US20110179741A1 - Multi-purpose mobile modular structure - Google Patents

Multi-purpose mobile modular structure Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20110179741A1
US20110179741A1 US13/007,667 US201113007667A US2011179741A1 US 20110179741 A1 US20110179741 A1 US 20110179741A1 US 201113007667 A US201113007667 A US 201113007667A US 2011179741 A1 US2011179741 A1 US 2011179741A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
joints
beams
modular building
frame
joint
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13/007,667
Inventor
Chih-Cheng YEN
Original Assignee
Yen Chih-Cheng
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to JP2010012609A priority Critical patent/JP2011149233A/en
Priority to JP2010-012610 priority
Priority to JP2010012610A priority patent/JP2011149234A/en
Priority to JP2010-012609 priority
Application filed by Yen Chih-Cheng filed Critical Yen Chih-Cheng
Priority claimed from PCT/SG2011/000025 external-priority patent/WO2012099531A1/en
Publication of US20110179741A1 publication Critical patent/US20110179741A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/343Structures characterised by movable, separable, or collapsible parts, e.g. for transport
    • E04B1/34315Structures characterised by movable, separable, or collapsible parts, e.g. for transport characterised by separable parts
    • E04B1/34326Structures characterised by movable, separable, or collapsible parts, e.g. for transport characterised by separable parts mainly constituted by longitudinal elements
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B2001/0053Buildings characterised by their shape or layout grid
    • E04B2001/0076Buildings with specific right-angled horizontal layout grid
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/18Structures comprising elongated load-supporting parts, e.g. columns, girders, skeletons
    • E04B1/24Structures comprising elongated load-supporting parts, e.g. columns, girders, skeletons the supporting parts consisting of metal
    • E04B1/2403Connection details of the elongated load-supporting parts
    • E04B2001/2406Connection nodes
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/18Structures comprising elongated load-supporting parts, e.g. columns, girders, skeletons
    • E04B1/24Structures comprising elongated load-supporting parts, e.g. columns, girders, skeletons the supporting parts consisting of metal
    • E04B1/2403Connection details of the elongated load-supporting parts
    • E04B2001/2421Socket type connectors
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04CSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; BUILDING MATERIALS
    • E04C3/00Structural elongated elements designed for load-supporting
    • E04C3/02Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces
    • E04C3/04Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces of metal
    • E04C2003/0404Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces of metal beams, girders, or joists characterised by cross-sectional aspects
    • E04C2003/0426Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces of metal beams, girders, or joists characterised by cross-sectional aspects characterised by material distribution in cross section
    • E04C2003/043Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces of metal beams, girders, or joists characterised by cross-sectional aspects characterised by material distribution in cross section the hollow cross-section comprising at least one enclosed cavity
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04CSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; BUILDING MATERIALS
    • E04C3/00Structural elongated elements designed for load-supporting
    • E04C3/02Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces
    • E04C3/04Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces of metal
    • E04C2003/0404Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces of metal beams, girders, or joists characterised by cross-sectional aspects
    • E04C2003/0443Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces of metal beams, girders, or joists characterised by cross-sectional aspects characterised by substantial shape of the cross-section
    • E04C2003/0465Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces of metal beams, girders, or joists characterised by cross-sectional aspects characterised by substantial shape of the cross-section square- or rectangular-shaped

