US20110120035A1 - Private renal suites within an in-center facility - Google Patents

Private renal suites within an in-center facility Download PDF

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US20110120035A1
US20110120035A1 US12626329 US62632909A US2011120035A1 US 20110120035 A1 US20110120035 A1 US 20110120035A1 US 12626329 US12626329 US 12626329 US 62632909 A US62632909 A US 62632909A US 2011120035 A1 US2011120035 A1 US 2011120035A1
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dialysis
out
treatment
patients
suites
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US12626329
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W. Bruce Staebler
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Staebler W Bruce
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04HBUILDINGS OR LIKE STRUCTURES FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES; SWIMMING OR SPLASH BATHS OR POOLS; MASTS; FENCING; TENTS OR CANOPIES, IN GENERAL
    • E04H3/00Buildings or groups of buildings for public or similar purposes; Institutions, e.g. infirmaries, prisons
    • E04H3/08Hospitals, infirmaries, or the like; Schools; Prisons

Abstract

Private renal suites are offered within an in-center facility for out-patient dialysis treatment. A plurality of suites allow for amenities associated with different theme-oriented accommodations, such as resembling a room in a home, an office, or other theme-oriented accommodation, such as a seasonal theme, a sports theme, a child's setting, or a hobby enthusiast theme. Each treatment room is fabricated to replicate the themed setting while allowing the out-patient to be comfortable and relaxed, enjoy the themed atmosphere, or possibly perform work-related tasks during what is otherwise a difficult and stressful procedure.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates to private renal suites for accommodating patients undergoing dialysis therapy in a private setting. More particularly, the invention relates to a suite of rooms at an in-center facility that allows for amenities associated with different theme oriented accommodations, such as resembling a room in a home, an office, or other theme-oriented accommodations in an out-patient setting for patients needing treatment. Each treatment room is fabricated to replicate a home living room setting, a home office setting, or other themed setting, including children themes for pediatric patients, to allow each patient to be comfortable and relaxed, or to possibly perform work-related tasks, participate in sedentary games, or other diversionary activities during what is otherwise a difficult and stressful procedure.
  • 2. Description of Related Art
  • Dialysis is a life-preserving treatment for hundreds of thousands of people in the United States with kidney failure. It is a type of renal replacement therapy which is used to provide an artificial replacement for loss of kidney functions. There are two main forms of dialysis, hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, both of which are life support treatments of the blood. Dialysis does not treat kidney diseases.
  • Dialysis treatment generally refers to chronic dialysis given to patients who have reached a stage of kidney impairment that requires dialysis to maintain life; or acute dialysis given to patients who require dialysis because of temporary kidney failure.
  • Hemodialysis relies on convective transport of a dialysate and utilizes counter-current flow, where the dialysate is flowing in the opposite direction to blood flow in an extracorporeal circuit. Peritoneal dialysis is based on the principle that the peritoneal membrane which surrounds the intestine can act as a natural semi-permeable membrane and that, if a dialysate is instilled within the membrane through a catheter, intracorporeal dialysis can occur by diffusion.
  • Dialysis may be used for very sick patients who have recently lost kidney functions (acute renal failure) or for stable patients who have permanently lost kidney functions (chronic or end-stage renal failure). As part of the treatment regimen, the patient may have to take several drugs to control blood pressure and other problems like anemia and high phosphorus levels. Many people who dialyze three times a week complain of feeling exhausted for hours after a session.
  • Typically, dialysis units are in the following types of facilities: a) an out-of-hospital, licensed facility which provides services on an out-patient basis to persons requiring dialysis on a short-term basis or for a chronic condition, or training for home dialysis; b) a hospital environment for a licensed hospital designed, equipped, and staffed to offer dialysis therapy on an out-patient basis, and to provide training for home dialysis, and renal transplantation as appropriate; and c) home dialysis.
