US20100116856A1 - Modular infant carrier apparatus and method - Google Patents

Modular infant carrier apparatus and method Download PDF

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Publication number
US20100116856A1
US20100116856A1 US12292189 US29218908A US2010116856A1 US 20100116856 A1 US20100116856 A1 US 20100116856A1 US 12292189 US12292189 US 12292189 US 29218908 A US29218908 A US 29218908A US 2010116856 A1 US2010116856 A1 US 2010116856A1
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Prior art keywords
sling
infant
hook
embodiment
portion
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US12292189
Inventor
Louis W. Tompros
Karen Abrecht Tompros
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Tompros Louis W
Karen Abrecht Tompros
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47DFURNITURE SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR CHILDREN
    • A47D13/00Other nursery furniture
    • A47D13/02Baby-carriers; Carry-cots

Abstract

The invention relates to a modular infant carrier apparatus and method. In one embodiment, a sling comprising a tail portion and two arm portions supports an infant when rings at the ends of the tail portion and arm portions are brought together at a single point above the infant. The rings are held together by a clamp, and the clamp allows the sling to be attached to space-saving receivers including a wall-mounted hook, a ceiling-mounted hook, a door-mounted hook, a hook attached to a heavy item of furniture, a stand-mounted hook, an over-door hook, or an item of clothing worn by an adult. In one embodiment, the sling can be moved from one receiver to another using a single hand, without removing the infant from the sling. Other embodiments are described and shown.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    Not Applicable
  • STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • [0002]
    Not Applicable
  • THE NAMES OF THE PARTIES TO A JOINT RESEARCH AGREEMENT
  • [0003]
    Not Applicable
  • INCORPORATION-BY-REFERENCE OF MATERIAL SUBMITTED ON A COMPACT DISC
  • [0004]
    Not Applicable
  • SEQUENCE LISTING
  • [0005]
    Not Applicable
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0006]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0007]
    This invention relates to a carrier for an infant. More particularly, this invention relates to an infant carrier that includes a sling that can be moved from one location to another, without removing the infant from the sling.
  • [0008]
    2. Description of Related Art
  • [0009]
    Slings for carrying infants are well known. Slings are advantageous because they are lightweight and usually inexpensive to manufacture. Almost all prior slings are designed exclusively to attach an infant to an adult. It is well known that it is often soothing for an infant to be carried close to the body of an adult. See generally William Sears, M. D. & Martha Sears, R. N., The Baby Book (1993). It is therefore advantageous to encourage an adult to use a sling to carry an infant whenever possible. However, it is not possible to carry an infant in a sling at all times. For example, it is impractical or unsafe to perform some common household tasks while carrying an infant in a sling—including lifting heavy objects, cooking on a stove, or using knives, scissors, or other sharp tools.
  • [0010]
    Prior art slings typically hold the infant in position by partially surrounding the infant in fabric that is either worn by or wrapped completely around an adult. In some prior art slings, an adult first puts the sling on, then inserts the infant into the sling. For example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,469,259 (issued to Krich et al.) and 6,325,259 (issued to Tharalson et al.) disclose such slings. One disadvantage of such slings is that the infant cannot be detached from the adult without removing the infant from the sling. Removing the infant from the sling usually requires the adult to use two hands and results in the infant being jostled, potentially causing discomfort to the infant. A second disadvantage of such slings is that the sling cannot support the infant unless an adult is wearing the sling. If the adult wants to detach the infant, it must remove the infant from the sling and place the infant in some separate receptacle-often a crib, cradle, seat, or other device for securing the infant. The inability of the adult to easily attach and detach the infant undesirably discourages the adult from using the sling.
  • [0011]
    In other prior art slings, the infant may be placed in the sling before the adult puts the sling on, and the sling may be removed while the infant is still in the sling. For example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,757,925 (issued to Knittel) discloses such a sling. Slings in which the infant can be detached from the adult without removing the infant from the sling are advantageous, because the adult can attach or remove the infant with less disturbance to the infant. However, even prior art slings that can be attached to or detached from an adult without removing the infant have the disadvantage that two hands are required to attach or remove the infant. Likewise, such slings have the disadvantage that they cannot support the infant unless an adult is wearing the sling. Once again, a separate receptacle is required to support the infant when it is detached from the adult.
