US20100240472A1 - Golf ball dimples forming indicia - Google Patents

Golf ball dimples forming indicia Download PDF

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Publication number
US20100240472A1
US20100240472A1 US12407812 US40781209A US2010240472A1 US 20100240472 A1 US20100240472 A1 US 20100240472A1 US 12407812 US12407812 US 12407812 US 40781209 A US40781209 A US 40781209A US 2010240472 A1 US2010240472 A1 US 2010240472A1
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US
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Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
golf ball
dimples
dimple
value
perimeter
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12407812
Inventor
Nicholas M. Nardacci
Matthew F. Hogge
William E. Morgan
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Acushnet Co
Original Assignee
Acushnet Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0004Surface depressions or protrusions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0004Surface depressions or protrusions
    • A63B37/0006Arrangement or layout of dimples
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0004Surface depressions or protrusions
    • A63B37/0007Non-circular dimples
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0004Surface depressions or protrusions
    • A63B37/0007Non-circular dimples
    • A63B37/0008Elliptical
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0004Surface depressions or protrusions
    • A63B37/0007Non-circular dimples
    • A63B37/0009Polygonal
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0004Surface depressions or protrusions
    • A63B37/0012Dimple profile, i.e. cross-sectional view
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/0003Golf balls
    • A63B37/0022Coatings, markings
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B37/00Solid balls; Rigid hollow balls; Marbles
    • A63B37/14Special surfaces
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B45/00Apparatus or methods for manufacturing balls
    • A63B45/02Marking of balls

