US20120324760A1 - Footwear with heel based arcuate panel-shaped impact absorbing resilient concealed tongue - Google Patents

Footwear with heel based arcuate panel-shaped impact absorbing resilient concealed tongue Download PDF

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US20120324760A1
US20120324760A1 US13/385,234 US201213385234A US2012324760A1 US 20120324760 A1 US20120324760 A1 US 20120324760A1 US 201213385234 A US201213385234 A US 201213385234A US 2012324760 A1 US2012324760 A1 US 2012324760A1
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tongue
portion
footwear
sole
upper
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Abandoned
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US13/385,234
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Adam A. Ochoa
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Ochoa Adam A
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Application filed by Ochoa Adam A filed Critical Ochoa Adam A
Priority to US13/385,234 priority patent/US20120324760A1/en
Publication of US20120324760A1 publication Critical patent/US20120324760A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/18Resilient soles
    • A43B13/181Resiliency achieved by the structure of the sole
    • A43B13/183Leaf springs

Abstract

Footwear includes an arcuate, resilient, panel-shaped tongue concealed in the heel to absorb impact forces and facilitate the natural rolling contact of an individuals foot when the individual is walking or running.

Description

  • This application claims priority based on provisional patent application Ser. No. 61/517,942, filed Apr. 27, 2011.
  • This invention relates to footwear.
  • While an individual walks or runs, impact forces are generated when the individual's feet contact the ground. The individual's feet, ankle, knee, and hip joints function to absorb and distribute these impact forces. Designing comfortable footwear which facilitates the absorption and distribution of such impact forces has for many decades been an objective of those skilled in the art. Accordingly, continuing to design and produce improved footwear is highly desirable.
  • Therefore, it is an object of the instant invention to provide improved footwear.
  • This and other, further and more specific objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description thereof, taken in conjunction with the drawings, in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a side elevation partial section view illustrating footwear provided with one embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a partial side elevation section view of the sole of footwear illustrating another embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 3 is a partial side elevation section view of the sole of footwear illustrating a further embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 4 is a partial bottom view of the embodiment of the invention of FIG. 1 illustrating additional construction details thereof;
  • FIG. 5 is a partial bottom view of the embodiment of the invention of FIG. 2 illustrating additional construction details thereof;
  • FIG. 6 is a partial bottom view of the embodiment of the invention of FIG. 3 illustrating additional construction details thereof;
  • FIG. 7 is a partial side elevation section view of the sole of footwear illustrating still another embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 8 is a partial side elevation section view of the sole of footwear illustrating still a further embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 9 is a partial side elevation section view of the sole of footwear illustrating yet still another embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 10 is a partial bottom view illustrating yet still a further embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 11 is a partial front view of the ankle portion of footwear illustrating an ankle support system constructed in accordance with an embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 12 is a partial front view of the ankle support system of FIG. 11 illustrating the mode of operation thereof;
  • FIG. 13 is a side view of the ankle support system of FIG. 12;
  • FIG. 14 is a partial front view of the ankle portion of footwear illustrating another ankle support system constructed in accordance with another embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 15 is a partial front view of the ankle support system of FIG. 14 illustrating the mode of operation thereof;
  • FIG. 16 is a side view of the ankle support system of FIG. 15;
  • FIG. 17 is partial side section view of footwear illustrating another embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 18 is a section view of a portion of the footwear of FIG. 4 illustrating an alternate embodiment of the invention; and,
  • FIG. 19 is partial side elevation section view of the sole of footwear illustrating yet still a further embodiment of the invention
