US20100218845A1 - Refillable bag-on-valve system - Google Patents

Refillable bag-on-valve system Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100218845A1
US20100218845A1 US12/395,559 US39555909A US2010218845A1 US 20100218845 A1 US20100218845 A1 US 20100218845A1 US 39555909 A US39555909 A US 39555909A US 2010218845 A1 US2010218845 A1 US 2010218845A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
container
aperture
width
valve
bag
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/395,559
Inventor
Yoram Fishman
Original Assignee
Yoram Fishman
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Yoram Fishman filed Critical Yoram Fishman
Priority to US12/395,559 priority Critical patent/US20100218845A1/en
Publication of US20100218845A1 publication Critical patent/US20100218845A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65BMACHINES, APPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR, OR METHODS OF, PACKAGING ARTICLES OR MATERIALS; UNPACKING
    • B65B31/00Packaging articles or materials under special atmospheric or gaseous conditions; Adding propellants to aerosol containers
    • B65B31/003Adding propellants in fluid form to aerosol containers

Abstract

One embodiment relates to a system including a first bag-on-valve aerosol container including a first valve comprising a first valve stem, and a body having an aperture extending therethrough from a first end of the body to a second end of the body. The aperture is sized to accept the first valve stem at the first end of the body. The aperture is also sized to accept a second valve stem at the second end of the body; the body sized to accept the first valve stem and a second valve stem at the same time. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • For certain types of products, an aerosol can is used to deliver the product. Aerosol containers may include a variety of configurations, including, for example, piston-in-can and bag-in-can designs. One example of a bag-in-can design includes a flexible bag within a can, wherein the flexible bag has an open end sealingly connected to an aerosol valve. Such a configuration is commonly referred to as a bag-on-valve (BOV) design. The product is typically filled into the flexible bag and a propellant (for example, liquid or compressed gas) is positioned in the can outside of the bag between the bag outer wall and the inner wall of the can. When the valve is actuated, the force applied to the bag from the propellant causes the product to be transmitted through the valve to the environment outside the can. The can is configured so that the propellant remains in the can after the product has been transmitted through the valve and out of the can.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Certain embodiments of the invention are described with reference to the accompanying drawing which, for illustrative purposes, are schematic and not necessarily drawn to scale.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a view of a bag-on-valve aerosol container and a body used for transmitting a product into or out of the container, in accordance with certain embodiments.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a view of portions of two bag-on-valve aerosol cans and a body used for transmitting a product from one can to the other can, with the body positioned between the cans, in accordance with certain embodiments.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a view of two bag-on-valve aerosol cans and a body used for transmitting a product from one can to the other can, with the body positioned between the cans, in accordance with certain embodiments.
  • FIGS. 4(A)-4(B) illustrate side cross sectional and top down views of the structure of a body used for transmitting a product from one bag-on-valve aerosol can to another bag-on-valve aerosol can, in accordance with certain embodiments.
  • FIGS. 5-8 illustrate side cross sectional views of the structure of a body used for transmitting a product from one bag-on-valve aerosol can to another bag-on-valve aerosol can, in accordance with certain embodiments.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Certain embodiments of the present invention relate to devices, systems, and methods used for transmitting a product from one aerosol container to another container. The aerosol container may in certain embodiments be a bag-on-valve container, in which a pressurized gas in a can applies a pressure to a bag positioned in the can, to force the product out of the can when a valve is actuated. Such products may include, but are not limited to, health and cosmetic formulations, for example, hair care products, shaving products, sun protection factor (SPF) products, and skin care products.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a bag-on-valve container 10 including a can 12 having a bag 14 positioned therein. At an end of the container 10 is a valve 16, which includes valve stem 18 extending outward. The bag 14 is coupled to the valve 16 so that a product 20 in the bag 14 can be transmitted through the valve 16 when the valve 16 is opened by actuation. The valve 16 may be actuated by applying a force to the valve stem 18, which acts to open the valve 16. In certain embodiments, the product 20 may be selected from hair care products, shaving products, sun protection products, and skin and baby products, cleansers, and other lotions and sprays. Any suitable bag-in-valve container and valve mechanism may be used. Such valve mechanisms may include the use of a spring, such as spring 29 and spring 129, as illustrated, for example, in FIG. 2. Suitable containers and valve mechanisms are available from SeaquistPerfect Dispensing, of Cary, Ill.
