US20120222252A1 - Surface cleaning apparatus - Google Patents

Surface cleaning apparatus Download PDF

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Publication number
US20120222252A1
US20120222252A1 US13040695 US201113040695A US20120222252A1 US 20120222252 A1 US20120222252 A1 US 20120222252A1 US 13040695 US13040695 US 13040695 US 201113040695 A US201113040695 A US 201113040695A US 20120222252 A1 US20120222252 A1 US 20120222252A1
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Prior art keywords
air
cyclone
cleaning
surface
chamber
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US13040695
Inventor
Wayne Ernest Conrad
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G B D Corp
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G B D Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/10Filters; Dust separators; Dust removal; Automatic exchange of filters
    • A47L9/16Arrangement or disposition of cyclones or other devices with centrifugal action
    • A47L9/1658Construction of outlets
    • A47L9/1666Construction of outlets with filtering means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/10Filters; Dust separators; Dust removal; Automatic exchange of filters
    • A47L9/106Dust removal
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L9/00Details or accessories of suction cleaners, e.g. mechanical means for controlling the suction or for effecting pulsating action; Storing devices specially adapted to suction cleaners or parts thereof; Carrying-vehicles specially adapted for suction cleaners
    • A47L9/10Filters; Dust separators; Dust removal; Automatic exchange of filters
    • A47L9/16Arrangement or disposition of cyclones or other devices with centrifugal action
    • A47L9/1608Cyclonic chamber constructions

Abstract

A surface cleaning apparatus comprises an air flow path extending from a dirty air inlet to a clean air outlet and includes a suction motor. The surface cleaning apparatus may be battery powered and/or may have a power requirement of 200 Watts or less. A cyclone chamber may be provided in the air flow path and may comprise a cyclone air inlet having a height, a cyclone air outlet and a screen surrounding the cyclone air outlet. The cyclone air outlet may comprise a passage that extends into the cyclone chamber less than the height of the cyclone inlet.