Abstract

A modular building system is disclosed. The modular building includes a plurality of pre-fabricated joints having open-ended hollow arms extending orthoganally along at least two directional axes, as defined by a 3-dimensional rectangular coordinate system. The system further includes a plurality of pre-fabricated beams detachably insertable into the open-ends of the hollow arms of the joints and connectors removeably securing the beams in the hollow arms of the joints. The joints and beams are assembled to build a variety of modular grid-frame structures in accordance with pre-determined assembly plans.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The invention relates to a mobile modular building system that can be rapidly deployed to create usable space for different purposes. The invention also relates to all joints and connectors that are integral parts of the invention.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Modular structures have been used in various applications. Modular structures are usually designed to combine standard components in different combinations to create varied configurations.
  • An example of modular structures is pre-fabricated or “pre-fab” housing. Pre-fabricated housing are usually manufactured in a remote location and then transported to the place of use for assembly. These homes are usually manufactured in a large facility into partially completed structures before being transported and assembled.
  • This method of construction necessitates the use of a large facility during the manufacturing process because of the need to handle the large assemblies. Transportation to the site of use also poses challenges because the partially completed units will require vehicles that are built to accommodate the weight and size of the structures. Similar problems also apply to the assembly process. Heavy lifting equipment will be necessary to handle the partially completed structures during the assembly process because of the weight and size of some of these units or modules.
  • Another form of modular construction uses refurbished shipping containers. The panels of shipping containers are removed and new panels and interiors added to the frame to create structures which may look very different from the original containers.
  • The problems that are associated with pre-fab buildings also apply to containers. The size and weight of shipping containers necessitate the need for heavy equipment during the manufacturing, transportation and assembly process. Compared to pre-fab buildings, which are generally customized designs, shipping container offers the advantage of an immediate standardized structure that can be easily utilized. Shipping containers have been engineered to withstand substantial loads, so structural strength is usually not a major concern. This means that retrofits can be made without extra consideration for the structural integrity. This helps to reduce the time required for the building process as well as costs associated with ensuring the integrity of a customized structure.
  • The configurations obtainable using shipping containers are however also limited by the fact that they come in standard sizes. To ensure that the structural integrity of the structure is not compromised, the frame is usually left untouched. However, this also means that only certain configurations based on standard container sizes are possible.
  • The structure of shipping containers may be altered to meet specific requirements. However, whenever this happens, proper structural analysis has to be conducted to ensure that the structural integrity is not compromised. This also means that, depending on the changes, the structure may no longer be modular.
  • Besides these larger structures, there are also lightweight modular structures, usually made of aluminum profiles. Due to the fact that they are light weight structures, their lower structural strength means that they are generally not robust enough for use as permanent or large-scale housing solutions and only suitable as temporary structures.
  • These lightweight structures are commonly used as exhibition booths, temporary retail showrooms and also structures that house equipment for industrial applications. The lower weight and size of these structures make them conducive to handling and transportation.
  • These structures are also generally made from standardized designs and as such can be combined in different forms to create multiple configurations. The standardized designs also mean manufacturing costs can be lowered substantially because of larger production quantities.
  • More importantly, the structures are generally designed to be re-usable. They can usually be disassembled and removed, then packed and stored until they are needed again. Due to the temporary nature of the structures, the panels used for these structures are however usually removed and discarded after use.
  • The object of the present design is to provide a design that will combine the robustness and permanency of current modular or pre-fabricated buildings with the ease of handling and cost-effectiveness of lightweight modular structures. As opposed to most permanent solutions, the current design also focuses strongly on the re-use capability of the structures and all associated panels.
  • SUMMARY OF THE DESIGN
  • The present invention consists of a structure using a system of beams and joints to create a modular structure using a basic “C” frame unit that is expandable and reconfigurable. The use of a system which can be assembled only when necessary, instead of a partially or fully completed structure, means that the difficulties associated with manufacturing, handling, storage and transportation of modular structures are drastically reduced. The objective is to create a system that can be used as a permanent structure while retaining many of the advantages associated with lightweight mobile structures.
  • The beam is a hollow extruded section that is uniform throughout its entire length. Each joint is made up of at least two interconnected hollow elements which are perpendicular to each other with a similar cross-section that are of an enlarged size. A “C” frame is formed by inserting opposing ends of a vertical beam into joints located at each end. The beams are secured by means that may include bolts. Each joint has an additional element in the horizontal direction perpendicular to the original element into which another beam is inserted and secured. The resultant section forms a “C” with a single vertical beam and two horizontal beams protruding from each end.
  • The basic “C” frame can be further expanded by using joints with additional elements perpendicular to those in the original joint. These additional elements will enable crossbeams to be added to either sides of the “C” frame to create multiple connected “C” frames. In order to increase the structural integrity of the assembly, additional joints may be added to the mid-section and ends of the horizontal beams for additional crossbeams. This will create a modular grid-like network that distributes lateral and vertical loads throughout the connected portions of the structure. With this arrangement, as more joints and beams are added, the expanded structure becomes an even larger interconnected network grid that distributes the loads even more evenly throughout the entire structure.
  • This grid-like structure also forms the basic framework for attaching internal and external panels. The panel consists of a larger rectangular main body panel mounted over a smaller rectangular frame. When mounted onto the structure, the overhang of the main body panel will just extend over the outer edges of the grid while the frame will fit snugly within the opening in the grid. The presence of the frame stiffens the panel and in the same manner, both the panel and the frame will also act as strengthening elements by adding rigidity to the structure.
  • Vertical wall panels are secured by mounting another panel on the opposing side of the grid such that both panels can be secured to each other by means of bolts and nuts inserted through the drilled holes in the panel. Horizontal roof panels can be attached in a similar manner. Floor panels can be secured by simply fitting the panels and frame into the grid. This system also allows the internal and external panels to be changed quickly and cost-effectively when the need arises. This means that the structures can be adapted for different purposes with a simple change of panels.
  • Employing this system of beams, joints and panels shortens the time required for assembly and disassembly by making the process extremely simple. If the structures need to be removed, the beams can be easily released and removed from the joints and the structure disassembled.
  • The joints not only act as connectors between the beams but also strengthen the structure at the weakest points within the assembled structure. Using different combinations of beams and joints, the configuration of the structure can also be changed easily.
  • The structure is also designed to be structurally strong enough to allow for the stacking of these structures up to a designated height provided the required support structures are also in place. As such, the structure is able to not only expand laterally but also vertically, providing great flexibility.
  • The present design also allows for the routing of internal cabling and wiring through the beams to enable the structures to be internally lighted and the additional of services such as air-conditioning or heaters.
  • Even though the current design is robust enough to be used as a permanent structure, the design also allows the beams, joints and even the panels to be re-used. Beams and joints can be re-used for other applications and panels can be repaired and renewed if necessary.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • An embodiment of the present design will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • [FIG. 1] A perspective view of the frame assembly in the modular structure (embodiment 1).
  • [FIG. 2] An exploded perspective view of the frame assembly structure (embodiment 1).
  • [FIG. 3] The long and short beams used by the frame assembly from FIG. 1. (a) profile view of the long beam (b) profile view of the short beam. (c) a cross-sectional view of the long beam (embodiment 1).
  • [FIG. 4] (a) is the cross-sectional view of a modified long beam from FIG. 2. (b) a cross-sectional view of an alternative configuration (embodiment 1).
  • [FIG. 5] Shows the joint used in the frame assembly from FIG. 1, (a) is the perspective view, (b) is the plan view, (c) is the front view for (a) as viewed from direction A, (d) is the front view for (a) as viewed from direction B (embodiment 1).
  • [FIG. 6] Shows the joint used in the frame assembly from FIG. 1, (a) is the perspective view, (b) is the plan view, (c) is the front view as viewed from direction C, (d) is the front view for (a) as viewed from direction D (embodiment 1).
  • [FIG. 7] Shows the joint used in the frame assembly from FIG. 1, (a) is the perspective view, (b) is the plan view, (c) is the front view as viewed from direction E, (d) is the front view as viewed from direction F (embodiment 1).
  • [FIG. 8] Shows a schematic view of the relationship between the end support sleeve and the long beam (embodiment 1).
  • [FIG. 9] A perspective view which shows the schematic make-up of the frame assembly in FIG. 1 when attached with panels (embodiment 1).
  • [FIG. 10] Shows one type of main body panel from FIG. 9, (a) is the front view, (b) is the profile view, (c) is the plan view (embodiment 1).
  • [FIG. 11] Shows another type of panel from FIG. 9, (a) is the front view, (b) is the profile view, (c) is the plan view (embodiment 1).
  • [FIG. 12] Shows the schematic view of the relationship between the frame of the panel and the opening in the frame assembly structure (embodiment 1).
  • [FIG. 13] Perspective view showing the frame assembly of the modular structure (embodiment 2).
  • [FIG. 14] is the cross-sectional perspective view of the frame assembly from FIG. 13 (embodiment 2)