  • A propellant 22 is positioned in the can 12, to apply a pressure to the bag 14. The propellant 22 may be any suitable propellant, including, but not limited to, compressed gases and/or liquefied hydrocarbons. FIG. 1 illustrates wavy lines 22 to indicate a propellant in gas form. FIG. 1 also illustrates that if the propellant is a liquefied hydrocarbon, a quantity of the liquefied hydrocarbon 22′, as indicated by the hatched line, will also be present in the can. Examples include, but are not limited to, nitrogen, air, and hydrocarbons. The valve 16 may be actuated by applying a force to the valve stem 18. The container 10 may also include an spray top 15 adapted to be removeably coupled to the valve stem 18, and a cap 11 that fits over the spray top 15. The spray top 15 permits the user to direct the spray of product towards the side of the can by applying a force to the spray top 15, which in turn transmits a force to the valve stem 18 to actuate the valve 16 and transmits the product through the valve stem 18 and the spray top 15. The spray top 15 includes an aperture 19 that follows a path through the spray top 15 that includes a bend that directs the spray of product to the side.
  • FIG. 1 also illustrates a body 30 including an aperture 32 extending therethrough. The body 30 may be coupled to the valve stem 18 when the spray top 15 is not positioned on the valve stem 18. The body 30 is shaped so that the valve stem 18 can be accepted into the aperture 32. The body 30 may be formed from any suitable material through which a IS product such as, for example, a cosmetic product, may flow, including, but not limited to, polymers, metals, ceramics, glass, and composite materials.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates the container 10 and body 30 of FIG. 1, together with a second container 110, the second container including a bag 114 positioned therein, a valve 116, and a valve stem 118 extending outward, in accordance with certain embodiments. The second container 100 may in certain embodiments be a different size than the first container 10 and contain a different sized bag 114 therein. As illustrated in FIG. 2, the valve stem 18 from the container 10 extends into the aperture 32 at a lower end 31 of the body 30. The valve stem 118 of the container 110 is aligned to be inserted into the aperture 32 at an upper end 33 of the body 30.
  • The aperture 32 extending through the body 30 as illustrated in the embodiment of FIG. 2 has substantially frusto-conical shaped portions separated by a cylindrical shaped portion. The aperture 32 extends upward from the lower end 31 of the body in a frusto-conical manner for a distance into the body 30. The aperture also extends downward from the upper surface 33 in a frusto-conical manner for a distance into the body 30. The aperture 32 has its largest diameter where it intersects with the upper end 33 and the lower end 31 of the body 30. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, the frusto-conical shapes extending from each of the ends 31, 33 extend a distance of less than one half the length of the body 30. A central portion of the aperture 32 between the frusto-conical portions is cylindrical shaped. Other sizes and shapes for the various portions of the aperture 32 are also possible.
  • In addition, the second container 110 may include a propellant that applies a different pressure to the bag 114 than the pressure applied to the bag 14 by the propellant in the first container 10. By having a different pressure in each of the containers 10, 110, when each is coupled to the body 30 and actuated, the bag having a higher pressure applied to it will deliver product to the bag in the other can. When a compressed gas propellant (for example, nitrogen or air) is used, the bag in the can being filled will either be filled to its capacity or be filled until the pressure in each can is equalized. If a liquified hydrocarbon propellant (for example, isopentane, isobutene, or dimethyl ether) is used, a constant pressure is applied to the bag regardless of the quantity of product in the can. As a result, when a liquefied hydrocarbon is used, the bag being filled (the bag with the lower pressure) will either be filled to its capacity or filled until the supply can is empty of product. This is because the hydrocarbon propellant is present in an equilibrium state of liquid and vapor in the can. In certain embodiments, the propellant in one of the containers 10, 110 has a pressure that is about 15 percent to about 150 percent greater than the pressure in the other of the containers 10, 110.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates an embodiment in which a larger container 210 delivers product 220 to a smaller container 310 thorough a body 230, in accordance with certain embodiments. The container 210 includes a bag 214 that can hold a greater volume of product than the bag 314 in the container 310. As a result, if one uses up most or all of the contents in the container 310, it may be refilled using the container 210 and the body 230. As seen in FIG. 3, when the valves 216 and 316 are each engaged, the product 220 flows from the bag 214 in can 212 through the aperture 332 in the body 230 to the bag 314 in the can 312. The pressure 222 in the can 212 should be sufficient to ensure that a large enough force is applied to the bag 214 so that the product can flow through the valve 216 and the body 230 and into the bag 314 when the valves 216 and 316 are actuated. The pressure in the can 312 should be small enough so that it allows for the product 220 to be delivered into the bag 314, yet be large enough so that after the bag 314 is filled with product 220, the product 220 will flow through the valve 316 when actuated by the user.