Description

    FIELD
  • [0001]
    The disclosure relates to surface cleaning apparatuses, such as vacuum cleaners having a suction motor that produces a reduced air flow, such as a battery operated vacuum cleaner
  • INTRODUCTION
  • [0002]
    Various constructions for surface cleaning apparatuses, such as vacuum cleaners, are known. Currently, many surface cleaning apparatuses are constructed using at least one cyclonic cleaning stage. Air is drawn into the vacuum cleaners through a dirty air inlet and conveyed to a cyclone inlet. The rotation of the air in the cyclone results in some of the particulate matter in the airflow stream being disentrained from the airflow stream. This material is then collected in a dirt bin collection chamber, which may be at the bottom of the cyclone or in a direct collection chamber exterior to the cyclone chamber (see for example WO2009/026709 and U.S. Pat. No. 5,078,761). One or more additional cyclonic cleaning stages and/or filters may be positioned downstream from the cyclone.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0003]
    The following summary is provided to introduce the reader to the more detailed discussion to follow. The summary is not intended to limit or define the claims.
  • [0004]
    According to one broad aspect, a surface cleaning apparatus comprises at least one cyclone chamber and has a suction motor that is operated at a reduced power level compared to a convention vacuum cleaner. For example, the suction motor may have a power requirement of 200 Watts or less. Alternately, or in addition the surface cleaning apparatus may be battery operated. The cyclone chamber is provided with a vortex finder that extends into the cyclone chamber less than the height of the cyclone air inlet and, preferably, no vortex finder is provided. It has been surprisingly determined that, by reducing the size of, or eliminating the vortex finder, (without making any other change), the cleaning performance of the surface cleaning apparatus may be improved.
  • [0005]
    While a battery pack having a large power capacity may be provided so as to provide a high level of current for an extended period of time, the weight of the battery pack may be excessive for use in a vacuum cleaner. However, if the weight of the battery pack is reduced, then the operating life between charges may be low or the air flow produced by the surface cleaning apparatus may result in poor cleaning performance. In such a case, reducing the size of, or eliminating the vortex finder may result in an improvement in cleaning performance.
  • [0006]
    Accordingly, the cyclone air outlet may comprise a passage that extends into the cyclone chamber less than the height of the cyclone inlet and may be an opening in an end wall of the cyclone chamber. In particular, the surface cleaning apparatus may be operable without having a traditional, non-permeable outlet conduit or vortex finder extending into the cyclone chamber. In this configuration the screen may provide the function of a traditional vortex finder under certain air flow conditions.
  • [0007]
    The surface cleaning apparatus may be battery powered, or may be connectable to an external power source, or both.
  • [0008]
    In one embodiment in accordance with this broad aspect, a battery operated surface cleaning apparatus comprises an air flow path extending from a dirty air inlet to a clean air outlet and includes a suction motor. A cyclone chamber may be provided in the air flow path. The cyclone chamber may comprise a cyclone air inlet having a height, a cyclone air outlet and a screen surrounding the cyclone air outlet. The cyclone air outlet may comprise a passage that extends into the cyclone chamber less than the height of the cyclone inlet. The surface cleaning apparatus may also include at least one battery operably connected to the suction motor.
  • [0009]
    In another embodiment in accordance with this broad aspect, a surface cleaning apparatus comprises an air flow path extending from a dirty air inlet to a clean air outlet and includes a suction motor having a power requirement of 200 Watts or less. A cyclone chamber may be provided in the air flow path and may comprise a cyclone air inlet having a height, a cyclone air outlet and a screen surrounding the cyclone air outlet. The cyclone air outlet may comprise a passage that extends into the cyclone chamber less than the height of the cyclone inlet.
  • [0010]
    In any of the embodiments described above the at least one battery or surface cleaning apparatus may produce less than 50 air watts and an air flow rate less than 1.3 m3/minute.
  • [0011]
    The at least one battery or surface cleaning apparatus may produce less than 40 air watts and an air flow rate less than 1.2 m3/minute.
  • [0012]
    The at least one battery or surface cleaning apparatus may produce less than 30 air watts and an air flow rate less than 1.1 m3/minute.
  • [0013]
    The passage may be provided in a wall of the cyclone chamber and may have a thickness proximate a thickness of the wall.
  • [0014]
    The cyclone air inlet and the cyclone air outlet may be provided at a first end of the cyclone chamber.
  • [0015]
    The cyclone chamber may comprise a dirt outlet and the dirt outlet may be at a second end of the cyclone chamber opposed to the first end.
  • [0016]
    The screen may have a plurality of openings that are less than 8 mm in size, preferably less than 6 mm in size, more preferably less than 4 mm in size, and still more preferably less than 2 mm in size.
  • [0017]
    The screen may be cylindrical in shape.
  • [0018]
    The screen may be frusto-conical in shape.
  • [0019]
    The screen may have a height that is from 0.5 to 4 times the height of the cyclone air inlet.
  • [0020]
    The screen may have a height that is from 1 to 3 times the height of the cyclone air inlet.
  • [0021]
    The screen may have a height that is about twice the height of the cyclone air inlet.
  • DRAWINGS
  • [0022]
    Reference is made in the detailed description to the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • [0023]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an embodiment of a surface cleaning apparatus;
  • [0024]
    FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a cyclone bin assembly useable with the surface cleaning apparatus of FIG. 1;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 3 is a section view of the cyclone bin assembly of FIG. 2, taken along line 3-3 in FIG. 2;
  • [0026]
    FIG. 4 is a top perspective view of the cyclone bin assembly of FIG. 2, with its lid open; and,
  • [0027]
    FIG. 5 is the perspective view of FIG. 4, with the screen removed.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0028]
    Referring to FIG. 1, an embodiment of a surface cleaning apparatus 100 is shown. In the embodiment illustrated, the surface cleaning apparatus 100 is an upright surface cleaning apparatus. In alternate embodiments, the surface cleaning apparatus may be another suitable type of surface cleaning apparatus, including, for example, a hand vacuum, a canister vacuum cleaner, a stick vac, a wet-dry vacuum cleaner and a carpet extractor. The surface cleaning apparatus 100 can comprise an electrical cord to connect to an external power source, including, for example, a standard electrical outlet. Alternatively, or in addition to being connectable to an external power source, the surface cleaning apparatus 100 can comprise an onboard power source, including, for example one or more batteries. Optionally, the on board battery may be rechargeable, preferably while mounted to the surface cleaning apparatus 100.
  • [0029]
    As exemplified in FIG. 1, the surface cleaning apparatus 100 includes a surface cleaning head 102 and an upper section 104. The surface cleaning head 102 includes a pair of rear wheels 106 and a pair of front wheels (not shown) for rolling across a surface and a dirty air inlet 108. The upper section 104 is moveably connected to the surface cleaning head 102. The upper section 104 is moveable (e.g., pivotally mounted) between a storage position and an in use position. An air flow passage extends from the dirty air inlet 108 to a clean air outlet 110 on the upper section 104. A handle 116 is provided on the upper section 104 for manipulating the surface cleaning apparatus 100.
  • [0030]
    The upper section 104 comprises an air treatment housing 112 and a suction motor housing 114. The air treatment housing 112 houses an air treatment member, which is positioned in the air flow passage downstream from the dirty air inlet 108 to remove dirt particles and other debris from the air flowing through the air flow passage. In the illustrated example, the air treatment member comprises a cyclone bin assembly 118 comprising a cyclone chamber 120 and a dirt collection chamber 122.
  • [0031]
    The suction motor housing 114 is configured to house a suction motor (not shown). The suction motor is in air flow communication with the air flow passage, downstream from the cyclone bin assembly 118. Air exiting the cyclone bin assembly 118 can flow into a suction motor and is ejected via the clean air outlet 110. The suction motor is preferably provided below the cyclone air outlet.
  • [0032]
    As exemplified in FIGS. 2-5, the cyclone bin assembly 118 comprises a cyclonic chamber 120 and a dirt collection chamber 122. The cyclone chamber and the dirt collection chamber may be of any configuration and may be in any orientation.
  • [0033]
    As exemplified, the cyclone chamber 120 comprises a sidewall 124, a first (e.g., upper) end wall 126 and an opposing second end wall, or floor 128. A tangential air inlet 130, in air flow communication with the dirty air inlet 108, is provided in the sidewall 124 for receiving a particle laden fluid stream, represented by arrow 132. As the fluid stream 132 circulates within the cyclone chamber 120, dirt particles and other debris may be disentrained from the fluid stream 132. Dirt particles and other debris separated from the fluid stream 132 may exit the cyclone chamber 120 through a dirt outlet 134, and are collected in the dirt collection chamber 122.
  • [0034]
    Preferably, the dirt outlet 134 comprises a gap provided between the sidewall 124 of the cyclone chamber and second (lower) end wall 128. The gap may extend part way or all the way around sidewall 124. Preferably, as exemplified, the dirt outlet comprises a slot 136 that extends part way around sidewall 122 between the end of sidewall 124 facing second end wall 128 and second end wall 1286. Debris separated from the air flow in the cyclone chamber 120 can travel from the cyclone chamber 120, through the dirt outlet 158 to the dirt collection chamber 122. The cyclone bin assembly 118 comprises a longitudinal axis 138.
  • [0035]
    The dirt collection chamber 122 comprises a sidewall 140, a first end wall 144 and an opposing second endwall, or floor 144. Preferably, the floor 144 is pivotally connected to the dirt collection chamber 122, by hinges 146, and can be rotated between a closed position (FIG. 2) and an open position. The floor 144 can be held in the closed position by a releasable latch 148, or other suitable closure mechanism. The floor 128 of the cyclone chamber may be movable with the floor 144 to allow dirt retained in the cyclone chamber 120 to be emptied when the dirt collection bin 122 is opened. In the illustrated example, the floor 128 of the cyclone chamber 120 is supported above the floor 144 of the dirt collection chamber 122 on a support member 150.
  • [0036]
    Air circulating within the cyclone chamber 120 can exit via a cyclone air outlet. Referring to FIG. 5, the cyclone air outlet comprises an air outlet passage 152 provided in the first end wall that is in airflow communication with, preferably, a pair of external outlet down ducts 154. In the illustrated example, the passage 152 and down ducts 154 are in airflow communication by an air outlet chamber 156 that is located between the first end wall 126 of the cyclone chamber 120 and an optionally openable lid 158 of the cyclone bin assembly 118. The downstream ends of the down ducts 154 are in fluid communication with the suction motor (for example a fluid flow motor), which is preferably provided downstream from the cyclone bin assembly 118.
  • [0037]
    Referring to FIGS. 3 and 5, the passage 152 has a passage height 160, measured parallel to the cyclone chamber axis 138. Conventional cyclone chamber designs include a generally elongate outlet passage that extends into the interior of the cyclone chamber. Such air outlet passages tend to have solid, fluid impermeable walls, and are commonly referred to as vortex finders. Known vortex finders can have heights of several inches. Preferably, unlike conventional cyclone chamber designs, the height 160 of the air outlet passage 152 is selected so that the walls of the outlet passage 152 do not substantially extend into the interior of the cyclone chamber 120. Preferably, the height 160 of outlet passage 152 is selected to be less than the height 162 of the tangential air inlet 130 supplying air to the cyclone and may be less than half the height 162 or a third of the height. More preferably, the air inlet 164 of the outlet passage 152 does not extend beyond the inner surface 166 of the first end wall 128 (i.e., in to the cyclone chamber 120). In the illustrated example, the height 160 is less than height 162, and is generally equal to the thickness 168 of the endwall 128. Reducing the height 160 of the outlet passage 152 may help reduce energy losses as air exits the cyclone chamber 120, which may help increase the efficiency of the surface cleaning apparatus 100.
  • [0038]
    The cyclone air outlet also comprises a screen 168. The screen 168 may help prevent elongate particles such as hair and other debris from exiting the cyclone chamber 120 via the air outlet passage 152. The screen 168 comprises fluid permeable regions 170 that are covered with a fluid permeable material 180 (e.g., a mesh material) extending between non-permeable frame members 172. The permeable material 180 comprises a plurality of openings 182 to allow air to flow therethrough. The permeability of the fluid permeable regions, and the corresponding flow resistance of the screen 168, can be varied by varying the properties of the permeable material 180, including, for example the size and/or shape of the openings 182. For example, the openings 182 can be configured to have a diameter or maximum height that is less than 8 mm in size, preferably less than 6 mm, more preferably less than 4 mm and may be less than 2 mm.
  • [0039]
    The Applicant has discovered that for certain air flows, having certain flow properties, the fluid permeable screen 168 can be used in place of a traditional, non-permeable vortex finder to help facilitate the cyclonic air flow pattern within the cyclone chamber 120. For example, Applicant has discovered that if the surface cleaning apparatus 100 operates with a given combination of operating power and air flow rate, positioning the screen 168 within the cyclone chamber 120 may be sufficient to facilitate cyclonic flow of the air, while still allowing the air flow to ultimately exit the cyclone chamber 120 via the outlet passage 152.
  • [0040]
    For example, the use of a screen 168, as opposed to a traditional non-permeable vortex finder, is sufficient to facilitate operation of the surface cleaning apparatus 110 when the surface cleaning apparatus 100 produces approximately 50 air watts of power (or less), preferably 40 air watts of power or less and optionally 30 air watts of power or less and/or operates an air flow rate of approximately 1.3 cubic meters per minute (or less), preferably 1.2 cubic meters per minute or less and optionally 1.1 cubic meters per minute or less. In this configuration, the suction motor used in the surface cleaning apparatus 100 may be configured to have a power requirement of 500 watts or less, and preferably has a power requirement of less than 200 watts.
  • [0041]
    Preferably, the screen 168 has a height 186 that is greater than the height 160 of the outlet passage 152. More preferably, the height 186 of the screen 168 is greater than the height 162 of the air inlet 128. Optionally, the screen 168 can be configured so that the height 186 is between about 0.5 and 4 times larger than height 162. Preferably, the height 186 is between about 1 and about 3 times the height 162 of the air inlet 128, and more preferably is about 2 times the height 162 of the air inlet 128.
  • [0042]
    Optionally, the lid 158 of the cyclone bin assembly 118 is openable to allow a user to remove the screen 168. In the illustrated example, the lid 158 is hinged and can pivot open to allow access to the removable of the screen 168. Alternatively, the lid 158 can be detachable.
  • [0043]
    In the illustrated example, outlet passage 152 and the screen 168 have generally round cross sectional shapes, and the screen 168 is received in the outlet passage 152. Optionally, the screen 168 can be configured to have a cylindrical shape, a generally frusto-conical shape or any other suitable shape. The screen 168 may comprise an annular rim 174. When screen 168 is positioned in cyclone chamber 120, the rim 174 may be positioned above, and preferably rests on the upper wall 126 such that the screen 168 is suspended from the rim 174. A gasket 175 or other sealing member may be provided between the rim 174 and the upper wall 126 to help seal the rim 174 against the upper wall 126.
  • [0044]
    Optionally, the lid 158 can include at least one or more engagement member that can secure the screen 168 in position when the lid 158 is closed. In the illustrated example, the engagement member comprises four securing legs 176 extending from the inner surface 178 of the lid 158. When the lid 158 is closed, the securing legs 176 rest on the rim 174 and press the rim 174 against the upper wall 126. Providing securing legs 176 to hold the rim 174 in place may eliminate the need to use additional fasteners or attachment members to hold the screen 168 in position. The legs 176 are preferably spaced apart from each other around the perimeter of the rim 174. Spacing the legs 176 apart from each other may help to provide a distributed holding force and may help facilitate airflow between the legs 176, from the outlet passage 152 to the outlet conduits 234. Optionally, a different number of legs 176, other type of holding structure, including for example a curved wall or a bayonet mount, or other type of fastening members can be used to hold the screen 168 in place.
  • [0045]
    In the illustrated example, the screen 168 can be received in the outlet passage 152 in a plurality of rotational alignment positions, and need not be oriented in a predetermined direction or alignment relative to the upper wall 126 of the cyclone chamber 120.
  • [0046]
    Optionally, some or all of the upper wall 126 of the cyclone chamber 120 can be removable with the screen 168. Removing a portion of the upper wall 126 may allow a user to access the interior of the cyclone chamber 120. Optionally, the removable portion of the upper wall 126 can be an annular band 178 that surrounds the outlet passage 152 and screen 168. Removing some or all of the upper wall 126 while the floors 128 and 144 are open may allow simultaneous access to both ends of the cyclone bin assembly 118, which may help a user to clean the interior of the cyclone bin assembly 118.
  • [0047]
    What has been described above has been intended to be illustrative of the invention and non-limiting and it will be understood by persons skilled in the art that other variants and modifications may be made without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the claims appended hereto.

Claims (32)

  1. 1. A battery operated surface cleaning apparatus comprising:
    (a) an air flow path extending from a dirty air inlet to a clean air outlet and including a suction motor;
    (b) a cyclone chamber provided in the air flow path and comprising a cyclone air inlet having a height, a cyclone air outlet and a screen surrounding the cyclone air outlet, wherein the cyclone air outlet comprises a passage that extends into the cyclone chamber less than the height of the cyclone inlet; and,
    (c) at least one battery operably connected to the suction motor.
  2. 2. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the at least one battery produces less than 50 air watts and an air flow rate less than 1.3 m3/minute.
  3. 3. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the at least one battery produces less than 40 air watts and an air flow rate less than 1.2 m3/minute.
  4. 4. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the at least one battery produces less than 30 air watts and an air flow rate less than 1.1 m3/minute.
  5. 5. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the passage is provided in a wall of the cyclone chamber and passage has a thickness proximate a thickness of the wall.
  6. 6. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the cyclone air inlet and the cyclone air outlet are provided at a first end of the cyclone chamber.
  7. 7. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 6 wherein the cyclone chamber further comprises a dirt outlet and the dirt outlet is at a second end of the cyclone chamber opposed to the first end.
  8. 8. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the screen has a plurality of openings that are less than 8 mm in size.
  9. 9. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the screen has a plurality of openings that are less than 6 mm in size.
  10. 10. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the screen has a plurality of openings that are less than 4 mm in size.
  11. 11. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the screen has a plurality of openings that are less than 2 mm in size.
  12. 12. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the screen is cylindrical in shape.
  13. 13. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the screen is frusto-conical in shape.
  14. 14. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the screen has a height that is from 0.5 to 4 times the height of the cyclone air inlet.
  15. 15. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the screen has a height that is from 1 to 3 times the height of the cyclone air inlet.
  16. 16. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 1 wherein the screen has a height that is about twice the height of the cyclone air inlet.
  17. 17. A surface cleaning apparatus comprising:
    (a) an air flow path extending from a dirty air inlet to a clean air outlet and including a suction motor having a power requirement of 200 Watts or less and;
    (b) a cyclone chamber provided in the air flow path and comprising a cyclone air inlet having a height, a cyclone air outlet and a screen surrounding the cyclone air outlet, wherein the cyclone air outlet comprises a passage that extends into the cyclone chamber less than the height of the cyclone inlet.
  18. 18. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 17 wherein the surface cleaning apparatus produces less than 50 air watts and an air flow rate less than 1.3 m3/minute.
  19. 19. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 17 wherein the surface cleaning apparatus produces less than 40 air watts and an air flow rate less than 1.2 m3/minute.
  20. 20. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 17 wherein the surface cleaning apparatus produces less than 30 air watts and an air flow rate less than 1.1 m3/minute.
  21. 21. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 17 wherein the passage is provided in a wall of the cyclone chamber and passage has a thickness proximate a thickness of the wall.
  22. 22. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 17 wherein the cyclone air inlet and the cyclone air outlet are provided at a first end of the cyclone chamber.
  23. 23. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 22 wherein the cyclone chamber further comprises a dirt outlet and the dirt outlet is at a second end of the cyclone chamber opposed to the first end.
  24. 24. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 17 wherein the screen has a plurality of openings that are less than 8 mm in size.
  25. 25. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 17 wherein the screen has a plurality of openings that are less than 6 mm in size.
  26. 26. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 17 wherein the screen has a plurality of openings that are less than 4 mm in size.
  27. 27. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 17 wherein the screen has a plurality of openings that are less than 2 mm in size.
  28. 28. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 17 wherein the screen is cylindrical in shape.
  29. 29. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 17 wherein the screen is frusto-conical in shape.
  30. 30. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 17 wherein the screen has a height that is from 0.5 to 4 times the height of the cyclone air inlet.
  31. 31. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 17 wherein the screen has a height that is from 1 to 3 times the height of the cyclone air inlet.
  32. 32. The surface cleaning apparatus of claim 17 wherein the screen has a height that is about twice the height of the cyclone air inlet.
US13040695 2011-03-04 2011-03-04 Surface cleaning apparatus Abandoned US20120222252A1 (en)

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Applications Claiming Priority (8)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13040695 US20120222252A1 (en) 2011-03-04 2011-03-04 Surface cleaning apparatus
US14003160 US9962052B2 (en) 2011-03-04 2012-03-05 Surface cleaning apparatus
PCT/CA2012/000194 WO2012119226A1 (en) 2011-03-04 2012-03-05 Surface cleaning apparatus
CA 2947348 CA2947348A1 (en) 2011-03-04 2012-03-05 Surface cleaning apparatus
CA 2828465 CA2828465A1 (en) 2011-03-04 2012-03-05 Surface cleaning apparatus
CA 2950543 CA2950543A1 (en) 2011-03-04 2012-03-05 Surface cleaning apparatus
US15365118 US20170079494A1 (en) 2011-03-04 2016-11-30 Surface cleaning apparatus
US15660083 US20170319032A1 (en) 2011-03-04 2017-07-26 Surface cleaning apparatus

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US14003160 Continuation-In-Part US9962052B2 (en) 2011-03-04 2012-03-05 Surface cleaning apparatus
PCT/CA2012/000194 Continuation-In-Part WO2012119226A1 (en) 2011-03-04 2012-03-05 Surface cleaning apparatus
US14003160 Continuation-In-Part 2013-11-11

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US9693665B2 (en) 2014-10-22 2017-07-04 Techtronic Industries Co. Ltd. Vacuum cleaner having cyclonic separator
US9775483B2 (en) 2014-10-22 2017-10-03 Techtronic Industries Co. Ltd. Vacuum cleaner having cyclonic separator
US20170303756A1 (en) * 2016-04-25 2017-10-26 Omachron Intellectual Property Inc. Cyclone assembly for surface cleaning apparatus and a surface cleaning apparatus having same
US20170303758A1 (en) * 2016-04-25 2017-10-26 Omachron Intellectual Property Inc. Cyclone assembly for surface cleaning apparatus and a surface cleaning apparatus having same
US9885194B1 (en) 2017-05-11 2018-02-06 Hayward Industries, Inc. Pool cleaner impeller subassembly
US9885196B2 (en) 2015-01-26 2018-02-06 Hayward Industries, Inc. Pool cleaner power coupling
US9896858B1 (en) 2017-05-11 2018-02-20 Hayward Industries, Inc. Hydrocyclonic pool cleaner
US9909333B2 (en) 2015-01-26 2018-03-06 Hayward Industries, Inc. Swimming pool cleaner with hydrocyclonic particle separator and/or six-roller drive system

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US9549650B2 (en) 2012-08-09 2017-01-24 Dyson Technology Limited Cleaning appliance
GB2504762B (en) * 2012-08-09 2014-12-10 Dyson Technology Ltd A cleaning appliance

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