  • [FIG. 15] Shows the center joint used in the frame assembly in FIG. 13, (a) is a perspective view, (b) is a plan view, (c) is the front view of (a) as viewed from direction G, (d) is the front view of (a) as viewed from direction H (embodiment 2).
  • [FIG. 16] shows the center joint used in the frame assembly in FIG. 13, (a) is a perspective view, (b) is a plan view, (c) is the front view of a as viewed from direction I, (d) is the front view of (a) as viewed from direction J (embodiment 2).
  • [FIG. 17] shows a perspective view of a modified example of the frame assembly for the modular structure (embodiment 2).
  • [FIG. 18] shows the joint, (a) is the profile view, (b) is the plan view, (c) is the rear view (embodiment 3).
  • [FIG. 19] shows the joint, (a) is the profile view, (b) is the plan view, (c) is the rear view (embodiment 3).
  • [FIG. 20] shows the joint, (a) is the front view, (b) is the profile view, (c) is the bottom view (embodiment 3).
  • [FIG. 21] shows the joint, (a) is the plan view, (b) is the profile view, (c) is the rear view (embodiment 3).
  • [FIG. 22] shows the joint, (a) is the perspective view, (b) is the plan view, (c) is the rear view (embodiment 3).
  • [FIG. 23] shows the joint, (a) is the perspective view, (b) is the profile view, (c) is the bottom view (embodiment 3).
  • [FIG. 24] shows the joint, (a) is the perspective view, (b) is the rear view, (c) is the plan view (embodiment 3).
  • [FIG. 25] shows the joint, (a) is the bottom view, (b) is the front view, (c) is the profile view (embodiment 3).
  • [FIG. 26] shows the joint, (a) is the profile view, (b) is the plan view, (c) is the profile view (embodiment 3).
  • [FIG. 27] shows the joint, (a) is the perspective view, (b) is the plan view, (c) is the front view (embodiment 3).
  • [FIG. 28] A perspective view of the frame assembly structure (embodiment 3).
  • [FIG. 29] A perspective view as viewed from direction K of the frame assembly structure in FIG. 28 (embodiment 3).
  • [FIG. 30] The front view of the frame assembly structure in FIG. 28 (embodiment 3).
  • [FIG. 31] The plan view of the frame assembly structure in FIG. 28 (embodiment 3).
  • [FIG. 32] The profile view of the frame assembly structure in FIG. 28 (embodiment 3).
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • FIG. 1 shows the perspective view of embodiment 1 which consists of a frame assembly in a modular structure. FIG. 2 shows the cross-sectional perspective view of the frame assembly in FIG. 1.
  • As shown in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2, frame assembly 1 consists of a beam-like frame assembly with long beam 3 and short beam 5 and end joints 7, 9 and center joint 11. Frame assembly 1 is formed from a series of intersecting and orthogonal long beam 3 and short beam 5, numerous end joints 7, 9 and center joint 11, into a three-dimensional lattical structure. This frame structure 1, in one embodiment, is made up entirely of a “C” structure made up of the top section 13, bottom section 15 and the side section 17. Other shape structure may also be useful.
  • Top section 13 and bottom section 15 are facing each other on opposing ends vertically, connected in between by the side section 17 at one end. Top section 13, bottom section 15 and side section 17 are respectively formed by the outer frame section 19 and the numerous grid-like openings 23. In this embodiment, the outer frame section 19 is made up of two openings 23.
  • FIG. 3 shows the frame assembly 1 using the long and short beams, (a) is the profile view of the long beam, (b) is the profile view of the short beam, (c) is the cross-sectional view of the long beam.
  • The said long beam 3 and the short beam 5 are different only in terms of the length while being the same in terms of profile and form. As such, a detailed description will be given only for the long beam 3.
  • The long beam 3, for example, can be fabricated from a lightweight aluminum alloy such as 7000 series aluminum. The long beam may also be fabricated from other types of materials. For example, the long beam may be fabricated from steel. Other materials may also be useful. The materials selected may depend on the mechanical strength or stiffness desired. The long beam 3, in one embodiment, is hollow throughout its length. Providing the long beam which is partially hollow throughout its length may also be useful. In other embodiments, the long beam is solid throughout its length. Alternatively, the long beam may be partially solid. Both ends of the long beam 3 consist of cross-section 25 that are perpendicular to the axis.
  • The said long beam 3 has a rectangular cross-section, whereby a vertical wall 27 is longer than the horizontal wall 29. The horizontal wall 29 of the long beam 3 forms both the inner and outer faces of the “C” frame in the frame assembly 1. Accordingly, the frame assembly 1 has increased flexural stiffness on both the inside and the outside of the “C”.
  • The center of the cross-section in the long beam 3, in one embodiment, has a circular tube section 31 that traverses the entire length. Between the circular section 31 and the corner sections as well as the vertical wall 27, there are panel-like reinforcement sections 33, 35 that run along the length. The thickness of the reinforcement sections 33, 35 and the circular tube section 31, for example, are the same as the vertical wall 27 and the horizontal wall 29.
  • The circular tube section 31 and the reinforcement sections 33, 35, not only strengthen the long beam 3 but also divides the internal spaces into the hollow sections 37, 39, 41, 43, 45, 47 and 49. The hollow sections 37˜49 can be used to distribute wiring used for lighting, etc.
  • Also, the rigidity of the long beam 3 can be increased with the insertion of a rod-like component made from materials such as steel into the hollow section 49 in the circular tube section 31. In this instance, even if the rod is made from materials such as steel, the size with respect to the cross section of the long beam 3 is small, so the increase in weight to the structure will be negligible.
  • The cross-section profile of the long beam 3, for example, can be modified as shown in FIG. 4. The long beam 3 a in FIG. 4( a), with tubular section 31 a and reinforcement sections 33 a, 35 a, are thinner than the wall thickness of the vertical wall 27 and the horizontal wall 29. Also, for the long beam 3 b in FIG. 4( b), the tubular section 31 b and the vertical wall 27 and horizontal wall 29 are connected by reinforcement section 33 b and 35 b, with the thickness of 31 b, 33 b and 35 b being thinner than the vertical wall 27 and horizontal wall 29.
  • FIGS. 5 to 7 show the joints used in the frame assembly 1 shown in FIG. 1.
  • The said joints 7 and 9 are, as shown in FIG. 1, FIG. 5 and FIG. 6, the connectors for the ends of the long beam 3 or the short beam 5, and made from lightweight materials such as 7000 series aluminum. Other materials may also be useful. For example, the joints may be formed from steel or other types of materials which provide sufficient mechanical stability or stiffness.
  • The said joint 7, as shown in FIG. 1 and FIG. 5, makes up the extreme corners for the upper section 13 and the lower section 15 of the frame assembly 1. It consists of the end support sleeve 51 and 53.
  • The end support sleeves 51 and 53 form an “L” shape structure. That is, one end of the end support sleeve 51 protrudes out from the side wall 55 of the other opposing sleeve 53.
  • The said end support sleeves or arms 51 and 53, in one embodiment, are hollow rectangular cross-sections and the vertical wall 57 is longer than the horizontal wall 55. Providing sleeves that are solid or partially solid may also be useful. On the inside of the support sleeves 51 and 53, the openings 59 and 61 were made to fit the cross-section of the long beam 3 and the short beam 5.
  • The insides of the openings 59 and 61 support the ends of the long beam 3 and the short beam 5 when they are inserted longitudinally. Between the supporting sleeves 51 and 53 and the long beam 3 and short beam 5, the position can be fixed and also prevented from becoming dislodged by using a locking mechanism or fasteners such as locking nuts. Other types of fasteners may also be useful.
  • Inside the said openings 59 and 61, the contact walls 67 and 69 are perpendicular to the axis of the long beam 3 and the short beam 5. The contact surface 67 of one side of the support sleeve 51 is actually the outside surface of the vertical wall 57 of the support sleeve 53; the contact surface 69 of the other support sleeve 53, becomes the inner surface of vertical wall 57, which forms the outer face of the “L” shape structure. The contact surfaces 67 and 69 will come into contact with end 25 of the long beam 3 and the short beam 5 when these are inserted into the sleeves 51 and 53.
  • The said joint 9, as shown in FIG. 1 and FIG. 6, forms the corner of the “C” structure in the said frame assembly. This joint 9 is the same as joint 7 and is formed by the end support sleeve 71 and 73 in an “L” shape form with the addition of a support sleeve 75. The end support sleeve 75 forms an “L” shape with the end support sleeve 73.
  • That is, the end support sleeve 75 protrudes from the outside of the vertical wall 57 of the end support sleeve 73; the end support sleeve 71 protrudes from the outside of the horizontal wall 55 of end support sleeve 73. Between the supporting sleeves 73 and 71 and also between 73 and 75, diagonal reinforcement ribs 77 and 79 have been added.
  • The end support sleeves 71, 73 and 75 are similar in form to the end support sleeves 51 and 53 in the said joint 7. Accordingly, the two long beams 3 and the short beam 5 are supported when inserted into the openings 81, 83 and 85 of the end support sleeves 71, 73 and 75, the long beams 3 and the short beam 5 are positioned and also secured to the end support sleeves 71, 73 and 75 using a locking mechanism or fasteners such as bolts, nuts, etc.
  • The contact surfaces 87, 89 and 91 of the said support sleeve 71, 73 and 75 form the external wall of the horizontal wall 55 of the support sleeve 73, the inner surface of the horizontal wall 55 of the outside of the “L” shape, the outside surface of the vertical wall 57 of the support sleeve 73 respectively.
  • End joint 9 can also fit into the diagonally opposite corner of the frame assembly 1 if it is rotated into a diametrically opposite direction to that in FIG. 6( b).
  • The center joint 11, as shown in FIG. 1 and FIG. 7, connect the mid-section of the long beam 3 and the ends of the short beam 5 to each other. This center joint 11 consists of the center support sleeve 93 and the end support sleeve 95.
  • The said center sleeve 93 consists of opening 97 that passes through both ends. The mid-section of long beam 3 is inserted into opening 97 and thus supported. The center support sleeve 93 and the end support sleeve 95 form a “T” structure.
  • The end support sleeve 95 protrudes from the outer surface of the vertical wall 57 in the middle of the center support sleeve 93. The end support sleeve 95 has the same profile as the support sleeve 51 and 53 of the said joint 7 and it contains the contact surface 99 that is the outer surface of vertical wall 57 of the center support sleeve 93. As such, the end of the short beam 5 will be inserted into the opening 100 of end support sleeve 95 to be supported and the end 25 of the short beam 5 will then be pressing against the contact surface 99.
  • The position of the short beam 5 and long beam 3 can be fixed and held in place when inserted into the end support sleeve 95 or center support sleeve 93 by means such as bolts, nuts, etc.
  • FIG. 8 shows the cross-sectional view of the detailed relationship between the end support sleeve of the end joint and the long beam. FIG. 8 only shows the relationship between the support sleeve 51 of end joint 7 and long beam 3. However, the relationship between that of the other joint 9 and the end support sleeves 53, 71, 73, 75 and 95 and that of either long beam 3 or short beam 5 will be the same as that illustrated in FIG. 8.
  • As is mentioned above, for the end support sleeve 51, the long beam 3 will be supported when inserted into opening 59 and at the same time the end 25 of long beam 3 will press against the contact face 67. The end support sleeve 51 and the end of the long beam 3 can be secured using a locking mechanism or a fastener such as bolt 96. Providing other types of fastener may also be useful.