  • Briefly, in accordance with the invention, I provide improved footwear. The footwear comprises a sole including an upper portion and a lower portion. The upper and lower portions bound a space extending therebetween and have at least two operative positions, a first operative position with the upper portion spaced a first selected distance apart from the lower portion; and, a second operative position with at least one of the upper and lower portions displaced toward the other when a compressive force is applied to the sole such that the upper and lower portions are spaced a second selected distance apart less than the first selected distance. The footwear also includes an outer covering attached to and extending upwardly from the upper portion of the sole and shaped and dimensioned to extend over at least a portion of a human foot; and, includes a elastic panel-shaped tongue extending intermediate the upper and lower portions and resiliently deflectable when the compressive force is applied to the sole to generate a force opposing the compressive force.
  • Turning now to the drawings which illustrate the invention by way of example and not by way of limitation of the scope of the invention, and in which like reference characters refer to corresponding elements throughout the several views, FIG. 1 illustrates footwear generally indicated by reference character 10. The footwear 10 includes a sole 12 having an upper portion 13, a lower portion 14, and a space 15 extending therebetween. Portions 13 and 14 typically, but not necessarily, are deformable. The sole 12 has at least two operative positions, a first operative position illustrated in FIG. 1 with the upper portion spaced a first selected distance apart from the lower portion; and, a second operative position with at least one of the upper and lower portions 13, 14 displaced toward the other when a compressive force B is applied to the sole such that the upper and lower portions are spaced a second selected distance apart which is less than the first selected distance. The footwear 10 also includes an outer covering 11 attached to and extending upwardly from the upper portion of the sole 12 and shaped and dimensioned to extend over at least a portion of a human foot. The footwear 10 also includes an elastic panel-shaped tongue 18 which extends intermediate the upper and lower portions 13, 14 and is resiliently deflectable to generate a force opposing the compressive force B when the compressive force B is applied to the sole 12.
  • In FIG. 1, the heel portion of footwear 10 is indicated by arrow A and generally comprises the portion of footwear 10 to the left of indicia line 16. Tongue 18 is located in the heel portion of footwear 10.
  • In FIG. 1, resilient arcuate panel-shaped tongue 18 is integrally formed with and extends outwardly from base 17. Base 17 rests against, and if desired can be fixedly attached to, the inner surface 13A of deformable upper portion 13.
  • When a compressive force B is applied to upper portion 13 to deflect upper portion 13 from its first normal operative position toward lower portion 14, tongue 18 resiliently deflects in the direction of arrow C toward upper portion 13. When tongue 18 is resiliently deflected by force B toward upper portion 13, tongue 18 rolls and/or slides over the inner surface 14A of bottom portion 14 and the point(s) at which tongue 18 contacts lower portion 14 move in the direction of arrow A (assuming base 17 remains in fixed position). When the compressive force B is released or removed, tongue 18 is likewise released and resiliently moves in a direction opposite that of arrow C and returns to the first operative position illustrated in FIG. 1. While tongue 18 is returning resiliently to its first operative position, the point(s) at which tongue 18 contacts lower portion 14 move in a direction opposite that of arrow A back to the position illustrated in FIG. 1. Arrows S in FIG. 1 indicate how the points at which tongue 18 contacts bottom portion 14 move laterally during the deflection and release of tongue 18.
  • When an individual wearing footwear on one of his feet is walking (or running), and the individual contacts the ground with bottom portion 14, the individual's weight produces compressive force B which displaces the upper portion 13 of sole 12 toward bottom portion 14 and toward the ground. When the individual subsequently lifts the foot off the ground, compressive force B is released, or removed, and tongue 18 resiliently returns to the position illustrated in FIG. 1.
  • Tongue 18 is (as are the tongues 22, 32, 31, 35, 36, and 37) preferably, but not necessarily, mounted and completely or partially concealed by and enclosed by sole 12 within space 15. Sole 12 currently preferably completely encloses tongue 18 and base 17. Further, in the embodiments of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, resilient tongues 18 and 21 are mounted and housed in the heel of footwear 10.
  • In FIG. 2, one end of arcuate resilient panel-shaped tongue 21 is fixedly secured to the inner surface 13A by fastener 20. When compressive force B is applied to upper portion 13, and consequently to tongue 21, tongue 21 is displaced upwardly in the direction of arrow D in FIG. 2. When tongue 21 is resiliently deflected by force B toward upper portion 13, tongue 21 rolls and/or slides over the inner surface 14A of bottom portion 14 and the point(s) at which tongue 21 contacts lower portion 14 move to the left in FIG. 2. When the compressive force B is released or removed, tongue 21 is likewise released and resiliently moves in a direction opposite that of arrow D and returns to the first operative position illustrated in FIG. 2. While tongue 21 is returning resiliently to its first operative position, the point(s) at which tongue 18 contacts lower portion 14 move over inner surface 14A toward the right in FIG. 2 back to the first operative position depicted FIG. 2. Arrows T in FIG. 2 indicate how the points at which tongue 21 contacts the inner surface 14A of bottom portion 14 move laterally during the deflection and release of resilient tongue 21. Tongue 21 is preferably, although not necessarily, partially or completely enclosed by and concealed in sole 12.
  • In the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG. 3, each end of resilient arcuate panel shaped tongue 22 is fixedly attached to a different cylindrically shaped member 23, 24 which slides over upper surface 14A during the deflection and release of tongue 22. When compressive force B is generated against deformable upper portion 13, and therefore against arcuate tongue 22, the intermediate section of tongue 22 is displaced in the direction of arrow G and members 23 and 24 slide outwardly over surface 14A in the directions E and F, respectively. When compressive force B is released (typically when an individual wearing the footwear lifts his foot off the ground), tongue 22 resiliently returns to the configuration illustrated in FIG. 3. While tongue 22 is resiliently returning to the configuration of FIG. 3, member 23 slides over surface 14A in a direction opposite that of arrow E and member 24 slides over surface 14A in a direction opposite that of arrow F.
  • FIG. 4 is a bottom view of arcuate tongue 18 and base 17. Tongue 18 is generally U-shaped and includes ends 25 and 26. The shape and dimension of tongue 18 can vary as desired.
  • FIG. 5 is a bottom view of arcuate tongue 21 and cylindrically shaped fastener 20. Tongue 21 is generally U-shaped and includes ends 27 and 28. The shape and dimension of tongue 21 can vary as desired; for example, as indicated by dashed line 21A, the space between fingers 27 and 28 can be eliminated so that tongue 21 is solid U-shaped panel member.
  • FIG. 6 is a bottom view of arcuate tongue 22 and cylindrically shaped members 23 and 24. Tongue 22 is, as can be seen, a solid panel member without perforations or openings formed therethrough.
  • In FIG. 7, one end of arcuate panel-shaped resilient tongue 31 is fixed secured to inner surface 13A by member 30. The other end of tongue 31 is attached to one end of arcuate panel-shaped resilient tongue 32. Tongue 32 bears against surface 13A. If desired, tongue 32 can initially be spaced a selected distance apart from surface 13A. Tongue 31 bears against surface 14A. When a compressive force B is applied to sole 12, portion 13 is displaced toward portion 14 (and/or vice-versa), in which case tongue 32 is resiliently deflected in the direction of arrow H and tongue 31 is resiliently deflected in the direction of arrow J. When tongues 32 and 31 are so deflected they roll and/or slide over surfaces 13A and 14A, respectively, in the manner described above with respect to tongues 18 and 21 when said tongues 18 and 21 are resiliently deflected in response to a compressive force. B.
  • The embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG. 8 includes a first arcuate resilient panel shaped tongue 35 and a second arcuate resilient panel shaped tongue 36. The proximate end of tongue 35 is fixedly secured to cylindrically shaped member 34. The proximate end of tongue 36 is also fixedly secured to cylindrically shaped member 34. Member 34 is not fixedly attached to upper portion 13, although member 34 can, if desired, be fixedly secured to upper portion 13. When a compressive force B is applied to deformable upper portion 13, member 34 is downwardly displaced in the direction of arrow B, and tongues 35 and 36 are resiliently deformed such that the distal ends of tongues 35 and 36 are upwardly displaced in the direction of arrows K and L, respectively. Further, when member 34 is downwardly displaced and tongues 35 and 36 are resiliently deformed, each tongue 35 and 36 slides and/or rolls over surface 14A in the manner previously discussed with respect to tongues 18 and 21. When compressive force B is released, tongues 35 and 36 resiliently return to the configuration illustrated in Fig. FIG. 8. In FIGS. 1 to 3 and 7 to 9, it is assumed that when compressive force B is applied, footwear 10 is on a floor or other surface which supports and generally prevents the downward displacement of bottom portion 14 of footwear 10.