Abstract

The present invention comprises a golf ball with dimples. Some of the dimples have markings that are raised geometric elements having substantially the same elevation as the undimpled land area. Innovatively, the markings interact with and become components of dimples themselves rather than being additions or replacements for dimples. Innovatively, the markings increase the total perimeter value of one or more dimples, and the aggregate dimple perimeter value of a golf ball. Such increased perimeter quantities provide a means to control and improve aerodynamic performance.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention generally relates to golf balls. Particularly, the invention is directed to improved golf balls having a plurality of dimples forming indicia.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Golf balls are routinely marked with various surface indicia, such as the manufacturer's logo and trademark, and the play number, which allows golfers using the same type of golf ball to distinguish one player's ball from that of another. Additional symbols that may also be applied to golf balls include custom figures for promotional purposes as well as specific marks reflecting manufacturing information. There are different approaches commonly used, mostly water-based or solvent-based ink printing systems, for adding indicia to the dimpled outer surface of a golf ball. However, such conventional ink-based indicia are not sufficiently durable (impact resistant) to withstand multiple impacts with a golf club.
  • During the first half of the 20th century it was a common practice to mold the brand name of a golf ball directly into the ball's outer surface either as raised or recessed text. If recessed, it was sometimes paint-filled to increase visibility. This type of text was small, markings typically less than 0.010″ in height, and occupied a small portion of the ball's surface in a small area on each pole. The area was typically a small rectangular patch containing the name in a single line of text, or a circular patch of ½″ diameter or less. The texts replaced the dimples and had no connection or contact with the remaining dimples. The texts were merely a way of identifying the ball type at a time when modern printing techniques and durable inks were not available.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 7,273,426 to Sato et al. discloses a golf ball having markings of letters or figures on its surface with concave parts and/or convex parts, wherein the markings manifest themselves with depressions and/or grooves having a substantially uniform depth from the surface. The depressions are formed on the walls of the dimples and over the land existing between adjacent dimples.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 7,303,492 to Aoyama et al. discloses a golf ball comprising an outer spherical surface including a plurality of dimples that form indicia. These dimples are depressions that take the form of text letters, markings or other symbols, and occupy a substantial portion of the ball's surface in a repeating, distributed pattern.
  • However, there still remains a need for golf balls comprising dimples interacting with raised indicia to provide unique identification and patterns to the balls without using inks.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention concerns a golf ball with dimples comprising markings that are raised geometric elements. The raised markings interact with and become components of dimples themselves rather than being additions or replacements for dimples. Innovatively, the markings increase the perimeter of dimples thereby providing a means to control and improve aerodynamic performance.
  • In one embodiment, the present invention is directed to a golf ball comprising a first set of dimples, a second set of dimples, and a land area. The first set of dimples has at least one dimple comprising circumference c. The second set of dimples comprises at least one marking within at least one dimple comprising n subcomponents. The at least one dimple comprising n subcomponents has a total perimeter value provided by the expression
  • P = i = 1 n p i
  • where p is the perimeter of the each subcomponent and n is at least two, and wherein the value of P is at least about 1.10c.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • In the accompanying drawings which form a part of the specification and are to be read in conjunction therewith and in which like reference numerals are used to indicate like parts in the various views:
  • FIG. 1 is a golf ball with dimples comprising raised markings;
  • FIG. 2 is another golf ball with dimples comprising raised markings;
  • FIG. 3 is another golf ball with dimples comprising raised markings;
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a conventional golf ball dimple and an inventive golf ball dimple with raised markings; and
  • FIG. 5 illustrates the air flow on a golf ball in flight.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Referring to FIG. 1, a golf ball 10 includes a spherical outer surface that has at least two types of dimples 15 and 20 formed thereon. The first type of dimple 15 is a conventional spherical dimple. The second of type of dimple 20 is a combination of a conventional dimple and markings 30, which are raised geometric elements having substantially the same elevation as the undimpled land area 40. The markings 30 interact with and become integral components of dimples 20 rather than being additions or replacements for dimples. Innovatively, the markings 30 increase the “total individual perimeter value” of one or more dimples 20, and the “aggregate global dimple perimeter value” of a golf ball 10, as explained below. Such increased perimeter quantities provide a means to control and improve aerodynamic performance.
  • As used herein, the quantity “aggregate global dimple perimeter value” (“AGDPV”) represents the sum of perimeters for all dimples 15, 20 in a given golf ball 10. This quantity is distinguished from the “total individual perimeter value” of a single dimple, which can mean either the circumference of a single dimple 15, or if a dimple 20 has two or more subcomponents n then the quantity refers to the sum of perimeters of n subcomponents. As used herein, “perimeter” and “circumference” are measured along the land surface or along an elevation substantially the same as the elevation of the land surface.
  • As used herein, the terms “marking,” “character,” “indicia,” “logo,” “image,” and “pattern” are the same for purposes of this invention and are considered to mean any letter, number, symbol, icon, design, bar code, or the like, that can be added to the three-dimensional spherical surface of a golf ball 10. Markings 30 can be added by any suitable means including, but not limited to, producing a master pattern or hob comprising said markings 30. Further information about hobs can be found in U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,831,423 and 6,726,869, which are incorporated herein by reference in their entireties.
  • With respect to markings 30, there may be numerous variations of location, orientation, frequency and marking(s) selection, thereby increasing the possible number of design permutations. FIG. 1 shows multiple dimples 20 forming a marking 30 that is a geometric pattern comprising a single shape such as a circle. Other suitable shapes include, but are not limited to, an oval, a polygon, and the like. FIG. 2 shows a single dimple 20 forming a marking 30, i.e. a “Z.” FIG. 3 shows multiple dimples 20 forming a marking 30 (the Pinnacle® airfoil) comprising multiple geometrical shapes, i.e., a circle and a triangle. In yet another embodiment, more than one marking 30, 30′ may contribute to the shape of a single dimple 20, as shown in FIG. 1.
  • The advantage of markings 30 can be better understood by comparing an inventive dimple 20 with a conventional dimple 15 as depicted in FIG. 4. A conventional dimple 15 simply has a circumference c on the outside of that dimple. By contrast, an inventive dimple 20 substantially contains within it a marking 30 that traverses through said dimple 20. Consequently, dimple 20 is split into four subcomponents (i.e., n1, n2, n3, n4) each comprising a perimeter p. Generally, for any given dimple 20, the total perimeter value P of n subcomponents is provided by the expression
  • P = i = 1 n p i
  • where the value of n is at least two (i.e., there are a minimum of two subcomponents), or at least three, or at least four. For example, dimple 20 in FIG. 4 has total individual perimeter value given by the expression P=p1+p2+p3+p4. In the present invention, the value of P is at least about 1.1, preferably at least about 1.25, more preferably at least about 1.5, and most preferably at least about 1.75 times greater than the value of c. A person of ordinary skill in the art would readily appreciate that if a golf ball 10 comprises one or more dimples 20 each having a total perimeter value P, then there is a resultant increase in the aggregate global dimple perimeter value (“AGDPV”).
  • The advantage of increased perimeter quantities (i.e., all the individual total perimeter values and the collective aggregate dimple perimeter value) can be appreciated by understanding the aerodynamics of a golf ball 10. As illustrated in FIG. 5, when a golf ball 10 travels through the air, the air surrounding the ball has different velocities and, thus, different pressures. The air develops a thin boundary layer adjacent to the ball's outer surface. The air exerts maximum pressure at stagnation point, B, on the front of the ball. The air then flows over the sides of the ball and has increased velocity and reduced pressure. The air separates from the surface of the ball at points S1 and S2, leaving a large turbulent flow area called the wake that has low pressure. The difference in the high pressure in front of the ball and the low pressure behind the ball slows the ball down. This is the primary source of drag, which is the air resistance that acts on the golf ball in the direction opposite the ball's flight direction.
  • The dimples 15, 20 on golf ball 10 cause the thin boundary layer to flow in a turbulent manner. Rather than flowing in smooth, continuous layers (i.e., a laminar boundary layer), this turbulent boundary layer has a microscopic pattern of fluctuations and randomized flow. It is the circumference/perimeter of each dimple 15, 20, where the dimple wall drops away from the outer surface of the ball, which actually creates the turbulence in the boundary layer. The turbulence energizes the boundary layer and helps move the separation point S1 further backward, so that the layer stays attached further along the ball's outer surface. As a result, there is a reduction in the area of the wake, an increase in the pressure behind the ball, and a substantial reduction in drag. Thus, given the role of the circumference/perimeter of each dimple 15, 20 in creating a turbulent boundary layer, it may be advantageous to increase total individual dimple perimeter values and the aggregate global dimple perimeter value so as to improve the golf ball's aerodynamic performance.
  • The dimples of the present invention can be arranged in an icosahedron pattern, or other suitable polyhedron patterns including, but not limited to, octahedrons (8-sided polyhedrons), dodecahedrons (12-sided polyhedrons), icosidodecahedrons (polyhedrons with twenty triangular faces and twelve pentagonal faces), and various dipyramids (polyhedrons formed from two n-agonal pyramids placed symmetrically base-to-base).
  • The dimple patterns of the present invention can be used with any type of golf ball with any playing characteristics. For example, the dimple pattern can be used with conventional golf balls, solid or wound. These balls typically have at least one core layer and at least one cover layer. Wound balls typically have a spherical solid rubber or liquid filled center with a tensioned elastomeric thread wound thereon. Wound balls typically travel a shorter distance, however, when struck as compared to a two piece ball. The cores of solid balls are generally formed of a polybutadiene composition. In addition to one-piece cores, solid cores can also contain a number of layers, such as in a dual core golf ball. Covers, for solid or wound balls, are generally formed of ionomer resins, balata, or polyurethane, and can consist of a single layer or include a plurality of layers and, optionally, at least one intermediate layer disposed about the core.
  • While it is apparent that the illustrative embodiments of the invention disclosed herein fulfill the objectives of the present invention, it is appreciated that numerous modifications and other embodiments may be devised by those skilled in the art. For instance, the cross-sectional shape can be circular or also catenary, elliptical, conical, among others. Similarly, the dimple perimeter shape is not limited to being circular in plan view, but it could also have polygonal, oval, or irregular plan form shapes, among others. There are also no restrictions on the side walls of indicia elements, given that the number of intersections with dimple perimeter could be zero or greater. Further discussion of golf ball dimple patterns may be found in U.S. Pat. No. 7,303,491, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. Additionally, feature(s) and/or element(s) from any embodiment may be used singly or in combination with other embodiment(s) and steps or elements from methods in accordance with the present invention can be executed or performed in any suitable order. Therefore, it will be understood that the appended claims are intended to cover all such modifications and embodiments, which would come within the spirit and scope of the present invention.

Claims (15)

  1. 1. A golf ball comprises a first set of dimples, a second set of dimples and a land area, wherein the first set of dimples has at least one dimple comprising circumference c, wherein the second set of dimples comprises at least one marking within at least one dimple comprising n subcomponents, wherein said dimple has a total perimeter value provided by the expression
    P = i = 1 n p i
    where p is the perimeter of the each subcomponent and n is at least two, and wherein the value of P is at least about 1.10c.
  2. 2. The golf ball of claim 1, wherein the value of P is at least 1.25c.
  3. 3. The golf ball of claim 1, wherein the value of P is at least 1.5c.
  4. 4. The golf ball of claim 1, wherein the value of P is at least 1.75c.
  5. 5. The golf ball of claim 1, wherein n is at least three.
  6. 6. The golf ball of claim 1, wherein n is at least four.
  7. 7. The golf ball of claim 1, wherein the dimples have a cross-sectional shape selected from the group consisting of circular, catenary, elliptical, and conical shapes.
  8. 8. The golf ball of claim 1, wherein the dimples have a plan form shape selected from the group consisting of circular, polygonal, oval, and irregular shapes.
  9. 9. The golf ball of claim 1, wherein the at least one marking in the second set of dimples forms a geometrical pattern on the golf ball.
  10. 10. The golf ball of claim 9, wherein said geometrical pattern comprises a circle.
  11. 11. The golf ball of claim 9, wherein said geometrical pattern comprises an oval.
  12. 12. The golf ball of claim 9, wherein said geometrical pattern comprises a polygon.
  13. 13. The golf ball of claim 9, wherein said geometrical pattern comprises multiple geometrical shapes.
  14. 14. The golf ball of claim 13, wherein said shapes comprise a circle and a triangle.
  15. 15. The golf ball of claim 1, wherein the at least one marking in the second set of dimples is substantially contoured within a single dimple.
US12407812 2009-03-20 2009-03-20 Golf ball dimples forming indicia Abandoned US20100240472A1 (en)