  • In this situation, the loading on the ends of long beam 3 due to its own weight, applied loads or external forces, etc. is sustained by sleeve 51 with the engagement of the ends of the long beam 3 against the contact surface 67.
  • Accordingly, even though the applied loads on the long beam 3 may force the end support sleeve 51, as shown in the arrow in FIG. 8, to rotate around the bolt 96 with the bolt as a fulcrum, this does not happen because the movement of the end face 25 of the long beam 3 will be restricted by the contact surface 67.
  • As a result, the end support sleeve 51 can be secured to the end of the long beam 3 using, for example, a single bolt 96, improving the efficiency of the assembly process while still being able to constrain the shaking or movement in the frame assembly 1.
  • Moreover, because contact surface 67 becomes the outer surface of the other end support sleeve 53, the applied loading from the long beam 3 is transmitted through contact face 67 to the other support sleeve 53 and also to the other long beam 3 supported by this sleeve.
  • If multiple fasteners such as bolts 96 are used, ranging for example, from 2 to 4, even better stability can be attained.
  • As described, the support sleeves of the various types joints are configured in 90° or multiple of 90° angles with respect to other sleeves. It is understood that the joints may have sleeves which are configured to have angles other than 90°. For example, a joint may be configured to have one or more sleeves configured at 45° with another sleeve. This facilitates providing a module with different types of shapes, as desired.
  • FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the structure when a panel is attached to the frame assembly in FIG. 1. FIGS. 10 and 11 show the main body of the panel from FIG. 9.
  • As shown in FIGS. 9 to 11, the frame assembly 1 forms the modular structure 105 when it is attached with panels 102 within the rectangular cavities 23 on the inside and the outside. FIG. 9 shows only the single panel 102.
  • The said panel 102 consists of a set of panels 101 and 103.
  • The panel 101, as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10, is attached to the external face of the “C” structure in the frame assembly 1. However, it can also be affixed to the internal and external surfaces of the “C” structure for the extreme ends of the top section 13 and bottom section 15 of the frame assembly 1, to form a set of double-sided panel body.
  • The said panel main body 101 can be made from lightweight materials such as a 7000 series aluminum alloy. However, it can also be made from materials other than aluminum alloy like wood and plastic and also other materials. The panel main body 101 is a rectangular board and is larger than the cavity 23 of the frame assembly 1. The four edges of panel main body 101 are collinear with the long beam 3 and the short beam 5 and covers the cavity 23 entirely.
  • The said frame 109 protrudes from the inner face 111 of panel 101 and acts as the strengthening component for panel 101. The frame 109 is formed by multiple vertical frame sections 113 and horizontal frame sections 115 at both ends.
  • The outer face of the frame 109 fits into the cavity 23 to secure the position of panel body 101, and through this process, frame 109 also acts to increase the strength of the frame assembly 1.
  • Another panel 103, as shown in FIGS. 9 and 11, are affixed to the inside corners of the “C” structure in the frame assembly 1. The basic structural make-up of the panel 103 is the same as panel 101.
  • Panel 103, in addition to the structure of panel 101, has sections 125, 127 and 129, which are formed to accommodate the support ribs 77 and 79 of end joint 9 and the end support sleeve 73. To conform to the shape of panel 103, the frame 119 also has section 131.
  • The said panels 101 and 103, as shown in FIG. 9, are affixed and secured to each other using a locking mechanism or a fastener such as bolt 133. Other types of fastener may also be useful. The bolt 133 is inserted through the panel 103 into panel 101 and then secured into place using means such as a nut.
  • As a result, a set of panels 101 and 103 are secured against each other by sandwiching the said “C” structure of the frame assembly 1. The locking mechanism can be, but is not restricted to, the bolt 133 used to secure panels 101 and 103.
  • Within the frames 109 and 119, for the panels 101 and 103, there are spaces between the vertical frames 113. Into this space, things such as insulation can be added.
  • FIG. 12 is the schematic view of the relationship between the panel frame and the cavity of the frame assembly. FIG. 12 only illustrates the relationship between the panel main body 101 and frame 109 with relation to the cavity 23 of the frame assembly but the relationship between the frame 119 for the other panel 103 and the cavity 23 will be the same as FIG. 12.
  • As mentioned above, the edges of frame 109 in panel 101 fits into the internal perimeter of the cavity 23.
  • In this way, they act as structure strengthening components for frame assembly 1 by sustaining the applied loads from the long beam 3 and the short beam 5.
  • For this purpose, the frame 109 is able to prevent long beam 3 from collapsing because it fits snugly into the corners of the cavity 23 of the frame assembly 1 and also along the long beam 3.
  • The frame assembly 1 is thus prevented from shaking or moving.
  • This embodiment consists of the joints 7 and 9 that connect the intersecting long beam 3 and short beam 5 and the two long beams 3 to form the modular structure 105 from the frame assembly 1; the end support sleeves 51, 53, 71, 73 and 75 that support the long beams 3 and the short beams 5 when they are inserted; the contact surfaces 67, 69, 87, 89 and 91 in the end support sleeves that engage the said long beam 3 and short beam 5.
  • As such, in this embodiment, the applied loading by the ends of the long beam 3 and the short beam 5 are supported by the end support sleeves 51, 53, 71, 73 and 75; and also by the contact surfaces 67, 69, 87, 89 and 91, when they come into contact with the ends of the long beam 3 and the short beam 5.
  • As a result, by using this simple structure in this embodiment, even if lightweight materials are being used, the strength of the frame assembly 1 and the modular structure 105 will still not be compromised.
  • Also, the joints 7 and 9, when the long beam 3 and the short beam 5 are inserted into the end support sleeves 51, 53, 71, 73 and 75, can connect the long beam 3 to the short beam 5 and also other long beams 3 easily.
  • As such, in this embodiment, the assembly of the frame assembly 1 and the modular structure 105 can be performed easily, raising assembly efficiency.
  • The end support sleeves 51, 53, 71, 73 and 75 can be positioned accurately and securely to the ends of the long beam 3 and the short beam 5 easily with a locking mechanism or fastener such as a single bolt 96.
  • In this instance, through the contact of the ends of the long beam 3 and the short beam 5 against the contact surfaces 67, 69, 87, 89 and 91, any rotation by the long beam 3 and the short beam 6 around the bolt 96 can be restricted.
  • As such, in this embodiment, the efficiency in assembly can be improved while ensuring that the frame assembly 1 is restricted from shaking or twisting.
  • The center joint 11 in this embodiment is a joint that connects intersecting long beams 3 and short beams 5 to form the frame assembly 1 that make up modular structure 105; it consists of the end support sleeves 95 and the center end support sleeve 93 that supports the end section of the short beam 5 and the center section of the long beam 3 when they are inserted; it consists of the contact surface 99 that comes into contact with the end of the short beam 5 is inserted into the end support sleeve 95.
  • For this reason, the center joint 11, similar to end joints 7 and 9, allows the frame assembly 1 that forms modular structure 105 to be made from lightweight materials while reducing structural weakness and increasing the efficiency during assembly.
  • The center end support sleeve 93 of joint 11 encompasses and supports the mid-section of the long beam 3, reducing the flexing of the beam.
  • Also, in this embodiment, the joints 7, 9 and 11 can be easily removed from the long beam 3 and the short beam 5, and the frame assembly 1 that make up modular structure 105 can be easily disassembled.
  • Also, in this embodiment, because the structural strength of the frame assembly 1 and the modular structure 105, as mentioned earlier, has been improved, any deformation of the long beam 3, the short beam 5 and the joints 7, 9 and 11, will be limited, so it will be possible to re-use the components.
  • The said contact surfaces 67, 69, 87, 89, 91 and 99 sustain the applied loads attributed to the ends of the long beam 3 and the short beam 5 because they are in direct contact thereby also increasing the structure strength of the frame assembly 1 and the modular structure 105.
  • The contact surfaces 67, 87, 91 and 99 of the said end support sleeves 51, 71, 75 and 95 form the outer surface of the end support sleeves, 53, 73 and the center support sleeve 93.
  • For this purpose, the applied loads of the long beam 3 and the short beam 5, through the contact surfaces 67, 87, 91 and 99, are conveyed to the other end support sleeve 53, 73 and the center support sleeve 93 and the long beam 3 and the short beam 5 are supported by these surfaces.
  • As such, in this embodiment, the structural integrity of the frame assembly 1 and the modular structure 105 is increased.
  • End joints 7, 9 and the center joint 11, besides being able to distribute the applied loading of the long beam 3 and the short beam 5 easily, also strengthen the areas which are being stressed by applied loads.
  • The frame assembly 1 in this embodiment, being an assembly formed from the connection of multiple numbers of the said long beam 3, short beam 5, joints 7, 9 and 11, means that there is no need for partial assembles of the components, resulting in the ease of production, transportation, handling and management of the components.
  • Moreover, besides the increased stiffness of the frame assembly 1 through joints 7, 9 and 11, the structural framework created by the long beam 3 and the short beam 5, together with the joints 7, 9 and 11, is able to distribute the applied loads, creating an increase in structural strength.
  • Also, through the appropriate combination of the joints 7, 9 and 11, in the frame assembly 1, it is possible to expand the structure to the desired height and width, ensuring flexibility in changing the form.
  • The said lattical framework of the frame assembly 1 is made up of opposing top section 13 and bottom section 15, both connected at one end by the side section 17 to form a “C” frame. Providing other frame shapes may also be useful.
  • According, the frame assembly 1 can be easily constructed such that it is open on 3 sides while being able to maintain its structural integrity.
  • The modular structure 105 in this embodiment consists of the frame assembly 1 with each rectangular cavity 23 attached with panel 102, said panel 102 consisting of a pair of panels 101 and 103 attached on both the inside and outside of said cavity 23, said panels 101 and 103 with attached frames 109 and 119 that fit within the said cavity 23, and a pair of fasteners such as bolts 133 that secure panels 101 and 103 to each other.
  • For this reason, in this embodiment, due to the manner in which the frames 109 and 119 fitting into the cavity 23 and the panels 101 and 103 being secured by the bolts 133, the inner face and the outer face of the modular structure 105 can be easily constructed.
  • Also, in panel 102, as a result of securing panels 101 and 103, there is no need for any special equipment or process for frame assembly 1, increasing the ease of installation and application.
  • In addition, there is no need for partially completed components for panel 102, resulting in the ease of production, transportation, handling and management.
  • Also, it is possible to easily change the panels in response to the intended application.