  • It should be appreciated that the actual pressure applied to the bag in the container will vary as the product is delivered into or out of the can when a compressed gas (e.g. nitrogen, air, etc.) is used as the propellant. This is because as the bag is emptied of product, the bag will fold up, thus increasing the volume between the bag and the can. As this increased volume is filled with the compressed gas, the pressure on the bag decreases. When a liquid hydrocarbon propellant is used, the pressure to the bag in the container remains generally constant as the product is delivered into or out of the can, because the liquid hydrocarbon propellant is present in the can in an amount to ensure equilibrium state of liquid and vapor. As a result, as the bag is emptied of product and begins to fold up, the increased volume between the bag and the can will be filled with additional vapor from the volatile hydrocarbon liquid, thus keeping the pressure constant.
  • As the product is used up, the volume inside the can between the bag and the interior walls of the can changes as the bag collapses due to the decreased amount of product therein. As illustrated in FIG. 3, because the bag 314 in can 312 of container 310 is almost empty, the bag 314 has folded up in the can 312 due to the application of pressure from the propellant 322. The bag 314 may include a number of fold regions, for example, fold regions 340, 342. As the bag 314 is filled, these fold regions 340, 342 will unfold and the bag 314 will expand into the interior of the can 312. In one embodiment using a compressed gas, when a can includes a bag that is substantially empty of product, the pressure on the bag may be about 20 psi. When the bag is substantially filled with product and the volume inside the can between the can and the bag is decreased, the pressure on the bag may be in the range of about 90 psi to 120 psi. Other pressures may also be used. Certain embodiments using hydrocarbon propellants may use lower pressures, for example, in a range of about 70 psi to about 90 psi. It should be appreciated that different types of products may require different pressures to be used, depending on factors such as, for example, the viscosity of the product. For example, certain embodiments may utilize a spray pressure of about 35 psi and higher in order to atomize products such as hair sprays. Products such as shampoos may utilize a lower dispensing pressure, for example, about 20 psi and higher.
  • The body through which the product is transmitted from one container to another container may have a variety of configurations in addition to the configuration of the body 30 illustrated in FIGS. 1-3. The body itself may take a variety of shapes including, but not limited to, cylindrical. The aperture extending through the body may also have a variety of shapes and angles. FIGS. 4(A) through 8 illustrate examples of shapes for the aperture extending through a body, in accordance with certain embodiments.
  • FIGS. 4(A) and 4(B) illustrate a body 330, including an aperture 332 extending therethrough. The height of the body 330 may be separated into regions P1, P2, and P3 as illustrated in the side cross-sectional view of FIG. 4(A). Within upper region P1, the aperture 332 has a frusto-conical shape having a larger diameter at the top end 333 of the body 330. Within central region P2, the aperture 332 has a cylindrical shape. Within lower region P3, the aperture 332 has a frusto-conical shape having a larger diameter at the bottom end 331 of the body 330. Thus, the aperture 332 includes a cylindrical shaped central interior region with frusto-conical shaped regions on either side of the central interior region. FIG. 4(B) illustrates a top down view of the body 330. The circles 335, 339 illustrate the diameter of the aperture 332 at the top surface 333 and in the central region P2.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a side cross-sectional view of a body 430, including an aperture 432 extending therethrough. The aperture 432 includes a frusto-conical portion extending from the top end 433 to a central region 438 of the body 430, with a larger diameter at the top end 433. The aperture also includes a frusto-conical portion extending from the bottom end 431 to the central region 438 of the body 430, with a larger diameter at the bottom end 431. Thus, the aperture in this embodiment includes only the two frusto-conical portions, which meet in the central region 438 of the body 430.