US20110182231A1 - Methods and systems for a wireless routing architecture and protocol - Google Patents

Methods and systems for a wireless routing architecture and protocol Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20110182231A1
US20110182231A1 US13078562 US201113078562A US2011182231A1 US 20110182231 A1 US20110182231 A1 US 20110182231A1 US 13078562 US13078562 US 13078562 US 201113078562 A US201113078562 A US 201113078562A US 2011182231 A1 US2011182231 A1 US 2011182231A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
station
path
relay
message
rs
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13078562
Inventor
Guo Qiang Wang
Shiquan Wu
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Apple Inc
Original Assignee
Nortel Networks Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W40/00Communication routing or communication path finding
    • H04W40/02Communication route or path selection, e.g. power-based or shortest path routing
    • H04W40/04Communication route or path selection, e.g. power-based or shortest path routing based on wireless node resources
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L45/00Routing or path finding of packets in data switching networks
    • H04L45/12Shortest path evaluation
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L45/00Routing or path finding of packets in data switching networks
    • H04L45/26Route discovery packet
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W40/00Communication routing or communication path finding
    • H04W40/24Connectivity information management, e.g. connectivity discovery or connectivity update
    • H04W40/246Connectivity information discovery
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W40/00Communication routing or communication path finding
    • H04W40/02Communication route or path selection, e.g. power-based or shortest path routing
    • H04W40/12Communication route or path selection, e.g. power-based or shortest path routing based on transmission quality or channel quality
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W40/00Communication routing or communication path finding
    • H04W40/24Connectivity information management, e.g. connectivity discovery or connectivity update
    • H04W40/30Connectivity information management, e.g. connectivity discovery or connectivity update for proactive routing
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W80/00Wireless network protocols or protocol adaptations to wireless operation, e.g. WAP [Wireless Application Protocol]
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W88/00Devices specially adapted for wireless communication networks, e.g. terminals, base stations or access point devices
    • H04W88/02Terminal devices
    • H04W88/04Terminal devices adapted for relaying to or from another terminal or user
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02DCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES [ICT], I.E. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AIMING AT THE REDUCTION OF THIR OWN ENERGY USE
    • Y02D70/00Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks
    • Y02D70/10Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT]
    • Y02D70/14Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers [IEEE] networks
    • Y02D70/146Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers [IEEE] networks in Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access [WiMAX] networks
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02DCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES [ICT], I.E. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AIMING AT THE REDUCTION OF THIR OWN ENERGY USE
    • Y02D70/00Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks
    • Y02D70/20Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks independent of Radio Access Technologies
    • Y02D70/22Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks independent of Radio Access Technologies in peer-to-peer [P2P], ad hoc and mesh networks
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02DCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES [ICT], I.E. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AIMING AT THE REDUCTION OF THIR OWN ENERGY USE
    • Y02D70/00Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks
    • Y02D70/30Power-based selection of communication route or path
    • Y02D70/32Power-based selection of communication route or path based on wireless node resources
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02DCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES [ICT], I.E. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AIMING AT THE REDUCTION OF THIR OWN ENERGY USE
    • Y02D70/00Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks
    • Y02D70/30Power-based selection of communication route or path
    • Y02D70/34Power-based selection of communication route or path based on transmission quality or channel quality