  • A dialysis center comprises a highly specialized facility which provides for the treatment of patients with irreversible renal insufficiencies. Treatment procedures require professional supervision by staff experienced in renal pathophysiology. Generally, an in-center hemodialysis treatment requires travel to a clinic three times a week, where the patient must sit in a chair for three to four hours each time while waiting for their blood to be cleaned. In-center hemodialysis patients must follow a strict schedule because the clinic treats three to five shifts of patients in the course of the day. Someone who gets to the clinic late often cannot make up the time by staying longer because the machine is needed for the next patient. This becomes a greater inconvenience for the patients, and some have opted for home dialysis treatment, where the dialysis equipment is stored and operated in the patient's home.
  • For in-center operations, licensing agencies usually expect that each dialysis unit will be provided within a room having at least a patient bed, which typically is placed to have clearance of about three feet (3 ft) on each side and front, a lounge chair located to permit clearance of approximately three feet (3 ft) on each side and front, and privacy curtains or cubicle walls separating each patient.
  • Additionally, an isolation room is generally required having approximately a minimum of one-hundred square feet (100 sq. ft), with a toilet room, and an entry vestibule or outer room, containing sink, counter space, and storage space. A lavatory is commonly located within the isolation room. The isolation room is a part of the patient station. A separate entrance from inside the patient station to the isolation room is also typically provided. In some instances, individually controlled reading lights are provided for each patient station. Hand washing facilities are generally made convenient to the treatment area.
  • In some clinics, private bed stations are used. These are enclosed rooms, though still visually and audibly observable from the Nurse Station, for patients requiring singular privacy or blood borne infection isolation but not airborne infection isolation. These rooms accommodate patients who might agitate other patients, or be caused anxiety by others, or who are known to have blood borne pathogens.
  • Cubicle bed stations are usually open for patients who have arrived stretcher- or bed-bound but do not require isolation or singular privacy. Cubicle bed stations are usually not in enclosed rooms. Cubicle chair stations are the most common dialysis station. They include a mobile reclining chair for the patient.
  • A small but growing number of clinics offer home dialysis in addition to standard dialysis treatments. The patient starts learning to do treatments at the clinic, working with a dialysis nurse. Most people who do home dialysis have helpers who train with them at the clinic. The helper can be a family member, neighbor, or close friend. Some programs do not require a helper if the patient can do all the tasks alone. However, home treatment has inherent risks, including monitoring low blood pressure and infection. The most serious risk is the possibility of an air embolism—a condition in which air is introduced into the blood stream accidentally, preventing the heart from adequately pumping blood. Another serious risk is blood loss if a catheter separates. In the absence of professional assistance, these risks deter many from home dialysis. Other drawbacks of home dialysis include large, noisy dialysis machines in the patient's home, which generally requires a dedicated space for a treatment area. Also, training for home dialysis is approximately an eight (8) week procedure, which puts an additional burden on the new care-giver.
  • Furthermore, dialysis treatments in the home may necessitate plumbing or wiring modifications, and these changes may or may not be paid for by insurance plans or by Medicare. It is also likely that home dialysis will cause water and electricity bills to rise. A dedicated space will be needed where a chair, dialysis machine, and water treatment tanks (depending on the machine) can be placed with access to water and a drain. The dialyzers will also need to be stored when not in use, along with bottles of dialysate, bleach and disinfectant, syringes, needles, medications, blood tubes, water test kits, and all other equipment and supplies. Most often, a family member or friend trains to be a helper, although some people have hired dialysis nurses or technicians. Medicare does not pay for home hemodialysis helpers. A few clinics pay for them, but this is very rare. In most cases, people have paid out-of-pocket for a helper. Some have also offered free rent in a spare room in exchange for a helper, or even traded helping tasks with another home dialysis patient.
  • Some additional negatives to conventional home dialysis treatment include the following: a) requiring a care-giver friend or relative to be there for each treatment can put added stress on the relationship between the patient and the care-giver and/or cost the patient extra money to hire someone; b) training can take several weeks, and the patient and care-giver may need to take time off work to do it; c) at least one room will be needed to store the machine and supplies; d) time will be spent to set up the machine, clean it, and order supplies; e) the care-giver will need to learn to keep the patient cool, comfortable, and respond to problems that may arise; and f) typically two needle sticks are needed for each treatment, and the patient or the patient's care-giver will need to learn how to place them.