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a side cross-sectional view of a body 530, including an aperture 532 extending therethrough. The height of the body 530 may be separated into regions P1, P2, and P3. Within upper region P1, the aperture 532 has a cylindrical shape. Within central region P2, the aperture 532 has a cylindrical shape with a smaller diameter than that in region P1. Within lower region P3, the aperture 532 has a cylindrical shape having the same diameter as that in the upper region P1. Thus, the aperture 532 includes a smaller diameter cylindrical shaped central interior region with larger diameter cylindrical shaped regions on either side of the central interior region.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a side cross-sectional view of a body 630, including an aperture 632 extending therethrough. The aperture 632 is cylindrical shaped for its entire length, from the top end 633 to the bottom end 631 of the body 630. In this embodiment, the diameter of the cylindrical shaped aperture 632 does not change within the body 630.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a side cross-sectional view of a body 730, including an aperture 732 extending therethrough. The height of the body 730 may be separated into regions P1, P2, and P3. Within upper region P1, the aperture 732 has a frusto-conical shape having a larger diameter at the top end 733 of the body 730. Within central region P2, the aperture 732 has a cylindrical shape. Within lower region P3, the aperture 732 has a frusto-conical shape having a larger diameter at the bottom end 731 of the body 730. Thus, the aperture 732 includes a cylindrical shaped central interior region with frusto-conical shaped regions on either side of the central region. The frusto-conical shaped portions of the aperture 732 have different diameters at the upper end 733 and lower end 731 of the body 730. This allows cans having a wide range of valve stem sizes to be used.
  • Embodiments may include systems or kits including a body for transferring a product from one bag-on-valve container to another bag-on-valve container, and a bag-on-valve container. Such a system may include, for example, a relatively small container. The user may then separately obtain another container, such as a larger volume container containing the product, and then refill the smaller container when needed. Alternatively, systems or kits may include both a small container and a large container, together with the body for transferring the product between containers. Embodiments may also include the body alone. As noted above, the body may have a variety of configurations, depending on the specific features of the valves and cans used.
  • Embodiments may include one or more of the following advantages. First, embodiments permit a container to be reused instead of being discarded after one use. Second, embodiments provide for improved convenience because a user can, for example, carry a small container with them during the day and then refill it from a large container (which is kept at home) when necessary. Third, once the user has the small container and the body for transferring product, then the user can purchase large containers used for refill. Purchasing large containers is likely to be more economical for the user. Fourth, certain embodiments may utilize a compressed gas that is non-volatile, such as nitrogen or air. The use of such gases in an aerosol container is environmentally safe. In one specific use, a small container including a non-volatile compressed gas may be suitable for use in an airplane, whereas a container including a liquefied hydrocarbon may not be suitable. Other advantages may also be present in various embodiments.
  • The exact form of embodiments may change depending on factors such as the size and type of valve used, and the shape of the valve stem and the bottle. For example, while the apertures in certain embodiments are circular in cross section, other shapes are possible depending on, for example, the shape of the valve stem used. The sizes and angles of the surfaces of the body defining the aperture may also be varied from those illustrated. In addition, while the bodies in the various configurations are illustrated as rectangular in cross section, other shapes are possible. Furthermore, the shape and size of the various components (can, valve, body) may be different from those illustrated. Since there may be many modifications without departing from the scope of the invention, the examples set forth herein are not intended to limit the invention but to illustrate certain aspects of the invention more clearly.
  • It will, of course, be understood that modifications of embodiments of the present invention, in its various aspects, will be apparent to those skilled in the art. The scope of the invention should not be limited by the particular embodiments described above. In addition, the terms “including”, “comprising”, “having” and variations thereof mean “including, but not limited to”, unless expressly specified otherwise. A listing of items does not imply that any or all of the items are mutually exclusive, unless expressly specified otherwise. An ordering of operations does not necessarily mean that the operations must be carried out in the listed order. The terms “a”, “an” and “the” mean “one or more”, unless expressly specified otherwise.