Abstract

The present invention provides a method for generating routing paths in a multi-hop network. The multi-hop network includes a base station, at least one relay station, and at least one non-relay mobile station. The routing paths are paths between the base station and the at least one non-relay mobile station via the at least one relay station. The base station broadcasts a path discovery message (PDM) including a path list with a starting point of the path list being the base station. Each of the relay stations receives the PDM and updates the PDM by adding their own respective node identifier to the path list and broadcasting the updated PDM. The PDMs eventually reach the non-relay mobile station. The non-relay mobile stations reply to the base station by sending the base station the updated path list between the base station and the non-relay mobile station. In some embodiments the base station or the at least one non-relay mobile station acting as a source node sends a dynamic service (DSx) message including an end-to-end path list to an end of path destination. The relay stations use the path list to forward the message between the source node and the end of path destination. In some implementations the multi-hop network operates in a manner that is consistent with any one of: IEEE 802.16, IEEE 802.16d, and IEEE 802.16e.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application is a continuation application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/481,825 filed Jul. 7, 2006, which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/730,763 filed on Oct. 27, 2005, both of which are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The invention relates to routing for wireless signal transmission.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    WiMAX is defined as “Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access” by the WiMAX Forum, which was formed in April 2001 to promote conformance and interoperability of the IEEE 802.16 standard. WiMAX is described as “a standards-based technology enabling the delivery of last mile wireless broadband access as an alternative to cable and DSL.”
  • [0004]
    One aspect of the standard provides a simple Point-to-Multi-Point (PMP) architecture. The PMP architecture includes a base station (BS) communicating over a single hop to one or more wireless mobile stations (MS). FIG. 1A shows an example of a PMP architecture in which BS 50 is in communication with MS 52 and MS 54. In an ideal case, conventional PMP transmission allows for a 50 km hop and transmission rates of approximately 30 Mbps in the direction from BS to MS and 17 Mbps in the direction from MS to BS. To provide suitable transmission over the single hop, a BS having a tall antenna with a good line of sight to the MS is typically required.
  • [0005]
    The current version of IEEE 802.16d also defines a mesh architecture. In a mesh network each node only transmits as far as an adjacent node. In a mesh network nodes can transmit data from nearby nodes to nodes that are too far away to reach in a single hop or do not have clear line of sight, resulting in a network that can span large distances. This introduces complexity to network control and resource scheduling. The current version of the IEEE 802.16d mesh network architecture is considered to be “connection-less”. Connection-less mode transmission is a transmission format in which packets are provided with header information sufficient to permit delivery of the packets without additional instructions.
  • [0006]
    The mesh mode as it is currently defined in the standard is not entirely compatible with the PMP mode due to different frame structures used for transmission of messages and data in each respective mode. The two modes also have different procedures for network entry. In addition, the mesh mode does not support handoff for mobility of the MS. The mesh mode also does not support OFDMA at PHY layer.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0007]
    According to a first aspect of the invention, there is provided a method for execution in a multi-hop network comprising a base station and at least one relay station for generating routing paths between the base station and at least one non-relay mobile station, the method comprising: the base station broadcasting over a first hop a path discovery message (PDM) including a path list comprising a node identifier for the base station; each relay station of the at least one relay station; receiving the PDM that was broadcast over a preceding hop, the PDM including the path list defining all preceding hops; adding a node identifier of the relay station to generate an updated path list in the PDM; and broadcasting a PDM including the updated path list over a subsequent hop; the base station receiving a reply from a given one of the at least one non-relay mobile station, the reply comprising a respective path list including node identifiers of all stations in a routing path between the base station and the non-relay mobile station inclusive, the reply being routed via relay stations identified in the respective path list.
  • [0008]
    In some embodiments when a non-relay mobile station of the at least one non-relay mobile station receives multiple PDMs, each having a different path list, from different relay stations, the at least one non-relay mobile station: determines which one of the multiple PDMs has a preferred path list based on at least one criterion characterizing the path lists of the multiple PDMs; and selects the PDM with the preferred path list to use as a routing path between the base station and the non-relay mobile station.
  • [0009]
    In some embodiments the at least one criterion is selected from a group consisting of: the shortest path between the base station and the at least one non-relay mobile station; the best determined radio performance between the base station and the at least one non-relay mobile station; a quality of service (QoS) value, or least-power-consumed link between the base station and the at least one non-relay mobile station.
  • [0010]
    In some embodiments at least one relay station or at least one non-relay mobile station determines whether a generated routing path is valid by: periodically sending a request message to the base station; and receiving a response to the request message if the routing path is still valid.
  • [0011]
    In some embodiments the method further comprises: the base station or a non-relay mobile station of the at least one non-relay mobile station sending over a first hop a service flow request message including an end-to-end path list and a connection identifier (CID) that defines the connection between the base station and the non-relay mobile station; each relay station of the at least one relay station; receiving the service flow request message that was broadcast over a preceding hop; and determining whether the message is to be forwarded over a subsequent hop or dropped based on the path list and the CID; if the message is to be forwarded, forwarding the message over a subsequent hop based on the contents of the path list and the CID.
  • [0012]
    In some embodiments the method is applied to a wireless network operating in a manner that is consistent with any one of: IEEE 802.16, IEEE 802.16d, and IEEE 802.16e.
  • [0013]
    In some embodiments the base station allocates transmission resources to each of the at least one relay stations and each of the at least one relay stations partitions the allocated transmission resources to at least one subordinate RS.
  • [0014]
    In some embodiments allocated transmission resources are at least one of: shared band and time slots with MIMO transmissions, shared band and time slots with beam-forming transmissions, adjacent band slots with MIMO transmissions, adjacent band slots with beam-forming transmissions, or different sub-channels.
  • [0015]
    In some embodiments the end-to-end path list is comprised of a list of entries, the entries each being one of node identifiers or link identifiers.
  • [0016]
    In some embodiments broadcasting a PDM by the base station or a respective relay station further comprises broadcasting an air-link-descriptor for each respective hop.
  • [0017]
    In some embodiments at least one routing path comprises more than two hops.
  • [0018]
    According to a second aspect of the invention, there is provided a method for execution in a multi-hop network comprising a base station and at least one relay station for message forwarding based on known routing paths between the base station and at least one non-relay mobile station, the method comprising: the base station or a non-relay mobile station of the at least one non-relay mobile station sending over a first hop a service flow request message including an end-to-end path list and a connection identifier (CID) that defines the connection between the base station and the non-relay mobile station; each relay station of the at least one relay station; receiving the service flow request message that was broadcast over a preceding hop; and determining whether the message is to be forwarded over a subsequent hop or dropped based on the path list and the CID; if the message is to be forwarded, forwarding the message over a subsequent hop based on the contents of the path list and the CID.
  • [0019]
    In some embodiments the service flow request message further comprises a transport CID identifying a connection between two stations over a single hop that can be used to create an entry in a forwarding table for a respective relay station to forward messages between the base station and the non-relay mobile station.
  • [0020]
    In some embodiments when the at least one relay station receives a service flow MAC PDU (media access control protocol data unit) from the direction of the base station, the relay station uses the CID of the MAC PDU to look up the forwarding table to determine whether to further broadcast the MAC PDU in the direction of the non-relay mobile station or drop the MAC PDU.
  • [0021]
    In some embodiments when the at least one relay station receives a management flow MAC PDU from the direction of the base station, the relay station checks the ownership of the CID in the forwarding table to determine whether to process the MAC PDU, further broadcast the MAC PDU in the direction of the non-relay mobile station, or drop the MAC PDU.
  • [0022]
    In some embodiments sending the service flow message comprises including a node ID list which is a path list that consists of all the stations along a selected path between the base station and at least one relay station and/or the non-relay mobile station.
  • [0023]
    In some embodiments sending the node ID list comprises sending the node ID list in a MAC sub-header.
  • [0024]
    In some embodiments the method further comprises including a air-link-descriptor for a first and subsequent hops in the MAC sub-header.
  • [0025]
    According to a third aspect of the invention, there is provided a multi-hop network adapted for communication with at least one non-relay mobile station, the network comprising: a base station; and at least one relay station being adapted to receive and forward transmissions between the base station and the at least one non-relay mobile station: wherein: the base station being adapted to broadcast over a first hop a path discovery message (PDM) including a path list with a starting point of the path list being the base station; each relay station of the at least one relay station being adapted to: receive the PDM that was broadcast over a preceding hop, the PDM including the path list defining all preceding hops; add a node identifier of the relay station to generate an updated path list in the PDM; and broadcast a PDM including the updated path list over a subsequent hop; and the base station being further adapted to receive a reply from each of the at least one non-relay mobile station, the reply comprising a respective path list including the node identifiers of all stations in the routing path between the base station and the non-relay mobile station, the reply being routed via relay stations identified in the respective path list.
  • [0026]
    In some embodiments the base station or a non-relay mobile station of the at least one non-relay mobile station sends over a first hop a service flow request message including an end-to-end path list and a connection identifier (CID) that defines the connection between the base station and the non-relay mobile station; each relay station of the at least one relay station; receives the service flow request message that was broadcast over a preceding hop; and determines whether the message is to be forwarded over a subsequent hop or dropped based on the path list and the CID; forwards the message over a subsequent hop based on the contents of the path list and the CID, if it is determined that the message is to be forwarded.
  • [0027]
    In some embodiments at each relay station a priority class identifier associated with a MAC PDU is used by the relay station to prioritize transmission order of the MAC PDU.
  • [0028]
    In some embodiments at least one of the at least one relay stations is one of: a fixed location relay station, a nomadic relay station and a mobile relay station.
  • [0029]
    In some embodiments the multi-hop network operates in a manner that is consistent with any one of: IEEE 802.16, IEEE 802.16d, and IEEE 802.16e.
  • [0030]
    According to a further aspect of the invention, there is provided a method for execution by a non-relay mobile station that is adapted to be in communication with a base station via at least one relay station, the non-relay mobile station involved with generation of a routing path between the base station and the non-relay mobile station, the method comprising: receiving a PDM that originated from the base station and was broadcast over a preceding hop from at least one relay station, the PDM including a path list defining all preceding hops; adding a node identifier of the non-relay mobile station to the path list to generate an updated path list between the base station and the non-relay mobile station; and sending the base station the updated path list, the updated path list being routed via relay stations identified in the updated path list.
  • [0031]
    Other aspects and features of the present invention will become apparent to those ordinarily skilled in the art upon review of the following description of specific embodiments of the invention in conjunction with the accompanying figures.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0032]
    Embodiments of the invention will now be described with reference to the attached drawings in which:
  • [0033]
    FIG. 1A is a schematic diagram of a point-to-multi-point (PMP) network architecture;
  • [0034]
    FIG. 1B is a schematic diagram of a multi-hop network architecture for use with some embodiments of the invention;
  • [0035]
    FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of a multi-hop network architecture illustrating base station (BS) oriented route discovery according to an embodiment of the invention;
  • [0036]
    FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of a multi-hop network architecture illustrating constraint based dynamic service signaling according to an embodiment of the invention;
  • [0037]
    FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of a frame used for Down link (DL) and Up link (UL) transmission in accordance with some embodiments of the invention;
  • [0038]
    FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of an example of a modified MAC (media access control) sub-header for use with some embodiments of the invention; and
  • [0039]
    FIG. 6 is a signaling flow diagram illustrating operation of the multi-level relay network architecture according to an embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION
  • [0040]
    In some embodiments of the present invention there are provided protocols for use with a multi-hop network architecture. In some embodiments the multi-hop network architecture is a tree architecture. In some embodiments the multi-hop network architecture is a mesh architecture.
  • [0041]
    In the multi-hop architecture, a relay station (RS) is utilized between a base station (BS) and a mobile station (MS). Therefore, multiple hops occur between the BS and MS. Multiple RS may be located between the BS and the MS. In some implementations the multi-hop network architecture is used in addition to the single hop PMP architecture.
  • [0042]
    The RS may be installed inside of a building (e.g., subway tunnel), on a roof top of a building or a residential house, on an RS tower, on a mobile vehicle platform (e.g., trains, buses, ferries), on aerial-based platforms, or even possibly carried by soldiers in the battlefield.
  • [0043]
    Some examples of devices that may be considered to be a MS are a cellular telephone, a computer having a wireless modem, and a wireless enabled PDA (Personal Data Assistants).
  • [0044]
    In the multi-hop network architecture, there are two types of air interfaces. A first type of air interface occurs between BS and RS and between RS and RS and a second type of air interface occurs between RS and MS. The two air interfaces are either logical (they share the same radio spectrum) or physical (they may use different radio spectrum).
  • [0045]
    A first aspect of the invention provides a method for each station (BS,RS,MS) to discover adjacent neighbours automatically and to find routing paths in a dynamically changing wireless access network. A second aspect is managing end-to-end (that is BS to MS, via the intermediate RS, or vice versa) connections, otherwise referred to as data flow forwarding paths.
  • [0046]
    A BS-oriented Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) protocol is provided to enable each node (both RS and MS) to automatically generate routing paths between the BS and themselves. The protocol is considered to be BS-oriented as the BS originates the protocol by broadcasting a path discovery message (PDM). Each RS that receives the message appends its own identification to the message, which creates a path list and the forwards the message on. Each MS that receives the message sends back the complete path list to the BS, via the relay stations included in the path list. In some embodiments the BS-oriented protocol utilizes a Down Link (DL) broadcast mechanism that is a feature of the IEEE 802.16 standard, such as a DL-MAP and a centralized radio allocation technique of the PMP mode to send the path discovery message.
  • [0047]
    In some embodiments of the invention, there is provided a constraint-based signaling protocol for end-to-end connection (data flow forwarding path) management in the multi-hop topology. In some embodiments of the invention, Dynamic Service (DSx) signaling based on IEEE 802.16 is used in conjunction with a determined path list to create and manage data flow forwarding paths.
  • [0048]
    In some embodiments of the invention new MAC (media access control) layer functions are provided to implement the protocols.
  • [0049]
    The MAC layer is used to enable features in the physical (PHY) layer in an air interface architecture. A frame is a format used to transmit data over the air interface between BS and RS and/or MS. An example of a frame structure will be described below with reference to FIG. 4.
  • BS-Oriented Dynamic Source Routing
  • [0050]
    Reference to FIG. 2 will now be made in describing the BS-oriented DSR protocol.