  • Moreover, the frames 109 and 119 in the panels 101 and 103 are used as reinforcements to the panels 101 and 103, so they help to improve the structural strength of the modular structure 105.
  • At the same time, because the frames 109 and 119 of the panels 101 and 103 serve as additional reinforcements for frame assembly 1 by fitting into and supporting the frame around cavity 23, the structural strength of the modular structure 105 is further improved.
  • In the said arrangement, the corners of the frames 109 and 119 fit into the corners of the cavity 23 of the frame assembly 1 and against the long beam 3 and the short beam 5 within the cavity 23. In this manner, the frames 109 and 119 are able to restrain the long beam 3 and the short beam 5 from flexing and the shaking or twisting of the frame assembly 1.
  • In the said frames 109 and 119, the multiple vertical frame sections 113, due to the fact that it is connected at both ends to horizontal frame section 115 to form a single structure, serves not only to strengthen the panels but and also allow the inclusion of materials such as insulation in the gaps between the frame sections 13.
  • Embodiment 2
  • FIG. 13 is the perspective view of the embodiment 2 of the present invention which relates to the frame assembly of the modular structure, FIG. 14 is the cross-sectional view of FIG. 13, FIG. 15 shows the joints being used for the frame assembly in FIG. 13, FIG. 16 shows the center joint being used in the frame assembly in FIG. 13. Because the basic structure of this embodiment is the same as that of embodiment 1, the structural components are numbered similarly and also added with an “A” and detailed explanation is omitted.
  • The frame assembly 1A for this embodiment is similar to FIGS. 13 and 14, end joint 135 and the center joint 137 are used for expansion of the structure. In this embodiment, the outer frame sections 19A of the upper section 13A, the lower section 15A and the side section 17A form four cavities 23A.
  • The said end joint 135, as shown in FIGS. 13 to 15, is affixed between two end joints 9 on either side and together with said end joints 9 form the “C” structure of the frame assembly 1A.
  • The said end joint 135 is similar to the said joint 9 and has a pair of end support sleeves 71A and 73A that form an “L” shape and to this is added a pair of opposing end support sleeves 75A on either side. The end support sleeves 75A form a “T” shape with the end support sleeve 73A. In other words, the end support sleeves 75A protrude from the outside of the two vertical walls 57 of the end support sleeve 73A. Between the end support sleeve 73A and the end support sleeves 75A, diagonal ribs 77 and 79A are added for support.
  • For the end support sleeve 75A, it has an opening 85A into which the short beam 5 will be inserted longitudinally to be supported.
  • For the said end support sleeve 75A, the contact face 91A is the outer face of the vertical wall 57 of the end support sleeve 73A, and the end 25 of the short beam 5 will be coming into contact with it.
  • The center joint 137, as shown in FIGS. 13, 14 and 16, connects the mid-section of the inner long beam 3, which is located to the inside of the outer frame section 19A, and the end section of the short beam 5. This center joint 137 has two vertical walls 57 and 57, from which a pair of end support sleeves 95A extend outwards to form an “X” shape body.
  • The said center joint 137 supports the mid-section of the long beam 3 when it is inserted through support sleeve 93A and also supports short beam 5 when it is inserted through support sleeve 95A. In support sleeve 95A, the end 25 of short beam 5 will come into contact with contact face 99.
  • In this embodiment, in addition to having the same functionality as the previous embodiment, the frame assembly 1A can be expanded using the end joint 135 and center joint 137 and thereby distributing the applied loads more widely.
  • Modified Embodiment
  • In this embodiment, as shown in FIG. 17, by using the end joint 135 and the center joint 137 appropriately, the frame assembly 1B can be further expanded. In this modified embodiment, the outer frame section 19A of the upper section 13A and the lower section 15A and the side section 17A form nine cavities 23B.
  • Accordingly, in the frame assembly 1B, the use of the end joint 135 and the center joint 137 to further expand the structure also allows it to distribute the load even further.
  • Embodiment 3
  • FIGS. 18 to 27 show the joints involved in embodiment 3 of the current invention. In this embodiment, because of the similarity to embodiments 1 and 2, the numbering of the respective component will be the same with the substitution of “C” for “A” and detailed descriptions will be omitted.
  • In this embodiment, as shown in FIGS. 18 to 27, joints 139, 140, 149, 157, 161, 165, 167, 171, 175, 179 can be used to further augment the frame assembly and also the form of the frame assembly in added flexibility.
  • The joint 139 in FIG. 18 is an end joint that is essentially the end joint 9 in embodiment 1 added with an end support sleeve 141 in the rear face.
  • That is, joint 139 is formed by the end support sleeve 141 on the vertical wall 55 on the rear face of end support joint 73C. With this, joint 139 forms a “T” shape body when viewed from the top and also from the side.
  • The said end support sleeve 141 is longer than the end support joint 71C. End support sleeve 141 and the corner of end support sleeve 73C include a diagonal rib 77C for additional support.
  • The joint 140 in FIG. 19 is the diametrically opposite version of joint 139 in FIG. 18.
  • The joint 149 in FIG. 20 forms a center joint and is the center joint 11 in embodiment 1 with an addition end support sleeve 143 extending from the bottom face.
  • That is to say that joint 149 is formed at the center section on the lower face of the center support sleeve 93C, protruding from vertical wall 57 to form end support sleeve 143.
  • The joint 157 in FIG. 21 is an end joint that is formed with the addition of the end support sleeve 141 to the rear face of end joint 135 in embodiment 2.
  • That is, joint 157 is formed by the addition of end support sleeve 141 to the vertical wall 55 on the rear face of the end support sleeve 73C. With this, joint 157 forms a “T” shape body when viewed from the top and from the front.
  • The said end support sleeve 141 is longer than the end support sleeve 71C, with the diagonal rib 77C located at the corner between end support sleeve 141 and end support sleeve 73C.
  • The joint 161 in FIG. 22 is an end joint that is formed by the addition of end support sleeve 141 and 145 to the rear face and upper face of the joint 9 in embodiment 1.
  • That is, joint 161 is formed by the addition of end support sleeve 141 on the horizontal wall 55 of the rear face of end support sleeve 73C together with an end support sleeve 145 that extends from the top face of the end support sleeve 71C. With this, the joint 161 forms an “X” when viewed from the side.
  • The end support sleeves 141 and 145 are longer than end support sleeves 71C, 73C, 75C. Between end support sleeve 141 and 145, between 141 and 145 and at the corner of the end support sleeve 71C and 73C, there are diagonal reinforcement ribs 77C.
  • The joint 165 in FIG. 23 is the diametrically opposite counterpart of the joint 161 in FIG. 22.
  • The joint 167 in FIG. 24 is a center joint that is formed when end support sleeves 147 and 143 are added to the top face and the bottom face of the center joint 11 in embodiment 1.
  • That is, joint 167 is formed by the addition of end support sleeve 143 on the vertical wall 55 of the mid-section of the bottom face of center support sleeve 93C together with an end support sleeve 147 that extends from the top face of the end support sleeve 95C. With this, the joint 167 forms an “X” when viewed from the side.
  • Joint 171 in FIG. 25 is a center joint and is formed with the addition of the end support sleeve 143 to the bottom face of the center joint 137 in said embodiment 2.
  • That is, joint 171 is formed by the addition of end support sleeve 143 on the vertical wall 55 of the bottom mid-section of center support sleeve 93C. With this, joint 171 will form an “X” when viewed from the top and a “T” when view from the front.
  • In FIG. 26, the joint 175 is an end joint formed by the addition of the end support sleeve 141 and 145 to the back face and the top face of the joint 135 in said embodiment 2.
  • That is, joint 175 is formed by the addition of end support sleeve 141 on the vertical wall 55 of the rear face of end support sleeve 73C. With this, the joint 175 looks like an “X” when viewed from the top.
  • In addition, the joint 175 is formed by the end support sleeve 145 that is added to the top face of the end support sleeve 73C. With this, joint 175 looks like an “X” when viewed from the front and from the side.
  • At the corner section of the end support section between end support sleeve 141 and 145; and between 141 and 73C, there are the diagonal ribs 77C. The diagonal ribs 77C and 79C are also present at the corner section between end support sleeve 145 and the end sleeves 71C and 75C.
  • In FIG. 27, joint 179 is a center joint formed by the addition of end support sleeve 147 and 143 to the top face and bottom face of the center joint 137 in embodiment 2.
  • That is, joint 179 is formed by the protrusion of end support sleeves 147 and 143 from the vertical wall 55 of the top face and mid-section of the bottom face of center support sleeve 93C. With this, the joint 179 looks like an “X” when viewed from the top, the front and also from the side.
  • FIG. 28 shows the perspective view of the frame assembly in embodiment 3 of the current invention, FIG. 29 is the perspective view of the frame assembly in FIG. 28 when viewed from the direction of the arrow “K”, FIG. 30 is the front view of the frame assembly in FIG. 28, FIG. 31 is the plan view of the frame assembly in FIG. 28 and FIG. 32 is the side view of the frame assembly in FIG. 28.
  • In this embodiment, using the joints 139, 140, 149, 157, 161, 165, 167, 171, 175 and 179, frame assembly 1C, as shown in FIGS. 28 to 32, will be possible.
  • Frame assembly 1C as shown in FIGS. 28 to 32, for example, is formed by multiple “C” structures formed by the frame sections 183, 185, 187 and 189. To make it easier for identification, some of the “C” frame in the frame sections in 183, 185, 187 and 189 are shown as hatched.
  • The frame sections 183 and 185 are similar to frame assembly 1A in embodiment 2 and are located on opposing ends. Frame sections 187 and 189 connect frame sections 183 and 185 to each other.
  • Frame section 187 is similar to frame assembly 1B in embodiment 2 and is connected to frame section 183 with the open end of the “C” frame facing each other. Frame section 187 is connected to the frame 189 next to it.
  • Frame section 189 is formed by a “C” frame that faces the opposite direction to frame section 187. The cavity 23C of top section 193 and the bottom section 195 for frame 189 is larger by 1 extra row on each side when compared to the frame assembly 1A in embodiment 2, with nine cavities 23C. The frame section 189 is connected to frame section 185 such that its opening of the “C” frame faces that of frame section 185.
  • In this embodiment, in addition to the advantages offered by the previous embodiment, can be expanded even further and also distribute the applied loads even more widely through the joints 139, 140, 149, 157, 161, 165, 167, 171, 175 and 179. At the same time, the flexibility of the frame assembly is further increased.
  • Also, in the frame assembly 1C, the “C” frame structures 183 and 187 are connected face-to-face with the frame structures 185 and 189 in a simple structure that increases the structure strength tremendously.
  • As described, the beams are configured to fit or inserted into the hollow sections of the sleeves of the joints. In other embodiments, the sleeves may be configured to fit or inserted into the hollow sections of the beams. In such embodiments, the sleeves of the joints may be solid or partially solid, while the beams have at least a hollow at the ends to accommodate the sleeves.