  • The embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG. 9 includes a first arcuate resilient panel 37. The proximate end of panel 37 is fixedly secured to a first end of a second arcuate resilient panel 38. The second end of panel 38 is fixedly secured to member 39. Member 39 is fixedly secured in sole 12. When a compressive force B is applied to deformable portion 13, tongue 37 is resiliently downwardly depressed in the direction of arrow B, and tongue 38 is upwardly resiliently depressed in the direction of arrow M.
  • FIG. 10 illustrates an alternate configuration 22A of an arcuate resilient panel-shaped tongue 22. Panel shaped tongue 22A includes a peripheral band which circumscribes and encloses a space or opening 22C. Dashed line 22B illustrate still another alternate configuration of a tongue 22 in which arcuate resilient panel-shaped tongue 22B comprises only a relatively narrow panel shaped strip. Tongues 22A and 22B illustrate how the shape and dimension of a tongue 18, 21, 22, 31, 32, 34, 35, 37, 38 can vary as desired.
  • In the embodiments of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, a resilient, panel-shaped arcuate tongue 18, 21, 32, 35, 37 is, importantly, located in the heel of footwear 10 and functions to absorb the forces generated when an individual is walking or running and the heel of footwear 10 initially strikes the ground.
  • FIGS. 11 to 13 illustrate an ankle support 40 that is mounted externally on a deformable portion 11A of footwear 10. Portion 11A ordinarily is constructed from fabric, leather, or some other material which provides support which is still pliable and deformable. This typically is the case, for example, in “high topped” basketball shoes. Portion 11A provides support for an ankle of an individual wearing footwear 10. Support 40 includes members 42 and 44 affixed to the exterior of portion 11A. If desired, members 42 and 44 can, in whole or in part, be integrated in portion 11A, or can be mounted internally on portion 11A. When the individual's ankle supinates (moves outwardly so the inner sole and arch of the foot tend to lift off the ground) and moves in the direction of arrow N in FIG. 12, then portion 11A deforms in the manner illustrated in FIG. 12 and the canted surface 43 of member 42 contacts stop surface 45 of member 44 to help prevent further deformation of portion 11A in the direction of arrow N. This provides ankle support for the individual.
  • FIGS. 14 to 16 illustrate an ankle support 50 that functions in a manner similar to support 40 and that is also mounted externally on a deformable portion 11A of footwear 10. Portion 11A ordinarily is constructed from fabric, leather, or some other material which provides support which is still pliable and deformable. This typically is the case, for example, in “high topped” basketball shoes. Portion 11A provides support for an ankle of an individual wearing footwear 10. Support 50 includes members 52 and 54 affixed to the exterior of portion 11A. Finger 51 is fixedly secured to member 52 and is slidably received by a groove, slot, or opening formed in member 54. If desired, members 52 and 54 can, in whole or in part, be integrated in portion 11A, or can be mounted internally on portion 11A. When the individual's ankle supinates (moves outwardly so the inner sole and arch of the foot tend to lift off the ground) and moves in the direction of arrow N in FIG. 15, then portion 11A deforms in the manner illustrated in FIG. 12 and the canted surface 53 of member 52 contacts stop surface 55 (FIG. 16) of member 54 to help prevent further deformation of portion 11A in the direction of arrow N. This provides ankle support for the individual. When portion 11A deforms in the direction of arrow N, finger 51 slides into member 54 in the direction of arrow P.
  • In FIG. 17 the sole of woman's footwear 60 includes a deformable upper portion 62 and a lower portion 61 bounding an open inner space 63. One end of a first arcuate resilient panel 65 is fixedly secured to one end of a second resilient arcuate panel 64. Panel 65 contacts the inner surface of upper portion 62. Panel 64 contacts the inner surface of lower portion 61. When a compressive force Q is applied to deformable portion 13, tongue 65 is resiliently downwardly depressed in the direction of arrow R, and tongue 64 is upwardly resiliently pressed. Tongue can, but need not be, fixedly secured to lower portion 61.
  • The open spaces 15 and 63 can, in addition to the resilient tongue structure inserted therein, be completely or partially filled with one or more other supplemental materials such as, by way of example and not limitation, insulation or latex. Such supplemental materials should not, however, prevent the resilient displacement of panels 18, 21, 22, etc. when a compressive force is applied so such panels.
  • The footwear 10 in FIG. 1 can include one or more externally visible fiber optic strands 60 mounted on outer covering 11 or sole 12. A light source 61 directs light into strand 60. The light source 61 can be powered by a battery mounted in footwear 10. Alternatively, light source 61 can be powered by a piezoelectric crystal or other piezoelectric source 62 which generates electricity when compressed. An individual walking or running in footwear 10 would compress crystal 62 when footwear contacted the ground. Such compression generates electricity to power light source 61.
  • In FIGS. 1 to 9, the thickness of tongues 18, 21, 22, 31, 32, 34, 35, 37, 38 is generally uniform throughout. As noted, this need not be the case. The shape and dimension of a tongue 18, 21, etc. or other structural component of the invention can vary as desired. FIG. 18 illustrates an alternate embodiment of the invention in which tongue 18 tapers from right to left. Consequently, the thickness indicated by arrows W2 in FIG. 18 is greater than the thickness indicated by arrows W1.
  • When an individual's foot contacts the ground while walking, the back of the heel ordinarily first strikes the ground, followed by the outer edge of the foot. The outer edge of the foot (or of a shoe worn on the foot) rolls over the ground and the foot eventually rotates inwardly such the bottom of the foot and the bottoms of the toes contact the ground. When the toes and bottom of the foot do eventually contact the ground, a portion of the arch normally does not contact the ground, which results in a footprint having a shape often illustrated in cartoons and seen when an individual walks across firm sand or another reasonably firm surface which still deforms to a certain extent under the weight of an individual so that a footprint is formed on the surface. An individual having “flat feet” forms a footprint in which more of the arch than normal contacts the ground and forms a footprint which is, across the arch portion of the footprint, wider than normal.
  • The particular laterally tapered configuration illustrated in FIG. 18 can be advantageous because it facilitates the inward rotation of an individual's foot as it strikes and rolls over the ground.
  • In an alternate embodiment of the invention, the lateral taper illustrated in FIG. 18 is reversed such that the thickness W1 is greatest and the thickness W2 is less than that of the thickness W1. This “reversed” taper helps tongue 18 conform to the tilted configuration of the foot when the outer edge of the foot is rolling over the ground after the back of the heel of the foot contacts the ground.
  • As noted, after the rear most portion of an individual's heel initially contacts the ground when an individual is walking, the foot rolls onto its outer edge and then inwardly so the greatest area of the bottom of the foot (including the ball of the foot and the bottom of the toes of the foot) contacts the ground. After the foot rolls onto the greatest area of the bottom of the foot, the foot continue to roll over the ground and the heel—and then the arch—moves upwardly away from the ground so eventually only the ball of the foot and the toes contact the ground (or, if a shoe is worn, so only the portion of the sole beneath the ball and toes of the foot contact the ground). The ball and toes of the foot push off from the ground and the ball of the foot and then, finally, the toes separate from the ground and move upwardly away from the ground. The sequence of the “rolling contact” described in this paragraph is summarized as rear of the heel, then outer side of the foot, then bottom of the foot, then ball and toes, and then (just prior to lift off of the foot from the ground) toes. One important feature of the invention is that is permits and generally facilitates and does not interfere with the rolling contact of a foot (or shoe) as rolls over the ground from heel to toe. An apparatus which somehow generates forces that significantly interferes with the normal rolling travel of a foot (or shoe) over the ground would be contrary to purpose and function of the invention.
  • In FIG. 19, the toe portion 71 of the sole of footwear 11 is shaped and dimensioned such that a space, indicated by arrows S, exists between upper portion 70 and lower portion 38A. This space begins in the toe of the sole and extends rearwardly in the manner illustrated in FIG. 19. Since tongue 37 flexes downwardly in the direction of arrow B when a compressive forces acts against tongue 37 in the direction of arrow B, and since portion 70 can also be displaced downwardly in the direction of arrow B, the space S facilitates the movement of portion 70 in the direction of arrow B. Portion 70 is fixedly secured to toe portion 71, but still can pivot about portion 71 in the general direction indicated by arrow B. The pivoting of portion 70 enables substantially the entire length of the bottom of a foot in footwear 11 to pivot about toe 71 in the generally direction of arrow B, which is believed to contribute significantly to the comfort of footwear having a toe portion 71 in combination with functionally related portion 70 and tongue 37.
  • Having described my invention in such terms as to enable those skilled in the art to understand and practice the invention, and having described various embodiments thereof,

Claims (1)

1. Footwear comprising
(a) a sole including an upper portion and a lower portion, said upper and lower portions bounding a space extending therebetween and having at least two operative positions,
(i) a first operative position with said upper portion spaced a first selected distance apart from said lower portion; and,
(ii) a second operative position with at least one of said upper and lower portions displaced toward the other when a compressive force is applied to said sole such that said upper and lower portions are spaced a second selected distance apart less than said first selected distance;
(b) an outer covering attached to and extending upwardly from said upper portion of said sole and shaped and dimensioned to extend over at least a portion of a human foot; and,
(c) a elastic panel-shaped tongue extending intermediate said upper and lower portions and resiliently deflectable when said compressive force is applied to said sole to roll over said lower portion and generate a force opposing said compressive force.
US13/385,234 2011-04-27 2012-02-09 Footwear with heel based arcuate panel-shaped impact absorbing resilient concealed tongue Abandoned US20120324760A1 (en)

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US201161517942P true 2011-04-27 2011-04-27
US13/385,234 US20120324760A1 (en) 2011-04-27 2012-02-09 Footwear with heel based arcuate panel-shaped impact absorbing resilient concealed tongue

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US13/385,234 US20120324760A1 (en) 2011-04-27 2012-02-09 Footwear with heel based arcuate panel-shaped impact absorbing resilient concealed tongue

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2515133A (en) * 2013-06-11 2014-12-17 K Swiss Inc Article of footwear, elements thereof, and related methods of manufacturing
US20150027000A1 (en) * 2013-07-26 2015-01-29 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with support assembly having primary and secondary members
US20160058123A1 (en) * 2014-08-29 2016-03-03 Nike, Inc. Sole assembly for an article of footwear with bowed spring plate
WO2016094714A1 (en) * 2014-12-10 2016-06-16 Howard Baum Shoe sole with energy restoring device
US9622540B2 (en) 2013-06-11 2017-04-18 K-Swiss, Inc. Article of footwear, elements thereof, and related methods of manufacturing

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US1172613A (en) * 1914-12-28 1916-02-22 Peder Christian Trondrup Larsen Shoe construction.
US1332070A (en) * 1918-08-16 1920-02-24 Charles H Shamo Shock-absorber for footwear
US4638575A (en) * 1986-01-13 1987-01-27 Illustrato Vito J Spring heel for shoe and the like
US4756095A (en) * 1986-06-23 1988-07-12 Nikola Lakic Footwarmer for shoe
US4894934A (en) * 1989-01-23 1990-01-23 Illustrato Vito J Rebound heel device
US5279051A (en) * 1992-01-31 1994-01-18 Ian Whatley Footwear cushioning spring
US5282325A (en) * 1992-01-22 1994-02-01 Beyl Jean Joseph Alfred Shoe, notably a sports shoe, which includes at least one spring set into the sole, cassette and spring for such a shoe
US5381608A (en) * 1990-07-05 1995-01-17 L.A. Gear, Inc. Shoe heel spring and stabilizer
US5517769A (en) * 1995-06-07 1996-05-21 Zhao; Yi Spring-loaded snap-type shoe
US6557271B1 (en) * 2001-06-08 2003-05-06 Weaver, Iii Robert B. Shoe with improved cushioning and support
US6928756B1 (en) * 2003-03-03 2005-08-16 Richard Haynes Jump assisting spring heel shoe
US6964119B2 (en) * 2001-06-08 2005-11-15 Weaver Iii Robert B Footwear with impact absorbing system
US8166671B2 (en) * 2006-03-30 2012-05-01 Li-Ning Sports (Shanghai) Co., Ltd. Adjustable shock attenuating means for footwear and footwear using the same
US8510970B2 (en) * 2010-03-30 2013-08-20 Howard Baum Shoe sole with energy restoring device

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1172613A (en) * 1914-12-28 1916-02-22 Peder Christian Trondrup Larsen Shoe construction.
US1332070A (en) * 1918-08-16 1920-02-24 Charles H Shamo Shock-absorber for footwear
US4638575A (en) * 1986-01-13 1987-01-27 Illustrato Vito J Spring heel for shoe and the like
US4756095A (en) * 1986-06-23 1988-07-12 Nikola Lakic Footwarmer for shoe
US4894934A (en) * 1989-01-23 1990-01-23 Illustrato Vito J Rebound heel device
US5381608A (en) * 1990-07-05 1995-01-17 L.A. Gear, Inc. Shoe heel spring and stabilizer
US5282325A (en) * 1992-01-22 1994-02-01 Beyl Jean Joseph Alfred Shoe, notably a sports shoe, which includes at least one spring set into the sole, cassette and spring for such a shoe
US5279051A (en) * 1992-01-31 1994-01-18 Ian Whatley Footwear cushioning spring
US5517769A (en) * 1995-06-07 1996-05-21 Zhao; Yi Spring-loaded snap-type shoe
US6557271B1 (en) * 2001-06-08 2003-05-06 Weaver, Iii Robert B. Shoe with improved cushioning and support
US6964119B2 (en) * 2001-06-08 2005-11-15 Weaver Iii Robert B Footwear with impact absorbing system
US6928756B1 (en) * 2003-03-03 2005-08-16 Richard Haynes Jump assisting spring heel shoe
US8166671B2 (en) * 2006-03-30 2012-05-01 Li-Ning Sports (Shanghai) Co., Ltd. Adjustable shock attenuating means for footwear and footwear using the same
US8510970B2 (en) * 2010-03-30 2013-08-20 Howard Baum Shoe sole with energy restoring device

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2515133A (en) * 2013-06-11 2014-12-17 K Swiss Inc Article of footwear, elements thereof, and related methods of manufacturing
US9622540B2 (en) 2013-06-11 2017-04-18 K-Swiss, Inc. Article of footwear, elements thereof, and related methods of manufacturing
US20150027000A1 (en) * 2013-07-26 2015-01-29 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with support assembly having primary and secondary members
US9451805B2 (en) * 2013-07-26 2016-09-27 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with support assembly having primary and secondary members
US20160058123A1 (en) * 2014-08-29 2016-03-03 Nike, Inc. Sole assembly for an article of footwear with bowed spring plate
US9968160B2 (en) * 2014-08-29 2018-05-15 Nike, Inc. Sole assembly for an article of footwear with bowed spring plate
WO2016094714A1 (en) * 2014-12-10 2016-06-16 Howard Baum Shoe sole with energy restoring device

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