  • [0012]
    Other non-sling infant carriers that are capable of securing an infant in multiple different receivers are also known in the art. For example, there are numerous prior art infant car-seat carriers that can be moved back and forth between a car-seat base in a vehicle and a stroller base, without removing the infant from the car-seat carrier. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,750,783 (issued to Irby et al.) discloses such a car-seat carrier. However, a disadvantage of these car-seat carriers is that they are heavier than slings. A second disadvantage of such car-seat carriers is that, the carriers themselves must be large enough to surround an infant, and the receivers into which they are attached are also large. The receivers for such car-seat carriers take up a significant amount of space even when they are not in use. It is impractical to have multiple receivers for an infant car seat carrier in a small living space, such as a city apartment. A third disadvantage of car-seat carriers it that, although an adult may be able to carry a car-seat carrier that is holding an infant, car-seat carriers cannot be attached to the adult, so at least one of the adults hands must be occupied holding the carrier. A fourth disadvantage of car-seat carriers is that they do not hold the infant close to the body of an adult, so that the infant must be removed from the car-seat carrier if the infant is to be carried close to the body of an adult.
  • [0013]
    The prior art also includes some slings that can be removed from an adult and attached to a stationary object. Each such prior art sling has significant disadvantages. U.S. Pat. No. 6,065,655 (issued to Parewick) discloses a sling-type combination child carrying and seat harness. The Parewick apparatus functions as a seat harness by removing the infant from the sling, attaching the sling to a chair or grocery cart seat, and then replacing the child in the sling. There are several disadvantages to the Parewick apparatus. First, to convert the apparatus from a sling to a harness, the infant must be removed from the sling. This results in jostling of the infant, requires two hands, and discourages use. Second, the Parewick apparatus can only be used to secure the infant to a chair, grocery cart seat, or other similar receptacle. It is not practical to have a large number of such receptacles in a small living space. Third, the infant must be able to sit up to be able to use the Parewick apparatus as a seat harness; it cannot be used by an infant lying down.
  • [0014]
    Another prior art sling that can be removed from an adult and attached to a stationary object is the Babykeeper 3-in-1 Hip Carrier, described in detail at www.mommysentials.com. The Babykeeper 3-in-1 is a sling that can be removed from the adult and hung over the door of public restroom or attached to a shopping cart as a safety harness. The Babykeeper 3-in-1 has several disadvantages. First, the Babykeeper 3-in-1 only allows the infant to be placed either in a grocery cart or attached to a door, such as a bathroom stall door, over which two large hooks can be hooked. It cannot be attached to a wall, ceiling, item of furniture, or stand. Second, an adult wearing the Babykeeper 3-in-1 requires a series of complicated steps to detach it from the adult and attach it to a door. The adult must use two hands to remove the Babykeeper 3-in-1 completely to detach the infant. Third, when the Babykeeper 3-in-1 is attached to a door, the infant's head must be in an upright position, so it cannot be used for an infant that is not yet capable of supporting its own head. Fourth, the hooking mechanism of the Babykeeper 3-in-1 is bulky and must be worn by the adult when the Babykeeper 3-in-1 is used as a sling.
  • [0015]
    There is a need for an infant carrier that can be easily attached to and detached from an adult, preferably using a single hand, and that allows the infant to be moved easily to and among different space-saving receivers.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0016]
    The invention is set forth in the claims, to which reference should now be made. In one aspect, the invention provides a sling and two or more receivers. The sling comprises a tail portion that can be positioned between the legs of an infant, and two arm portions that can be positioned above the shoulders of the infant. At the end of the tail and arm portions are rings. When an infant is placed in the sling, the rings at the ends of the tail portion and arm portions of the sling can be brought together, so that the sling supports the infant when the rings are held together at a single point. A clamp is also provided to hold the rings together and to connect the sling to one of the receivers. The receivers can be a wall-mounted hook, a ceiling-mounted hook, a door-mounted hook, a hook attached to a heavy item of furniture, a stand-mounted hook, an over-door hook, of an item of clothing worn by an adult.