Claims (20)

1. A system comprising:
a first bag-on-valve aerosol container including a first valve comprising a first valve stem; and
a body including an aperture extending therethrough from a first end of the body to a second end of the body, the aperture sized to accept the first valve stem at the first end of the body, the aperture also sized to accept a second valve stem at the second end of the body; the body sized to accept the first valve stem and a second valve stem at the same time.
2. The system of claim 1, further comprising a second bag-on-valve aerosol container including a second valve comprising a second valve stem.
3. The system of claim 2, wherein the first aerosol container and the second aerosol container are different sizes.
4. The system of claim 1, wherein the aperture at the first end of the body includes a first width, and the aperture at the second end of the body includes a second width, and the first width equals the second width.
5. The system of claim 1, wherein the aperture at the first end of the body includes a first width, and the aperture at the second end of the body includes a second width, and the first width is different than the second width.
6. The system of claim 1, wherein the aperture includes a first width at the first end of the body, a second width at the second end of the body, and a third width at a central portion of the body, wherein the third width is smaller than the first width and the second width.
7. The system of claim 1, wherein the aperture includes a larger width at the first end of the body than at a central portion of the body, and wherein the aperture includes a larger width at the second end of the body than at the central portion of the body.
8. The system of claim 1, wherein the aperture includes a frusto-conical shaped portion extending from the first end of the body to an interior region of the body spaced away from the first end, and wherein the aperture includes a frusto-conical shaped portion extending from the second end of the body to an interior region of the body spaced away from the second end.
9. The system of claim 1, wherein the body comprises a cylindrical shape.
10. The system of claim 2, wherein the first aerosol container and the second aerosol container each contain a product therein, the product selected from the group consisting of a shaving gel, a shaving cream, a hair gel, a hair spray, a shampoo, an sun protection product, and a cleansing product.
11. A method for filling a first bag-on-valve aerosol container from a second bag-on-valve aerosol container, comprising:
providing a first container comprising a bag-on-valve aerosol container, the first container including a first valve stem;
providing a second container comprising a bag-on-valve aerosol container, the second container including a second valve stem;
providing a body including an aperture extending therethrough from a first end of the body to a second end of the body;
positioning the body and the first container so that the valve stem of the first container is accepted into the aperture at the first end of the body;
positioning the body and the second container so that the valve stem of the second container is accepted into the aperture at the second end of the body; and
actuating the valve on the first container and actuating the valve on the second container so that a product is transferred from one of the first container and the second container to the other of the first container and the second container through the body.
12. The method of claim 11, wherein the actuating the valve on the first container and actuating the valve on the second container is carried out for a time sufficient so that one of (i) equalizing a pressure between the first container and the second container, and (ii) filling one of the first container and the second container with the product, occurs.
13. A body adapted to fit first and second bag-on-valve aerosol spray containers at the same time, comprising:
a body including an aperture extending therethrough from a first end of the body to a second end of the body,
the aperture sized to accept a first valve stem from a first bag-on-valve aerosol spray container at the first end of the body;
the aperture also sized to accept a second valve stem from a second bag-on-valve aerosol spray container at the second end of the body; and
wherein the body is sized to accept the first valve stem from the first bag-on-valve aerosol spray container and the second valve stem from the second bag-on-valve aerosol container at the same time.
14. The body of claim 13, wherein the aperture at the first end of the body includes a first width, and the aperture at the second end of the body includes a second width, and the first width equals the second width.
15. The body of claim 13, wherein the aperture at the first end of the body includes a first width, and the aperture at the second end of the body includes a second width, and the first width is different than the second width.
16. The body of claim 13, wherein the body comprises a cylindrical shape.
17. The body of claim 13, wherein the aperture includes a first width at the first end of the body, a second width at the second end of the body, and a third width at a central portion of the body, wherein the third width is smaller than the first width and the second width.
18. The body of claim 13, wherein the aperture includes a larger width at the first end of the body than at a central portion of the body, and wherein the aperture includes a larger width at the second end of the body than at the central portion of the body.
19. The body of claim 13, wherein the aperture includes a frusto-conical shaped portion extending from the first end of the body to an interior region of the body spaced away from the first end, and wherein the aperture includes a frusto-conical shaped portion extending from the second end of the body to an interior region of the body spaced away from the second end.
20. The body of claim 19, wherein the aperture further includes a cylindrical shaped portion positioned between the frusto-conical shaped portions
US12/395,559 2009-02-27 2009-02-27 Refillable bag-on-valve system Abandoned US20100218845A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/395,559 US20100218845A1 (en) 2009-02-27 2009-02-27 Refillable bag-on-valve system