  • [0051]
    FIG. 2 illustrates an example multi-hop network 200 including a base station 205. The base station 205 is in communication with two relay stations, namely RS 210 and RS 212. RS 210 is in communication with two relay stations, RS 220 and RS 222. RS 220 is in communication with two mobile stations, namely MS 230 and MS 232. RS 212 is in communication with two relay stations, RS 224 and RS 226. RS 226 is in communication with two mobile stations, namely MS 234 and MS 236.
  • [0052]
    FIG. 2 is one example of such a network. It is to be understood that the number of RS and MS in the network is implementation specific. Furthermore, the number of RS between BS and MS can be greater than or less than the two that are shown in FIG. 2.
  • [0053]
    In operation, BS 205 transmits broadcast messages in a frame structure to RS one hop away from the BS. The frame structure includes multiple MAC messages. The MAC messages include broadcast messages to more than one MS or messages directed to individual MS. One type of broadcast message is a path discovery message, generally indicated at 207. The path discovery message 207 includes a connection identifier (CID) for the message that is referred to as a broadcast CID 208. The broadcast CID 208 is used to indicate a connection to all MS communicating with the BS. In some embodiments the broadcast CID 208 is an efficient manner of addressing all MS by utilizing 802.16 PMP downlink transmission characteristics. In some embodiments the broadcast CID is located in a header of the path discovery message. In some embodiments, the discovery message is embedded in 802.16 broadcast control messages such as DL-MAP message. A subsequent portion of the path discovery message 207 is a path list 209. The path list 209 when transmitted by the BS 205 includes only the identification of the BS 205.
  • [0054]
    RS 212 receives the path discovery message 207 and adds its identification to the path list 209, such that updated path list 228 in the path discovery message 207′ includes BS 205 and RS 212. RS 212 then broadcasts the path discovery message 207′ to RS 224 and RS 226. RS 226 then repeats this process so updated path list 235 in path discovery message 207″ broadcast by RS 226 includes BS 205, RS 212 and RS 226.
  • [0055]
    In some embodiments, an air-link-descriptor which describes the radio channel quality information and/or the power consumption of each RS can be associated with each entry in the path list.
  • [0056]
    MS 236 receives the path discovery message 207″ and adds its own identification to path list 235 resulting in end-to-end path list 244. MS 236 sends a response back to BS 205 in a MAC message 240 with the end-to-end path list 244. The MAC message 240 includes a CID referred to as a management CID 242. The management CID 242 indicates an MS specific connection related to management of the link between the BS 205 and MS 236, as opposed to for example a connection for transport of data between the BS 205 and MS 236. In some embodiments, this response message with path list may be implemented by utilizing an uplink uni-cast message according to IEEE 802.16, such as a RNG-REQ (Ranging Request) message.
  • [0057]
    The preceding description is for discovery of the path route between BS 205 and MS 236, but it is to be understood that the same process is occurring along other path routes in the network. For example, each of the RS which receive the path discovery message from the BS in a first hop, updates the path discovery message by adding their own respective node identifier to the path list in the received path discovery message, which initially only contains the BS node identifier. The RS sends the updated path discovery message over a second hop. After each subsequent hop to either a further RS or a MS, the path discovery message received by the further RS or the MS is updated to include the node identifier of the respective station.
  • [0058]
    In some embodiments the MS may receive a path discovery message from more than one RS. The received path discovery messages each have a different path list as they have hopped along different routes to reach the MS. The MS then makes a decision as to which path list is to be selected and communicates this selection to the BS. In some embodiments this decision is made based on the number of the hops in the path list (e.g., the shortest path). In some embodiments this decision is made based on channel/power information collected from air-link-descriptor (e.g., the better quality or energy saving path).
  • [0059]
    More generally, a method for generating routing paths in a multi-hop network between a base station and at least one non-relay mobile station over multiple hops via at least one relay station can be described as follows. The base station broadcasts a path discovery message (PDM) including a path list in which a starting point of the path list is the base station. As described above, the PDM may also include the air-link quality information between the BS and RS. Each relay station of the at least one relay station receives a PDM over a preceding hop, the received PDM including the path list defining all preceding hops. Each relay station adds a node identifier of the relay station to generate an updated path list in the PDM. In some embodiments the relay stations also include the associated air-link quality information. Each relay station then broadcasts the PDM over a subsequent hop. Each of the at least one non-relay mobile station receives the PDM from a preceding hop and adds a node identifier of the non-relay mobile station to the path list to generate an updated path list between the base station and the non-relay mobile station. Each non-relay mobile station then replies to the base station by sending the updated path list between the base station and the non-relay mobile station. In some embodiments for the replay message, each relay station on the reverse path adds air-link quality information for each link back to the base station.
  • [0060]
    In some embodiments the path list is created by using link identifiers, which are links between nodes or stations (BS,RS,MS), as opposed to node or station identifiers.
  • [0061]
    The BS-oriented DSR protocol provided in some embodiments of the invention includes features for route discovery, route optimization, and route maintenance. Route discovery provides a mechanism for determining a path between the BS and MS via one or more RS as described above. Route optimization provides a mechanism for selecting an optimum route if more than one route is discovered. Route maintenance provides a mechanism for ensuring the routes that have been previously determined are still valid.
  • Route Discovery
  • [0062]
    The BS periodically broadcasts the path discovery message and DL bandwidth availability with a sequence number. The path discovery message is transmitted by each RS to reach the respective MS as described above. In some embodiments the path discovery message transmitted by the BS is piggybacked on a broadcast management message such as a DL-MAP provided by IEEE 802.16d. In some embodiments the response MAC message transmitted by the MS is piggybacked on a RNG-REQ (Ranging request) message as provided by IEEE 802.16d.
  • Route Optimization
  • [0063]
    When a MS receives multiple path discovery messages from different air links, each having a corresponding path list the MS can select a path from the multiple path discovery messages based on certain criterion. Some examples of selection criteria are a shortest path, a best radio performance, a QoS path, and an energy-saving path, such as a least-power-consumed link path. When a new path is chosen, the MS sends a MAC message to the BS reporting the selected path list. This decision may also be made on a hop-by-hop basis by each RS, depending on how air-link QoS information is acquired, distributed and stored, either globally or locally. It also depends on how radio resources are to be allocated and scheduled, for example centralized by the BS or distributed amongst the RS.
  • [0064]
    In some embodiments the MS can apply MIMO technology to utilize multi-path diversity. For example, several MS could transmit messages using collaborative MIMO (multiple input multiple output) techniques.
  • Route Maintenance
  • [0065]
    In some embodiments, any of the RS and/or MS periodically send RNG-REQ messages to the BS to test whether the existing routing paths are still valid. For example, the RS and/or MS sends a RNG-REQ message. If the path is still valid the BS sends back a RNG-RSP (ranging response) message. If the path is not valid, that is there is no longer a direct path along that route, the BS will not receive the RNG-REQ and therefore not send a RNG-RSP. In this case, the MS has to re-start network entry procedure to re-attach to the BS and determine a new path to the BS.
  • Constraint-Based Dynamic Service Signaling
  • [0066]
    Reference to FIG. 3 will now be made in describing constraint-based dynamic service signaling.
  • [0067]
    FIG. 3 illustrates the same example multi-hop network 200 that was described in FIG. 2.
  • [0068]
    When a path between the MS and the BS is known, transportation connections are created between the BS and MS for transportation of payload data. For example, the path between the BS and a specific MS may be known, but there is no data transportation or service flow currently occurring over the path. In another example, that a service flow over the path, but a further service flow is requested for the path. A first step is to establish a service flow connection between the two stations. A transport connection can be created by the BS sending a Dynamic Service Addition request (DSA-REQ) defined in 802.16d to the MS via one or more RS in the network or by the MS sending a DSA-REQ to the BS via one or more RS.
  • [0069]
    In operation, a path list identifying nodes in the network is included with the DSA-REQ message. An example of such a path list is a path list selected by the MS and provided to the BS, which is based on the BS-oriented DSR discovery protocol. However, a path list that is determined by a method other than the BS-oriented DSR discovery protocol (e.g., a pre-provisioning path) can be included with the DSA-REQ. The path list is used by one or more RS between the MS and BS to navigate from the source of the DSA-REQ to the desired destination, that is from the BS to the MS or vice versa.
  • [0070]
    The following description is for describing constraint-based service flow provisioning on the path between BS 205 and MS 236, which is originated by BS 205. It is to be understood that a similar process can be performed that originates from the MS and occurs in a reverse direction.
  • [0071]
    The BS 205 sends a frame with multiple bursts, each burst including one or more MAC messages to the MS. In the example of FIG. 3, a DSx message is part of a MAC message, indicated at 310 that includes a MAC header 312, a MAC sub-header 316 and the DSx message body. The type of DSx message illustrated in FIG. 3 is a DSA message 320. The MAC header 312 contains a management tunnel CID 314 field to identify that the connection concerns a management related aspect of the link between BS 205 and MS 236. The MAC header contains other fields as well that are not shown. An example of other fields may be those shown in FIG. 4 and described in further detail below. The MAC sub-header 316 includes a path list 318 that identifies the route between BS 205 and MS 236 as BS 205
    Figure US20110182231A1-20110728-P00001
    RS 212
    Figure US20110182231A1-20110728-P00001
    RS 226
    Figure US20110182231A1-20110728-P00001
    MS 236. The DSA-REQ message 320 includes a service flow ID (SFID) 322 and a transport CID (Transport CID) 324. The transport CID can be considered a local CID between two stations for a single hop.
  • [0072]
    RS 212 receives the MAC message 310 and based on the path list 318 determines that the MAC message 310 should be forwarded on to RS 226. The management CID 314 is used in conjunction with the path list 318 to determine if any of the messages in the frame are to be dropped or forwarded. The management CID 314 of the message header 312 indicates that the MAC message 310 is directed to from BS 205 to MS 236. The path list 318 in the sub-header 316 for the MAC message 310 that is received by RS 212 includes both RS 212 and MS 236, so the MAC message 310 is forwarded over another hop to RS 226. Before the MAC message 310 is forwarded, the transport CID 324 is swapped, such that the MAC message 310 becomes MAC message 310′ having a new local transport CID (Transport CID*) 330, which is the local CID for RS 212 to RS 226. RS 226 receives the modified MAC message 310′ from RS 212. RS 226 determines from the path list 318 that the MAC message 310′ should be forwarded on to MS 236. The transport CID 330 is swapped, such that MAC message 310 becomes MAC message 310″ having a new local transport CID (Transport CID**) 340, which is the local CID for RS 226 to MS 236. MS 236 receives the modified MAC message 310″ from RS 226.
  • [0073]
    Further details involved in swapping transport CIDs can be found in applicant's corresponding U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/478,719 filed on Jul. 3, 2006, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • [0074]
    In some embodiments, instead of using transport CIDs specific to particular station and swapping the transport CIDs for each hop, a global end-to-end transport CID can be carried in the DSx message. In this case, all the RS along the end-to-end path would simply forward DSx message to the destination MS, based on the path list from MAC sub-header.
  • [0075]
    Based on operation of PMP downlink multicasting in 802.16, not all MAC messages in a downlink frame used to transport multiple MAC message are targeted to the destination MS which is in a subordinate tree of a particular RS. In some embodiments the particular RS drops the MAC messages not targeted to the destination MS. By checking the path list in MAC sub-header, or checking the CID ownership from a routing database and CID swapping table, the particular RS determines whether to continue forwarding the MAC messages or drop the MAC messages.
  • [0076]
    In the multi-hop architecture the BS may have a larger transmission bandwidth capability than some or all of the RS. Therefore, dropping some messages from a frame when navigating from the BS to MS via one or more RS aids in mitigating bottlenecks in the network by more efficiently utilizing bandwidth available to the RS.
  • [0077]
    The same process of constraint-based service flow provisioning can be used for other types of dynamic service signaling, for example as DSD-REQ (Dynamic Service Delete request) and DSC-REQ (Dynamic Service Change request). While the DSx message has been described as a specific type of message that is used in the constraint-based service flow provisioning, more generally the message may be described as a service flow request message.
  • [0078]
    More generally, in a multi-hop network comprising a base station and at least one relay station, a method for message forwarding based on known routing paths between the base station and at least one non-relay mobile station can be described as follows. The base station or a non-relay mobile station of the at least one non-relay mobile station sends over a first hop a service flow request message including an end-to-end path list and a connection identifier (CID) that defines the connection between the base station and the non-relay mobile station. Each relay station of the at least one relay station receives the service flow request message that was broadcast over a preceding hop and determines whether the message is to be forwarded over a subsequent hop or dropped based on the path list and the CID. If the message is to be forwarded, the message is forwarded over a subsequent hop based on the contents of the path list and the CID.
  • [0079]
    In some embodiments of the constraint-based dynamic service signaling protocol, IEEE 802.16 Dynamic Service Configuration messages (DSx, where x=A, C, D for addition, change or delete, respectively) are used in conjunction with an end-to-end path list included in the MAC PDU sub-header. An example of such a sub-header is described in further detail below. The constraint-based dynamic service signaling protocol enables CID forwarding path creation, CID path management and CID path tear down for end-to-end paths. CID forwarding path creation provides a mechanism for using an established path list when creating a new service flow between the BS and MS via one or more RS as described above. CID path management provides a mechanism for maintaining a forwarding table at each RS to aid in routing flows as they pass through the RS. CID path tear down provides a mechanism for cancelling service flows when path lists have changed or become invalid as RS or MS relocate.
  • End-to-End CID Path Creation
  • [0080]
    In some embodiments, the BS or MS issues a DSA-REQ message to the next hop and includes the path list in the modified mesh sub-header. The path list is used to navigate between a source station and a target station, that is BS to MS or vice versa, via the one or more RS. When each RS receives the DSA-REQ message the RS determines whether to further relay the message to the next hop or drop the message, based on the path list and management CID.
  • End-to-End CID Path Management
  • [0081]
    In some embodiments, when DSA-REQ/DSA-RSP (Dynamic Service Addition response) messages include an allocated transport CID, each RS creates an entry in a forwarding table. The entry may contain such details as a node identifier (node ID), a first local transport CID identifying a link to a station in a preceding hop, a second transport CID identifying a station in subsequent hop, and the interface (I/F) ports associated with sending and receiving over hops of adjacent stations. If a global transport CID is allocated for end-to-end traffic by the BS, the first transport CID and the second transport CID are identical in the forwarding tables all the way from BS to RS and to MS. The forwarding table is used for data flow relay. In some embodiments management messages carry the path list in a sub-header for navigation purposes.
  • [0082]
    Once stations have created forwarding tables, the respective stations can conduct MAC layer forwarding functions such as service flow PDU forwarding and management flow PDU forwarding describe below.
  • End-to-End CID Path Release
  • [0083]
    In some embodiments DSD-REQ/DSD-RSP (Dynamic Service Deletion response) messages are also used to update CID allocation along the path.
  • [0084]
    For example, when the BS or MS decides to terminate a service flow, the respective BS or MS acting as a source node creates and issues a DSD-REQ. The MAC layer of the source node checks the CID of the service flow that is to be terminated against a service flow ID associated with the service flow to be terminated, and creates the DSD-REQ with the CID and the path list. The DSD-REQ is then transmitted to a RS over a first hop by the source node. Each RS along the path receives and forwards the DSD-REQ along the path. After receiving the DSD-REQ each RS along the given route looks up the mapping table and removes the correspondent entry. If the CID is allocated locally, it is returned to a local CID poll for future use. The DSD-REQ is forwarded until it reaches the last station in the path list, which is a destination node. The destination node then sends a DSD-RSP back to the source node in acknowledgement of the DSD-RSP. DSD-REQ and DSD-RSP are defined in 802.16
