single angled backside.
  • An advantage of the present invention is that the kettlebell reduces skin tears. The handle cutout is designed to reduce friction as the kettlebell is swung, reducing skin tears, blisters, and friction hotspots. Another advantage of the invention is that the kettlebell reduces wrist or forearm injuries. The kettlebell's angled backside is design to reduce the stress and impact of the kettlebell into the hand, wrist, and forearm and also the unnatural angle that the user's wrist has to bend while performing an over the head or hand swinging or flipping motion.
  • The foregoing, and other features and advantages of the invention, will be apparent from the following, more particular description of the preferred embodiments of the invention, the accompanying drawings, and the claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIGS. 1-4 illustrate conventional prior art kettlebells.
  • FIGS. 5-6 illustrate handle cutouts of the ergonomically shaped kettlebell apparatus according to embodiments of the invention.
  • FIGS. 7-8 illustrate an angled backside of the ergonomically shaped kettlebell apparatus according to embodiments of the invention.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a flow chart showing a user using the ergonomically shaped kettlebell apparatus according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • Before the present composition, methods, and methodologies are described, it is to be understood that this invention is not limited to particular compositions, methods, and experimental conditions described, as such compositions, methods, and conditions may vary. It is also to be understood that the terminology used herein is for purposes of describing particular embodiments only, and is not intended to be limiting, since the scope of the present invention will be limited only in the appended claims.
  • As used in this specification and the appended claims, the singular forms “a”, “an”, and “the” include plural references unless the context clearly dictates otherwise. Unless defined otherwise, all technical and scientific terms used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which this invention belongs. Any methods and materials similar or equivalent to those described herein can be used in the practice or testing of the invention, as it will be understood that modifications and variations are encompassed within the spirit and scope of the instant disclosure.
  • The present invention relates to an ergonomically shaped kettlebell apparatus that saves the user's hands and wrists from common injuries that occur during kettlebell workouts. The kettlebell includes one or more handle cutouts and an angled backside. The handle cutouts are shaped to reduce the heavy friction that kettlebells apply to the user's hands, especially the outside of the pinky fingers, which typically causes friction hotspots. In one embodiment, the angled backside shaves down between approximately a quarter of an inch to two inches off the back half of the kettlebell, such that it is shaped to reduce the stress and impact placed on the back of the user's wrist and forearm during a kettlebell flipping motion or when held in an upright position, which typically causes wrist and forearm injuries. Although the invention is sometimes illustrated and described in the context of a certain number of cutouts, one of ordinary skill in the art can apply these concepts to another number of cutouts (e.g., 1, 2, 3, etc.).
  • FIGS. 5-6 illustrate handle cutouts 515 of the ergonomically shaped kettlebell apparatus 500 according to embodiments of the invention. The kettlebell 500 includes a handle 510, a plurality of handle cutouts 515, a bell portion 520, an angled backside 525, a user conforming contour 530. The kettlebell 100 is ergonomically shaped to reduce common wrist and skin tear injuries for a user seeking a kettlebell workout.
  • The handle 510 (e.g., kettlebell handle) rises up from the bell portion 520 of the kettlebell 500 in an upside down u-shape as do all conventional kettlebell handles. The handle 510 allows the user to lift, swing, and rotate the kettlebell 100. The handle 510 includes an inside portion and an outside portion. The inside portion includes a plurality of handle cutouts 515. The outside portion can include handle cutouts or can be conventionally shaped.
  • The handle cutouts 515 (e.g., a hand saver, indentations, grooves, etc.) are ergonomically shaped to reduce friction and injuries while lifting, swinging, and rotating the kettlebell 500. The cutouts and indentations 515 are designed into the handle 110 to conform to human hands and alleviate friction hotspots during use. The cutouts and indentations 515 on the kettlebell handle 510 are designed around the user's hand. In a preferred embodiment, the cutouts 515 reduce the friction on the outside of the user's pinky fingers.
  • The bell portion 520 (e.g., kettlebell body, kettlebell bell portion, etc.) contains a majority of the kettlebell's weight. Unlike the conventional bell portion, which is typically shaped like a circle or oval which sometimes include a small flat portion to label the weight and provides no wrist protection, the bell portion 520 can have the angled backside 525 for reducing wrist or forearm injuries.
  • The angled backside 525 and the user conforming contour 530 is a less sharp circular angle than traditional kettlebells and contains no sharp edges to conform to the user's wrist and forearm or not make contact with the user's wrist and forearm. The angled backside 525 and the user conforming contour 530 are discussed further with respect to FIGS. 7-8.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates the user grabbing the kettlebell handle with two hands for a kettlebell swing. The kettlebell swing is a common exercise where the user swings the kettlebell down between his open legs and up to his head. In this motion, the handle cutouts 515 provide room for the user's hands to naturally grip and move about the handle 510 of the kettlebell 500 during exercise, thus reducing friction hotspots and subsequent blisters or skin tears. The ergonomically correct cutouts or indentations 515 on the handle 510 conform to the shape of human hands, unlike conventional kettlebell handles which have a continuous round shaped handle giving no consideration to the unique shape of human hands, thus causing friction blisters and possible skin tears through repeated use. The handle cutouts 515 reduce friction points, thus resulting in a more comfortable user experience and less injuries to the user. The handle cutouts 515 can be referred to as a hand saver, because they are shaped to save the user's hands (e.g., palm, outside of the user's hands, pinkies, and wrists) from friction hotspots, blisters, and skin tears that result from kettlebell workouts.
  • The handle cutouts 515 are grooves or indentations cut into the handles to follow the natural lines of the user's hand or hands that grip the kettlebell during a workout. The handle cutouts 515 can be anywhere on the handles and will vary per weight of the kettlebell, but primarily they are the inside sides of the handles. In a preferred embodiment, the handle cutouts are configured to conform to the fingers (e.g., pinky fingers) of the user. The inside of the handles will have the most pronounced indentations or cutouts. The handle cutouts 515 are shaped as if the user grinded the inside of the metal handle down with a file to the shape of his hands.
  • In one embodiment, the depth of the handle cutouts or indentations 915-1215 is between 1/50th of an inch and 1.5 inches. In a preferred embodiment, there are at least two indentations, one per side, located on the inside of the handles, which are necessary to reduce friction during use.
  • FIGS. 7-8 illustrate an angled backside of the ergonomically shaped kettlebell apparatus 500 according to embodiments of the invention. The angled backside 525 (e.g., a wrist saver, bell portion cutout, body indentation, etc.) is an ergonomic shape to reduce injuries to the back of the hand, wrist, and forearm while flipping the kettlebell 100 over the user's head or arm. The angled backside 525 is shaped to reduce the stress placed on the back of the user's wrist. The angled backside 525 can be referred to as a wrist saver, because it saves the users from the common wrist injuries that occur during kettlebell workouts.
  • The user conforming contour 530 can have different degrees and sizes of indentations while continuing to conform or not provide contact with the user's wrist and forearm. In a preferred embodiment, the user conforming contour 530 is angled on the back of the kettlebell 500 to match a user's forearm. This disperses the load across a wider area than a conventional perfectly round kettlebell or a kettlebell with an edge. The user conforming contour 530 is illustrated as a convex angle because of the smooth slope lacks edges on outside of the kettlebell 500. In one embodiment, the user conforming contour 530 on the upper side of the back of the kettlebell 500 is hand sanded down between approximately a quarter of an inch to two inches from a conventional kettlebell.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a flow chart showing the user using the ergonomically shaped kettlebell apparatus 500 according to one embodiment of the invention. The process starts at step 900. At step 910, the user grips the handle cutouts 515 of the handle 510 with two hands for a two handed kettlebell swing. Next, at step 920, the user swings the kettlebell 100 down between his legs and then up vertically. During this common kettlebell exercise, the handle cutouts 515 can save the user's palms, pinkies, wrists, and parts of the hand opposite the thumb from friction hotspots, blisters, and skin tears. At step 930, the user grips the handle 510 with one hand for a one arm kettlebell snatch. At step 940, the user swings and flips the kettlebell 100 above his head. During this common kettlebell exercise, the angled backside 525 saves the user's wrists, hands, and forearms from stress and impact related injuries. The process ends at step 950.
  • It should be understood that the invention is not limited to the embodiments set forth herein for purposes of exemplification, but is to be defined only by a fair reading of the appended claims, including the full range of equivalency to which each element thereof is entitled. Although the invention has been described with reference to the above examples, it will be understood that modifications and variations are encompassed within the spirit and scope of the invention. Accordingly, the invention is limited only by the following claims.

Claims (12)

1. An apparatus comprising:
a kettlebell handle comprising an inside and an outside; and
a plurality of handle cutouts on the inside of the kettlebell handle, wherein the plurality of handle cutouts are configured to conform to the outside of the pinky fingers of the user.
2. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a kettlebell bell portion attached to the kettlebell handle, the kettlebell bell portion comprising an angled backside, the angled backside configured to conform to a forearm of the user holding the kettlebell handle in an upright position.
3. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the kettlebell handle consists of two handle cutouts.
4. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the kettlebell handle consists of three handle cutouts.
5. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the kettlebell handle comprises three handle cutouts.
6. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the kettlebell consists of a single angled backside.
7. A kettlebell comprising:
a handle comprising an inside and an outside; and
a handle cutout on the inside of the handle, wherein the handle cutouts is configured to conform to the outside of the pinky fingers of the user.
8. The kettlebell of claim 7, further comprising a bell portion attached to the handle, the bell portion comprising an angled backside, the angled backside configured to conform to a forearm of the user holding the handle in an upright position.
9. The kettlebell of claim 7, wherein the handle consists of two handle cutouts.
10. The kettlebell of claim 7, wherein the handle consists of three handle cutouts.
11. The kettlebell of claim 7, wherein the handle comprises three handle cutouts.
12. The kettlebell of claim 7, wherein the apparatus consists of a single angled backside.
US13/531,482 2011-07-08 2012-06-22 Ergonomically shaped kettlebell Abandoned US20130012367A1 (en)

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Cited By (14)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20140024507A1 (en) * 2012-07-18 2014-01-23 Mehari Hagos Exercise apparatus and method
US20140287891A1 (en) * 2013-03-22 2014-09-25 Mitch Marich Exercise device
US20160129305A1 (en) * 2013-06-05 2016-05-12 Rustam Maratovich Sadvakassov Impact plyometric expander (variants)
USD799975S1 (en) * 2015-04-06 2017-10-17 Arash Anvaripour Container for powdered or granulated products
USD811019S1 (en) * 2016-01-15 2018-02-20 David Alton Toy for animals
USD832942S1 (en) 2017-12-04 2018-11-06 Brunswick Corporation Exercise kettlebell
US10179259B1 (en) 2016-05-24 2019-01-15 Zachary Zagata Exercise weight and set of exercise weights
USD842399S1 (en) 2017-11-30 2019-03-05 Brunswick Corporation Exercise weight plate
USD842941S1 (en) 2017-12-18 2019-03-12 Brunswick Corporation Exercise weight plate
USD844077S1 (en) 2017-12-04 2019-03-26 Brunswick Corporation Exercise dumbbell
USD861085S1 (en) 2018-01-04 2019-09-24 Life Fitness, Llc Dumbbell
USD888846S1 (en) * 2015-09-02 2020-06-30 Kompan A/S Exercise apparatus
US11052281B2 (en) * 2018-06-29 2021-07-06 Abran Saldate Multi-purpose exercise device
USD932571S1 (en) * 2020-01-07 2021-10-05 Liven Sports Mfg. (Xiamen) Co., Ltd. Kettlebell

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US20140024507A1 (en) * 2012-07-18 2014-01-23 Mehari Hagos Exercise apparatus and method
US20140287891A1 (en) * 2013-03-22 2014-09-25 Mitch Marich Exercise device
US9597542B2 (en) * 2013-03-22 2017-03-21 Kettleball, LLC Exercise device
US20160129305A1 (en) * 2013-06-05 2016-05-12 Rustam Maratovich Sadvakassov Impact plyometric expander (variants)
US10130839B2 (en) * 2013-06-05 2018-11-20 Rustam Maratovich Sadvakassov Impact plyometric expander (variants)
USD799975S1 (en) * 2015-04-06 2017-10-17 Arash Anvaripour Container for powdered or granulated products
USD888846S1 (en) * 2015-09-02 2020-06-30 Kompan A/S Exercise apparatus
USD811019S1 (en) * 2016-01-15 2018-02-20 David Alton Toy for animals
US10179259B1 (en) 2016-05-24 2019-01-15 Zachary Zagata Exercise weight and set of exercise weights
USD842399S1 (en) 2017-11-30 2019-03-05 Brunswick Corporation Exercise weight plate
USD832942S1 (en) 2017-12-04 2018-11-06 Brunswick Corporation Exercise kettlebell
USD844077S1 (en) 2017-12-04 2019-03-26 Brunswick Corporation Exercise dumbbell
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USD861085S1 (en) 2018-01-04 2019-09-24 Life Fitness, Llc Dumbbell
USD881295S1 (en) 2018-01-04 2020-04-14 Life Fitness, Llc Dumbbell
US11052281B2 (en) * 2018-06-29 2021-07-06 Abran Saldate Multi-purpose exercise device
USD932571S1 (en) * 2020-01-07 2021-10-05 Liven Sports Mfg. (Xiamen) Co., Ltd. Kettlebell

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