Claims (21)

1. A modular building system comprising:
a plurality of pre-fabricated joints having open-ended hollow arms extending orthogonally along at least two directional axes, as defined by a 3-dimensional rectangular coordinate system;
a plurality of pre-fabricated beams detachably insertable into the open-ends of the hollow arms of said joints; and
connectors removably securing said beams in the hollow arms of said joints; wherein
said joints and beams are assembled to build a variety of modular grid-frame structures in accordance with pre-determined assembly plans.
2. The modular building system according to claim 1 further comprising a plurality of pre-fabricated panels.
3. The modular building system according to claim 1, wherein said joints and beams are made using a light-weight metal.
4. The modular building system according to claim 1, wherein said joints and said beams are made of extruded aluminum.
5. The modular building system according to claim 1, wherein said joints have up to six hollow arms extending orthogonally along directional axes, as defined by a 3-dimensional rectangular coordinate system.
6. The modular building system according to claim 5, wherein said joints further comprise at least one bracing member, said bracing member is diagonally positioned between two adjacent hollow arms extending along orthogonally along directional axes, as defined by a 3-dimensional rectangular coordinate system.
7. The modular building system according to claim 5, wherein said joints further comprise hollow arms of differing lengths extending along orthogonally along directional axes, as defined by a 3-dimensional rectangular coordinate system.
8. The modular building system according to claim 2, wherein said panels comprising a first sheet member and a second sheet member.
9. The modular building system according to claim 8, wherein said first sheet member is supported by a support-frame structure, and the support-frame correspondingly fits within an opening in the grid-frame structure formed by said joints and said beams.
10. The modular building system according to claim 8, wherein said first sheet members is supported by a first support-frame structure and said second sheet member is supported by a second support-frame structure, and the first and second support-frame structures correspondingly fit within an opening in the grid-frame structure formed by said joints and said beams.
11. The modular building system according to claim 8, wherein an insulative material is positioned between said first and second sheet members.
12. The modular building system according to claim 2, wherein said connectors simultaneously secure said panels to the grid-frame structure.
13. The modular building system according to claim 1, wherein said beam is a tube.
14. The modular building system according to claim 13, wherein said beam has support members forming compartments within the tube.
15. The modular building system according to claim 13, wherein said beam has support members forming a compartment within the tube for holding a reinforcing member.
16. The modular building system according to claim 15, wherein said reinforcing member is a steel rod.
17. A modular building system comprising:
a plurality of pre-fabricated joints having sleeves extending along at least a first direction and a second direction;
a plurality of pre-fabricated beams which can mate with the sleeves of the joints; and
a locking mechanism for securing the beams and the joints when the beams and the joints are mated; wherein
the joints and beams are assembled to build a variety of modular frame structures in accordance with a pre-determined assembly plan.
18. The modular building system of claim 17
wherein:
the sleeves of the joints include hollow sections; and
the beams are mated with the joints by inserting the beams into the hollow sections of the joints.
19. The modular building system of claim 17
wherein:
the beams include hollow sections; and
the beams are mated with the joints by inserting the sleeves of the joints into the hollow sections of the beams.
20. The modular building system of claim 17
wherein:
the first and second directions are orthogonal to each other.
21. The modular building system of claim 17
wherein:
a disengaged locking mechanism enables unmating of the beams and joints.
US13/007,667 2010-01-22 2011-01-17 Multi-purpose mobile modular structure Abandoned US20110179741A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP2010012609A JP2011149233A (en) 2010-01-22 2010-01-22 Joint, skeleton assembly using the same, and module structure
JP2010-012610 2010-01-22
JP2010012610A JP2011149234A (en) 2010-01-22 2010-01-22 Panel and module structure using the same
JP2010-012609 2010-01-22