  • Regardless of the negatives of home treatment, many patients still desire the comforts and amenities realized in a home setting during their treatment hours at an in-center facility, which for the most part is down-time for the patient with little productivity; however, home amenities are clearly lacking at in-center treatment facilities, and attempts to make the patient treatment area more hospitable have not been successful.
  • In U.S. Pat. No. 6,243,993, issued to Swensson on Jun. 12, 2001, entitled “MODULAR HEALTHCARE ROOM INTERIOR,” a modular patient healthcare room interior assembly is taught for establishing a healthcare room in an unfinished space of a building. Each wall panel segment includes a finished interior wall surface. A divider may be used to separate the room into a bedroom and a bathroom. A prefabricated bathing unit is located in the bathroom, along with a nurse's station. A medical gas rail is also included in the room interior. This design is made to accommodate rapid installation of a hospital room setting. It is modular with extensive prefabrication of stations and other features. All of the components are designed to be fabricated at one or more off site locations and then transported to the onsite assembly point. The design does not teach, nor does it suggest, a conversion of an otherwise operating in-center treatment facility into a pseudo-home treatment facility.
  • In U.S. Publication No. 2002/0157330, issued to Lee, Md., entitled “SINGLE HEALTH ROOM,” a modular room is taught, in essence a single health room. As depicted in the figures of the Lee invention, the single health room resembles a closet or enclosed shelter having automatic temperature and humidity control and air purifying equipment. It has sound-proof walls, audio equipment, and an independent supply of oxygen; in an effort isolate the user from outside interruptions, thus resting the user. It is designed for removing displeasing noises and polluted air. It is not designed for dialysis treatment, and implementation in a dialysis treatment center would be counterintuitive to the design approach of total isolation.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Bearing in mind the problems and deficiencies of the prior art, it is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a suite for accommodating a patient undergoing dialysis therapy that is available at an in-center treatment facility, but is made to resemble a home environment to give the patient amenities normally associated with in-home treatment without having to cope with the drawbacks of home dialysis.
  • It is another object of the present invention to provide a dialysis treatment facility that includes a plurality of suites with each suite fabricated to include all of the necessary medical equipment for dialysis treatment as well as numerous home amenities or work related amenities to make the patient's stay more relaxing and/or more productive during dialysis treatment.
  • A further object of the invention is to provide a dialysis treatment facility that includes a plurality of suites, each having a different theme orientation to give each patient a different experience that helps divert the patient during hours of treatment.
  • Another object of the present invention is to provide a plurality of suites for a dialysis treatment facility having themes for children undergoing the treatment, wherein the ambiance of each themed suite is suitable for the interests of children and adolescents.
  • Still other objects and advantages of the invention will in part be obvious and will in part be apparent from the specification.
  • The above and other objects, which will be apparent to those skilled in the art, are achieved in the present invention which is directed to in a first aspect, an in-center dialysis treatment facility comprising a plurality of suites for providing simultaneous dialysis treatment to out-patients, each suite including: dialysis equipment for dialysis treatment of each of the out-patients; video equipment for in-situ remote monitoring of the out-patients during treatment; a fully reclinable dialysis chair and/or adjustable bed; and furniture and décor to give each out-patient a treatment experience that resembles receiving treatment in a home.
  • The plurality of suites resembling a home includes: a flat screen monitor; Internet access via the flat screen monitor; a private sink; a private bathroom; a bookshelf including a selection of books; games, including electronic video games with accessories for more than one player; a DVD player in electrical communication with the flat screen monitor; a DVD library; a coat closet; and a small table with chairs for guest accommodation.
  • The in-center facility further includes a plurality of office suites resembling office accommodations, comprising office furniture and décor to give an out-patient a treatment experience that allows the out-patient an opportunity to perform work related tasks during treatment. Each of the plurality of office suites includes: Internet access; a computer having software for performing general business tasks; a fax machine; a copy machine; a telephone including conferencing features; a printer in electrical communication with the computer; and writing and note taking supplies; all of which are accessible to the out-patient while receiving treatment in the reclinable dialysis chair and/or adjustable bed.