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/395,559 US20100218845A1 (en) 2009-02-27 2009-02-27 Refillable bag-on-valve system

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100218845A1 true US20100218845A1 (en) 2010-09-02

Family

ID=42666485

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/395,559 Abandoned US20100218845A1 (en) 2009-02-27 2009-02-27 Refillable bag-on-valve system

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20100218845A1 (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110120572A1 (en) * 2008-07-26 2011-05-26 Ender Ronald J Fluid supply
FR3041330A1 (en) * 2015-09-18 2017-03-24 Marquage Plus Assembly comprising two bonbonnes for forming aerosol of a bi-component product
WO2017078834A1 (en) 2015-11-02 2017-05-11 American Sterilizer Company Non-aspirating transport gel dispenser

Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2823953A (en) * 1954-07-06 1958-02-18 John R Mcgeorge Liquid spraying device
US3291348A (en) * 1962-09-27 1966-12-13 Lab Chibret Method for packaging, mixing and dispensing a plurality of substances
US3343718A (en) * 1965-04-06 1967-09-26 Capitol Packaging Co Method of forming and dispensing aerosol dispensible polymerizable compositions
US3698453A (en) * 1970-09-01 1972-10-17 Oreal Device for storing two liquids separately and dispensing them simultaneously under pressure
US3817297A (en) * 1971-08-20 1974-06-18 H King Reusable aerosol dispenser
US3868978A (en) * 1972-11-22 1975-03-04 Karl Horst Knopf Rechargeable aerosol-type dispensing device for whipped cream
US3992003A (en) * 1975-10-24 1976-11-16 Visceglia Marco P Aerosol container having sealed propellant means
US4202470A (en) * 1977-03-07 1980-05-13 Minoru Fujii Pressurized dispensers for dispensing products utilizing a pressure transfer fluid
US4441632A (en) * 1981-12-03 1984-04-10 Stoody William R Soft shell aerosol dispenser unit
US4988017A (en) * 1981-04-24 1991-01-29 Henkel Kommanditgesellschaft Auf Aktien Dual chamber aerosol container
US5179982A (en) * 1990-03-02 1993-01-19 Martin Berube Apparatus for discharging a fluid and, more particularly, for spraying a liquid
US5203383A (en) * 1991-01-15 1993-04-20 Pentti Turunen System for using aerosols and aerosol packages
US5405051A (en) * 1993-09-30 1995-04-11 Miskell; David L. Two-part aerosol dispenser employing puncturable membranes
US20040156915A1 (en) * 2000-11-24 2004-08-12 Harman Anthony David Generation of therapeutic microfoam
US6848601B2 (en) * 2002-03-14 2005-02-01 Homax Products, Inc. Aerosol systems and methods for mixing and dispensing two-part materials
US7124788B2 (en) * 2003-07-10 2006-10-24 Precision Valve Corporation Means and method for filling bag-on-valve aerosol barrier packs

