US20100279753A1 - System and method for fantasy interactive sports game - Google Patents

System and method for fantasy interactive sports game Download PDF

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Publication number
US20100279753A1
US20100279753A1 US12771445 US77144510A US2010279753A1 US 20100279753 A1 US20100279753 A1 US 20100279753A1 US 12771445 US12771445 US 12771445 US 77144510 A US77144510 A US 77144510A US 2010279753 A1 US2010279753 A1 US 2010279753A1
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game
player
athletes
players
points
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US12771445
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Robert S. Goldberg
Adam T. Goldberg
Alex John Moses
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MO GOLD LLC
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MO GOLD LLC
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/326Game play aspects of gaming systems
    • G07F17/3272Games involving multiple players
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting

Abstract

The invention is a statistics based fantasy style interactive sports game of a predetermined duration that may be played in a bar or restaurant or over the internet. Each game takes place during a fixed time period (such as one hour), before which players choose a number of athletes from one or more sports that will be playing during that time period. During the course of the hour a player is awarded points for plays completed by selected athletes. At the end of the hour, the game player with the most points wins.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application relates to the same subject matter as co-pending provisional patent application Ser. No. 61/174,022, filed by the same applicant on Apr. 30, 2009. This application claims the Apr. 30, 2009 filing date as to the common subject matter.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of Invention
  • The present invention relates to a system and method for a fantasy interactive sports game. It applies particularly to timed multi-player games, and will be described with particular reference thereto.
  • 2. Background
  • The invention is a statistics based fantasy style interactive sports game that can be played in places like a bar or restaurant as well as via a network such as the internet. The game may take place during a fixed time period (such as one hour), before which players choose a number of athletes from one or more sports that will be playing during that time period. During the course of the time period athletes are assigned points for plays that they complete. At the end of the time period, the player with the most points wins.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Sample Game Rules
  • After the initial athlete selection, points are awarded for plays that the selected athletes complete during the course of a game period of a predetermined duration. Each sport has different rules which will determine how many points a play is worth. The aggregate of those points at the end of the game period will determine a score for the player who selected those athletes. The player with the most points at the end of the game period wins.
  • ALTERNATIVE EMBODIMENTS OF THE PRESENT INVENTION
  • In one alternative embodiment, all of a player's picks cannot be from the same team.
  • In another embodiment, the choices may be restricted to players who are actually playing during the course of the hour.
  • In yet another embodiment of the invention, a player may sign up for a defined time period game starting in the future. For example, the player may sign up for a 60 minute game running from 1 pm to 2 pm.
  • In still another variation of the invention, a player may sign up for a defined period of play starting immediately and then the completed score of the player will be placed in a tournament of a pre-determined size along with other players, wherein the player with the highest score winning the tournament.
  • Sample Display Design Considerations.
  • The information that is displayed to the player may be as follows:
  • Athlete names or numbers, or both, for the present or upcoming game (if there is one).
  • Current winner and order of finish updates for the bar.
  • Statistics updates, which may be displayed by TV, ticker scrawl, or other manners known in the art.
  • Sample Use of the Invention.
  • Player first enters a play area, such as a bar. The game may also be played over the internet via a PC, a telephone, set top box for a television or other similar device.
  • There may be an advertisement for the game in the bar, over the internet, radio, television, print or other known media.
  • There may be place cards on the bar and tables with rules.
  • A player decides to play. There may be a list of prizes displayed at the play area or nearby.
  • A list of local and national prizes may be compiled and displayed at the play area or elsewhere. For example, the national prize can be on place card, since this will not change frequently. Also, the local prize may be written on blackboard, menu insert, or verbally told by a bartender or waiter.
  • A player is given or obtains a blank ticket, such as a Scantron card, which may be provided by a ticket holder on a table. A ticket holder may be placed near one or more ticket readers, and may be placed near seating such as at a bar. A supply of pencils with the game provider's website and name (like at the lotto counters) may also be provided.
  • Seating areas also may each have a ticket reader.
  • Alternatively, the game may be played with a touch screen kiosk; however, the advertising materials discussed above may still be supplied.
  • A player then fills out a blank ticket. The player may view a TV or ticker and fills in the ticket.