  • [0085]
    In service flow PDU forwarding when the RS receives a MAC PDU from a node in the direction of the MS, the RS uses the CID associated with the MAC PDU and compares the CID with the forwarding table to determine if the RS should further broadcast the PDU to a RS in the direction of the MS (or the MS itself), or drop the MAC PDU. When the RS receives a MAC PDU from a node in the direction of the MS, the RS forwards the MAC PDU to an RS in the direction of the BS (or to the BS itself).
  • [0086]
    In management flow PDU forwarding when the RS receives a MAC PDU from a node in the direction of the MS, the RS uses the CID associated with the MAC PDU and compares the CID with the forwarding table to determine whether to process the MAC PDU, as the RS is a managed object, to further broadcast the PDU to a RS in the direction of the MS (or to the MS itself), or drop the MAC PDU. When the RS receives the MAC PDU from a node the direction of the MS, the RS forwards the MAC PDU to an RS in the direction of the BS (or to the BS itself).
  • [0087]
    In some embodiments the air interface between the BS and RS is referred to as a Macro-PMP link and the air interface between the RS and MS is referred to as a Micro-PMP link. The definition of Macro-PMP and Micro-PMP refers to distributed radio resource allocation and scheduling. In Macro-PMP, the BS allocates radio channels to all RS coupled to the BS over a first hop, and also allocates some blocks or polls of radio frequencies or channels to some subordinate RS. In some embodiments the first hop RSs can further allocate radio channels from the BS allocated block/polls to subordinate trees of the first hop RSs. Such a second level allocation is referred to as Micro-PMP. Each PMP region or cell defines a broadcast domain by given radio frequency or channel. Via Macro-PMP and Micro-PMP, the end-to-end relay path can be treated as being composed of a concatenation of multiple PMP sub-paths within a multi-layer subordinate tree. In some embodiments each sub-path within a sub-tree is logically represented as a tunnel. The tunnel can have a corresponding tunnel CID. The tunnels can be used to support traffic aggregation, traffic security, traffic navigation and traffic QoS associated with Macro-PMP link and micro-PMP link.
  • [0088]
    FIG. 1B shows an example of a multi-hop network architecture including BS 60 that has a Macro-PMP link with each of RS 62, RS 63 and RS 64. RS 62 has a Micro-PMP link with each of MS 65 and MS 66. RS 63 has a Micro-PMP link with MS 67. RS 64 has a Micro-PMP link with each of MS 67 and MS 68. In some embodiments the Macro-PMP links are used for transmitting broadcast messages to some or all RS from the BS or for transmitting messages to particular RS from the BS. In some embodiments the Micro-PMP links are used for transmitting broadcast messages to some or all MS from the BS via one or more RS or for transmitting messages to particular MS from the BS via one or more RS.
  • [0089]
    FIG. 1B is one example of multi-hop network architecture. It is to be understood that the number of RS and MS in the network is implementation specific and may vary from that shown in FIG. 1B. It is also to be understood that the number of MS connected to an RS is not limited to a maximum of two as shown in FIG. 1B, but the number of MS connected to an RS can be greater than two. Furthermore, a number of RS occurring between BS and MS can be greater than the one RS that is shown in FIG. 1B. As shown in FIG. 1B, an MS can be coupled to more than on RS, for example MS 67 connected to both RS 63 and 64, resulting in more than one path from BS to MS.
  • [0090]
    In some embodiments, for the Macro-PMP link, the BS allocates radio resources for transmission to each RS and for receiving transmission from each RS. In some embodiments, for the Micro-PMP link, the RS further partitions radio resources and allocates resources to the RS in the direction of the MS. This is repeated for each RS located between the BS and MS until resources are allocated for each MS. In some embodiments of the invention when allocating transmission resources, Macro-PMP and Micro-PMP schema share the same band and time slots when using MIMO transmission techniques, share the same band and time slots when using beam-forming transmission techniques, or the schema use adjacent band or different sub-channels.
  • [0091]
    In the multi-hop network architecture, the RS plays a double role. In a first role, when interacting with the MS, the RS is a master that actively coordinates with each MS the RS is associated with. In some embodiments this may include arranging cooperative MIMO transmission for capacity enhancement or transmission diversity for coverage enhancement. In a second role, when interacting with the BS, the RS is a slave that stores and forwards data packets to/from the BS.
  • [0092]
    In the multi-hop network architecture the BS has a fixed location. In some implementations the one or more RS have a fixed locations. In other implementations the one or more RS is nomadic or mobile. The MS is fully mobile-enabled. However, in some embodiments the MS may be stationary. Mobile RS and MS may relocate within the same cell. Mobile RS and MS may also relocate to other cells having a different BS. When leaving one cell and entering another, handoff may be initiated by the BS, any of the RS or the MS.
  • [0093]
    In some embodiments data traffic is distributed to a next hop via PMP air link or multiple PP (point-to-point) air interfaces when sent in a direction from the BS to the MS. Each RS determines whether to further relay the data flow along the path, or simple drop it.
  • [0094]
    In some embodiments data traffic from multiple stations, either relay or mobile is aggregated together at a next hop when sent in a direction from the MS to the BS.
  • [0095]
    In some implementations either one of or both of the BS-oriented protocol and constraint-based signaling can be applied to a conventional IEEE 802.16 relay-tree architecture and/or a conventional IEEE 802.16 mesh architecture.
  • [0096]
    The frame structure used with some embodiments of the inventions includes MAP (multiplexing access profile) information elements (IE) to provide a structure within the frame for defining where down link (DL) and up link (UL) transmission resources are located within the frame. A DL transmission resource is a time or frequency slot in the frame allocated for transmission from the BS in the direction of the MS, via one or more RS. An UL transmission resource is a time or frequency slot in the frame allocated for transmission from the MS in the direction of the BS, via one or more RS.
  • [0097]
    By way of example, FIG. 4 shows a schematic diagram of a conventional frame structure for time division duplex (TDD) transmission used in conjunction with embodiments of the invention.
  • [0098]
    Frame N, which is preceded by Frame N−1 and followed by Frame N+1, includes a DL sub-frame 105 and an UL sub-frame 108. The DL sub-frame 105 includes a DL PHY PDU (packet data unit) 110 that has a preamble 112, a frame control header (FCH) 114 and multiple DL bursts 116,118,120. The FCH 114 contains the DL Frame Prefix (DLFP) 123 to specify the burst profile and the length of the DL-MAP immediately following the FCH. The DLFP is a data structure transmitted at the beginning of each frame and contains information regarding the current frame. In some embodiments the multiple DL bursts (1 to M) 116,118,120 each have different modulation and coding. In other embodiments, some or all of the DL bursts have the same modulation and coding. A first DL burst 116 contains broadcast messages 124 to be broadcast to all RS and MS including DL MAP and UL MAP IEs (not shown). If the broadcast messages 124 do not occupy an entire allocated time duration for the first DL burst 116, MAC PDU messages 126 directed to one or more individual MS may fill the remainder of the time duration. In some embodiments the broadcast messages may use more than a single DL burst. However, a shorter broadcast message means that more data and less overhead can be transmitted in the frame. Subsequent DL bursts 118,120 include multiple MAC PDU messages (1 to P) 128,130 directed to one or more individual MS. In some embodiments the DL bursts include padding 132. Each MAC PDU message contains a MAC header 134. The MAC PDU message may also include a MAC message payload 136 and cyclic redundancy check (CRC) 138 as shown in FIG. 2. The CRC 138 is used for error detection. The broadcast messages 124 also contains a MAC header. Each MAC PDU message may also be assigned a sequence number that can be used for purposes such as maintaining an ordered sequence at the receiver and/or aiding in retransmission of MAC PDU messages that were not received.
  • [0099]
    The UL sub-frame 108 shown in FIG. 4 includes a contention slot 150 for initial ranging requests, which is a time duration for multiple MS communicating with the BS to contend for time in finalizing synchronization of the respective MS with the network. The UL subframe 108 also includes a contention slot 152 for bandwidth (BW) requests, which is a time duration for the multiple MS communicating with the BS to contend for UL resources for transmission of data from the MS to the BS. The UL subframe 108 also includes multiple UL PHY PDUs 154,156 which are the up link resources used by each respective source MS (1 to K) to communicate with the BS. Each UL PHY PDU 154,156 includes a preamble 160 and an UL burst 162. The UL burst 162 is transmitted using a modulation and coding specific to the source MS. The UL burst 162 includes multiple MAC PDU messages (1 to P) 164,166. In some embodiments the UL burst 162 includes padding 168. Each MAC PDU message 164,166 contains a MAC header 170. The MAC PDU message 164,166 may also include a MAC message payload 172 and CRC 174. Following the UL sub-frame 108 is a receive/transmit transition guard (RTG) 178.
  • [0100]
    FIG. 4 is an example frame that can be used in accordance with the invention. In some embodiments the frame structure may not include all the described components of FIG. 2, for example a frame structure may not include both described contention slots, or may include additional slots to allow contending for other reasons. Furthermore, a frame structure may have other additional guard slots such as a transmit/receive transition guard (TTG) located between the DL sub-frame 105 and UL sub-frame 108. While the frame of FIG. 4 is substantially consistent with the frame structure established for IEEE 802.16, the use of other frame structures may be considered within the scope of the invention if capable of supporting the BS-oriented protocol and constraint-based signaling as described herein.
  • [0101]
    In some embodiments frames N−1 and N+1 have a similar structure. In other embodiments, frames in the sequence are a mixture of frames, some having a similar structure and others having different structure.
  • [0102]
    Frames enabling frequency division duplex (FDD) communication and combined TDD/FDD communication are also both considered to be within the scope of the invention.
  • [0103]
    As described above MAC PDUs include MAC headers. The MAC header can be used to transmit data or MAC messages. There are two common forms or MAC header, a generic MAC header and a bandwidth request MAC header. MAC PDUs may also contain a MAC sub-header that is typically located subsequent to the MAC header.
  • 802.16d MAC Sub-Header Extension
  • [0104]
    In 802.16d, a MAC PDU is composed of MAC header and MAC PDU body. The MAC header is fixed in size while the MAC PDU body can be variable size. In the multi-hop architecture a route between the BS and MS includes multiple hops via one or more RS. In some embodiments of the invention a sub-header is provided that includes a node ID list, which is the path list of all the nodes along the selected path between BS and MS.
  • [0105]
    An example of a sub-header will now be described with regard to FIG. 5. Fields of a generic MAC header are collectively indicated at 400. The numbers in brackets in each field indicate a number of bytes in the field.
  • [0106]
    The feedback header 400 includes a “Header Type (HT)” field 401, an “Encryption Control (EC)” field 402, a “Type” field 403, a “Extended Subheader Format Reserved (ESFRSV)” field 404, a “CRC indicator (CI)” field 405, an “encryption key sequence (EKS)” field 406, another “RSV” field 407, a “Length (Len)” field 408, a “CID” field 409 and a “Header Check Sequence (HCS)” field 410. “HT” field 401 indicates the type of header. “Type” field 403 indicates sub-headers and special payload types present in the message payload. The “RSV” fields 404,407 are reserved for variable use, which allows flexibility in the use of these fields. “Len” field 408 is the length in bytes of the MAC PDU including the MAC header and the CRC if present. In some embodiments values to be used in the different fields can be found in the IEEE 802.16 standard.
  • [0107]
    When used with some embodiments of the invention, the CID field 409 in the generic MAC header 400 is a tunnel CID. The tunnel CID can be considered a global CID between the BS and a specific RS or MS. Depending on whether the radio resource is allocated in a centralized or distributed manner, in some embodiments the tunnel CID is allocated by the BS and in some embodiments the tunnel CID is allocated by the RS. In some embodiments the tunnel CID is a management tunnel CID that is used for signaling associated with managing a connection. In some embodiments the tunnel CID is a transport tunnel CID that is used for forwarding of data over a connection.
  • [0108]
    The sub-header is indicated at 415. The sub-header includes a listing of n Node (or station) IDs that form the path list from the BS to a given MS. The sub-header 415 is also shown to include fields for a CID Stack 422, priority class 424, a Sequence number 426, and an air-link-descriptor 428. In some embodiments the air-link-descriptor includes current radio channel and/or air link quality information. In some embodiments the air-link-descriptor includes power consumption information. In some embodiments the priority class field 424 contains an identifier that is used to determine the priority of contents of a forwarded message with respect to other forwarded messages. The priority class field allows the RS to prioritize the order for forwarding messages.
  • [0109]
    In some embodiments the fields for CID Stack 422, priority class 424, Sequence number 426 and air-link-descriptor 428 are optional fields. Therefore, in some embodiments some or all of these fields may not be included in the sub-header.
  • [0110]
    For example, in some embodiments when the generic MAC header and sub-header are used for a Path Discovery Message, the sub-header may include only the path list. In some embodiments the Path Discovery Message may also include optional fields such as an air-link-descriptor and sequence number. As the Path Discovery Message is transmitted downstream, for each new node, an identifier of that new node is added into path list of the PDM.
  • [0111]
    In some embodiments, when the sub-header is used in conjunction with a DSx signaling message, the sub-header may only contain the path list, to be used for navigation purpose. In some embodiments, when the sub-header is used for normal payload MAC PDU transmission, the sub-header may contain CID stack and priority class information.
  • [0112]
    FIG. 5 is one example of a generic MAC header that those skilled in the art may be familiar with according to IEEE 802.16. In some embodiments there may be a greater or lesser number of fields in each of the generic MAC header and sub-header, respectively that that which are shown in FIG. 5. Furthermore, the MAC header fields may have a different number of bytes than indicated in FIG. 5. More generally, it is to be understood that a MAC header having a different layout but performing substantially the same task could be used in conjunction with the sub-header.
  • [0113]
    FIG. 6 will now be used to describe an example of signaling flow between BS, RS and MS for entry of the RS and MS into the network, determination of the path list, and PDU forwarding.
  • [0114]
    The RS enters the network either using a conventional PMP entry method if the RS is adjacent to the BS or using a mesh entry method if the RS is not adjacent to the BS as indicated at 605. The MS enters the network via the conventional PMP entry method as it is adjacent to an RS as indicated at 607. The BS sends a path discovery message 610 to the RS as described above as part of the path discovery protocol. The RS forwards the path discovery message 612 to the MS. The MS responds by sending the completed path list to the RS as a portion of a RNG-REQ (ranging request) message 615 and the RS forwards the RNG-REQ to the BS 617. The BS sends a RNG-RSP (ranging response) to the RS 620 which is forwarded on to the MS 622 by the RS. While the main purpose of the RNG-RSP is for the MS to connect with the network, it also acts to confirm the routing path is correct between the BS and the MS. Step 630 shows a double arrowhead line indicating that either the BS or the MS can act as the source that initiates sending a DSA-REQ message to a destination for creating an end-to-end flow path. At step 640 the destination then sends a DSA-RSP to the source. At step 650 the source sends a DSA-ACK to acknowledge the DSA-RSP. Steps 660 and 662 illustrate implementation of 1) end-to-end management in the storing of information and 2) service and management flow PDU forwarding in the forwarding of MAC-PDU messages in UL and DL directions.
  • [0115]
    In some embodiments the invention provides solutions for end-to-end data packet delivery in a WiMAX (IEEE 802.16) tree and/or mesh network topologies. In some embodiments the invention supports multi-hop relay for data distribution/aggregation between BS and MS with tree and/or mesh topologies, which extends access coverage and achieves better traffic throughput and performance. In some embodiments the invention can be applied to fixed, nomadic and mobile RS relay topology. Furthermore, in some embodiments, aspects of the invention are backward compatible with existing IEEE 802.16d/16e standards with only a minor extension in the current interface definition.
  • [0116]
    In some implementations the invention is based on well-understood Ad hoc network routing technology and IEEE 802.16 dynamic service provisioning capability. In some embodiments the multi-hop architecture can be applied to both of multi-layer PMP radio tree and/or mesh networks and multiple Point-to-Point air link tree and/or mesh networks.
  • [0117]
    In some embodiments the multi-hop architecture and associated protocols used in conjunction with the architecture enable one or more of the following benefits:
  • [0118]
    increased coverage of radio transmission and longer transmission range;
  • [0119]
    better utilization of radio resource allocation and reduced interference;
  • [0120]
    enhanced system capacity and performance compared to known IEEE 802.16 architecture and protocols;
  • [0121]
    improved MS battery life; and
  • [0122]
    lower cost system deployment.
  • [0123]
    Numerous modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practised otherwise than as specifically described herein.

Claims (36)

  1. 1. A method of operating a base station in a multi-hop network, comprising:
    broadcasting a path discovery message (PDM) comprising:
    a path list comprising a node identifier for the base station; and
    a broadcast connection identifier (CID) identifying that the PDM is broadcast for any non-relay station served by the base station; and
    receiving a reply message from at least one non-relay station served by the base station, the reply message comprising:
    a path list comprising node identifiers of the non-relay station and all stations in a routing path between the base station and the non-relay station; and
    a management connection identifier (CID) identifying a management connection between the non-relay station and the base station defined by the routing path.
  2. 2. The method as defined in claim 1, wherein the step of receiving a reply message comprises receiving the reply message via relay stations identified in the path list.
  3. 3. The method as defined in claim 1, further comprising sending a service flow message comprising an end-to-end path list and the management CID that defines a connection between the base station and the non-relay station.
  4. 4. The method as defined in claim 3, wherein the end-to-end path list comprises a list of entries, each entry being one of a node identifier and a link identifier.
  5. 5. The method as defined in claim 1, further comprising:
    receiving a request message from one of a relay station and a non-relay station; and
    responsive to the request message, sending a response message if a routing path to the non-relay station is still valid.
  6. 6. The method as defined in claim 1, further comprising allocating transmission resources for at least one relay station coupled to the base station by a first hop.
  7. 7. The method as defined in claim 1, wherein the base station operates in a manner consistent with any of:
    IEEE 802.16;
    IEEE 802.16d; and
    IEEE 802.16e.
  8. 8. A method of operating a relay station in a multi-hop network, comprising:
    receiving a path discovery message (PDM), the PDM comprising:
    a path list, the path list comprising:
    a node identifier for a base station; and
    node identifiers for any relay stations between the base station and the relay station; and
    a broadcast connection identifier (CID) identifying that the PDM is broadcast for any non-relay station served by the base station;
    adding a node identifier of the relay station to the path list to generate an updated path list; and
    broadcasting a PDM including the updated path list.
  9. 9. The method as defined in claim 8, further comprising determining whether a generated routing path is valid by:
    periodically sending a request message to the base station; and
    receiving a response message indicating that the routing path is still valid.
  10. 10. The method as defined in claim 8, further comprising:
    receiving a service flow request message comprising an end-to-end path list and a management connection identifier (CID) that defines a connection between the base station and a non-relay station;
    determining whether the service flow message is to be forwarded or dropped based on the path list and the management CID; and
    if the message is to be forwarded, forwarding the message based on the path list and the management CID.
  11. 11. The method as defined in claim 10, wherein the end-to-end path list comprises a list of entries, each entry being one of a node identifier and a link identifier.
  12. 12. The method as defined in claim 8, wherein the relay station operates in a manner consistent with any of:
    IEEE 802.16;
    IEEE 802.16d; and
    IEEE 802.16e.
  13. 13. A method of operating a non-relay station in a multi-hop network, comprising:
    receiving at least one path discovery message (PDM), the PDM comprising:
    a path list, the path list comprising:
    a node identifier for a base station; and
    node identifiers for any relay stations between the base station and the non-relay station; and
    a broadcast connection identifier (CID) identifying that the PDM is broadcast for any non-relay station served by the base station; and
    sending a reply message to the base station, the reply message comprising:
    a path list comprising node identifiers of the non-relay station and all stations in a routing path between the base station and the non-relay station; and
    a management connection identifier (CID) identifying a management connection between the non-relay station and the base station defined by the routing path.
  14. 14. The method as defined in claim 13, wherein the step of receiving at least one PDM comprises receiving multiple PDMs, each having a different path list, from multiple relay stations, the method further comprising:
    determining which one of the multiple PDMs has a preferred path list based on at least one criterion characterizing the path lists of the multiple PDMs; and
    selecting the PDM with the preferred path list to use as a routing path between the base station and the non-relay station.
  15. 15. The method as defined in claim 14, wherein the at least one criterion is selected from a group consisting of:
    shortest path between the base station and the non-relay station;
    best determined radio performance between the base station and the non-relay station;
    preferred value for at least one quality of service (QoS) parameter; and
    lowest power consumption for a link between the base station and the non-relay station over the path.
  16. 16. The method as defined in claim 13, further comprising determining whether a generated routing path is valid by:
    periodically sending a request message to the base station; and
    receiving a response message indicating that the routing path is still valid.
  17. 17. The method as defined in claim 13, wherein the end-to-end path list comprises a list of entries, each entry being one of a node identifier and a link identifier.
  18. 18. The method as defined in claim 13, wherein the non-relay station operates in a manner consistent with any of:
    IEEE 802.16;
    IEEE 802.16d; and
    IEEE 802.16e.
  19. 19. A base station for use in a multi-hop network, comprising:
    a transmitter operable to broadcast a path discovery message (PDM) comprising:
    a path list comprising a node identifier for the base station; and
    a broadcast connection identifier (CID) identifying that the PDM is broadcast for any non-relay station served by the base station; and
    a receiver operable to receive a reply message from at least one non-relay station served by the base station, the reply message comprising:
    a path list comprising node identifiers of the non-relay station and all stations in a routing path between the base station and the non-relay station; and
    a management connection identifier (CID) identifying a management connection between the non-relay station and the base station defined by the routing path.
  20. 20. The base station as defined in claim 19, wherein the receiver is operable to receive a reply message by receiving the reply message via relay stations identified in the path list.
  21. 21. The base station as defined in claim 19, wherein the transmitter is further operable to send a service flow message comprising an end-to-end path list and the management CID that defines a connection between the base station and the non-relay station.
  22. 22. The base station as defined in claim 21, wherein the end-to-end path list comprises a list of entries, each entry being one of a node identifier and a link identifier.
  23. 23. The base station as defined in claim 19, wherein:
    the receiver is operable to receive a request message from one of a relay station and a non-relay station; and
    the transmitter is operable, responsive to the request message, to send a response message if a routing path to the non-relay station is still valid.
  24. 24. The base station as defined in claim 19, further comprising a transmission resource allocator operable to allocate transmission resources for at least one relay station coupled to the base station by a first hop.
  25. 25. The base station as defined in claim 19, wherein the base station operates in a manner consistent with any of:
    IEEE 802.16;
    IEEE 802.16d; and
    IEEE 802.16e.
  26. 26. A relay station for a multi-hop network, comprising:
    a receiver operable to receive a path discovery message (PDM), the PDM comprising:
    a path list, the path list comprising:
    a node identifier for a base station; and
    node identifiers for any relay stations between the base station and the relay station; and
    a broadcast connection identifier (CID) identifying that the PDM is broadcast for any non-relay station served by the base station;
    a path list processor operable to add a node identifier of the relay station to the path list to generate an updated path list; and
    a transmitter operable to broadcast a PDM including the updated path list.
  27. 27. The relay station as defined in claim 26, further operable to determine whether a generated routing path is valid by:
    periodically sending a request message to the base station; and
    receiving a response message indicating that the routing path is still valid.
  28. 28. The relay station as defined in claim 26, wherein:
    the receiver is operable to receive a service flow request message comprising an end-to-end path list and a management connection identifier (CID) that defines a connection between the base station and a non-relay station;
    the path list processor is operable to determine whether the service flow message is to be forwarded or dropped based on the path list and the management CID; and
    the transmitter is operable, if the message is to be forwarded, to forward the message based on the path list and the management CID.
  29. 29. The relay station as defined in claim 28, wherein the end-to-end path list comprises a list of entries, each entry being one of a node identifier and a link identifier.
  30. 30. The relay station as defined in claim 26, wherein the relay station operates in a manner consistent with any of:
    IEEE 802.16;
    IEEE 802.16d; and
    IEEE 802.16e.
  31. 31. A non-relay station for a multi-hop network, comprising:
    a receiver operable to receive at least one path discovery message (PDM), the PDM comprising:
    a path list, the path list comprising:
    a node identifier for a base station; and
    node identifiers for any relay stations between the base station and the non-relay station; and
    a broadcast connection identifier (CID) identifying that the PDM is broadcast for any non-relay station served by the base station; and
    a transmitter operable to send a reply message to the base station, the reply message comprising:
    a path list comprising node identifiers of the non-relay station and all stations in a routing path between the base station and the non-relay station; and
    a management connection identifier (CID) identifying a management connection between the non-relay station and the base station defined by the routing path.
  32. 32. The non-relay station as defined in claim 31, wherein the receiver is operable to receive multiple PDMs, each having a different path list, from multiple relay stations, the non-relay station further comprising a path list processor operable to:
    determine which one of the multiple PDMs has a preferred path list based on at least one criterion characterizing the path lists of the multiple PDMs; and
    select the PDM with the preferred path list to use as a routing path between the base station and the non-relay station.
  33. 33. The non-relay station as defined in claim 32, wherein the at least one criterion is selected from a group consisting of:
    shortest path between the base station and the non-relay station;
    best determined radio performance between the base station and the non-relay station;
    preferred value for at least one quality of service (QoS) parameter; and
    lowest power consumption for a link between the base station and the non-relay station over the path.
  34. 34. The non-relay station as defined in claim 31, further operable to determine whether a generated routing path is valid by:
    periodically sending a request message to the base station; and
    receiving a response message indicating that the routing path is still valid.
  35. 35. The non-relay station as defined in claim 31, wherein the end-to-end path list comprises a list of entries, each entry being one of a node identifier and a link identifier.
  36. 36. The non-relay station as defined in claim 31, wherein the non-relay station operates in a manner consistent with any of:
    IEEE 802.16;
    IEEE 802.16d; and
    IEEE 802.16e.
US13078562 2005-10-27 2011-04-01 Methods and systems for a wireless routing architecture and protocol Abandoned US20110182231A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US73076305 true 2005-10-27 2005-10-27
US11481825 US7933236B2 (en) 2005-10-27 2006-07-07 Methods and systems for a wireless routing architecture and protocol
US13078562 US20110182231A1 (en) 2005-10-27 2011-04-01 Methods and systems for a wireless routing architecture and protocol

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13078562 US20110182231A1 (en) 2005-10-27 2011-04-01 Methods and systems for a wireless routing architecture and protocol
US14833472 US20150365876A1 (en) 2005-10-27 2015-08-24 Methods and Systems for a Wireless Routing Architecture and Protocol

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11481825 Continuation US7933236B2 (en) 2005-10-27 2006-07-07 Methods and systems for a wireless routing architecture and protocol

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14833472 Continuation US20150365876A1 (en) 2005-10-27 2015-08-24 Methods and Systems for a Wireless Routing Architecture and Protocol

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110182231A1 true true US20110182231A1 (en) 2011-07-28

Family

ID=37967377

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11481825 Active 2029-11-14 US7933236B2 (en) 2005-10-27 2006-07-07 Methods and systems for a wireless routing architecture and protocol
US13078562 Abandoned US20110182231A1 (en) 2005-10-27 2011-04-01 Methods and systems for a wireless routing architecture and protocol
US14833472 Abandoned US20150365876A1 (en) 2005-10-27 2015-08-24 Methods and Systems for a Wireless Routing Architecture and Protocol

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11481825 Active 2029-11-14 US7933236B2 (en) 2005-10-27 2006-07-07 Methods and systems for a wireless routing architecture and protocol

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14833472 Abandoned US20150365876A1 (en) 2005-10-27 2015-08-24 Methods and Systems for a Wireless Routing Architecture and Protocol

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (3) US7933236B2 (en)
WO (1) WO2007048247A1 (en)

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070058605A1 (en) * 2005-09-12 2007-03-15 Arnaud Meylan Scheduling with reverse direction grant in wireless communication systems
US20090245165A1 (en) * 2006-12-15 2009-10-01 Huawei Technologiies Co., Ltd. Method and system for resource scheduling in wireless system
US20090252145A1 (en) * 2004-06-02 2009-10-08 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and Apparatus for Scheduling in a Wireless Network
US20090323646A1 (en) * 2003-10-15 2009-12-31 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and apparatus for wirless lan (wlan) data multiplexing
US20100015914A1 (en) * 2006-09-30 2010-01-21 Hui Li Methods and equipment for performing channel aware relays in an enhanced relay cluster
US20110063996A1 (en) * 2009-09-16 2011-03-17 Lusheng Ji Qos in multi-hop wireless networks through path channel access throttling
US20120170481A1 (en) * 2009-09-18 2012-07-05 Sony Corporation Relay station, relay method, and wireless communication device
US20130028094A1 (en) * 2011-07-25 2013-01-31 Zhonghua Gao Fiber chanel device
US20130088994A1 (en) * 2009-09-01 2013-04-11 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for measuring performance of multi-service in tunnel
US8774098B2 (en) 2003-10-15 2014-07-08 Qualcomm Incorporated Method, apparatus, and system for multiplexing protocol data units
US8903440B2 (en) 2004-01-29 2014-12-02 Qualcomm Incorporated Distributed hierarchical scheduling in an ad hoc network
US9060310B2 (en) 2008-09-25 2015-06-16 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Method for QoS delivery in contention-based multi hop network
US9072101B2 (en) 2003-10-15 2015-06-30 Qualcomm Incorporated High speed media access control and direct link protocol
US9137087B2 (en) 2003-10-15 2015-09-15 Qualcomm Incorporated High speed media access control
US20150365876A1 (en) * 2005-10-27 2015-12-17 Apple Inc. Methods and Systems for a Wireless Routing Architecture and Protocol
US9226308B2 (en) 2003-10-15 2015-12-29 Qualcomm Incorporated Method, apparatus, and system for medium access control
US9439130B2 (en) * 2015-01-19 2016-09-06 Telefonica Digital Limited Method for controlling relay in a group communication and computer programs thereof
US20170054579A1 (en) * 2015-08-20 2017-02-23 Yokogawa Electric Corporation Wireless relay device, processing apparatus, wireless communication system, and wireless communication method
US20170230102A1 (en) * 2014-10-28 2017-08-10 Bayerische Motoren Werke Aktiengesellschaft Vehicle-Based Femtocell with Prioritization of Data Packets on the Basis of the Required Internet Service Quality