  • The plurality of suites may also include at least one theme-oriented suite for dialysis treatment including: dialysis equipment for dialysis treatment the out-patient; video equipment for in-situ remote monitoring of the out-patient during treatment; a fully reclinable dialysis chair and/or adjustable bed; and furniture and décor to give the out-patient an experience of receiving treatment in an environment that resembles the theme.
  • The theme-oriented suites will include accommodations for seasonal themes and décor, a geographic location suite, a sports oriented suite, a hobby oriented suite, and any number of pediatric oriented suites, or any combination thereof.
  • In a second aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of providing a comfortable setting for administering dialysis treatment to a plurality of out-patients at an in-center facility comprising: providing a plurality of suites for simultaneous dialysis treatment to accommodate the plurality of out-patients; preparing the suites for theme-oriented accommodations including having the plurality of suites resemble a room in a home, an office, a geographic location, a seasonal theme, a sports theme, a variety of hobby enthusiast themes, children oriented themes, or any combination thereof; administering dialysis treatment to each of the plurality of out-patients in the suites, wherein each of the plurality of suites includes dialysis equipment for dialysis treatment of the out-patients; providing a fully reclinable dialysis chair or adjustable bed for each of the plurality of out-patients for the dialysis treatment; and monitoring each of the plurality of out-patients in-situ during treatment using video equipment in electrical communication with display equipment at a centralized nursing station.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The features of the invention believed to be novel and the elements characteristic of the invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The figures are for illustration purposes only and are not drawn to scale. The invention itself, however, both as to organization and method of operation, may best be understood by reference to the detailed description which follows taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a sketch of a dialysis suite of the present invention, depicting typical home amenities that allow an in-center treatment facility to provide comforts not afforded out-patients.
  • FIGS. 2A-2C depict schematic example elevations of private treatment rooms within an in-center facility that include a plurality of suites for dialysis treatment, each suite designed to have a diverse theme, allowing a patient have an opportunity to work, relax, or experience a unique setting during the extended time of treatment.
  • FIG. 2A depicts a schematic example elevation of a private treatment room having a flat-screen digital television presented on a wall having storage drawers and shelves for patient use, along with desk.
  • FIG. 2B depicts a schematic example elevation of a private treatment room having raised panel cabinets and a wardrobe cabinet, sink, with countertop to give a home environment atmosphere for the patient.
  • FIG. 2C depicts a schematic example elevation of a private treatment room having a cabinet elevation for electronic equipment, such as for a DVD player, computer, music player, and slide-out desk.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT(S)
  • In describing the preferred embodiment of the present invention, reference will be made herein to FIGS. 1-2 of the drawings in which like numerals refer to like features of the invention.
  • The present invention allows a dialysis patient to choose from a plurality of suites that are fabricated to accommodate different themes, for example, a home setting, an office setting, and a recreational setting, to name a few. Each suite includes a private, walled room utilized for the delivery of dialysis treatment to a patient under the prescription and care of a nephrologist. For those patients who do not prefer a hospital setting, nor prefer to experience the drawbacks of home dialysis, including having to deal with the equipment in their home, the present invention teaches a suite of rooms in an office complex in travel distance to the patient's home that allows for all the amenities of the home, office, or other themed environment, allowing an individual patient to undergo treatment in a private setting, but still remain in a facility having direct access to fully maintained, modern equipment, and a professional medical staff.
  • For a suite fabricated to resemble a home environment at an in-center facility, the fabricated room is designed to offer the following specific amenities which are not available in treatment rooms in a clinic treatment area: a) flat screen TV; b) Internet access via flat screen TV; c) private sink; d) private bathroom; e) bookshelf with books; f) games; g) DVD library; h) coat closet; small table with chairs (for guest accommodation); i) independent HV/AC system; j) remote monitoring system (via closed-circuit TV); and k) fully reclinable dialysis chair and/or adjustable bed.
  • For a suite fabricated for an office setting, designed amenities would include: a) Internet access; b) computer; c) fax machine; d) copy machine; e) telephone with multiple features such as conference calling, and the like; f) printer; and g) writing and note taking supplies.
  • For a themed suite other than that resembling a home environment or an office environment, themed accoutrements are designed into the suite, and utilized to give the patient a specific experience. For example, a suite may be made to have the patient experience relaxing on an ocean-exposed porch at sunset, including providing sound replications, mild environmental conditions, with themed décor to enhance the patient's experience. In another example, the suite may be designed and decorated for pediatric patients with cartoon themed wallpaper, furniture, electronic gaming equipment, and the like.
  • FIG. 1 is a sketch of a dialysis suite of the present invention, depicting typical home amenities that allow an in-center treatment facility to provide comforts not generally afforded out-patients. A reclinable dialysis chair 12 is situated next to an end-table 14 and in view with a flat-screen digital television 16 that may be adapted for use with a computer and capable of Internet access for the patient/viewer. Dialysis equipment may be hidden from view, stored in storage compartment 18, which allows the in-center treatment room to resemble more closely a home environment. Other medical supplies are kept from view when not in use in cabinet 20. Chairs 22 and table 24 are added for visitors. A second suite, independent of and adjacent to this living room suite, may emphasize a business environment for another patient, complete with fax machine, versatile telephone connections, a working table, and other office amenities. A third suite may have a more recreational theme associated with it, including themed furniture, décor, and other associated amenities to allow the patient to experience a setting unrelated to the home, office, or institutionalized hospital environment. In this manner, a plurality of different suites may be fabricated in a single in-center facility to provide simultaneous treatment to several individual patients, giving each patient a different experience depending upon the patient's needs or desires.
  • FIG. 2 depicts schematics of example elevations of private treatment rooms within an in-center facility that include a plurality of suites for dialysis treatment, each suite designed to have a diverse theme, allowing a patient have an opportunity to work, relax, or experience a unique setting during the extended time of treatment. For example, in FIG. 2A, flat-screen digital television 16 is presented on a wall having storage drawers 30 and shelves 32 for patient use, along with desk 34. FIG. 2B depicts raised panel cabinets 36 and a wardrobe cabinet 38, sink 40, with countertop 42 to give a home environment atmosphere for the patient. FIG. 2C provides a cabinet elevation for electronic equipment, such as for a DVD player 44, computer 46, music player 48, and slide-out desk 50.
  • For recreational themes, flooring, walls, and ceiling are designed to give the patient an experience other than home or office. Different suites may accommodate different settings (seasonal scenes), exotic vacation scenes, or other experience, made specifically for the patient's comfort and relaxation. Extra attention for the design of suites used for pediatric patients is especially helpful in diverting the attention of the young patients.
  • In order to allow the professional staff the ability to monitor each patient during treatment, the present invention allows for in-situ video monitoring in addition to the typical electronic monitoring of patient vitals and dialysis equipment status. Video monitoring equipment is located in each suite and connected to displays at the Nurse Station console. The video equipment is conspicuously located in each suite in a manner that does not call attention to the equipment, and does not interfere or otherwise distract from the selected theme for the suite.
  • While the present invention has been particularly described, in conjunction with a specific preferred embodiment, it is evident that many alternatives, modifications and variations will be apparent to those skilled in the art in light of the foregoing description. It is therefore contemplated that the appended claims will embrace any such alternatives, modifications and variations as falling within the true scope and spirit of the present invention.

Claims (10)

1. An in-center dialysis treatment facility comprising a plurality of suites for providing simultaneous dialysis treatment to out-patients, each suite including:
dialysis equipment for dialysis treatment of each of said out-patients;
video equipment for in-situ remote monitoring of said out-patients during treatment;
a fully reclinable dialysis chair and/or adjustable bed; and
home furniture and décor to give each out-patient a treatment experience that resembles receiving treatment in a home.
2. The in-center dialysis treatment facility of claim 1 wherein said plurality of suites resembling a home includes:
a flat screen monitor;
Internet access via said flat screen monitor;
a private sink;
a private bathroom;
a bookshelf including a selection of books;
games, including electronic video games with accessories for more than one player;
a DVD player in electrical communication with said flat screen monitor;
a DVD library;
a coat closet; and
a small table with accompanying chairs for guest accommodations.
3. The in-center dialysis treatment facility of claim 1 wherein said video equipment for in-situ remote monitoring of said out-patients includes a closed-circuit TV monitoring system.
4. The in-center dialysis treatment facility of claim 2 wherein each suite includes an independent, individually operated HV/AC system.
5. The in-center dialysis treatment facility of claim 1 including a plurality of office suites resembling office accommodations, comprising office furniture and décor to give an out-patient a treatment experience that allows said out-patient an opportunity to perform work related tasks during treatment.
6. The in-center dialysis treatment facility of claim 5, wherein each of said plurality of office suites includes:
Internet access;
a computer having software for performing general business tasks;
a fax machine;
a copy machine;
a telephone including conferencing features;
a printer in electrical communication with said computer; and
writing and note taking supplies;
all of which are accessible to said out-patient while receiving treatment in said reclinable dialysis chair and/or adjustable bed.
7. An in-center dialysis treatment facility including a plurality of theme-oriented suites for dialysis treatment of out-patients including:
dialysis equipment for dialysis treatment said out-patients;
video equipment for individual, in-situ, remote monitoring of said out-patients during treatment;
a fully reclinable dialysis chair and/or adjustable bed in each of said theme-oriented suites; and
furniture and décor to give said out-patients an independent experience of receiving treatment in an environment that resembles said theme.
8. The in-center dialysis treatment facility of claim 7 wherein said plurality of theme-oriented suites includes accommodations for seasonal themes and décor, a geographic location suite, a sports oriented suite, a hobby oriented suite, or a pediatric or child themed suite, or any combination thereof.
9. A method of providing a comfortable setting for administering dialysis treatment to a plurality of out-patients at an in-center facility comprising:
providing a plurality of suites for simultaneous dialysis treatment to accommodate said plurality of out-patients;
preparing said suites for theme-oriented accommodations including having said plurality of suites resemble a room in a home, an office, a geographic location, a seasonal theme, a sports theme, a hobby enthusiast theme, a child-oriented theme, or any combination thereof;
administering dialysis treatment to each of said plurality of out-patients in said suites, wherein each of said plurality of suites includes dialysis equipment for dialysis treatment of said out-patients;
providing a fully reclinable dialysis chair or adjustable bed for each of said plurality of out-patients for said dialysis treatment; and
monitoring each of said plurality of out-patients in-situ during treatment using video equipment in electrical communication with display equipment at a centralized nursing station.
10. The method of claim 9 including providing furniture and décor to give each out-patient a treatment experience that resembles receiving treatment in said home, office, geographic location, seasonal environment, sports environment, hobby enthusiast environment, children oriented or any combination thereof.
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US20130104462A1 (en) * 2011-10-26 2013-05-02 Six Continents Hotels, Inc. Sliding panels for providing selective access to service areas
US8707630B1 (en) * 2010-11-01 2014-04-29 Walgreen Co. Pharmacy workspace with clinic station
US8776445B1 (en) * 2010-11-01 2014-07-15 Walgreen Co. Pharmacy workspace

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US8707630B1 (en) * 2010-11-01 2014-04-29 Walgreen Co. Pharmacy workspace with clinic station
US8776445B1 (en) * 2010-11-01 2014-07-15 Walgreen Co. Pharmacy workspace
US20130104462A1 (en) * 2011-10-26 2013-05-02 Six Continents Hotels, Inc. Sliding panels for providing selective access to service areas

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Berg et al. Caring relationship in a context: Fieldwork in a medical ward
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Forty The modern hospital in England and France: the social and medical uses of architecture
Kinney Operating Room: The Intensive-Care Unit
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Burke A new approach to isolation
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