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
PCT/SG2011/000025 WO2012099531A1 (en) 2011-01-17 2011-01-18 Multi-purpose mobile modular structure

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110179741A1 true US20110179741A1 (en) 2011-07-28

Family

ID=44307883

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/007,667 Abandoned US20110179741A1 (en) 2010-01-22 2011-01-17 Multi-purpose mobile modular structure

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20110179741A1 (en)

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110308063A1 (en) * 2010-06-21 2011-12-22 Arnold Feeleus Connectors for Forming Joints Between Pieces of Finished Lumber and Methods Relating to Same
WO2013162465A1 (en) 2012-04-28 2013-10-31 Hock Pheng Tan A narrow space rescue training device
US20140352247A1 (en) * 2012-03-20 2014-12-04 J. Martin Lovely THOMPSON Framework serving as structural support and utility space
US9145671B1 (en) * 2014-04-28 2015-09-29 Tim Cornell Modular housing framing systems
US9494273B2 (en) * 2015-01-12 2016-11-15 Shanghai Zhenhua Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. Casing tensioner platform frame and casing tensioner platform frame kit
US20180127969A1 (en) * 2016-11-04 2018-05-10 David T. Acquistapace Modular construction system and method
US20180238041A1 (en) * 2017-02-21 2018-08-23 Styrc Jacek Modular furniture system
US20190226198A1 (en) * 2015-11-13 2019-07-25 David Ryan Morgan Framework Module for use in Modular Building Construction
US10609894B1 (en) * 2016-11-30 2020-04-07 Brett William Bartley Tack room curtain hanging apparatus, system and method
USD887025S1 (en) 2017-11-17 2020-06-09 2724889 Ontario Inc. Connector for a modular structure
US10753082B2 (en) * 2016-06-10 2020-08-25 Nguyen Chi Co., Ltd. Structural member joint and structure

Citations (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2931129A (en) * 1955-08-15 1960-04-05 Ralph M Boniface Educational construction kit
US3462021A (en) * 1968-01-29 1969-08-19 Eugene E Hawke Load-resisting structures made of thin-walled,square tubing and connected with novel square,non-twisting couplings
US3740084A (en) * 1971-08-23 1973-06-19 K Tellberg Readily detachable self-aligning joint
US3784043A (en) * 1968-11-29 1974-01-08 M Presnick Lightweight collapsible structures
US3829999A (en) * 1969-06-06 1974-08-20 Dart Ind Inc Illuminated modular type sign
US3836270A (en) * 1972-12-18 1974-09-17 J Chambers Framework connector
US4267682A (en) * 1979-05-07 1981-05-19 Fowler Neal G Building panel
US4630550A (en) * 1985-04-02 1986-12-23 Jack J. Weitzman Prefabricated knock-down metal-frame work table
US4885883A (en) * 1986-02-27 1989-12-12 Wright Robert L Two-by-four corner members
US4910939A (en) * 1985-12-16 1990-03-27 Petrus Systems Limited Construction system
US4964252A (en) * 1988-10-25 1990-10-23 Fokker Special Products B.V. Joining system for joining wall panels to form a box-like housing
US4974387A (en) * 1989-08-15 1990-12-04 Karl Dufour Factory made light steel joint for roof trusses
US5195282A (en) * 1990-01-29 1993-03-23 Campbell E Logan Low cost-modular element housing
US5328287A (en) * 1992-03-20 1994-07-12 Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc. Rigid intersection connection
US5402608A (en) * 1992-02-27 1995-04-04 Chu; Rey-Chin Prefabricated built-up building construction
US5526614A (en) * 1994-10-12 1996-06-18 Huang; Chun-Chi Connector structure of assembled house truss
US5641192A (en) * 1995-03-31 1997-06-24 Smith; Duane Aerodynamic lightweight flexible flatbed top
US5660005A (en) * 1994-12-05 1997-08-26 Tacoma; Michael T. High strength, light weight, portable building
US5966890A (en) * 1998-02-09 1999-10-19 Inman; Michael J. Building frame structure
US6810628B2 (en) * 2001-08-09 2004-11-02 Emms Investment Pty Ltd. Jointing device
US6959515B1 (en) * 1999-05-21 2005-11-01 Ashley Thomas Beighton Building structures
US8024901B2 (en) * 2004-08-17 2011-09-27 Dirtt Environmental Solutions Ltd. Integrated reconfigurable wall system

Patent Citations (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2931129A (en) * 1955-08-15 1960-04-05 Ralph M Boniface Educational construction kit
US3462021A (en) * 1968-01-29 1969-08-19 Eugene E Hawke Load-resisting structures made of thin-walled,square tubing and connected with novel square,non-twisting couplings
US3784043A (en) * 1968-11-29 1974-01-08 M Presnick Lightweight collapsible structures
US3829999A (en) * 1969-06-06 1974-08-20 Dart Ind Inc Illuminated modular type sign
US3740084A (en) * 1971-08-23 1973-06-19 K Tellberg Readily detachable self-aligning joint
US3836270A (en) * 1972-12-18 1974-09-17 J Chambers Framework connector
US4267682A (en) * 1979-05-07 1981-05-19 Fowler Neal G Building panel
US4630550A (en) * 1985-04-02 1986-12-23 Jack J. Weitzman Prefabricated knock-down metal-frame work table
US4910939A (en) * 1985-12-16 1990-03-27 Petrus Systems Limited Construction system
US4885883A (en) * 1986-02-27 1989-12-12 Wright Robert L Two-by-four corner members
US4964252A (en) * 1988-10-25 1990-10-23 Fokker Special Products B.V. Joining system for joining wall panels to form a box-like housing
US4974387A (en) * 1989-08-15 1990-12-04 Karl Dufour Factory made light steel joint for roof trusses
US5195282A (en) * 1990-01-29 1993-03-23 Campbell E Logan Low cost-modular element housing
US5402608A (en) * 1992-02-27 1995-04-04 Chu; Rey-Chin Prefabricated built-up building construction
US5328287A (en) * 1992-03-20 1994-07-12 Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc. Rigid intersection connection
US5399044A (en) * 1992-03-20 1995-03-21 Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc. Rigid intersection connection
US5526614A (en) * 1994-10-12 1996-06-18 Huang; Chun-Chi Connector structure of assembled house truss
US5660005A (en) * 1994-12-05 1997-08-26 Tacoma; Michael T. High strength, light weight, portable building
US5641192A (en) * 1995-03-31 1997-06-24 Smith; Duane Aerodynamic lightweight flexible flatbed top
US5966890A (en) * 1998-02-09 1999-10-19 Inman; Michael J. Building frame structure
US6959515B1 (en) * 1999-05-21 2005-11-01 Ashley Thomas Beighton Building structures
US6810628B2 (en) * 2001-08-09 2004-11-02 Emms Investment Pty Ltd. Jointing device
US8024901B2 (en) * 2004-08-17 2011-09-27 Dirtt Environmental Solutions Ltd. Integrated reconfigurable wall system

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110308063A1 (en) * 2010-06-21 2011-12-22 Arnold Feeleus Connectors for Forming Joints Between Pieces of Finished Lumber and Methods Relating to Same
US20140352247A1 (en) * 2012-03-20 2014-12-04 J. Martin Lovely THOMPSON Framework serving as structural support and utility space
US9068352B2 (en) * 2012-03-20 2015-06-30 J Martin Lovely Thompson Framework serving as structural support and utility space
WO2013162465A1 (en) 2012-04-28 2013-10-31 Hock Pheng Tan A narrow space rescue training device
EP2841659A4 (en) * 2012-04-28 2015-05-27 Pheng Tan Hock A narrow space rescue training device
US9145671B1 (en) * 2014-04-28 2015-09-29 Tim Cornell Modular housing framing systems
US9494273B2 (en) * 2015-01-12 2016-11-15 Shanghai Zhenhua Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. Casing tensioner platform frame and casing tensioner platform frame kit
US10584476B2 (en) * 2015-11-13 2020-03-10 David Ryan Morgan Framework module for use in modular building construction
US20190226198A1 (en) * 2015-11-13 2019-07-25 David Ryan Morgan Framework Module for use in Modular Building Construction
US10753082B2 (en) * 2016-06-10 2020-08-25 Nguyen Chi Co., Ltd. Structural member joint and structure
US10081938B2 (en) * 2016-11-04 2018-09-25 David T. Acquistapace Modular construction system and method
US20180127969A1 (en) * 2016-11-04 2018-05-10 David T. Acquistapace Modular construction system and method
US10609894B1 (en) * 2016-11-30 2020-04-07 Brett William Bartley Tack room curtain hanging apparatus, system and method
US20180238041A1 (en) * 2017-02-21 2018-08-23 Styrc Jacek Modular furniture system
US20190376272A1 (en) * 2017-02-21 2019-12-12 Styrc Jacek Modular furniture system
US10858819B2 (en) * 2017-02-21 2020-12-08 2724889 Ontario Inc. Modular furniture system
USD887025S1 (en) 2017-11-17 2020-06-09 2724889 Ontario Inc. Connector for a modular structure

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3688461A (en) Framework for building structures
US4910932A (en) Modular building system
CA2885207C (en) Modular, multiperforated permanent formwork or centerring construction system for reinforced concrete
EP2535471B1 (en) Shelter
US8978338B2 (en) Structural trusses with monolithic connector plate members
US6874291B1 (en) Universal structural element
US20050011156A1 (en) Skeleton frame assembly for a tent
CA2824364C (en) Pivotally erectable structural frame system
EP1118725A2 (en) Structural member for building and method for forming a structure for building
WO2011130851A1 (en) Quick connect structural system
JP5501357B2 (en) Geometric structure system
US20090165401A1 (en) Method and system for a modular building structure
CN102444204B (en) Support beam structure capable of extending span and reducing height of ceiling structure and installing method thereof
WO2011014936A1 (en) Modular building construction
KR100937196B1 (en) Unit module using light weight panel and modular structure using the same
US20130008104A1 (en) Building construction for making transpirable walls and floors
KR20110023989A (en) Coupling device of a beam and a pillar of set building and construction method of set building using the same
DK9200156U4 (en) Box-shaped self-supporting building module
JP2014518972A (en) Frame connecting device for prefabricated building structures
US20170121990A1 (en) System, method for conversion of intermodal shipping containers to universal building modules
KR101278983B1 (en) Modular unit and modular construction using the same
US10006212B2 (en) Assembled house
JP4400833B2 (en) Seismic reinforcement method and reinforcement piece
US8966854B2 (en) Modular construction system, element and assembly method thereof
US20060026922A1 (en) Rapidly assembled finishing-free modular house with single-boards

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION