US20110218076A1 - Sprint trainer aid - Google Patents

Sprint trainer aid Download PDF

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US20110218076A1
US20110218076A1 US13043351 US201113043351A US2011218076A1 US 20110218076 A1 US20110218076 A1 US 20110218076A1 US 13043351 US13043351 US 13043351 US 201113043351 A US201113043351 A US 201113043351A US 2011218076 A1 US2011218076 A1 US 2011218076A1
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cable
sprinter
motor
training device
pull
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US13043351
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Wendell Lawrence
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Wendell Lawrence
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B24/00Electric or electronic controls for exercising apparatus of preceding groups; Controlling or monitoring of exercises, sportive games, training or athletic performances

Abstract

Disclosed is a sprinter training aid which pulls the sprinter forward in an over speed condition, for the purpose of exercise the muscles which pull the leg forward when running, such the hip flexor muscles. Two devices can be used, one pulling the sprinter forward and one pulling the sprinter backward at the start of a run. The backward pulling at the start of the run exercises the sprinter's muscles which are used when going from a stationary position, to a full speed sprint. The device which pulls the sprinter forward would take over when the rearward pulling device shut off, and pull the sprinter to an over speed condition. Include in the device is a cable and cable winder, and a motor, computer, and a wireless connection to a data compilation computer.

Description

    PRIORITY/CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/311,593, filed Mar. 8, 2010, and U.S. Provisional Application No. 61316145, filed Mar. 22, 2010, disclosures of which are incorporated by reference.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The presently disclosed and claimed inventive concept relates to a device to be used for increasing the speed of a sprinter, and more particularly to a sprinter training aid which pulls the sprinter forward in order to strengthen his running muscles by use of over speed.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Running requires the muscles of the leg to lift the leg up and then pull the leg down. The speed and rate of the leg going up must match the speed of the leg going down. Following the premise that a chain is as strong as its weakest link, the runner's rate of turnover (strides per second) is limited by whichever muscle group is the weakest or slowest (the muscle group that lifts the leg or the muscle group that lowers the leg).
  • The lower back-glute-ham group of muscles that drives the legs down includes much bigger muscles than the hip flexor group which pulls the leg up. Additionally, the lowering of the leg is assisted by gravity while the hip flexor group has to work against gravity to get its work done to pull the leg forward and up. It is for these reasons that the hip flexor group is the limiting factor in stride frequency, and requires the most developmental focus if increased speed is the goal. The sprinter training device of the invention is designed with this in mind, to increase the athlete's stride frequency by increasing the power generated by the hip flexor group. It achieves this by altering the run cycle so that the hip flexor group is targeted for muscle development, much like lifting weights for the hip flexor group.
  • The following formula is a description of the physics of hip flexor movement.
  • Hip Flexor Power Development:
      • A. The leg has a defined weight.
      • B. The swinging leg, on its way backward, moves at a measurable speed.
      • C. Weight(load)×Speed=Power.
  • The weight of the leg multiplied by the speed that the leg is moving will determine the power required to stop the limb and change its direction and move it forward. By forcing an athlete to run faster than the athlete's unassisted speed, the speed factor of the power equation is modified and therefore, the athlete's power is increased. It is in the increase in power that allows the athlete to achieve higher speeds and thus have greater speed endurance.
  • Fast Twitch Maintenance:
  • By causing the muscles of the leg to be energized in a more rapid sequence, the nervous system of the sprinter's leg is adapted to faster firing of the muscles involved in the run cycle.
  • Nervous Adaption:
  • If a runner ran downhill for 30 meters, he/she would most certainly run faster than a flying 30 meter run (natural, unassisted maximum velocity). This is because the nervous system is much more cooperative when the muscles that are innervated are relaxed.
  • However running downhill has been shown to not be the optimal way to increase speed. When running downhill, the runner is assisted by gravity, which tends to continue to accelerate the runner to his/her terminal speed, a condition in which relaxation is not possible. The pattern of nerve innervation and muscle firing sequence is altered from that of the unassisted running cycle. When the maximum over speed rate is achieved when running downhill, the runner adapts his run cycle, muscle innervation sequence and muscle firing pattern to cause the runner to lean backwards, apply breaking pressure to the feet when they are on the ground to absorb increased foot strike from the downhill posture, and in many subtle ways to change the downhill run cycle from that of the unassisted run cycle.
  • Downhill running puts the ankle joint at an unnatural position concerning the initial heel contact. It extends the ankle joint, negating its ability to add impulse to the body. By contrast, the machine of the invention allows the runner to have the same ankle position that he would use if he were unassisted. Because the runner is not at his or her maximum velocity, the runner does not “put on the brakes” nor change his posture, shifting the center of gravity backward.
  • Natural Running Curve:
  • All runners have to overcome the load of the body at the beginning of any run. Use of the motor of the device to pull the runner backward at the start of the sprint adds a slight load to the runner in order to exaggerate the runner's normal load (inertia). Running downhill or with the assistance of a bungee cord, for example, removes this normal load and is counterproductive to acceleration training
  • SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE
  • The purpose of the Abstract is to enable the public, and especially the scientists, engineers, and practitioners in the art who are not familiar with patent or legal terms or phraseology, to determine quickly from a cursory inspection, the nature and essence of the technical disclosure of the application. The Abstract is neither intended to define the inventive concept(s) of the application, which is measured by the claims, nor is it intended to be limiting as to the scope of the inventive concept(s) in any way.
  • Still other features and advantages of the presently disclosed and claimed inventive concept(s) will become readily apparent to those skilled in this art from the following detailed description describing preferred embodiments of the inventive concept(s), simply by way of illustration of the best mode contemplated by carrying out the inventive concept(s). As will be realized, the inventive concept(s) is capable of modification in various obvious respects all without departing from the inventive concept(s). Accordingly, the drawings and description of the preferred embodiments are to be regarded as illustrative in nature, and not as restrictive in nature.
  • This invention relates to a device for helping a sprinter develop muscles for running faster and to help the sprinter train in order to run faster. The device of the invention helps the runner run faster by addressing all three modes of improvement listed above, by pulling the runner forward with a cable attached to the sprinter. Training is accomplished by pulling the runner forward at a carefully controlled rate, which is based upon either the unassisted speed of the runner to which a percentage of over speed is applied, or a setting a line pressure to be maintained on the cable attached to the sprinter. With this acceptable range of comfortable over speed applied, the runner does not enter the over speed zone of the run cycle, which would be experienced in downhill running and which would cause a runner to shift to a braking and downhill style of running.
  • Since the runner is pulled forward at a slightly faster speed than his unassisted speed, the muscles of the hip flexor group are forced to work harder in pulling the leg forward for the next stride. Being within the comfortable over speed zone allows the athlete to relax and maintain his running form at above normal speeds, with the result being targeted workouts to the hip flexors
  • The device of the invention may be used in tandem, two to a runner. In such case, the parts of the devises are referred to as “first cable” or “second cable”, for example. Use of the device in tandem would include a device pulling the runner forward, and a device pulling the runner backward at the start of the run. The device of the invention includes a first harness which is placed around the runner, such as around the runner's waist. Attached to the harness is a first cable which extends to a first motor which has a first cable winding reel for taking in and letting out the first cable. The first cable can be made of any number of materials, such as nylon line, steel cable, line similar to monofilament fishing line, braided line, or any number of similar materials. The device includes a computer in which the sprinter's information can be entered. The information to be entered can include the sprinter's name or number, his unassisted speed, and the percent of over speed which is desired. Also enterable into the computer is the distance the sprinter wishes to set as a training distance, the line tension to be maintained, and the percent of over speed to be achieved. For instance, the practice race could be anywhere from 30 to 100 or more meters. The machine may be configured to send data to a central database if more than one machine is in use, for recording multiple athletes information, with the central database being on a coaches laptop or in his office, for instance.
  • The device has an auto release link. This can be a friction, magnetic, or other type of release which releases under a predetermined amount of force. The auto-release would release the runner from the motor if the runner fell down, for instance, or if the runner was not prepared to start at the beginning of the race. Typical line pressures to achieve over speed running would not typically pull a runner over, and could be in the range of 8-15 pounds. This amount of force could be easily resisted by a standing or running sprinter.
  • The machine can have a second unit which will work in concert with the first unit. The first unit could be called the assistance motor, and pulls the sprinter forward. The second unit is called the resistance motor and applies a pulling force on the sprinter which will cause drag at the beginning of the run. This initial period of resistance works the muscles used in overcoming the sprinters inertia in take off, and after the start of the run the assistance motor will cause extra speed as the resistance cycle is finished. The second unit can be identical to the first, with a second motor, second cable winding real, second cable, second harness, second power source, second device frame, second computer, second tensioning arm, second cable meter, second cable feed reel, etc.
  • The resistance motor will typically activate at the same time as the assistance motor, coordinated by wireless communication. At that time the resistance motor will have the higher (reverse) pulling force value thereby providing more resistance than assistance. The resistance motor will gradually reduce its resistance to zero, thus allowing the assistance (forward) motor full control and transitioning from resistance to assistance within the same run. The sprinter will experience higher power requirements (reduced speed) at the beginning of the run and higher speed requirements from the transition on to the assistance dominated part of the run.
  • Both units working together at the same time can thus overload the entire spectrum of a sprint. The overload that is experienced while training with the machine allows the sprinter to transition from power to speed much faster when that load is removed. This overloads the complete cycle of a sprint, and is like weight lifting for sprinters.
  • The device can include a start mode and a finish mode. In the start mode, the cable would begin to be taken up by the motor in the reel at a gradual rate until the runner had accelerated to his top unassisted speed. At that point, the motor and cable would continue to accelerate to the percentage of over speed or line tension that had been selected. Similarly, as the runner approaches the finish of the measured distance, as determined by the amount of cable that has been taken up into the device, the pulling motor would begin slowing down its pulling of the cable, until there was just enough pressure on the cable to keep the slack out of the cable. The motor and cable will ideally about seven pounds of maximum load to the harness on the runner, and that load may be adjustable at the discretion of the coach, athlete, or other user.
  • The start mode can be initiated from an audio feedback, such as the runner or someone else yelling, “start,” or “go,” or by the sound of a starting pistol or by a remote control, or by stepping or off of a pad. The computer and the motor module could also initiate the start by a countdown to the starting gun, and an audio signal to initiate the start of the race. The device could also be set to an auto-start mode, in which the cable begins to be taken in as soon as line slack in the cable is detected.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a sprinter training device of the disclosed technology.
  • FIG. 2 is a view of a runner being attached to two of the sprinter training devices.
  • DEFINITIONS
  • In the following description and in the figures, like elements are identified with like reference numerals.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE EXEMPLARY EMBODIMENTS
  • While the presently disclosed inventive concept(s) is susceptible of various modifications and alternative constructions, certain illustrated embodiments thereof have been shown in the drawings and will be described below in detail. It should be understood, however, that there is no intention to limit the inventive concept(s) to the specific form disclosed, but, on the contrary, the presently disclosed and claimed inventive concept(s) is to cover all modifications, alternative constructions, and equivalents falling within the spirit and scope of the inventive concept(s) as defined in the claims.
  • Shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 is a preferred embodiment of the invention. Many of the features of this preferred embodiment are optional, and the technology itself is defined by the claims and not by the preferred embodiment described herein.
  • The disclosed technology is a sprinter training device 10. The sprinter training device 10 basically extends and retracts a cable 16 which attaches with a harness to the waist of a sprinter. A sprinter pulls out the cable to position distant from the sprinter training device 10, and at the initiation of a sprint the sprinter training device 10 reels in the cable 16 at a rate which places a predetermined load on the cable which pulls the sprinter forward at a rate faster than his normal pace.
  • Shown in FIG. 1 is the sprinter training device 10 mounted in a device frame 20, with at least one wheel 54. The device frame 20 is shown in FIG. 1 as basically a rectangular structure in which are housed various components of the device. Obviously the device frame can take other shapes, but this particular example is shown as a preferred embodiment. The device frame 20 includes a computer monitor 56 which is located on a top panel of the device. In this particular design the computer monitor is angled and at roughly waist high for convenient use by a sprinter or coach. The device can also be controlled from a remote location, so that data is transferred from the device to a computer which records data for a number of runners and which records a number of practice runs for comparison.
  • In the device shown in FIG. 1, a motor 12 is mounted on the bottom shelf of the frame. As shown in FIG. 2, use of the device can involve the use of a first device 10 and a second device 110. In a set up in which two devices are used, the parts of the first device are designated by the term first, as in first motor, first cable winding reel, first cable, etc. The equivalent parts in the second device 110 are designated second motor, second cable winding reel, second cable, etc.
  • Shown in FIG. 1 is a first motor 12 attached to a shelf of the device frame 20. The motor is attached to a cable winding reel 14 around which is wrapped a length of cable 16. Cable 16 is routed around a pulley 38, with the pulley 38 attached to a first tensioning arm 36. The tensioning arm 36 is attached to the bottom shelf of the frame and is configured to rotate back and forth. The purpose of the tensioning arm 36 moving back and forth is so that fluctuations in the rate of uptake of the cable 16 caused by irregularities in the sprinter's movement can be accommodated by the tensioning arm 36 moving back and forth and keeping a constant tension on the cable. After passing over the pulley 38 the cable 16 passes out of the sprinter training device 10 and extends to the sprinters location, and is attached to the sprinter by a harness such as a belt around his waist.
  • The device shown in FIG. 1 also includes a cable feed reel 42, which rotates as cable is fed over the reel. The amount of cable that has been retracted from the device is measured and tracked by use of a measuring device on the cable feed reel 42, and a cable meter 40 mounted adjacent to the cable feed reel 42.
  • One way in which the length of cable which has been extended or retracted can be thus tracked with the cable feed reel and the cable meter is by use of a sensor using magnets. For instance, a magnet can be placed on the cable feed reel 42 and sensed by a first cable meter 40. By use of the Hall Effect, which is utilized in bicycle cyclometers, the number of rotations of the feed reel 42 can be converted to inches of cable 16 which has been extended. Use of a Hall Effect type sensor is only one example of how the line could be metered, in a meter using mechanical gears to calculate distance or a magnetic read switch can also be utilized, as could other measuring technologies.
  • Shown in FIG. 1 is a spring 48 which is attached to an arm cable 50, with the arm cable 50 going around a pulley 102. With this set up the spring 48 applies pressure to the tensioning arm 36 which causes it to come to rest at a position to the right in the view of FIG. 1. As additional force is applied to the cable 16, the tensioning arm 36 is allowed to move towards the left of FIG. 1, by the tensioning of the spring 48.
  • Shown in FIG. 1 is the power source 18, which in this case are batteries 52. An alternative power source is provided by use of the power cord 60 which can operate the device or charge the batteries. Included in the device shown in FIG. 1 is a computer 26 which is utilized to coordinate tension on the cable 16, to record the runner's names and unassisted sprint times, and to calculate the percentage of over speed or line tension to apply to the runner. The runner or the coach may enter a percentage of over speed to be applied to the runner, or they may specify a line tension to be steadily maintained as the runner approaches the training device 10.
  • FIG. 2 shows the training device 10 in operation with a runner 56 and a second unit 110. In most cases the second unit 110 would be identical to the first unit 10 but since the first unit 10 can take a number of configurations, the second unit 110 could also take different configurations. Shown in FIG. 2 is a sprint training device 10 with a cable 16 attached to the sprinter 56 by a harness 104. Included in the cable 16 is an auto release link 46. A second auto release link 46 is shown behind the sprinter 56. The auto release link can be a device which pulls apart at a predetermined pressure. This could be a friction type release mechanism, and it could also be magnetic, it could also be something as simple as hook and loop type fasteners stuck together. The amount of force applied through the cable to the runner's waist would typically be an amount of force from 5 to 15 pounds, and if the runner simply stopped running, the cable 16 would not pull him off balance. He could easily stop, stand, or back up against the force applied by the cable 16. Shown in FIG. 2 is an extending brace 44 which is an optional feature and is a folding leg which is attached to the device frame 20. It provides additional stability to the device as the cable applies pressure to the runner.
  • Shown in FIG. 2 are several buttons which are conveniently used in controlling the activities of the training device. These include an on/off switch 62, a retract button 64, and a kill switch 76. Other controls could be presented on the monitor 56 such as by a touch screen or by use of a mouse or keyboard.
  • FIG. 2 shows an optional configuration of the device, in which a second device 110 is attached to the sprinter 56, from behind the sprinter. The second device 110 includes a second motor 66 and a second cable 70. In the case of the second device pulling from behind, the computer of the second device is programmed to apply a resisting force to sprinter as he begins his run. This resisting force tapers off very quickly as the sprinter reaches speed, and thus provides resistance training for the initial surge of energy in getting the sprinter moving at full speed.
  • Use of the machine would typically involve initiation of a start cycle, with the first device 10 applying only enough pressure to keep the slack out of the line during the start phase. During the start phase the second device 110 would apply a predetermined amount of force to the runner in order to give the runner a workout for his initiation muscles. The start cycle would quickly phase out, and for the rest of the run the training device 10 would apply the prescribed forward pressure to the runner 56 and cause him to run faster than he would if unassisted.
  • Use of the device can also include a finishing cycle, in which the tension applied to the front of the sprinter 56 tapers off until there is just enough pressure to keep the slack out of the line.
  • While certain exemplary embodiments are shown in the Figures and described in this disclosure, it is to be distinctly understood that the presently disclosed inventive concept(s) is not limited thereto but may be variously embodied to practice within the scope of the following claims. From the foregoing description, it will be apparent that various changes may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the disclosure as defined by the following claims.

Claims (22)

  1. 1. A sprinter training device, comprising: a first motor with a first cable winding reel, configured to let out and take in a first cable to maintain a predetermined line tension;
    a first power source for said motor;
    a first training device frame comprising a mounting position for said first motor;
    a first harness attached to a first end of said cable, for attachment to a sprinter, with said first cable having a second end attached to said first cable winding reel; wherein,
    said first motor is configured to pull said sprinter forward toward said first motor by taking in said first cable fast enough to maintain a selected line pressure on said first cable in order to pull said sprinter forward faster than he could otherwise run.
  2. 2. The sprinter training device of claim 1 which further comprises a computer for inputting a line pressure to be maintained as said sprinter approaches said first motor and first cable winding reel.
  3. 3. The sprinter training device of claim 2 in which said computer includes a database of sprinters' unassisted speeds for selected distances, and a means for inputting a selected percent of over speed to retract said cable in order to pull said sprinter toward said first motor with a preselected tension on said first cable.
  4. 4. The sprinter training device of claim 2 in which said computer further comprises a start cycle which takes in said first cable after a start of a run to match the sprinter's acceleration, and gradually increases take up speed until a calculated over speed rate is achieved.
  5. 5. The sprinter training device of claim 2 which further comprises a first tensioning arm rotatingly anchored to said frame at one end, with said first cable passing over a pulley on a non-anchored end of said tensioning arm, with said tensioning arm movable to maintain first cable tension constant even if said sprinter's forward progress is of uneven speed.
  6. 6. The sprinter training device of claim 2 which further comprises a first cable meter, for measuring the length of first cable as it is pulled out.
  7. 7. The sprinter trainer device of claim 6 which further comprises a first cable feed reel for feeding out first cable from said first cable winding reel, with said first cable meter built into said first cable feed reed reel.
  8. 8. A sprinter training device, comprising:
    a first motor with a first cable winding reel, configured to let out and take in a first cable to maintain a predetermined line tension;
    a first power source for said first motor;
    a first training device frame comprising a mounting position for said first motor and other components;
    a first harness attached to a first end of said first cable, for attachment to a sprinter, with said first cable having a second end attached to said first cable winding reel;
    a first cable feed reel with a first cable measuring unit for tracking how much cable has been pulled out, said first cable feed reel for feeding out first cable from said first cable winding reel;
    a first tensioning arm rotatingly anchored at one end, with said first cable passing over a pulley on a non-anchored end of said first tensioning arm, with said first tensioning arm movable to maintain cable tension constant even if said sprinter's forward progress is of uneven speed;
    a computer for inputting a line pressure to be maintained as said sprinter approaches said first motor and first cable winding reel, and for shutting off said first motor when a measured amount of extended first cable has been retracted; wherein,
    said first motor is configured for retracting first cable at a rate to maintain a selected line pressure on said first cable in order to pull said sprinter forward faster than he could otherwise run.
  9. 9. The sprinter training device of claim 8 in which said computer includes a database of sprinters' unassisted speeds for selected distances, and a means for inputting a selected percent of over speed to retract said first cable in order to pull said sprinter toward said first motor with a preselected tension on said first cable.
  10. 10. The sprinter training device of claim 8 in which said computer further comprises a start cycle which takes in first cable after a start of a run to match the sprinter's acceleration, and gradually increases take up speed and line pressure until the calculated over speed rate is achieved.
  11. 11. The sprinter training device of claim 2 which further comprises a first extending brace attached to said frame for stabilizing said device against a pull by said cable being retracted by said first motor.
  12. 12. The sprinter training device of claim 2 in which a start cycle is initiated by said computer sensing slack in said first cable as the sprinter begins to run.
  13. 13. The sprinter training device of claim 2 in which said cable further comprises an auto release link, for disengaging said cable from said motor upon reaching a selected release tension.
  14. 14. The sprinter training device of claim 2 which further comprises a second device frame with a second motor and a cable winding reel, configured to let out and take in a second cable to maintain a predetermined line tension, with a power source for said second motor, with a second harness attached to a first end of said second cable, for attachment to said sprinter, with said second cable having a second end attached to said second cable winding reel; wherein,
    said second motor is configured to pull against said sprinters forward motion away from said second motor, by letting out second said cable fast enough to maintain a selected line pressure on said cable in order to present a rearward pull on said sprinter simultaneous to said forward pull from said first cable.
  15. 15. The sprinter training device of claim 14 which further comprises a second computer and a wireless communication with said first computer for coordination of cable retraction and release.
  16. 16. The sprinter training device of claim 14 which further comprises a second computer for inputting a line pressure to be maintained as said sprinter recedes from said second motor and said second cable winding reel.
  17. 17. The sprinter training device of claim 1 which further comprises an audible report of the length of cable played out, so a sprinter can move to a measured distance of his choosing.
  18. 18. The sprinter training device of claim 1 which further comprises a start cycle in which said cable winding reel is delayed from applying the selected cable pressure to said sprinter for a short period of time as the sprinter starts.
  19. 19. The sprinter training device of claim 14 which further comprises a start cycle in which said cable winding reel and said second cable winding reel are both delayed from applying the selected cable pressure to said sprinter for a short period of time as the sprinter starts.
  20. 20. The sprinter training device of claim 1 which further comprises a data collection function for saving data from each run cycle, for later analysis of run data.
  21. 21. The sprinter training device of claim 1 which further comprises a data analysis module with wireless connection to and from the computer to a data analysis module for data collection and analysis.
  22. 22. A sprinter training device, comprising:
    a first motor with a first cable winding reel, configured to let out and take in a first cable to maintain a predetermined line tension;
    a first power source for said first motor;
    a training device first frame comprising a mounting position for said first motor;
    a first harness attached to a first end of said first cable, for attachment to a sprinter, with said first cable having a second end attached to said first cable winding reel;
    a computer for inputting a line pressure to be maintained as said sprinter approaches said first motor and first cable winding reel
    a second device frame with a second motor and a second cable winding reel, configured to let out and take in a second cable to maintain a predetermined line tension, with a power source for said second motor, with a second harness attached to a first end of said second cable, for attachment to said sprinter, with said second cable having a second end attached to said second cable winding reel; wherein,
    said second motor is configured to pull against said sprinters forward motion away from said second motor, by letting out second said cable fast enough to maintain a selected line pressure on said cable in order to present a rearward pull on said sprinter simultaneous to said forward pull from said cable; wherein,
    said first motor is configured to pull said sprinter forward toward said motor by taking in said cable fast enough to maintain a selected line pressure on said cable in order to pull said sprinter forward faster than he could otherwise run, and said second motor is configured to pull said sprinter toward said second motor, with said second motor pulling more at the start of said sprint, and said second motor pulling less at the end of said spring.
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US20160325131A1 (en) * 2015-05-08 2016-11-10 Michael A. Wehrell Systems and methods for over speed to resistive training
US20180021627A1 (en) * 2016-07-20 2018-01-25 Strive VR, LLC Interactive and Dynamic Fitness System

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US20140323270A1 (en) 2014-10-30 application

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