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN104093461A (en) * 2012-01-23 2014-10-08 岸下佳弘 Golf ball
WO2015167675A1 (en) * 2014-04-28 2015-11-05 Parsons Xtreme Golf, LLC Golf balls and methods to manufacture golf club heads
US9248345B2 (en) * 2014-04-28 2016-02-02 Slick Golf, LLC Golf balls and methods to manufacture golf balls
US20160107037A1 (en) * 2014-04-28 2016-04-21 Slick Golf, LLC Golf balls and methods to manufacture golf balls
US20160184644A1 (en) * 2014-12-26 2016-06-30 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf ball
USD766387S1 (en) 2014-09-18 2016-09-13 Slick Golf, LLC Golf ball
USD766386S1 (en) 2014-04-28 2016-09-13 Slick Golf, LLC Golf ball
USD780863S1 (en) 2014-10-31 2017-03-07 Slick Golf, LLC Golf ball
JP2017513621A (en) * 2014-04-28 2017-06-01 パーソンズ エクストリーム ゴルフ,エルエルシーParsons Xtreme Golf,Llc Golf ball and golf ball manufacturing method

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3831423A (en) * 1973-01-26 1974-08-27 Acushnet Co Method of making golf ball molds
US6547678B2 (en) * 1999-10-25 2003-04-15 Gilbert Barfield Golf ball dimple structures with vortex generators
US6726869B2 (en) * 2001-02-23 2004-04-27 Acushnet Company Method of making golf ball mold halves and golf balls therefrom
US7195570B2 (en) * 2000-03-06 2007-03-27 Sunrise Enterprise Golf ball with improved directional stability in putting stroke
US7273426B2 (en) * 2005-06-09 2007-09-25 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf ball
US7303492B2 (en) * 2005-07-28 2007-12-04 Acushnet Company Golf ball dimples forming indicia

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3831423A (en) * 1973-01-26 1974-08-27 Acushnet Co Method of making golf ball molds
US6547678B2 (en) * 1999-10-25 2003-04-15 Gilbert Barfield Golf ball dimple structures with vortex generators
US7195570B2 (en) * 2000-03-06 2007-03-27 Sunrise Enterprise Golf ball with improved directional stability in putting stroke
US6726869B2 (en) * 2001-02-23 2004-04-27 Acushnet Company Method of making golf ball mold halves and golf balls therefrom
US7273426B2 (en) * 2005-06-09 2007-09-25 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf ball
US20080051224A1 (en) * 2005-06-09 2008-02-28 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf ball
US7303492B2 (en) * 2005-07-28 2007-12-04 Acushnet Company Golf ball dimples forming indicia

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN104093461A (en) * 2012-01-23 2014-10-08 岸下佳弘 Golf ball
WO2015167675A1 (en) * 2014-04-28 2015-11-05 Parsons Xtreme Golf, LLC Golf balls and methods to manufacture golf club heads
US9248345B2 (en) * 2014-04-28 2016-02-02 Slick Golf, LLC Golf balls and methods to manufacture golf balls
US20160107037A1 (en) * 2014-04-28 2016-04-21 Slick Golf, LLC Golf balls and methods to manufacture golf balls
USD766386S1 (en) 2014-04-28 2016-09-13 Slick Golf, LLC Golf ball
JP2017513621A (en) * 2014-04-28 2017-06-01 パーソンズ エクストリーム ゴルフ,エルエルシーParsons Xtreme Golf,Llc Golf ball and golf ball manufacturing method
US9764194B2 (en) * 2014-04-28 2017-09-19 Parsons Xtreme Golf, LLC Golf balls and methods to manufacture golf balls
USD766387S1 (en) 2014-09-18 2016-09-13 Slick Golf, LLC Golf ball
USD780863S1 (en) 2014-10-31 2017-03-07 Slick Golf, LLC Golf ball
US20160184644A1 (en) * 2014-12-26 2016-06-30 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf ball
US10039958B2 (en) * 2014-12-26 2018-08-07 Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd. Golf ball

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Owner name: ACUSHNET COMPANY, MASSACHUSETTS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:NARDACCI, NICHOLAS M.;HOGGE, MATTHEW F.;MORGAN, WILLIAM E.;SIGNING DATES FROM 20090209 TO 20090225;REEL/FRAME:022424/0628

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Owner name: KOREA DEVELOPMENT BANK, NEW YORK BRANCH, NEW YORK

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:ACUSHNET COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:027346/0222

Effective date: 20111031

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Free format text: RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENTS PREVIOUSLY RECORDED AT REEL/FRAME (027346/0222);ASSIGNOR:KOREA DEVELOPMENT BANK, NEW YORK BRANCH;REEL/FRAME:039939/0181

Effective date: 20160728