Patent Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2823953A (en) * 1954-07-06 1958-02-18 John R Mcgeorge Liquid spraying device
US3291348A (en) * 1962-09-27 1966-12-13 Lab Chibret Method for packaging, mixing and dispensing a plurality of substances
US3343718A (en) * 1965-04-06 1967-09-26 Capitol Packaging Co Method of forming and dispensing aerosol dispensible polymerizable compositions
US3698453A (en) * 1970-09-01 1972-10-17 Oreal Device for storing two liquids separately and dispensing them simultaneously under pressure
US3817297A (en) * 1971-08-20 1974-06-18 H King Reusable aerosol dispenser
US3868978A (en) * 1972-11-22 1975-03-04 Karl Horst Knopf Rechargeable aerosol-type dispensing device for whipped cream
US3992003A (en) * 1975-10-24 1976-11-16 Visceglia Marco P Aerosol container having sealed propellant means
US4202470A (en) * 1977-03-07 1980-05-13 Minoru Fujii Pressurized dispensers for dispensing products utilizing a pressure transfer fluid
US4988017A (en) * 1981-04-24 1991-01-29 Henkel Kommanditgesellschaft Auf Aktien Dual chamber aerosol container
US4441632A (en) * 1981-12-03 1984-04-10 Stoody William R Soft shell aerosol dispenser unit
US5179982A (en) * 1990-03-02 1993-01-19 Martin Berube Apparatus for discharging a fluid and, more particularly, for spraying a liquid
US5203383A (en) * 1991-01-15 1993-04-20 Pentti Turunen System for using aerosols and aerosol packages
US5405051A (en) * 1993-09-30 1995-04-11 Miskell; David L. Two-part aerosol dispenser employing puncturable membranes
US20040156915A1 (en) * 2000-11-24 2004-08-12 Harman Anthony David Generation of therapeutic microfoam
US6848601B2 (en) * 2002-03-14 2005-02-01 Homax Products, Inc. Aerosol systems and methods for mixing and dispensing two-part materials
US7124788B2 (en) * 2003-07-10 2006-10-24 Precision Valve Corporation Means and method for filling bag-on-valve aerosol barrier packs

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110120572A1 (en) * 2008-07-26 2011-05-26 Ender Ronald J Fluid supply
US8651130B2 (en) * 2008-07-26 2014-02-18 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Fluid supply
FR3041330A1 (en) * 2015-09-18 2017-03-24 Marquage Plus Assembly comprising two bonbonnes for forming aerosol of a bi-component product
WO2017078834A1 (en) 2015-11-02 2017-05-11 American Sterilizer Company Non-aspirating transport gel dispenser

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US10676272B2 (en) Recyclable plastic aerosol dispenser
US10683159B2 (en) Propellant-free pressurized material dispenser
US10427862B2 (en) Aerosol dispenser assembly having VOC-free propellant and dispensing mechanism therefor
US8881775B2 (en) Refill perfume bottle
KR101221866B1 (en) Pressurized package
US4062475A (en) Pressurized container for two-phase system
EP1966064B1 (en) Improved valve bag
US3198394A (en) Pressurized dispensers
US4175704A (en) Non-aerosol continuous spray dispenser
US5562235A (en) Pressure generator and dispensing apparatus utilizing same
DE60207024T2 (en) Unit for storing and dispensing a pressurized product
JP2507312B2 (en) Valve device for pressure spraying
US6923342B2 (en) Systems for dispensing multi-component products
US5125546A (en) Flow discharge valve
US4067499A (en) Non-aerosol continuous spray dispenser
DE602004009836T2 (en) Pressure control device
EP0709305B1 (en) Dispensing valve and dispenser provided with this valve
AU682974B2 (en) Multi-component dispenser with self-pressurization system
US6708852B2 (en) Non-chemical aerosol dispenser
ES2550339T3 (en) Refillable bottle dispenser of a fluid product
US9950821B2 (en) Components for aerosol dispenser
DE69911451T2 (en) Packing system for mixing and dispensing multi-component products
TW393344B (en) Dispensing gun with valving rod and bellows-type seal
EP0367604B1 (en) Dispensing apparatus for pressurised dispensing containers
EP0320510B1 (en) Device for storing and controlled dispensing of pressurized products and a method for the manufacturing of said device

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION