US20120296826A1 - Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display - Google Patents

Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display Download PDF

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Publication number
US20120296826A1
US20120296826A1 US13/110,709 US201113110709A US2012296826A1 US 20120296826 A1 US20120296826 A1 US 20120296826A1 US 201113110709 A US201113110709 A US 201113110709A US 2012296826 A1 US2012296826 A1 US 2012296826A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
method
ticket
visual object
device
further
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Abandoned
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US13/110,709
Inventor
Micah Bergdale
Matthew Grasser
Christopher Guess
Nicholas Ihm
Samuel Krueckeberg
Gregory Vayler
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BYTEMARK Inc
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BYTEMARK Inc
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Publication date
Priority to US13/110,709 priority Critical patent/US20120296826A1/en
Application filed by BYTEMARK Inc filed Critical BYTEMARK Inc
Priority claimed from US13/475,881 external-priority patent/US8494967B2/en
Assigned to BYTEMARK, INC. reassignment BYTEMARK, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: VALYER, GREGORY, BERGDALE, MICAH, GRASSER, MATTHEW, GUESS, CHRISTOPHER, IHM, NICHOLAS, KRUECKEBERG, SAMUEL
Publication of US20120296826A1 publication Critical patent/US20120296826A1/en
Priority claimed from US14/080,246 external-priority patent/US20140074578A1/en
Priority claimed from US14/286,622 external-priority patent/US10360567B2/en
Priority claimed from US14/597,965 external-priority patent/US20150262195A1/en
Priority claimed from US14/638,411 external-priority patent/US9881433B2/en
Priority claimed from US15/246,748 external-priority patent/US20160364659A1/en
Assigned to BILLYBEY HOLDING COMPANY LLC reassignment BILLYBEY HOLDING COMPANY LLC SECURITY INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BYTEMARK INC.
Priority claimed from US15/692,503 external-priority patent/US10453067B2/en
Assigned to BYTEMARK INC. reassignment BYTEMARK INC. RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BILLYBEY HOLDING COMPANY LLC
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q10/00Administration; Management
    • G06Q10/02Reservations, e.g. for tickets, services or events
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F21/00Security arrangements for protecting computers, components thereof, programs or data against unauthorised activity
    • G06F21/60Protecting data
    • G06F21/602Providing cryptographic facilities or services
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q20/00Payment architectures, schemes or protocols
    • G06Q20/04Payment circuits
    • G06Q20/045Payment circuits characterized in that the payment protocol involves at least one ticket
    • G06Q20/0457Payment circuits characterized in that the payment protocol involves at least one ticket characterized in that the ticket is sent electronically
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q20/00Payment architectures, schemes or protocols
    • G06Q20/30Payment architectures, schemes or protocols characterised by the use of specific devices
    • G06Q20/32Payment architectures, schemes or protocols characterised by the use of specific devices using wireless devices
    • G06Q20/327Short range or proximity payments by means of M-devices
    • G06Q20/3274Short range or proximity payments by means of M-devices using a pictured code, e.g. barcode or QR-code, being displayed on the M-device
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q20/00Payment architectures, schemes or protocols
    • G06Q20/38Payment protocols; Details thereof
    • G06Q20/382Payment protocols; Details thereof insuring higher security of transaction
    • G06Q20/3827Use of message hashing
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q20/00Payment architectures, schemes or protocols
    • G06Q20/38Payment protocols; Details thereof
    • G06Q20/40Authorisation, e.g. identification of payer or payee, verification of customer or shop credentials; Review and approval of payers, e.g. check credit lines or negative lists
    • G06Q20/401Transaction verification
    • G06Q20/4016Transaction verification involving fraud or risk level assessment in transaction processing
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07BTICKET-ISSUING APPARATUS; FARE-REGISTERING APPARATUS; FRANKING APPARATUS
    • G07B15/00Arrangements or apparatus for collecting fares, tolls or entrance fees at one or more control points
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q2220/00Business processing using cryptography

Abstract

This invention discloses a novel system and method for distributing electronic ticketing such that the ticket is verified at the entrance to venues by means of an animation or other human perceptible verifying visual object that is selected by the venue for the specific event. This removes the need to use a barcode scanner on an LCD display of a cell phone or other device and speeds up the rate at which human ticket takers can verify ticket holders.

Description

    FIELD OF INVENTION
  • This invention provides a mechanism whereby a venue or other facility that meters usage by means of tickets can distribute tickets electronically and use a visual aid on an electronic device to visually confirm that a person is a valid ticket holder,
  • BACKGROUND
  • Venues such as theaters, amusement parks and other facilities that use tickets, for example airlines, ferries and other transportation have a need to use electronic ticketing. Existing systems distribute information that can constitute a ticket, but the verification problem is difficult. In one example of prior art, an electronic ticket is displayed as a bar-code on the recipient's telephone display screen. The telephone is then placed on a scanner that reads the bar-code in order to verify the ticket. The problem with these systems is that the scanning process is fraught with error and the time taken to verify the electronic ticket far exceeds that of the old system: looking at the paper ticket and tearing it in half. Barcode scanners were not designed to read a lit LCD screen displaying a bar code. The reflectivity of the screen can defeat the scanning process. Therefore, there is a need for an electronic ticketing system that provides a human-perceivable visual display that the venue can rely on to verify the ticket. This invention provides for the distribution of an electronic ticket that also contains a visual display that ticket takers can rely on as verification, without using a scanning device.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • FIG. 1. Basic architecture.
  • FIG. 2. Flow chart for ticket purchase.
  • FIG. 3. Flow chart for displaying the verifying visual object.
  • FIG. 4. Example validating visual object.
  • FIG. 5. Example validating visual object
  • FIG. 6. Schematic of event database record.
  • FIG. 7 Schematic of authorized user database record.
  • FIG. 8. Flow chart for transfer of ticket.
  • FIG. 9. Example user interface on users device.
  • FIG. 10. Example user interface showing activation selection screen.
  • FIG. 11. Example user interface showing display of validating visual object and other ticketing information.
  • FIG. 12. Schematic of basic authorization protocol.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • The system operates on one or more computers, typically one or more file servers connected to the Internet and also on a customer's computing device. A customer's device can be a personal computer, mobile phone, mobile handheld device like a Blackberry™ or iPhone™ or any other kind of computing device a user can use to send and receive data messages. The customer's device is used to display the validating visual object.
  • Conventional electronic tickets display a barcode or QR code on a user's telephone, typically a cellphone or other portable wireless device with a display screen. The problem with this approach is that a barcode scanner has to be used by the ticket taker. Barcode scanners are not highly compatible with LCD screen displays of barcodes. The amount of time that it takes to process an electronic ticket is greater than that of a paper ticket. Sometimes the LCD display does not scan at all and a passenger has to be sent away to get a paper printout of a ticket. Given the potential large crowds that often attend open venues, this is impractical.
  • In this invention, the ticket is procured electronically and stored on the user's device. However, when the ticket is to be taken the verification is determined by a larger visual object that a human can perceive without a machine scanning it. The particular validating visual object chosen can be constantly changed so that the ticket taker does not have to be concerned that a device displaying the designated validating visual object is invalid. There are many types of visual objects that can be displayed that are easily recognized by a ticket taker. These can include but are not limited to: Patterns of color change, Animations and Geometric patterns.
  • In one embodiment of the invention, the user purchases a ticket from an on-line website. The website sends to the user's device a unique number, referred to as a token. The token is also stored in the ticketing database. When the time comes to present the ticket, the venue can select what visual indicator will be used as the designated validation visual object. The user can then request the validation visual object. The user's device will have an application that launches a user interface. The user can select “validate” or some other equivalent command to cause the application to fetch and download from the ticketing system a data object referred to herein as a ticket payload, which includes a program to run on the user's device. In another embodiment, the ticket payload can be pushed to the device by the venue. As a result, the application transmitted to the user's device is previously unknown to the user and not resident in the user's device. At that point the user's device can execute the program embodied in the ticket payload, which causes the validation visual object to be displayed on the user's device. The ticket taker knows what the validating visual object is, and simply looks to see that the user's device is displaying the correct visual object.
  • Piracy is limited in several ways. First, the ticket holder and their device does not have access to the validating visual object until a time select to be close to the point in time where the ticket has to be presented. Second, the validating visual object is one of an very large number of permutations and therefore cannot be guessed, selected or copied ahead of time. Third, the ticket payload can contain code that destroys the validating visual object in a pre-determined period of time after initial display or upon some pre-determined input event. Fourth, a number of security protocols can be utilized to ensure that a copy of the application that executes to display the validating visual object cannot be readily copied or reverse engineered.
  • Validating Visual Object Displays:
  • There many kinds of validation displays that can be utilized. The criterion for what constitutes a validating visual object is one that is readily recognizable from human observation, is encapsulated in such a way as to be transmitted to the customer's device with a minimum of network latency or download time, and that can be reasonably secured so as to avoid piracy. Barcodes and similar codes like the QR code are not validating visual objects because a person looking at them cannot tell one apart from another instead, the person has to rely on a barcode scanner and computing device to verify the barcode.
  • In one embodiment, the period that a particular validating visual object may be used is automatically limited. Examples of validating visual objects include:
    • 1. A color display on the device.
    • 2. A color sequence.
    • 3. An animation that is easily recognized.
    • 4. Animations can include easily recognizable geometric patterns, for example an array of diamonds, or an array of rotating cubes.
    • 5. A human recognizable image.
    • 6. The customer's face as an image.
    • 7. Combinations of the above.
  • In another embodiment, other images, for example, block letter, can be displayed so that additional information readily apparent to the ticket taker is displayed. For example, a letter can be designated for a Child ticket or a different letter for an Adult ticket.
  • Referring now to FIG. 1, the customer uses their device (1) to purchase a ticket from the service operating the system server (2) and database (3).
  • In one embodiment, an authorized user associated with the venue, typically the box office manager, logs into the back-end system through a secure web-page. The authorized user can enter the web-page by entering a username, password and venue identifier. The system maintains a database (3) that associates the venue identifier with a set of usernames and password pairs that are authorized to use the system on behalf of the venue. See The system checks the database (3) to verify that the venue ID, username and password are consistent with each other. The authorized user can navigate through to a point in the system user interface where a particular show may be selected for ticket taking. The user selects the upcoming show, and then selects from a display of possible validating visual objects. The validating visual object is transmitted to a device viewable by ticket taking staff at the entrances to the venue. The staff then can see the authorized object to accept for the upcoming show.
  • Ticket holders that have purchased tickets have a data record in the system database that contains the unique token associated with the ticket and other relevant information, including the venueID and an identifier identifying the specific show the ticket is for. See FIG. 6. At the entrance, customers are requested to operate an application on their devices. This application fetches the stored ticket token and transmits that token to the system, preferably over a secure data channel. The database looks up the token to check that the token is valid for the upcoming show. If the token is valid, then the system transmits back to the device a ticket payload. The ticket payload contains computer code that, when operated, displays the selected validating visual object.
  • The customer can navigate the user interface of the application in order to cause the application to request whether to display the validating visual object. As shown in FIG. 9, one or more available tickets can be displayed on the user interface, which provides the user the ability to select one of the tickets. When the customer properly actuates the user interface, for example, by actuating the “Activate Tickets” button (see FIG. 10), the validating visual object is displayed on the screen of the device. The animation can be presented along with other ticketing information (see FIG. 11). In one embodiment, the device transmits the ticket token to the system with a command indicating that the ticket has been used. In another embodiment, the customer can operate the application and request that the application transmit to the database the condition that the ticket was used. In that embodiment, the user can input a numeric code or password that the application uses to verify that the customer is confirming use of the ticket. In yet another embodiment, after the validating visual object has been launched, a predetermined amount of time later it can be deemed used. At that time, the application can cause the color of the object to be changed so that it indicates that there was a valid ticket, but the ticket was used. This condition is useful in cases where the venue checks tickets during shows while letting customers move around the venue's facilities.
  • In another embodiment, the purchase of the ticket causes the ticket payload to be downloaded to the customer's device. Likewise, the authorized user for the venue will select a validating visual object for a particular show well in advance of the show. In this case, because a customer may possess the payload some time before its use, precautions must be taken to secure the ticket payload from being hacked so that any similar device can display the validating visual object. While this is a security tradeoff, the benefit is that the customer need not have an Internet connection at a time close to the showtime of the venue.
  • The use of electronic ticketing provides opportunities that change how tickets can be bought and sold,. For example a first customer can purchase a ticket and receive on their device a ticket token. A second customer can purchase that ticket using the system. The first customer can use the application to send message to the system server indicating that the first customer intends to the web-page indicating that it wants to buy that particular ticket. The system can ask the first customer for a username and password to be associated with the first customer's ticket. If the second customer identifies the first customer's username, the system then can match the two together. At that point, the data record associated with the first customer's ticket is modified so that the ticket token value is changed to a new value. That new ticket token value is then transmitted to the second customer's device. At the same time, the system can operate a typical on-line payment and credit system that secures payment from the second customer and credits the first customer. In one embodiment, the system pays the first customer a discounted amount, retaining the balance as a fee.
  • In yet another embodiment, the first customer may he unknown to the second customer. In that embodiment, the first customer simply may indicate to the system, through a message transmitted from the application operating on the device or directly through a web-page, that the first customer is not going to use the ticket and wishes to sell it. At that point, the system can mark the data record associated with the ticket as “available for sate.” When the second customer makes a request to purchase a ticket for the same show, the system creates a new ticket token for the second customer and updates the ticket token stored in the data record.
  • In a general admission type of scenario, the ticketing database is simple: each show has a venue ID, some identifier associated with the show itself, various time indicators, the selected validating visual object, and a list of valid ticket tokens. In a reserved seating arrangement, the ticketing database has a data record associated with a show, as indicated by a show identifier, but each seat has a data record that has a unique show identifier and ticket token, which includes the identity of the seat itself.
  • In the preferred embodiment, the validating visual object is secured against tampering. One threat model is that a customer who has received a ticket payload would then take the data file comprising the ticket payload and analyze it to detect the actual program code that when executed, produces the validating visual object on the display screen of the device. Once that has been accomplished, the would-be pirate can then re-package the code without any security mechanism and readily distribute it to other device owners, or even cross-compile it to execute on other types of display devices. The preferred embodiment addresses this threat model in a number of ways.
  • First, the ticket payload can be secured in a region of the device under the control of the telecommunications provider. In this case, the customer cannot access the code comprising the ticket payload. In another embodiment, the ticket payload can be encrypted in such a way that the only decrypting key available is in the secure portion of the telecommunications device. In that embodiment, the key is only delivered when an application running on the secure part of the device confirms that the ticket payload that is executing has not been tampered with, for example, by checking the checksum of its run-time image. At that point, the key can be delivered to the ticket payload process so that the validating visual object is displayed on the device.
  • Second, the selected animation is packaged for each device. That is, the code that operates to display the validating visual object itself operates certain security protocols. The phone transmits a ticket transaction request. The request includes a numeric value unique to the device, for example, an IMEI number. Other embodiments use the UDID or hardware serial number of the device instead of or in combination with the IMEI number. The system server then generates the ticket token using the IMEI number and transmits that value to that device. In addition, the ticket payload is created such that it expects to read the correct IMEI number. This is accomplished by the system server changing portions of the ticket payload so that the it is customized for each individual IMEI number associated with a ticket token. The animation code comprising the ticket payload is designed so that it has to obtain the correct IMEI number at run time. In another embodiment, at run-time, the animation code will read the particular ticket token specific for the phone that instance of the animation was transmitted to. The code will then decode the token and check that it reflects the correct IMEI number for that device.
  • In another embodiment, the security protocol first requires the user to login to the server with a login username and password. The application also transmits the IMEI, UDID or serial number of the device or any combination of them. When verified by the server, an authorization key (Authkey) is transmitted to the device. The Authkey is a random number. When the user's application transmits a request for a validating visual object, it transmits the Authkey and the IMEI, UDID or serial number (or combination) that is used for verification. This is checked by the server for validity in the database. On verification, the validating visual object is encrypted using the Authkey and transmitted to the device. The application running on the device then uses the Authkey to decrypt and display the validating visual object. The Authkey is a one-time key. It is used once for each ticket payload. If a user buys a second ticket from the system, a different, second Authkey is associated with that second ticket payload. In one embodiment, the Authkey is unique to the ticket for a given event. In another embodiment, the Authkey is unique to the ticket, device and the event. In other embodiments, the Authkey can be replaced with a key-pair in an asymmetric encryption system. In that case, the validating visual object is encrypted with a “public”key, and then each user is issued a private key as the “Authkey” to be used to decrypt the object.
  • In yet another embodiment, the Authkey can be encrypted on the server and transmitted to the device in encrypted form. Only when the application is operating can the Authkey be decrypted with the appropriate key. In yet another embodiment, the application that displays the validating visual object can request a PIN number or some other login password from the user, such that if the device is lost, the tickets cannot be used by someone who finds the device.
  • In another embodiment, the application running on the device can fetch a dynamic script, meaning a piece of code that has instructions arranged in a different order for subsets of devices that request it. The ticket payload is then modified so as to have the same number of versions that are compatible with a corresponding variation in the dynamic script. As a result, it is difficult to reverse engineer the application because the application will be altered at run time and the ticket payload customized for that alteration. One embodiment of the dynamic script would be expressed in Java™ computer language and rendered using OpenView. The ticket payload can be an MIMI file called using Ajax.
  • Security can also be enhanced by actively destroying the validating visual object so that it resides in the device for a limited time. In one embodiment, the ticket payload has a time to kill parameter that provides the application with a count-down time to destroy the validating visual object. In another embodiment, the validating visual object is displayed when the user holds down a literal or virtual button on the user interface of the device. When the button is released, the application destroys the validating visual object.
  • Security can also be enhanced by retaining as steganographic data embedded in the validating visual object, the IMEI, UDID, Serial number or phone number of the device. The application can be operated to recover that information and display it on the screen. This makes it possible for security personnel at a venue to view that information from a validly operating device. If the device is showing a pirated validating visual object, then the actual data associated with the device will not match and it will be apparent from inspection of the device. This way, suspicious ticket holders can be subject to increased scrutiny, the presence of which deters piracy.
  • In another embodiment, the ticket payload can operate a sound sampling application that requests the customer to speak in to the device. The application can then use that data to check whether the voice print of the speaker matches the expected voice print. In yet another embodiment, the device can take a picture of the customer's face, and then facial recognition code embedded in the ticket payload can operate to check whether the features of the face sufficiently match a pre-determined set of features, that is, of the customers face at the time the ticket was purchased. In yet another embodiment, the verification can be supplemented by being sure that the use of the ticket is during a pre-determined period of time. In yet another embodiment, the verification can be supplemented by the ticket payload operating to check that the location of the venue where the ticket is being used is within a pre-determined range of tolerance to a UPS (Global Positioning System) location. In yet another embodiment, after a certain pre-determined number of downloads of ticket payloads for a specific show, the validating object is automatically changed. This last mechanism may be used for promotions, to select the first set of ticket buyers for special treatment at the venue. In yet another embodiment, two different validating visual objects may be used, which are selected based on the verified age of the customer. In this way, a venue can use the system to not only to verify ticket holders coming into the venue, but to verify their drinking age when alcoholic drinks are ordered.
  • Operating Environment:
  • The system operates on one or more computers, typically one or more file servers connected to the Internet. The system is typically comprised of a central server that is connected by a data network to a user's computer. The central server may be comprised of one or more computers connected to one or more mass storage devices. A website is a central server that is connected to the Internet. The typical website has one or more files, referred to as web-pages, that are transmitted to a user's computer so that the user's computer displays an interface in dependence on the contents of the web-page file. The web-page file can contain HTML or other data that is rendered by a program operating on the user's computer. That program, referred to as a browser, permits the user to actuate virtual buttons or controls that are displayed by the browser and to input alphanumeric data. The browser operating on the user's computer then transmits values associated with the buttons or other controls and any input alphanumeric strings to the website. The website then processes these inputs, in some cases transmitting back to the user's computer additional data that is displayed by the browser. The precise architecture of the central server does not limit the claimed invention. In addition, the data network may operate with several levels, such that the user's computer is connected through a fire wall to one server, which routes communications to another server that executes the disclosed methods. The precise details of the data network architecture does not limit the claimed invention. Further, the user's computer may be a laptop or desktop type of personal computer. It can also be a cell phone, smart phone or other handheld device. The precise form factor of the user's computer does not limit the claimed invention. In one embodiment, the user's computer is omitted, and instead a separate computing functionality provided that works with the central server. This may be housed in the central server or operatively connected to it. In this case, an operator can take a telephone call from a customer and input into the computing system the customer's data in accordance with the disclosed method. Further, the customer may receive from and transmit data to the central server by means of the Internet, whereby the customer accesses an account using an Internet web-browser and browser displays an interactive webpage operatively connected to the central server. The central server transmits and receives data in response to data and commands transmitted from the browser in response to the customer's actuation of the browser user interface.
  • A server may be a computer comprised of a central processing unit with a mass storage device and a network connection. In addition a server can include multiple of such computers connected together with a data network or other data transfer connection, or, multiple computers on a network with network accessed storage, in a manner that provides such functionality as a group. Practitioners of ordinary skill will recognize that functions that are accomplished on one server may be partitioned and accomplished on multiple servers that are operatively connected by a computer network by means of appropriate inter process communication. In addition, the access of the website can be by means of an Internet browser accessing a secure or public page or by means of a client program running on a local computer that is connected over a computer network to the server. A data message and data upload or download can be delivered over the Internet using typical protocols, including TCP/IP, HTTP, SMTP, RPC, FTP or other kinds of data communication protocols that permit processes running on two remote computers to exchange information by means of digital network communication. As a result a data message can be a data packet transmitted from or received by a computer containing a destination network address, a destination process or application identifier, and data values that can be parsed at the destination computer located at the destination network address by the destination application in order that the relevant data values are extracted and used by the destination application.
  • It should be noted that the flow diagrams are used herein to demonstrate various aspects of the invention, and should not be construed to limit the present invention to any particular logic flow or logic implementation. The described logic may be partitioned into different logic blocks (e.g., programs, modules, functions, or subroutines) without changing the overall results or otherwise departing from the true scope of the invention. Oftentimes, logic elements may be added, modified, omitted, performed in a different order, or implemented using different logic constructs (e.g., logic gates, looping primitives, conditional logic, and other logic constructs) without changing the overall results or otherwise departing from the true scope of the invention.
  • The method described herein can be executed on a computer system, generally comprised of a central processing unit (CPU) that is operatively connected to a memory device, data input and output circuitry (10) and computer data network communication circuitry. Computer code executed by the CPU can take data received by the data communication circuitry and store it in the memory device. In addition, the CPU can take data from the I/O circuitry and store it in the memory device. Further, the CPU can take data from a memory device and output it through the IO circuitry or the data communication circuitry. The data stored in memory may be further recalled from the memory device, further processed or modified by the CPU in the manner described herein and restored in the same memory device or a different memory device operatively connected to the CPU including by means of the data network circuitry. The memory device can be any kind of data storage circuit or magnetic storage or optical device, including a hard disk, optical disk or solid state memory.
  • Examples of well known computing systems, environments, and/or configurations that may be suitable for use with the invention include, but are not limited to, personal computers, server computers, hand-held, laptop or mobile computer or communications devices such as cell phones and PDA's, multiprocessor systems, microprocessor-based systems, set top boxes, programmable consumer electronics, network PCs, minicomputers, mainframe computers, distributed computing environments that include any of the above systems or devices, and the like.
  • Computer program logic implementing all or part of the functionality previously described herein may be embodied in various forms, including, but in no way limited to, a source code form, a computer executable form, and various intermediate forms (e.g., forms generated by an assembler, compiler, linker, or locator.) Source code may include a series of computer program instructions implemented in any of various programming languages (e.g., an object code, an assembly language, or a high-level language such as FORTRAN, C, C++, JAVA, or HTML) for use with various operating systems or operating environments. The source code may define and use various data structures and communication messages. The source code may be in a computer executable form (e.g., via an interpreter), or the source code may be converted (e.g., via a translator, assembler, or compiler) into a computer executable form.
  • The invention may be described in the general context of computer-executable instructions, such as program modules, being executed by a computer. Generally, program modules include routines, programs, objects, components, data structures, etc., that perform particular tasks or implement particular abstract data types. The computer program and data may be fixed in any form (e,g., source code form, computer executable form, or an intermediate form) either permanently or transitorily in a tangible storage medium, such as a semiconductor memory device (e.g., a RAM, ROM, PROM, EEPROM, or Flash-Programmable RAM), a magnetic memory device (e.g., a diskette or fixed hard disk), an optical memory device (e.g., a CD-ROM or DVD), a PC card (e.g., PCMCIA card), or other memory device. The computer program and data may be fixed in any form in a signal that is transmittable to a computer using any of various communication technologies, including, but in no way limited to, analog technologies, digital technologies, optical technologies, wireless technologies, networking technologies, and internetworking technologies. The computer program and data may be distributed in any form as a removable storage medium with accompanying printed or electronic documentation (e.g., shrink wrapped software or a magnetic tape), preloaded with a computer system on system ROM or fixed disk), or distributed from a server or electronic bulletin board over the communication system (e.g., the Internet or World Wide Web.) It is appreciated that any of the software components of the present invention may, if desired, be implemented in RUM (read-only memory) form. The software components may, generally, be implemented in hardware, if desired, using conventional techniques.
  • The invention may also be practiced in distributed computing environments where tasks are performed by remote processing devices that are linked through a communications network. In a distributed computing environment, program modules may be located in both local and remote computer storage media including memory storage devices. Practitioners of ordinary skill will recognize that the invention may be executed on one or more computer processors that are linked using a data network, including, for example, the Internet. In another embodiment, different steps of the process can be executed by one or more computers and storage devices geographically separated by connected by a data network in a manner so that they operate together to execute the process steps. In one embodiment, a user's computer can run an application that causes the user's computer to transmit a stream of one or more data packets across a data network to a second computer, referred to here as a server. The server, in turn, may be connected to one or more mass data storage devices where the database is stored. The server can execute a program that receives the transmitted packet and interpret the transmitted data packets in order to extract database query information. The server can then execute the remaining steps of the invention by means of accessing the mass storage devices to derive the desired result of the query. Alternatively, the server can transmit the query information to another computer that is connected to the mass storage devices, and that computer can execute the invention to derive the desired result. The result can then be transmitted back to the user's computer by means of another stream of one or more data packets appropriately addressed to the user's computer.
  • The described embodiments of the invention are intended to be exemplary and numerous variations and modifications will be apparent to those skilled in the art. All such variations and modifications are intended to be within the scope of the present invention as defined in the appended claims. Although the present invention has been described and illustrated in detail, it is to be clearly understood that the same is by way of illustration and example only, and is not to be taken by way of limitation. It is appreciated that various features of the invention which are, for clarity, described in the context of separate embodiments may also be provided in combination in a single embodiment. Conversely, various features of the invention which are, for brevity, described in the context of a single embodiment may also be provided separately or in any suitable combination, it is appreciated that the particular embodiment described in the specification is intended only to provide an extremely detailed disclosure of the present invention and is not intended to be limiting.
  • Modifications of the above disclosed apparatus and methods which fall within the scope of the invention will be readily apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art. Accordingly, while the present invention has been disclosed in connection with exemplary embodiments thereof, it should be understood that other embodiments may fall within the spirit and scope of the invention, as defined by the following claims.

Claims (16)

1. A method for distributing electronic tickets comprising:
Receiving a request to display a validating visual object;
Receiving a ticket token associated with the received request;
Generating a ticket payload;
Transmitting a ticket payload embodying a validating visual object.
2. The method of claim 1 further comprising:
Selecting a validating visual object;
Associating the selected validating visual object with an event;
Verifying that the received request is for the associated event;
Using the selected validating visual object to generate the ticket payload.
3. The method of claim 2 further comprising:
Transmitting the validating visual object to a remote device viewable by authorized persons that is distinct from the device from which the request was transmitted.
4. The method of claim 1 or claim 2 further comprising:
Transmitting an authorization key to the device that transmitted the received request.
5. The method of claim 4 further comprising:
After the Generating step, Encrypting the ticket payload using the authorization key.
6. The method of claim 4 further comprising:
After the Generating step, Encrypting the ticket payload with a public key for which the transmitted authorization key is the associated private key.
7. A method of displaying a validating visual object on a device comprising:
Receiving a ticket payload embodying the validating visual object; and
Displaying the validating visual object.
8. A method of claim 7 further comprising:
Causing the Displaying step in dependence on actuating the user interface such that release of the actuation further causes the validating visual object to be deleted or destroyed from the device.
9. The method of claim 7 further comprising:
Receiving a dynamic scrypt; and
Altering the run-time code using the received scrypt.
10. The method of claim 7 further comprising:
Receiving as input into the device through a user interface a key that permits the application running the method to operate.
11. The method of claim 7 further comprising:
Destroying the validating visual object after a pre-determined period of time has expired since the object was displayed the first time on the device.
12. The method of claim 7 further comprising:
Extracting additional information embedded in the validating visual object and displaying that information on the device screen.
13. The method of claim 7 further comprising: determining that the application running the method has not been tampered with.
14. The method of claim 7 further comprising: determining that the ticket payload has not been tampered with.
15. A system comprised of a website adapted to perform any of the methods of claims 1-14.
16. A computer readable medium containing computer program code that when run causes the performance of any of the methods of claim 1-14.
US13/110,709 2011-05-18 2011-05-18 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display Abandoned US20120296826A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/110,709 US20120296826A1 (en) 2011-05-18 2011-05-18 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display

Applications Claiming Priority (17)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/110,709 US20120296826A1 (en) 2011-05-18 2011-05-18 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display
PCT/US2012/038707 WO2013006228A1 (en) 2011-05-18 2012-05-18 A method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display for verification
CA2836470A CA2836470A1 (en) 2011-05-18 2012-05-18 A method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display for verification
BR112013032309A BR112013032309A2 (en) 2011-05-18 2012-05-18 method and system of electronic ticket distribution with visual display for verification
US13/475,881 US8494967B2 (en) 2011-03-11 2012-05-18 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display
EP12807600.7A EP2718883A4 (en) 2011-05-18 2012-05-18 A method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display for verification
US13/901,243 US9239993B2 (en) 2011-03-11 2013-05-23 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display
US14/080,246 US20140074578A1 (en) 2011-02-11 2013-11-14 Method and system for activating and validating coupons
US14/286,622 US10360567B2 (en) 2011-03-11 2014-05-23 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with data integrity checking
US14/888,766 US20160078447A1 (en) 2011-02-11 2014-05-23 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with data integrity checking
US14/597,965 US20150262195A1 (en) 2011-03-11 2015-01-15 Method and system for employing anti-ticket fraud system for mobile tickets
US14/638,411 US9881433B2 (en) 2011-03-11 2015-03-04 Systems and methods for electronic ticket validation using proximity detection
US14/823,157 US10346764B2 (en) 2011-03-11 2015-08-11 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display for verification
US15/246,748 US20160364659A1 (en) 2011-03-11 2016-08-25 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display for verification.
US15/485,581 US20170220960A1 (en) 2011-05-18 2017-04-12 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display for verification.
US15/692,503 US10453067B2 (en) 2011-03-11 2017-08-31 Short range wireless translation methods and systems for hands-free fare validation
US16/136,924 US20190019199A1 (en) 2011-03-11 2018-09-20 Method and system for providing visual validation of electronic tickets and payment for an additional item

Related Parent Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/046,413 Continuation-In-Part US10089606B2 (en) 2011-02-11 2011-03-11 System and method for trusted mobile device payment
US13/046,413 Continuation US10089606B2 (en) 2011-02-11 2011-03-11 System and method for trusted mobile device payment
US201514888766A Continuation-In-Part 2015-11-03 2015-11-03

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Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/475,881 Continuation-In-Part US8494967B2 (en) 2011-02-11 2012-05-18 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display
US14/080,246 Continuation-In-Part US20140074578A1 (en) 2011-02-11 2013-11-14 Method and system for activating and validating coupons
US14/888,766 Continuation US20160078447A1 (en) 2011-02-11 2014-05-23 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with data integrity checking
US14/286,622 Continuation-In-Part US10360567B2 (en) 2011-02-11 2014-05-23 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with data integrity checking
US15/485,581 Continuation US20170220960A1 (en) 2011-05-18 2017-04-12 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display for verification.

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US20120296826A1 true US20120296826A1 (en) 2012-11-22

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US13/110,709 Abandoned US20120296826A1 (en) 2011-05-18 2011-05-18 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display
US14/888,766 Pending US20160078447A1 (en) 2011-02-11 2014-05-23 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with data integrity checking
US15/485,581 Pending US20170220960A1 (en) 2011-05-18 2017-04-12 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display for verification.

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US14/888,766 Pending US20160078447A1 (en) 2011-02-11 2014-05-23 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with data integrity checking
US15/485,581 Pending US20170220960A1 (en) 2011-05-18 2017-04-12 Method and system for distributing electronic tickets with visual display for verification.

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US (3) US20120296826A1 (en)
EP (1) EP2718883A4 (en)
BR (1) BR112013032309A2 (en)
CA (1) CA2836470A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2013006228A1 (en)

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WO2013006228A1 (en) 2013-01-10
EP2718883A4 (en) 2015-04-01
US20160078447A1 (en) 2016-03-17
US20170220960A1 (en) 2017-08-03
BR112013032309A2 (en) 2016-12-20
EP2718883A1 (en) 2014-04-16
CA2836470A1 (en) 2013-01-10

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