  • A player then goes to the ticket scanner and scans one or more tickets, and then enters an entry fee if required. The fee may be paid by cash, debit card, gift card, credit card or other payment method.
  • A ticket reader may verify a ticket as a winner. The winning ticket user name and number, or both, may then be displayed on a display. Alternatively, a waiter may walk over to a winner to help verify a ticket.
  • The invention may also have other alternative embodiments.
  • For example, the player may bring a winning ticket to kiosk where he inserts ticket and receives a printed winning receipt. The kiosk may have a printer or the receipt may be printed elsewhere. The receipt may display the name of the playing area (such as a bar), expiration date, and value. The game provider may reimburse the playing area for prizes.
  • Customer may bring a winning bubble ticket or Scantron card to manager who may compare a large font 4 digit code on the ticket to the winning code on the display of the winning ticket. The manager then gives customer a prize such as a store gift certificate or a stamp on the bubble ticket with gift value. The manager may also sign a ticket to validate the ticket for future value redemption.
  • In another embodiment, the player may claim a prize only up to a certain time period such as one hour after the winner has been decided. In another embodiment, winning tickets and other information are stored and may be displayed on a website.
  • In another embodiment of the invention, a winner may redeem a voucher for a predetermined time such as a week after winning, but may be required to claim a prize during a predetermined time period (such as an hour).
  • In still another embodiment, national winners might be selected at a predetermined frequency, such as a predetermined number of times per year.
  • For example, there may be 5 national winners given out yearly per sport. For instance, national prizes might be awarded once quarterly, and the last one after the end of the playoffs. Eligible entries may be selected only from winning local predetermined time (such as one hour) games. This embodiment helps avoid the situation where people may scoop up losing tickets and go home and enter multiple tickets as potential national winners. In still another embodiment, a player may take a bubble ticket home and enter an identifier to register points for a national prize. A player may validates a ticket online, providing identification information such as the winner's name and the ticket number.
  • A national winner may be required to validate a ticket at home.
  • In another embodiment, the name of the winner and partial winning ticket number is displayed on the TV or ticker.
  • Participants choose a predetermined number, such as six, available players from the list provided by the game provider. Participants choose a number of athletes from one or more sports that will be playing during a time period. The list of players may be displayed on a monitor in the establishment hosting the game, or they may be printed on a ticket. Participants may be restricted to one entry or may be allowed to submit as many tickets as they would like. They may be charged per ticket.
  • Points are awarded for plays that the selected athletes complete during the course of the predetermined time period (one hour). Each sport has different rules, which will determine how many points a play is worth. The aggregate of those points at the end of the game period will determine the score for the player who selected those athletes. The player with the most points at the end of the game period wins.
  • The six players may be required to be chosen in order of anticipated highest performances. In this embodiment, two filled out cards can have the same six players, but the winning card will have the highest order of player performance. In the event two users select the same players in the same order, the user who submitted their card earliest may be deemed the winner.
  • Participating players may be required to fill out a bubble or Scantron ticket properly and submit it and pay for it (if required) during an allocated sign up time frame. The game provider would not be held responsible for Scantron tickets not filled out properly.
  • The fantasy players available to select may be the players with the top statistics for the games going on during that hour. While the game provider may do its best to only select active athletes, the game player is responsible for selecting athletes that have the highest likelihood of accumulating the most statistics.
  • The participant may be held responsible to recognize the possibility of a delay or cancellation of a game. No substitution for players involved in cancelled or delayed game may be allowed.
  • In another embodiment of the invention, there are no trades, bench players, or free agents. It may be required that once a Scantron card is submitted, no changes to the athlete selections will be allowed.
  • Statistics will be reported by the game provider as close to real time as possible. It is possible for a sporting event play to occur within an hour of a game but not be reported until after the game is over. The game provider may determine that a play begun before the predetermined time is up is still eligible, or that the statistics must be reported within the predetermined time, or some other similar criteria.
  • An establishment gift certificate may be awarded to the winner of a predetermined fantasy game. If the establishment is part of a group of fantasy game service providers, there may be a group gift certificate awarded to the winner of each group game. The game provider may set groups. In an embodiment having online participants, online players may not be eligible for establishment or group games.
  • Establishment and group winners may scan a receipt at a kiosk to receive a winning ticket. The winning ticket may be redeemed at the establishment for a set period of time. The fantasy game provider, the group or the establishment may determine this period of time.
  • A game provider may offer national games open to all players in establishments as well as online participants. The game provider will determine when and under what conditions national games will be offered.
  • Sample Football Rules.
  • Choose 6 athletes.
  • Categories & Points Received.
  • Rushing Yards 1 point/5 yards
    Rushing TD 6 points
    Receiving Yards 1 point/5 yards
    Receiving TD 6 points
    Reception .5 point
    Passing Yards 1 point/10 yards
    Passing TD 4 points
  • Fractions of points may be used in an alternative embodiment of the invention.
  • Sample Use Case—Giants opening drive of Super Bowl XLII
  • Jacobs rushed for 15 yards—3 points
  • Bradshaw rushed for 10 yards—2 points
  • Manning passed for 38 yards—3.8 points
  • Burress 14 yards receiving—2.8 points
  • Burress 1 reception—0.5 point Smith 21 yards receiving—4.2 points
  • Smith 3 receptions—1.5 points
  • Hedgecock 3 yard receiving—0.6 points
  • Hedgecock 1 reception—1 point
  • TOTAL
  • Jacobs—3
  • Bradshaw—2
  • Maiming—3.8
  • Burress—3.8
  • Smith—5.7
  • Hedgecock—1.6 points
  • Sample Basketball Rules.
  • 6 players chosen, easiest because same players play both Offense & defense and categories are very simple.
  • Categories & Points Received.
  • Point 1
    Assist 2
    Rebound 2
    Block shot 4
    Steal 4
  • Sample Use Case1st quarter of a game example
  • Kobe Bryant 11 points—11
  • Kobe 1 Steal—4
  • Fischer 2 points—2
  • Fischer 2 assists—4
  • Odom 5 rebounds—10
  • Odom 1 point—1
  • Gasol 5 rebounds—10
  • Gasol 1 assist—2
  • Pierce 2 points—2
  • Pierce 3 assists—6
  • Pierce 1 rebound—2
  • Pierce 1 steal—4
  • Garnett 10 points—10
  • Garnett 3 rebounds—6
  • Rondo 4 points—4
  • Rondo 4 steals—16
  • Rondo 1 assist—2
  • TOTAL
  • Kobe—15
  • Fischer—6
  • Odom—11
  • Gasol—12
  • Pierce—14
  • Garnett—16
  • Rondo—22
  • Alternative Sample Points Awarded by Sport.
  • Football Rules.
  • Offensive Player Points.
  • Rushing Yard: 0.2 points
  • Rushing TD: 6 points
  • Receiving Yards: 0.2 points
  • Receiving TD: 6 points
  • Reception: 2 points
  • Passing Yard: 0.1 points
  • Passing TD: 4 points
  • Fumble Lost: −1 point
  • Interception thrown: −2 points
  • Kickers Points
  • Field Goals 0-19 Yards: 1 point
  • Field Goals 20-29 Yards: 2 points
  • Field Goals 30-39 Yards: 3 points
  • Field Goals 40-49 Yards: 4 points
  • Field Goals 50+Yards: 5 points
  • Point After Attempt Made: 1 point
  • Defensive Players Points.
  • Tackle: 3 points
  • Sack: 4 points
  • Safety: 4 points
  • Pass Defended: 1 points
  • Interception: 4 points
  • Def TD: 6 points
  • Forced Fumble: 4 points
  • Fumble Recovery: 4 Points
  • Alternate Basketball Rules.
  • Point: 0.5 points
  • Assist: 1 point
  • Rebounds: 1 point
  • Block shot: 2 points
  • Steal: 2 points
  • Turnover: −0.5 points
  • Sample Baseball Rules (Hitting Only).
  • Single: 10 points
  • Walk: 5 points
  • Double: 15 points
  • Triple: 15 points
  • Home Run: 20 points
  • Run: 5 points
  • Run Batted In (RBI): 5 points
  • Stolen Base: 10 points
  • Still further advantages of the present invention will become apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art upon reading and understanding the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments.
  • There remains a need for a method for a statistics based, fantasy style sports game of a predetermined time interval. The present invention fulfills this objective, as well as other needs and objectives, as will be apparent from the following description of the present invention.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The invention may take form in various components and arrangements of components, and in various steps and arrangements of steps. The drawings are only for purposes of illustrating preferred embodiments and are not to be construed as limiting the invention.
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of one embodiment of the system of the invention.
  • FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of one embodiment of a kiosk embodying the invention.
  • FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of the data flow for the validation of a ticket in one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of an alternative embodiment of the system of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • A detailed description of the invention is provided herein.
  • An example of network architecture of the system 100 of the invention is provided in FIG. 1. As shown, players 10 at a location 12 such as a bar may play the game of the invention via a kiosk 14 located at the location 12. The kiosk 14 will include a kiosk display 16. The kiosk display 16 may be used for displaying screens related to payment, play of the game, results, advertisements and related content. The kiosk 14 is in electronic communication with a data center 18 having one or more computers 20 having a central processing unit (CPU) 22. The data center includes data regarding athletes, contests, game statistics and contestant information. The data center 18 may also be in electronic communication with a game display such as a ticker 24. The data center 18 also may transmit a feed 26 such as a video feed that may be transmitted to a video display 28 such as a television.
  • Sample Display Design Considerations.
  • The information that is displayed to the player at the kiosk display 16, game display 24 such as a ticker or video display 28, or any other display, may be as follows:
  • Athlete names or numbers, or both, for the present or upcoming game (if there is one).
  • Current winner and order of finish updates for the bar.
  • Statistics updates, which may be displayed by TV, ticker scrawl, or other manners known in the art.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a schematic diagram of one embodiment of the kiosk 14 of the system 100. As shown, the kiosk includes a CPU 30 in electronic communication with a display. The CPU 30 is linked to a kiosk display 32 which is in turn may be linked to a graphical user interface (GUI) such as a touch screen 34 for input of information needed to play the game. The kiosk 14 also may include a ticket input 36 for a ticket containing information for the game and the player so that the information may be read electronically at the kiosk 14. The CPU 30 is also in communication with a network interface 38. The network interface 38 is for transmission and receipt of information provided by the player and the statistics used to play the game.
  • In addition, the kiosk may include video output port 40 so that video advertisements or information relating to the play of the game may be displayed. The kiosk 14 may also optionally include a credit card input 42 and a confirmation and/or cancellation button 44. Also, the kiosk may have a dispenser for a receipt 46 indicating that the player is playing a game. The receipt may have an identification number or other verification indicia for easy verification that the receipt is valid or is a winner.
  • FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of the data flow 300 for the validation of a ticket in one embodiment of the invention. As shown, data such as new game information including eligible player information and eligible sport information is provided to the player on a new game screen 310. The player then inputs information 320 including the player's choices for athletes that are to be on the player's team into the system 100, for example by inputting a ticket or using a GUI at the kiosk 14, shown in FIG. 2. The kiosk 14 then validates the ticket 330 to confirm that legitimate and readable data has been entered by the player for playing the game. For example validation criteria would be that the proper number of athletes were chosen or that at least two sports were chosen by the player. If the ticket fails validation, then an invalid ticket screen 340 is presented. If the ticket passes validation, then a subtotal screen 350 is presented to alert the player of the amount that is needed to be paid to play the game (if anything). At that point the player may cancel the transaction, and a cancellation screen 360 is presented. If the player decides to make the transaction, then the player enters payment information (such as credit card information) into the kiosk 14, by swiping it or by other means known in the art. The system then validates the card 370. If the card is not validated, then an error screen 380 is presented, allowing the player to go back to the subtotal screen 350 to reenter the information or other information, or to cancel the transaction at the cancellation screen 360. If the card is validated, then the transaction is processed 390 and a confirmation 400 is presented to the player. Once the transaction has been confirmed, game information for the next game is provided on a new game screen 310 so that the process may repeat if desired.
  • Another embodiment of the system of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 4 is illustrated in a computer network system 500. The system 500 may include a computer network 510. The network 510 may comprise a communication system that connects computer systems by cable and/or wireless links by means known in the art. The network 510 may use operating systems and database managers known in the art.
  • The computer network 510 may further include a data center/host server 520, player hardware 530, and a client interface 540, in electronic communication with each other through the network 510. The data center/host server 520 may further include memory 550 and software for administering games and storing and retrieving data for games. The client interface 540 is a device through which administration of the games may be made. The player hardware 530 may be a PC, smartphone or similar device through which data for playing the game may be transmitted and received.
  • The data center 520 may be configured to manage memory 550 used in the administration and play of the games. The memory may be in a computer or accessible through a network through cloud computing.
  • The data center 520 may be in electronic communication with the memory 550, and perform administrative functions, including updating and retrieving game data and results.
  • Sample Use of the Invention.
  • Player first enters a play area, such as a bar. The game may also be played over the internet via a PC, a smartphone or other similar device.
  • There may be an advertisement for the game in the bar, over the internet, radio, television, smartphone, print or other known media.
  • There may be place cards on the bar and tables with rules.
  • A player decides to play. There may be a list of prizes displayed at the play area or nearby.
  • A list of local and national prizes may be compiled and displayed at the play area or elsewhere. For example, the national prize can be on place card, since this will not change frequently. Also, the local prize may be written on blackboard, menu insert, or verbally told by a bartender or waiter.
  • A player may given or obtains a blank ticket, such as a Scantron card, which may be provided by a ticket holder on a table. The blank ticket is used by the player to select athletes for the player's team during a game. A ticket holder may be placed near one or more ticket readers, and may be placed near seating such as at a bar. A supply of pencils with the game provider's website and name (like at the lotto counters) may also be provided.
  • Seating areas also may each have a ticket reader.
  • Alternatively, the game may be played with a kiosk such as one having a touch screen. Also the game may be played on participant hardware, such as a smartphone or PC; however, the advertising materials discussed above may still be supplied.
  • A player then fills out a blank ticket. The player may view a video feed or ticker to obtain up to the minute information regarding a game. The player then may fill in the ticket.
  • A player then may go to a ticket scanner and scan one or more tickets, and then enter an entry fee if required. The player may also enter a user name at the kiosk or by other means known in the art. The fee may be paid by cash, debit card, gift card, credit card or other payment method. Alternatively, the information to be placed in the ticket to be scanned is input into the kiosk directly by a GUI such as a touch screen. The player is then issued a receipt. The receipt may have a code on it for future verification that the receipt is for a winning entry in the game.
  • A reader may verify a receipt as a winner. The winning receipt number, the player user name, or both, may then be displayed on a display at the location and elsewhere, such as a web page. Alternatively, a waiter may walk over to a winner to help verify a ticket.
  • The invention may also have other alternative embodiments.
  • For example, the player may bring a winning receipt to kiosk where he inserts ticket and receives a printed winning voucher. The kiosk may have a printer, the player may receive credit electronically or the voucher may be printed elsewhere. The voucher may display the name of the playing area (such as a bar), expiration date, and value. The game provider may reimburse the location for prizes.
  • Alternatively, a player may bring a winning bubble ticket or Scantron card to a manager who may compare a digit code on the receipt to the winning code on the display of the kiosk. The manager then may give the player a prize such as a store gift certificate or a stamp on the bubble ticket with gift value. The manager may also sign a receipt to validate the receipt for future value redemption.
  • In another embodiment, a winning player may claim a prize only up to a certain time period such as one hour after the winner has been decided. In another embodiment, winning teams, vouchers and/or other information are stored and may be displayed on a website.
  • In another embodiment of the invention, a winning player may redeem a voucher for a predetermined time such as a week after winning. In still another embodiment, the player may be required to claim a prize during a predetermined time period (such as an hour).
  • In still another embodiment, national winning players might be selected at a predetermined frequency, such as a predetermined number of times per year.
  • In yet another embodiment, the player may sign up to play a game for a predefined period of play starting immediately and then the player will be placed in a tournament of a pre-determined size along with one or more additional players playing during the same predefined period of play, wherein a player with the highest score wins the tournament.
  • For example, there may be 5 national winners given out yearly per sport. For instance, national prizes might be awarded once quarterly, and the last one after the end of the playoffs. Eligible entries may be selected only from winning local predetermined time (such as one hour) games. This embodiment helps avoid the situation where people may scoop up losing tickets and go home and enter multiple tickets as potential national winners. In still another embodiment, a player may take a bubble ticket home and enter an identifier to register points for a national prize. A player may validates a ticket online, providing identification information such as the winner's name and the ticket number.
  • A national winner may be required to validate a ticket at home.
  • In another embodiment, the name of the winner and partial winning ticket number is displayed on the TV or ticker.
  • Participants choose a predetermined number, such as six, available players from the list provided by the game provider. The list of players may be displayed on a monitor in the establishment hosting the game, or they may be printed on a ticket. Participants may be restricted to one entry or may be allowed to submit as many tickets as they would like. They may be charged per ticket.
  • Game Rules.
  • Several players compete against each other. The grouping of players for a particular game may be made by the software of the system. Alternatively, the grouping may be made up from those players that sign up to play a game during a predetermined interval before a deadline. A player makes an initial selection of a predetermined number of athletes to make the player's team. The selection is made for a predetermined time interval, such as one hour on a given day. The time interval may be for a specific time, such as one hour, that is unrelated to the end of the contest in which the athlete performs. Points are awarded for plays that the selected athletes complete in a sport during the course of a game period of a predetermined time interval. The points awarded may be calculated in real time or near real time through a computer program that is accessed by the system. For example, the statistics for the game may be obtained from a source such as a statistics service such as Stats, Inc. Each sport has different rules which will determine how many points a play is worth. The aggregate of those points at the end of the game period will determine a score for the player who selected those athletes. The player with the most points at the end of a predetermined game period wins.
  • Sample Restrictions & Concerns.
  • In one alternative embodiment, all of a player's picks cannot be from the same team.
  • In another alternative embodiment, the selection of athletes must be made from at least two different sports.
  • In another embodiment, the choices provided to a player may be restricted to players who are actually playing during the course of the hour.
  • In still another embodiment, overlapping time intervals are provided for the play of the game. For example, one game may run from 1 pm until 2 pm, and another game may run from 1:15 to 2:15, and yet another game may run from 1:30 to 2:30.
  • In yet another embodiment, the players playing in overlapping time intervals are grouped into a single tournament, and a winner is determined from the grouped players.
  • In still another embodiment, the athletes selected must be listed by a player in an ascending or descending order of predicted point accumulation. This embodiment may be used to eliminate ties. However, a tie may alternatively go to the player that submits the list first. Other tiebreakers are also contemplated.
  • Points are awarded for plays that the selected athletes complete during the course of the predetermined time period (e.g., one hour). Each sport has different rules, which will determine how many points a play is worth. The aggregate of those points at the end of the game period will determine the score for the player who selected those athletes. The player with the most points at the end of the time interval for the game period wins.
  • For example six players may be chosen, either at large or from a list provided by an administrator of the game. The six players may be required to be chosen in order of anticipated highest performances. In this embodiment, two filled out cards can have the same six players, but the winning card will have the highest order of player performance. In the event two users select the same players in the same order, the user who submitted their card earliest may be deemed the winner.
  • Participating players may be required to fill out a bubble or Scantron ticket properly and submit it and pay for it (if required) during an allocated sign up time frame. The game provider would not be held responsible for Scantron tickets not filled out properly.
  • The administrator of the game may only make athletes available for selection those athletes with the top statistics for the games going on during that hour. This restriction may be made through a program in the host server or some other administration program for the game. While the game provider may do its best to only select active athletes, the player is responsible for selecting athletes that have the highest likelihood of accumulating the most statistics.
  • The participant may be held responsible to recognize the possibility of a delay or cancellation of a game. In another embodiment of the invention, no substitution for players involved in cancelled or delayed game may be allowed.
  • In still another embodiment of the invention, there are trades among players during a time interval when the game is played. In yet another embodiment, there are bench players that may substitute for athletes on an active roster of selected athletes. In still another embodiment, there are free agents (athletes that are available for picking even though they are not on a list preselected by the administrator of the game. Also, fractions of points may be used in an alternative embodiment of the invention.
  • It may be required that once a Scantron card is submitted, no changes to the athlete selections will be allowed.
  • Statistics will be reported by the game provider as close to real time as possible. It is possible for a sporting event play to occur within an hour of a game but not be reported until after the game is over. The game provider may determine that a play begun before the predetermined time is up is still eligible, or that the statistics must be reported within the predetermined time, or some other similar criteria.
  • An gift certificate redeemable at the location of the game may be awarded to the winner of a game played during a predetermined interval. If the location is part of a group of service providers of the system, there may be a group gift certificate awarded to the winner of each group game. Alternatively, the game provider may set groups for competition. In an embodiment having online participants, online players may not be eligible for establishment or group games.
  • Location and group winners may scan a receipt at a kiosk to receive a winning voucher. The winning voucher may be redeemed for credit at the location for a set period of time. The game provider, the group or the location may determine the period available for redemption. Other prizes such as cash or credit to a credit card may alternatively be given to a winning player.
  • A game provider may offer national games open to all players in establishments as well as online participants. The game provider will determine when and under what conditions national games will be offered.
  • Football Rules.
  • Choose 6 athletes.
  • Sample Categories & Points Received.
  • Rushing Yards 1 point/5 yards
    Rushing TD 6 points
    Receiving Yards 1 point/5 yards
    Receiving TD 6 points
    Reception .5 point
    Passing Yards 1 point/10 yards
    Passing TD 4 points
  • Sample Use Case—Giants opening drive of the Super Bowl
  • Jacobs rushed for 15 yards—3 points
  • Bradshaw rushed for 10 yards—2 points
  • Maiming passed for 38 yards—3.8 points
  • Burress 14 yards receiving—2.8 points
  • Burress 1 reception—0.5 point
  • Smith 21 yards receiving—4.2 points
  • Smith 3 receptions—1.5 points
  • Hedgecock 3 yard receiving −0.6 points
  • Hedgecock 1 reception—1 point
  • TOTAL
  • Jacobs—3
  • Bradshaw—2
  • Manning—3.8
  • Burress—3.8
  • Smith—5.7
  • Hedgecock—1.6 points
  • NBA Rules.
  • 6 players chosen, easiest because same players play both Offense & defense and categories are very simple.
  • Categories & Points Received.
  • Point 1
    Assist 2
    Rebound 2
    Block shot 4
    Steal 4
  • Sample Use Case1st quarter of a game example
  • Kobe Bryant 11 points—11
  • Kobe 1 Steal—4
  • Fischer 2 points—2
  • Fischer 2 assists—4
  • Odom 5 rebounds—10
  • Odom 1 point—1
  • Gasol 5 rebounds—10
  • Gasol 1 assist—2
  • Pierce 2 points—2
  • Pierce 3 assists—6
  • Pierce 1 rebound—2
  • Pierce 1 steal—4
  • Garnett 10 points—10
  • Garnett 3 rebounds—6
  • Rondo 4 points—4
  • Rondo 4 steals—16
  • Rondo 1 assist—2
  • TOTAL
  • Kobe—15
  • Fischer—6
  • Odom—11
  • Gasol—12
  • Pierce—14
  • Garnett—16
  • Rondo—22
  • Alternative Sample Points Awarded by Sport.
  • Football Rules.
  • Offensive Player Points
  • Rushing Yard: 0.2 points
  • Rushing TD: 6 points
  • Receiving Yards: 0.2 points
  • Receiving TD: 6 points
  • Reception: 2 points
  • Passing Yard: 0.1 points
  • Passing TD: 4 points
  • Fumble Lost: −1 point
  • Interception thrown: −2 points
  • Kickers Points
  • Field Goals 0-19 Yards: 1 point
  • Field Goals 20-29 Yards: 2 points
  • Field Goals 30-39 Yards: 3 points
  • Field Goals 40-49 Yards: 4 points
  • Field Goals 50+Yards: 5 points
  • Point After Attempt Made: 1 point
  • Defensive Players Points.
  • Tackle: 3 points
  • Sack: 4 points
  • Safety: 4 points
  • Pass Defended: 1 points
  • Interception: 4 points
  • Def TD: 6 points
  • Forced Fumble: 4 points
  • Fumble Recovery: 4 Points
  • Basketball Rules.
  • Point: 0.5 points
  • Assist: 1 point
  • Rebounds: 1 point
  • Block shot: 2 points
  • Steal: 2 points
  • Turnover: −0.5 points
  • Baseball Rules (Hitting Only).
  • Single: 10 points
  • Walk: 5 points
  • Double: 15 points
  • Triple: 15 points
  • Home Run: 20 points
  • Run: 5 points
  • Run Batted In (RBI): 5 points
  • Stolen Base: 10 points
  • It will be appreciated by persons skilled in the art that the present invention is not limited to what has been particularly shown and described herein above. In addition, unless mention was made above to the contrary, it should be noted that the accompanying drawing is not to scale. A variety of modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teachings without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.

Claims (25)

  1. 1. A system for enabling a plurality of players to play a fantasy sports game over a predetermined time interval, comprising:
    a. a game implemented with software for playing the game on a computer readable medium on one or more computers, the game having a plurality of players, each player having a team of a plurality of athletes in contests; and
    b. correlating points earned by the athletes for the team with the statistics of the athletes in contests scheduled to be played;
    wherein the game is played through a predetermined time interval.
  2. 2. The system of claim 1, wherein the player may sign up to play a game for a predefined period of play starting immediately and then the player will be placed in a tournament of a pre-determined size along with one or more additional players playing during the same predefined period of play, wherein a player with the highest score wins the tournament.
  3. 3. The system of claim 2, wherein a plurality of players playing in overlapping time intervals are grouped into a single tournament, and a winner is determined from the grouped players.
  4. 4. The system of claim 1, wherein the athletes are chosen from at least two teams.
  5. 5. The system of claim 1, wherein the contests comprise a plurality of sports.
  6. 6. The system of claim 1, wherein the player accesses the software via a network.
  7. 7. The system of claim 1, wherein the predetermined time interval is measured without regard to the end of the contests used in the game.
  8. 8. The system of claim 1, further comprising a kiosk for providing the player access to the game at a location.
  9. 9. The system of claim 8, wherein the kiosk is in electronic communication with a plurality of displays at the location.
  10. 10. The system of claim 8, wherein the kiosk comprises a dispenser for a voucher for a winning player.
  11. 11. The system of claim 1, wherein a list of available athletes for the player to select for the team is preselected.
  12. 12. The system of claim 1, wherein the software is accessible on player hardware.
  13. 13. The system of claim 1, wherein the player lists the athletes on the team in order of points earned.
  14. 14. A method for providing a fantasy sports game to be played by players over a predetermined time interval, comprising the steps of:
    a. accessing software for playing a game on a computer readable medium on one or more computers, the game having a plurality of players, each player having a team of a plurality of athletes in contests; and
    b. correlating points earned by the athletes for the team with the statistics of the athletes in the contests for the predetermined time interval.
  15. 15. The method of claim 14, wherein a plurality of players playing in overlapping time intervals are grouped into a single tournament, and a winner is determined from the grouped players.
  16. 16. The method of claim 14, wherein the athletes are from at least two different teams.
  17. 17. The method of claim 14, wherein the contests comprise at least two different sports.
  18. 18. The method of claim 14, wherein the player is able to access the game via a player device over a network.
  19. 19. The method of claim 14, wherein the predetermined time interval is measured without regard to the end of the contests used in the game.
  20. 20. The method of claim 14, wherein the player lists the athletes on the team in order of points earned.
  21. 21. A device for enabling a plurality of players to play a fantasy sports game over a predetermined time interval, comprising:
    a. software for playing a game on a computer readable medium, the game having a plurality of players, each player having a team of a plurality of athletes in contests; and
    b. correlating points earned by the athletes for the team with the statistics of the athletes in the contests scheduled to be played;
    wherein the game is played through the predetermined time interval.
  22. 22. The device of claim 21, wherein the athletes are from at least two different teams.
  23. 23. The device of claim 21, wherein the contests are at least two different sports.
  24. 24. The device of claim 21, wherein the predetermined time interval is measured without regard to the end of the contests used in the game.
  25. 25. The device of claim 21, wherein a plurality of players playing in overlapping time intervals are grouped into a single tournament, and a winner is determined from the grouped players.
US12771445 2009-04-30 2010-04-30 System and method for fantasy interactive sports game Abandoned US20100279753A1 (en)

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