Families Citing this family (97)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7248559B2 (en) 2001-10-17 2007-07-24 Nortel Networks Limited Scattered pilot pattern and channel estimation method for MIMO-OFDM systems
US7548758B2 (en) 2004-04-02 2009-06-16 Nortel Networks Limited System and method for peer-to-peer communication in cellular systems
WO2006043773A3 (en) * 2004-10-18 2007-04-05 Jin Young Chun A method of transmitting feedback information in an orthogononal frequency division multiplexing (ofdm)/ofdm access (ofdma) mobile communication system
KR101191721B1 (en) * 2005-11-03 2012-10-16 삼성전자주식회사 METHOD FOR GENERATING AND MANAGING CONNECTION IDENTIFIERS FOR SUPPORTING GROUP MULTICASTING IN IPv6-BASED WIRELESS NETWORK AND NETWORK INTERFACE OF ENABLING THE METHOD
KR101084147B1 (en) * 2006-01-02 2011-11-17 엘지전자 주식회사 Method for Handover Using Relay Station
KR100901137B1 (en) * 2006-01-03 2009-06-04 삼성전자주식회사 Method and apparatus for managing connection identifier in a multi-hop relay wireless access communication system
JP4484226B2 (en) * 2006-01-27 2010-06-16 Kddi株式会社 How aggregating service connection identifiers in the applied relay station IEEE 802.16, the program and the relay station
US8711803B1 (en) * 2006-02-21 2014-04-29 Apple Inc. Fast base station switching method and system, and hierarchical zone-based fast handoff approach
US7986915B1 (en) * 2006-02-24 2011-07-26 Nortel Networks Limited Method and system for a wireless multi-hop relay network
US8483123B2 (en) * 2006-06-30 2013-07-09 Nokia Corporation QoS request and information distribution for wireless relay networks
US8126470B2 (en) * 2006-07-03 2012-02-28 Nokia Corporation Topology and route discovery and management for relay networks
US7889713B2 (en) * 2006-07-03 2011-02-15 Nokia Corporation Transmission of management messages for relay networks
US8468338B2 (en) * 2006-07-06 2013-06-18 Apple, Inc. Wireless access point security for multi-hop networks
US20080049707A1 (en) * 2006-07-12 2008-02-28 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Transmission packet for wireless transmission in a high frequency band, and method and apparatus for transmission/receiving using the same
GB0616481D0 (en) * 2006-08-18 2006-09-27 Fujitsu Ltd Communications systems
JP5045029B2 (en) * 2006-08-21 2012-10-10 富士通株式会社 Radio base station
KR100957429B1 (en) * 2006-08-31 2010-05-11 삼성전자주식회사 Method and system for selecting relay station in a communication system
KR100975732B1 (en) * 2006-08-31 2010-08-12 삼성전자주식회사 Method and system transmitting resource allocation information in a communication system
US7995524B2 (en) * 2006-09-07 2011-08-09 Industrial Technology Research Institute Wireless communication system and method
CN101150498B (en) * 2006-09-18 2012-06-20 华为技术有限公司 Multi-jumper radio relay communication system and its download data transmission method
US8023446B2 (en) 2006-09-28 2011-09-20 Hang Zhang Systems and methods for facilitating intra-cell-peer-to-peer communication
KR101221597B1 (en) * 2006-09-29 2013-01-14 삼성전자주식회사 Method and apparatus for transceiving data frame in wireless broadband internet network
US8175024B2 (en) * 2006-10-16 2012-05-08 Nokia Corporation Bandwidth allocation for relay networks
EP1916808A1 (en) * 2006-10-27 2008-04-30 Nokia Siemens Networks Gmbh & Co. Kg Method of connection based scheduling with differentiated service support for multi-hop wireless networks
KR101352981B1 (en) * 2006-11-07 2014-01-21 한국전자통신연구원 Method for managing a relay path in wireless communication environment
EP1921807A1 (en) * 2006-11-13 2008-05-14 Alcatel Lucent Method for forwarding MAC protocol data units in a mobile radio communication network, corresponding communication end point and relay station
US20080159191A1 (en) * 2007-01-03 2008-07-03 Industrial Technology Research Institute Wireless communication and display system and method
US7957360B2 (en) * 2007-01-09 2011-06-07 Motorola Mobility, Inc. Method and system for the support of a long DRX in an LTE—active state in a wireless network
KR100827338B1 (en) * 2007-01-12 2008-05-06 삼성전자주식회사 A method and a system for controlling a connection in a reiteration area of wibro cells
KR100856520B1 (en) * 2007-02-21 2008-09-04 삼성전자주식회사 SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR HAND-OVER EXECUTION WiMAX MOBILE COMMUNICATION
KR100974193B1 (en) 2007-03-08 2010-08-05 삼성전자주식회사 Apparatus and method for processing ms information release on multi-hop path in a multi-hop relay broadband wireless access communication system
US8817809B2 (en) * 2007-06-18 2014-08-26 Qualcomm Incorporated Communication link allocation based on dynamic trend analysis
US7916704B2 (en) * 2007-06-29 2011-03-29 Motorola Solutions, Inc. Method of communication scheduling in a multihop network
US8693406B2 (en) * 2007-08-09 2014-04-08 Intel Corporation Multi-user resource allocation and medium access control (MAC) overhead reduction for mobile worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) systems
EP2028795A1 (en) * 2007-08-24 2009-02-25 Hopling Group B.V. Configuring a mesh network
EP2028794A1 (en) * 2007-08-24 2009-02-25 Hopling Group B.V. Network discovery protocol
US9143927B2 (en) * 2007-08-27 2015-09-22 Wichorus Inc. Method and apparatus for managing connection identifiers (CIDs) in a wireless communication network
KR101404677B1 (en) * 2007-09-03 2014-06-09 삼성전자주식회사 Method and apparatus for using efficient radio resource in wireless communication system based relay
US8626181B2 (en) * 2007-09-07 2014-01-07 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for allocating a dedicated access zone to relay station (RS) in broadband wireless access (BWA) communication system
US20090220085A1 (en) * 2007-09-07 2009-09-03 Zhifeng Tao Relay MAC Header for Tunneling in a Wireless Multi-User Multi-Hop Relay Networks
US8310961B2 (en) * 2007-10-08 2012-11-13 Nokia Siemens Networks Oy Techniques for link utilization for half-duplex and full-duplex stations in a wireless network
US20090141661A1 (en) * 2007-11-29 2009-06-04 Nokia Siemens Networks Oy Residual traffic state for wireless networks
US20090168770A1 (en) * 2007-12-28 2009-07-02 Shantidev Mohanty Techniques for efficient transfer of medium access control structures in a communication system
WO2009088266A3 (en) * 2008-01-11 2009-09-17 Lg Electronics Inc. Enhanced tdd frame structure
CN101562557B (en) * 2008-01-11 2011-09-21 中兴通讯股份有限公司 Method for relating MAP and corresponding data in multiple-hop relay network
US20090213778A1 (en) * 2008-01-14 2009-08-27 Zhifeng Tao Fragmentation and Packing for Wireless Multi-User Multi-Hop Relay Networks
US20090185526A1 (en) * 2008-01-18 2009-07-23 Futurewei Technologies, Inc. Method and Apparatus for a Dynamic Create/Change of Service Flows
EP2571317B1 (en) 2008-01-22 2015-04-22 BlackBerry Limited Path selection for a wireless system with relays
US8462743B2 (en) 2008-01-25 2013-06-11 Nokia Siemens Networks Oy Method, apparatus and computer program for signaling channel quality information in a network that employs relay nodes
US8295209B2 (en) * 2008-02-21 2012-10-23 Nokia Corporation Frame structures with flexible partition boundary for wireless networks
US8411584B1 (en) * 2008-03-31 2013-04-02 Olympus Corporation Wireless resource allocation system and method
KR101406961B1 (en) * 2008-04-22 2014-06-13 톰슨 라이센싱 Method and apparatus for multicast tree management in multi-hop relay communication system
JP4666003B2 (en) * 2008-05-23 2011-04-06 ソニー株式会社 Communication device, a communication system, communication method and program
US20110122811A1 (en) * 2008-07-07 2011-05-26 Nortel Networks Limited Codebook restructure, differential encoding/decoding and scheduling
US8811339B2 (en) * 2008-07-07 2014-08-19 Blackberry Limited Handover schemes for wireless systems
US8599728B2 (en) * 2008-07-11 2013-12-03 Nokia Siemens Networks Oy Recovery schemes for group switching procedures for multi-group frequency division duplex wireless networks
WO2010028312A3 (en) * 2008-09-05 2010-06-17 Zte (Usa) Inc. Mac layer packet data units for wireless communications
CN102273269A (en) * 2008-10-29 2011-12-07 诺基亚西门子通信公司 Addressing scheme for the relay network system
WO2010053295A3 (en) * 2008-11-04 2010-08-12 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for processing the relayed data in a multihop relay broadband wireless access communication system
EP2347611A4 (en) * 2008-11-11 2014-12-17 Aeronix Inc Method and apparatus for improved secure transmission between wireless communication components
US8848594B2 (en) * 2008-12-10 2014-09-30 Blackberry Limited Method and apparatus for discovery of relay nodes
US8040904B2 (en) * 2008-12-17 2011-10-18 Research In Motion Limited System and method for autonomous combining
US8355388B2 (en) 2008-12-17 2013-01-15 Research In Motion Limited System and method for initial access to relays
US8311061B2 (en) 2008-12-17 2012-11-13 Research In Motion Limited System and method for multi-user multiplexing
US8402334B2 (en) 2008-12-17 2013-03-19 Research In Motion Limited System and method for hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) functionality in a relay node
US8335466B2 (en) 2008-12-19 2012-12-18 Research In Motion Limited System and method for resource allocation
US8265128B2 (en) 2008-12-19 2012-09-11 Research In Motion Limited Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) with relay nodes
US8446856B2 (en) 2008-12-19 2013-05-21 Research In Motion Limited System and method for relay node selection
WO2010104333A3 (en) * 2009-03-13 2010-12-09 Lg Electronics Inc. Method and apparatus for relaying data in wireless communication system
US9654256B2 (en) 2009-04-21 2017-05-16 Lg Electronics Inc. Method of utilizing a relay node in wireless communication system
WO2010134162A1 (en) * 2009-05-19 2010-11-25 富士通株式会社 Base station, relay station, communication system, and communication method
CN102804890B (en) * 2009-06-19 2016-05-25 黑莓有限公司 A relay node, the access device and method implemented in a relay node
CA2765474C (en) * 2009-06-19 2015-08-04 Research In Motion Limited Mobile station association procedures with type ii relays
CN101932124B (en) * 2009-06-23 2014-10-15 财团法人资讯工业策进会 The base station, relay station, and backhaul control communication method
US8326156B2 (en) * 2009-07-07 2012-12-04 Fiber-Span, Inc. Cell phone/internet communication system for RF isolated areas
KR101096375B1 (en) * 2009-07-27 2011-12-20 주식회사 팬택 Method and apparatus for asigning connection identifier in multi-hop relay system
CN101969395B (en) 2009-07-28 2013-02-27 华为技术有限公司 Method for configuring code, method and system for detecting path and network equipment
WO2011052037A1 (en) * 2009-10-27 2011-05-05 富士通株式会社 Relay station, base station and wireless communication method
US20110223958A1 (en) * 2010-03-10 2011-09-15 Fujitsu Limited System and Method for Implementing Power Distribution
JP5672779B2 (en) * 2010-06-08 2015-02-18 ソニー株式会社 Transmission control apparatus, and a transmission control method
KR101465909B1 (en) * 2010-07-23 2014-11-26 엘지전자 주식회사 Method and apparatus for transceiving control information and/or data to/from a base station via an anchor terminal in a wireless access system supporting machine-type communication
US9882624B2 (en) 2010-09-29 2018-01-30 Qualcomm, Incorporated Systems and methods for communication of channel state information
US9806848B2 (en) 2010-09-29 2017-10-31 Qualcomm Incorporated Systems, methods and apparatus for determining control field and modulation coding scheme information
US9813135B2 (en) 2010-09-29 2017-11-07 Qualcomm, Incorporated Systems and methods for communication of channel state information
US9602298B2 (en) 2010-09-29 2017-03-21 Qualcomm Incorporated Methods and apparatuses for determining a type of control field
US9831983B2 (en) * 2010-09-29 2017-11-28 Qualcomm Incorporated Systems, methods and apparatus for determining control field and modulation coding scheme information
US9374193B2 (en) 2010-09-29 2016-06-21 Qualcomm Incorporated Systems and methods for communication of channel state information
US9077498B2 (en) 2010-09-29 2015-07-07 Qualcomm Incorporated Systems and methods for communication of channel state information
WO2012070847A3 (en) * 2010-11-25 2012-09-27 엘지전자 주식회사 Method and apparatus for notifying a node in a multi-node system
GB2488153B (en) * 2011-02-18 2013-07-17 Sca Ipla Holdings Inc Communication units and methods for supporting power control of broadcast communication
US9374767B2 (en) * 2011-03-09 2016-06-21 Intel Deutschland Gmbh Communication devices and methods for network signaling
JP2013093781A (en) * 2011-10-27 2013-05-16 Fujitsu Ltd Communication network system, node device, and route selection method for communication network system
US9119184B2 (en) * 2012-03-31 2015-08-25 Tejas Networks Limited Method and system of transmitting a bearer resource request message from a UE to a MME for setting up an EPS bearer in a LTE network
US8989807B2 (en) 2013-02-28 2015-03-24 Intel Mobile Communications GmbH Communication terminal device, communication device, communication network server and method for controlling
KR20150043887A (en) * 2013-10-15 2015-04-23 삼성전자주식회사 Method and its apparatus for controlling topology in beamforming system
US9461729B2 (en) * 2013-12-13 2016-10-04 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Software-defined network infrastructure having virtual range extenders
US9949063B2 (en) 2015-06-01 2018-04-17 Apple Inc. Bluetooth low energy triggering NAN for further discovery and connection

Citations (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5950133A (en) * 1996-11-05 1999-09-07 Lockheed Martin Corporation Adaptive communication network
US20020012320A1 (en) * 2000-03-16 2002-01-31 Ogier Richard G. Mobile ad hoc extensions for the internet
US20020168971A1 (en) * 2001-05-08 2002-11-14 Parkman David S. Path discovery method for return link communications between a mobile platform and a base station
US20030072270A1 (en) * 2001-11-29 2003-04-17 Roch Guerin Method and system for topology construction and path identification in a two-level routing domain operated according to a simple link state routing protocol
US20030161330A1 (en) * 2002-02-26 2003-08-28 Skyley Networks, Inc. Multi-hop peer-to-peer telecommunications method in a wireless network, radio terminal telecommunications method, and medium recording a program for causing a processor to implement the radio terminal telecommunications method
US20040018839A1 (en) * 2002-06-06 2004-01-29 Oleg Andric Protocol and structure for mobile nodes in a self-organizing communication network
US20040170154A1 (en) * 2000-07-13 2004-09-02 Ge Medical Systems Information Technologies Wireless lan architecture for integrated time-critical and non-time-critical services within medical facilities
US20050047364A1 (en) * 2003-09-03 2005-03-03 Fujitsu Limited Communication relay method and device
US20050135329A1 (en) * 2003-12-22 2005-06-23 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for processing data in high speed downlink packet access (HSDPA) communication system
US20050201269A1 (en) * 2004-03-12 2005-09-15 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for constructing MAP IE using reduced CID in broadband OFDMA systems
US20050232183A1 (en) * 2003-09-03 2005-10-20 Sartori Philippe J Method and apparatus for relay facilitated communications
US20050265360A1 (en) * 2004-05-07 2005-12-01 Lg Electronics Inc. IP addressing to support IPv4 and IPv6
US20050272481A1 (en) * 2004-05-10 2005-12-08 Lg Electronics Inc. Minimized IP connectivity establishment procedures
US20050286451A1 (en) * 2004-06-24 2005-12-29 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Connection identification allocating system and method in a broadband wireless access communication system

Family Cites Families (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5235599A (en) * 1989-07-26 1993-08-10 Nec Corporation Self-healing network with distributed failure restoration capabilities
CA2213984A1 (en) * 1996-08-22 1998-02-22 Norand Corporation Enhanced mobility and address resolution in a wireless premises based network
US6130881A (en) * 1998-04-20 2000-10-10 Sarnoff Corporation Traffic routing in small wireless data networks
US6947432B2 (en) * 2000-03-15 2005-09-20 At&T Corp. H.323 back-end services for intra-zone and inter-zone mobility management
US7158484B1 (en) * 2000-02-25 2007-01-02 Lucent Technologies Inc. Methods and apparatus for topology sensing in networks with mobile nodes
JP2003008585A (en) * 2001-04-20 2003-01-10 Toshiba Corp Communication controller and communication control method, and communication apparatus and communication method
US20040165595A1 (en) * 2003-02-25 2004-08-26 At&T Corp. Discovery and integrity testing method in an ethernet domain
US7349360B2 (en) * 2003-05-19 2008-03-25 Gaton Corporation Ad-hoc network and method of routing communications in a communication network
US20040235468A1 (en) * 2003-05-19 2004-11-25 Luebke Charles J. Wireless network clustering communication system, wireless communication network, and access port for same
US7401217B2 (en) * 2003-08-12 2008-07-15 Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories, Inc. Secure routing protocol for an ad hoc network using one-way/one-time hash functions
WO2005034551A1 (en) 2003-10-01 2005-04-14 Actix Limited Call tracking systems
US7394774B2 (en) * 2003-10-30 2008-07-01 Motorola, Inc. Method and apparatus for route discovery within a communication system
US7414977B2 (en) * 2003-11-25 2008-08-19 Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories, Inc. Power and delay sensitive ad-hoc communication networks
US7133373B2 (en) * 2003-12-19 2006-11-07 Motorola, Inc. Wireless network with improved sharing of high power consumption tasks
WO2005062554A8 (en) * 2003-12-23 2006-08-17 Leif Axelsson Method and system for efficient routing in ad hoc networks
US7382778B2 (en) * 2004-01-05 2008-06-03 Tropos Networks, Inc. Link layer emulation
CN1645794A (en) * 2004-01-19 2005-07-27 日立通讯技术株式会社 Access user management system and access user management apparatus
US20050174950A1 (en) * 2004-02-09 2005-08-11 Sharp Laboratories Of America, Inc. Distributed network organization and topology discovery in ad-hoc network
US7376122B2 (en) * 2004-02-23 2008-05-20 Microsoft Corporation System and method for link quality source routing
JP2005286989A (en) * 2004-03-02 2005-10-13 Ntt Docomo Inc Communication terminal and ad hoc network rout controlling method
JP4086304B2 (en) * 2004-04-23 2008-05-14 株式会社東芝 Communication device, a communication system, and communication control program
US7573835B2 (en) * 2004-08-16 2009-08-11 Renesas Technology Corporation Method, system, node, computer program product and communication packet for communicating information in an ad-hoc hierarchically addressed communication network
US7715396B2 (en) * 2004-08-19 2010-05-11 Microsoft Corporation Network routing
US7499445B2 (en) * 2005-03-18 2009-03-03 Cisco Technology, Inc. System and method for routing ISIS traffic through unidirectional links of a computer network
US7515544B2 (en) * 2005-07-14 2009-04-07 Tadaaki Chigusa Method and system for providing location-based addressing
US7933236B2 (en) * 2005-10-27 2011-04-26 Nortel Networks Limited Methods and systems for a wireless routing architecture and protocol

Patent Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5950133A (en) * 1996-11-05 1999-09-07 Lockheed Martin Corporation Adaptive communication network
US20020012320A1 (en) * 2000-03-16 2002-01-31 Ogier Richard G. Mobile ad hoc extensions for the internet
US20040170154A1 (en) * 2000-07-13 2004-09-02 Ge Medical Systems Information Technologies Wireless lan architecture for integrated time-critical and non-time-critical services within medical facilities
US6778825B2 (en) * 2001-05-08 2004-08-17 The Boeing Company Path discovery method for return link communications between a mobile platform and a base station
US20020168971A1 (en) * 2001-05-08 2002-11-14 Parkman David S. Path discovery method for return link communications between a mobile platform and a base station
US20030072270A1 (en) * 2001-11-29 2003-04-17 Roch Guerin Method and system for topology construction and path identification in a two-level routing domain operated according to a simple link state routing protocol
US20030161330A1 (en) * 2002-02-26 2003-08-28 Skyley Networks, Inc. Multi-hop peer-to-peer telecommunications method in a wireless network, radio terminal telecommunications method, and medium recording a program for causing a processor to implement the radio terminal telecommunications method
US20040018839A1 (en) * 2002-06-06 2004-01-29 Oleg Andric Protocol and structure for mobile nodes in a self-organizing communication network
US20050047364A1 (en) * 2003-09-03 2005-03-03 Fujitsu Limited Communication relay method and device
US20050232183A1 (en) * 2003-09-03 2005-10-20 Sartori Philippe J Method and apparatus for relay facilitated communications
US20050135329A1 (en) * 2003-12-22 2005-06-23 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for processing data in high speed downlink packet access (HSDPA) communication system
US20050201269A1 (en) * 2004-03-12 2005-09-15 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for constructing MAP IE using reduced CID in broadband OFDMA systems
US20050265360A1 (en) * 2004-05-07 2005-12-01 Lg Electronics Inc. IP addressing to support IPv4 and IPv6
US20050272481A1 (en) * 2004-05-10 2005-12-08 Lg Electronics Inc. Minimized IP connectivity establishment procedures
US20050286451A1 (en) * 2004-06-24 2005-12-29 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Connection identification allocating system and method in a broadband wireless access communication system

Cited By (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8582430B2 (en) * 2003-10-15 2013-11-12 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and apparatus for wireless LAN (WLAN) data multiplexing
US9226308B2 (en) 2003-10-15 2015-12-29 Qualcomm Incorporated Method, apparatus, and system for medium access control
US8774098B2 (en) 2003-10-15 2014-07-08 Qualcomm Incorporated Method, apparatus, and system for multiplexing protocol data units
US20090323646A1 (en) * 2003-10-15 2009-12-31 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and apparatus for wirless lan (wlan) data multiplexing
US9137087B2 (en) 2003-10-15 2015-09-15 Qualcomm Incorporated High speed media access control
US9072101B2 (en) 2003-10-15 2015-06-30 Qualcomm Incorporated High speed media access control and direct link protocol
US8903440B2 (en) 2004-01-29 2014-12-02 Qualcomm Incorporated Distributed hierarchical scheduling in an ad hoc network
US20090252145A1 (en) * 2004-06-02 2009-10-08 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and Apparatus for Scheduling in a Wireless Network
US9198194B2 (en) 2005-09-12 2015-11-24 Qualcomm Incorporated Scheduling with reverse direction grant in wireless communication systems
US8600336B2 (en) 2005-09-12 2013-12-03 Qualcomm Incorporated Scheduling with reverse direction grant in wireless communication systems
US20070058605A1 (en) * 2005-09-12 2007-03-15 Arnaud Meylan Scheduling with reverse direction grant in wireless communication systems
US20150365876A1 (en) * 2005-10-27 2015-12-17 Apple Inc. Methods and Systems for a Wireless Routing Architecture and Protocol
US20100015914A1 (en) * 2006-09-30 2010-01-21 Hui Li Methods and equipment for performing channel aware relays in an enhanced relay cluster
US8391777B2 (en) * 2006-09-30 2013-03-05 Nokia Siemens Network Gmbh & Co. Kg Methods and equipment for performing channel aware relays in an enhanced relay cluster
US20090245165A1 (en) * 2006-12-15 2009-10-01 Huawei Technologiies Co., Ltd. Method and system for resource scheduling in wireless system
US8325646B2 (en) * 2006-12-15 2012-12-04 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Method and system for resource scheduling in wireless system
US9521690B2 (en) 2008-09-25 2016-12-13 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Method for QoS delivery in contention-based multi hop network
US9060310B2 (en) 2008-09-25 2015-06-16 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Method for QoS delivery in contention-based multi hop network
US9042260B2 (en) 2008-12-16 2015-05-26 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Multi-hop wireless networks
US20130088994A1 (en) * 2009-09-01 2013-04-11 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for measuring performance of multi-service in tunnel
US9143425B2 (en) * 2009-09-01 2015-09-22 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for measuring performance of multi-service in tunnel
US9742645B2 (en) 2009-09-01 2017-08-22 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for measuring performance of multi-service in tunnel
US20110063996A1 (en) * 2009-09-16 2011-03-17 Lusheng Ji Qos in multi-hop wireless networks through path channel access throttling
US8483077B2 (en) * 2009-09-16 2013-07-09 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. QoS in multi-hop wireless networks
US9209890B2 (en) * 2009-09-18 2015-12-08 Sony Corporation Relay station, relay method, and wireless communication device
US20120170481A1 (en) * 2009-09-18 2012-07-05 Sony Corporation Relay station, relay method, and wireless communication device
US20130028094A1 (en) * 2011-07-25 2013-01-31 Zhonghua Gao Fiber chanel device
US20170230102A1 (en) * 2014-10-28 2017-08-10 Bayerische Motoren Werke Aktiengesellschaft Vehicle-Based Femtocell with Prioritization of Data Packets on the Basis of the Required Internet Service Quality
US9439130B2 (en) * 2015-01-19 2016-09-06 Telefonica Digital Limited Method for controlling relay in a group communication and computer programs thereof
US20170054579A1 (en) * 2015-08-20 2017-02-23 Yokogawa Electric Corporation Wireless relay device, processing apparatus, wireless communication system, and wireless communication method

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20070097945A1 (en) 2007-05-03 application
WO2007048247A1 (en) 2007-05-03 application
US20150365876A1 (en) 2015-12-17 application
US7933236B2 (en) 2011-04-26 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Soldani et al. Wireless relays for broadband access [radio communications series]
US7339897B2 (en) Cross-layer integrated collision free path routing
Shan et al. Cross-layer cooperative MAC protocol in distributed wireless networks
US7027426B2 (en) Multi-channel mobile ad hoc network
US20090116430A1 (en) System for enabling mobile coverage extension and peer-to-peer communications in an ad hoc network and method of operation therefor
Yuan et al. An optimized ad-hoc on-demand multipath distance vector (AOMDV) routing protocol
US20080107091A1 (en) Broadcast efficiency in a multihop network
US7466665B2 (en) Method and apparatus for route discovery within a communication system
US20080165719A1 (en) Method and apparatus for relay zone bandwidth allocation
Genc et al. IEEE 802.16 J relay-based wireless access networks: an overview
US20080205385A1 (en) Data frame formats to improve groupcast efficiency in multi-hop wireless networks
US20080002631A1 (en) System and method of operation of a communication network
US20070121531A1 (en) Hybrid wireless communication system and communication method using the same
US7450517B2 (en) Mobile ad hoc network system and operating method thereof
US7742448B2 (en) Optimizing topology learning in a multihop network
US20070147283A1 (en) Method and apparatus for end node assisted neighbor discovery
US20080002610A1 (en) Transmission of management messages for relay networks
US20080025280A1 (en) System and method for relaying data
US20070081507A1 (en) Channel configuration and bandwidth allocation in multi-hop cellular communication networks
US20080212513A1 (en) Protocol Data Units and Header in Multihop Relay Network
US20070178880A1 (en) Method and relay station for aggregating service connection identifiers in IEEE802.16
US20080316997A1 (en) Multi-radio node with a single routing module which manages routing for multiple different radio modules
US20070147377A1 (en) Communications methods and apparatus using physical attachment point identifiers
US20090003267A1 (en) Method of communication scheduling in a multihop network
US20050094576A1 (en) Method and apparatus for route discovery within a communication system

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: NORTEL NETWORKS LIMITED, CANADA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:WANG, GUO QIANG;WU, SHIQUAN;SIGNING DATES FROM 20060928 TO 20061010;REEL/FRAME:026118/0802

AS Assignment

Owner name: ROCKSTAR BIDCO, LP, NEW YORK

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NORTEL NETWORKS LIMITED;REEL/FRAME:027143/0717

Effective date: 20110729

AS Assignment

Owner name: APPLE INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ROCKSTAR BIDCO, LP;REEL/FRAME:028506/0001

Effective date: 20120511