  • [0017]
    In another aspect, the invention provides a method for carrying and supporting an infant, in which the infant is placed into a sling. The infant is placed into the sling such that the sling's tail portion is positioned between the legs of the infant and the sling's arm portions are positioned above the shoulders of the infant. The tail and arm portions are connected at a single point above the infant, in a position such that the sling is capable of supporting the infant. The sling is attached to a first receiver, removed from the first receiver, and attached to a second receiver.
  • [0018]
    There are many advantages to the infant carrier and method disclosed. One advantage of aspects of the invention is that an infant in the sling may be moved from one receiver to another without removing the infant from the sling. This advantage allows the infant to be easily attached to and detached from an adult and attached to and detached from other receivers without unnecessarily jostling the infant or waking the infant if it is asleep. Another advantage of aspects of the invention is that the infant in the sling can be moved from one receiver to another easily, using a single hand. Another advantage of aspects of the invention is that the sling is lightweight, so that the sling and infant can be carried together without much more effort than is required to carry the infant alone. Yet another advantage of aspects of the invention is that the infant in the sling can be supported by receivers that take up very little space when not in use. Another advantage of aspects of the invention is that when the sling is attached to a receiver, the sling and receiver take up only a small amount of total space. In some aspects, the sling and receiver are supported without touching the ground and therefore take up no floor space whatsoever. Another advantage of aspects of the invention is that the infant is free to swing gently and soothingly when the sling is attached to certain receivers. Another advantage of aspects of the invention is that the sling provides a swaddling effect to sooth the infant. Yet another advantage of aspects of the invention is that a sling can support an infant in any of the disclosed receivers even if the infant cannot support its own head. Other advantages will be apparent from the detailed description of the invention and from the drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0019]
    FIG. 1 illustrates one embodiment of the sling of the invention in an open position.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 2 illustrates one embodiment of the sling of the invention in an open position, in a top view.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 3 illustrates one embodiment of the sling and clamp of the invention in a closed position.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 4 illustrates one embodiment of the sling and clamp of the invention, showing the position of an infant, in a perspective view.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 5 illustrates one embodiment of the sling and clamp of the invention, showing the position of an infant, in a top view
  • [0024]
    FIG. 6 illustrates one embodiment of the sling, clamp, and wall-mounted hook of the invention
  • [0025]
    FIG. 7 illustrates one embodiment of the sling, clamp, and stand-mounted hook of the invention
  • [0026]
    FIG. 8 illustrates one embodiment of the sling, clamp, and over-door hook of the invention, with the door in closed position
  • [0027]
    FIG. 9 illustrates one embodiment of the over-door hook of the invention, with the door in open position
  • [0028]
    FIG. 10 illustrates one embodiment of the over-door hook of the invention
  • [0029]
    FIG. 11 illustrates one embodiment of the sling, clamp, and item of clothing of the invention
  • [0030]
    FIG. 12 illustrates a detail view of the front portion of one embodiment of the item of clothing of the invention
  • [0031]
    FIG. 13 illustrates one embodiment of the item of clothing of the invention, in a rear perspective view
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0032]
    The invention is illustrated by the following detailed description of a number of embodiments and aspects of the invention.
  • [0033]
    Referring first to FIG. 1, one embodiment of sling 101 of the invention is depicted. In the preferred embodiment, sling 101 is a single piece of fabric. In other embodiments, sling 101 may be separate pieces of fabric sewn, glued, clipped, or otherwise attached to one another. The fabric may be any fabric capable of supporting the weight of an infant without tearing. In the preferred embodiment, the sling is made of a single piece of woven cotton. Woven cotton is advantageous because it is strong, lightweight, washable, and not prone to stretching. In other embodiments, the sling is made of any type of cotton, jersey, flannel, wool, synthetic fabric, any blend of fabrics, or combinations of any of these fabrics.
  • [0034]
    Sling 101 includes a tail portion 102 and two arm portions 103A and 103B. In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 1, arm portions 103A-B are positioned at a 180-degree angle to each other, and tail portion 102 is positioned at a 90-degree angle to each of arm portions 103A-B. In another embodiment not depicted in FIG. 1, the arm portions are positioned at a 90-degree angle to each other, and the tail portion is positioned at a 135-degree angle to each of the arm portions. In other embodiments not depicted in FIG. 1, the arm portions are positioned relative to each other at any angle less than 180 degrees but greater than 0 degrees, and the tail portion is positioned so that the angle between the tail portion and one arm portion is approximately equal to the angle between the tail portion and the other arm portion.
  • [0035]
    Rings 105A-C are attached to the end of each of arm portions 103A-B and tail portion 102. Rings 105A-C may be made of any metal, plastic, or other material capable of supporting the weight of an infant without breaking. In the preferred embodiment, rings 105A-C are circular, equally sized, and made of stainless steel. In other embodiments, the rings are D-shaped or triangular. In the preferred embodiment, each of rings 105A-C is the same size. In other embodiments, the rings may be of any convenient size or shape. Rings 105A-C may be attached to arm portions 103A-B and tail portion 102 in any of a number of ways, including by a thread, fabric, adhesive, glue, or by positioning the ring in holes in the fabric of arm portions 103A-B and tail portion 102. In the preferred embodiment, flap 106 extends from each of arm portions 103A-B and tail portion 102 through each ring 105A-C, and is sewn back onto arm portion 103A or 103B or tail portion 102 to secure ring 105A-C.
  • [0036]
    When sling 101 is in use, an infant is placed on top of the sling, in a position such that tail portion 102 is between the legs of the infant, and arm portions 103A-B are above the shoulders of the infant. Tail portion 102 and arm portions 103A-B should be of such relative size and position that the sling is capable of supporting an infant when rings 105A-C are held together at a single point above the infant. In particular, arm portions 103A-B must be sufficiently long relative to tail portion 102 such that the infant's head is held above its body and legs. If arm portions 103A-B are too short relative to tail portion 102, the infant will be held with its head below its body, which could undesirably result in the infant slipping out of the sling.
  • [0037]
    Referring to FIG. 2, a top view of sling 101 of one embodiment of the invention is depicted. To ensure that tail portion 102 and arm portions 103A-B are of such relative size and position that the sling is capable of supporting an infant when the rings 105A-C are held together at a single point above the infant, arm portions 103A and 103B are of roughly the same length. Arm lengths 201A and 201B are the lengths between the point at which the arm portions 103A and 103B, respectively, connect and the farthest point of rings 105A-B attached to the end of each arm portion 103A-B. Sling height 202 is the length between the point at which the arm portions 103A-B connect and the farthest point of ring 105C attached to the end of the tail portion 102. In one embodiment, arm lengths 201A and 201B are equal, and sling height 202 is equal to twice arm length 201A, plus or minus 25%. In the preferred embodiment, arm lengths 201A and 201B are equal and sling height 202 is equal to twice arm length 201A.
  • [0038]
    The absolute size of sling 101 roughly corresponds to the size of the infant that the sling is capable of holding. In one embodiment, sling height 202 is equal to the height of the infant to be carried, plus or minus 25%. In another embodiment, sling height 202 is equal to the height of the infant to be carried. In the preferred embodiment, an infant of height 60 centimeters is carried, each arm length 201A and 201B is 30 centimeters, and sling height 202 is 60 centimeters.
  • [0039]
    Referring to FIG. 3, sling 101 is depicted in a closed position. In FIG. 3 and the figures that follow, sharp angles are shown to depict the features of the sling in various positions. In practice, the fabric of sling 101 will be flexible and conform to the shape of an infant placed in the sling. Sling 101 can be placed in a closed position by bringing rings 105A-C together at a single point. Clamp 301 connects the rings 105A-C together. Clamp 301 can be any ring that can be opened and is capable of holding the rings together and supporting the weight of the infant without breaking. Preferably, the clamp is one of any of well known types of clamps that can be both held and opened using a single hand. In the preferred embodiment, clamp 301 is a carabiner.
  • [0040]
    Referring once again to FIG. 1, in one embodiment, strap 107 is present. Strap 107 is a piece of webbing, cotton, or plastic that is attached at its midpoint to the midpoint of sling 101, at the point where the infant's waist rests in the sling. Loop 108 is also attached to sling 101, below strap 107. Referring to FIG. 4, when an infant is placed in the sling, one or both ends of strap 107 can be passed through loop 108, and attached to the other end of strap 107. In one embodiment, the ends of strap 107 can be attached to each other by snaps. In the preferred embodiment, the ends of strap 107 can be attached to each other using Velcro.
  • [0041]
    Referring once again to FIG. 1, in one embodiment, head cushion 109 is present. Referring to FIG. 5, head cushion 109 is positioned to partially surround the head of the infant in the sling 101, when the sling is in a closed position. Head cushion 109 provides support to the infant's head to prevent injury to the infant's neck when sling 101 is being moved. Head cushion 109 may be made of any fabric that can be used for sling 101. In one embodiment, the head cushion is a flat piece of fabric of the same type as the sling. In another embodiment, the head cushion is made of fabric stuffed with a padding material such as cotton or foam. In the preferred embodiment, head cushion 109 is a piece of woven cotton stuffed with cotton stuffing.
  • [0042]
    Referring once again to FIG. 4, the position of an infant in one embodiment is depicted. The infant is positioned such that tail portion 102 of the sling 101 is between the legs of the infant. The infant is also positioned such that arm portions 103A-B of sling 101 are positioned above the shoulders of the infant. When sling 101 is in the closed position, rings 105A-C are held together at a single point above the infant. Clamp 301 holds the rings together.
  • [0043]
    Clamp 301 can connect to sling 101 to any of a number of receivers. Embodiments of receivers are depicted in FIGS. 7-13.
  • [0044]
    Referring to FIG. 6, an embodiment of a wall-mounted hook receiver is depicted. In this embodiment, hook 601 is affixed to wall 602. Hook 601 may be affixed to the wall using any of a number of well-known methods, including screws, nails, mounting brackets, or adhesive. Hook 601 may be made of any material capable of supporting the weight of an infant without breaking. Hook 601 must be small enough to fit inside clamp 301, but large enough such that clamp 301 cannot slip off of hook 601. In the preferred embodiment, hook 601 is metal and is mounted by screws to a stud in wall 602. Sling 101 is attached to hook 601 by hanging clamp 301 onto hook 601. In an additional embodiment, a hook is affixed to a door, in the same way in which hook 601 is affixed to wall 602, thereby forming a door-mounted hook receiver. In another embodiment, a hook is affixed to a heavy item of furniture such as a cabinet, armoire, or bookcase, in the same way in which hook 601 is affixed to wall 602, thereby forming a furniture-mounted hook receiver. In yet another embodiment, a hook is affixed to a ceiling, in the same way in which hook 601 is affixed to wall 602, but such that the hook hangs down from the ceiling and can support clamp 301, thereby forming a ceiling-mounted hook receiver.
  • [0045]
    Referring to FIG. 7, an embodiment of a stand-mounted hook receiver is depicted. In this embodiment, hook 701 is affixed to the top of stand 702. In one embodiment, stand 702 has collapsible legs 703A-C. Hook 701 may be of any type and size described in connection with hook 601. Hook 701 is affixed to stand 702 either by fitting onto or into the top of the stand, or by any of a number of well-known methods, including screws, nails, mounting brackets, or adhesive. In the preferred embodiment, hook 701 and stand 702 are a single piece of material. Sling 101 is attached to hook 701 by hanging clamp 301 onto hook 701.
  • [0046]
    Referring to FIG. 8, an embodiment of an over-door hook receiver is depicted. In this embodiment, over-door hook 801 rests on top of door 802. Sling 101 is attached to over-door hook 801 by hanging clamp 301 onto over-door hook 801. FIG. 9 depicts an embodiment of over-door hook 801 resting on door 802 when door 802 is open, without the sling attached. FIG. 10 is a close-up view of the preferred structure of over-door hook 801.
  • [0047]
    FIGS. 11, 12, and 13 depict one embodiment of a receiver in the form of an item of clothing. Referring to FIG. 11, in this embodiment, item of clothing 1101 is made up of front portion 1102 and four straps 1103A-D. Referring to FIG. 12, straps 1103A-D of this embodiment of the item of clothing extend from front portion 1102 in an X shape. Referring to FIG. 13, straps 1103A-D connect to back portion 1301 in an I shape to form the back of the item of clothing. Referring again to FIG. 12, ring 1104 is attached to front portion 1102. Ring 1104 may be made of any metal, plastic, or other material capable of supporting the weight of an infant without breaking. In the preferred embodiment, ring 1104 is circular and made of stainless steel. Ring 1104 may be attached to front portion 1102 in any of a number of ways, including by a thread, fabric, adhesive, glue, or by positioning the ring in a hole in the fabric of the front portion 1102. In the preferred embodiment, flap 1201 extends from the front portion 1102 through ring 1104, and is sewn back onto front portion 1102 to secure ring 1104.
  • [0048]
    In other embodiments not depicted in the drawings, the item of clothing may be any shirt, sweater, coat, vest, shoulder strap, belt, or other clothing item, to which is attached a ring capable receiving clamp 301.
  • [0049]
    In another embodiment, the invention discloses a method for carrying and supporting an infant. In this embodiment, the infant is placed on top of a sling, in a position such that tail portion 102 is between the legs of the infant, and arm portions 103A-B are above the shoulders of the infant. Rings 105A-C at the ends of tail portion 102 and arm portions 103A-B are connected at a single point above the infant. In one embodiment, this connection is made using a clamp 301. Sling 101 is attached to a first receiver, removed from that first receiver, and attached to a second receiver. In various embodiments, the first and second receivers are any permutation of: a wall-mounted hook; a ceiling-mounted hook; a door-mounted hook; a furniture-mounted hook; a stand-mounted hook; an over-door hook; and/or an item of clothing worn by an adult. In the preferred embodiment, the sling is attached to a first receiver, removed from the first receiver, and attached to a second receiver all using a single hand.
  • [0050]
    The invention has been described in connection with a number of specific embodiments. However, numerous modifications, which are contemplated as falling within the scope of the invention, should now be apparent to those skilled in the art. Therefore, it is intended that the scope of the invention be limited only by the scope of the claims and their equivalents.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. An infant carrier comprising:
    a sling for carrying an infant, said sling comprising:
    a tail portion capable of being positioned between the legs of an infant;
    two arm portions capable of being positioned above the shoulders of the infant;
    rings attached to the end of the tail portion and each arm portion; and
    said tail portion and said arm portions being of such relative size and position that the sling is capable of supporting an infant when said rings are held together at a single point above the infant;
    a clamp for holding said rings together at a single point and for attaching the sling to a receiver; and
    a plurality of receivers selected from the group consisting of:
    a wall-mounted hook;
    a ceiling-mounted hook;
    a door-mounted hook;
    a furniture-mounted hook;
    a stand-mounted hook;
    an over-door hook; and
    an item of clothing worn by an adult.
  2. 2. The carrier of claim 1, wherein the sling is made of a single piece of fabric.
  3. 3. The carrier of claim 2, wherein the fabric is woven cotton.
  4. 4. The carrier of claim 1, wherein the arm portions of the sling are of substantially the same length.
  5. 5. The carrier of claim 4, wherein the sling height is equal to twice the arm length, plus or minus 25%.
  6. 6. The carrier of claim 4, wherein the sling height is equal to twice the arm length.
  7. 7. The carrier of claim 1, wherein the sling further comprises a strap capable of securing the infant to the sling at the infant's waist.
  8. 8. The carrier of claim 1, wherein the sling further comprises a head cushion.
  9. 9. The carrier of claim 1, wherein the clamp is a carabiner.
  10. 10. The carrier of claim 1, wherein at least one of the at least two receivers is an item of clothing worn by an adult.
  11. 11. The carrier of claim 10, wherein the item of clothing worn by an adult comprises:
    a front portion to which a ring is attached;
    straps extending from the front portion in an X shape;
    a back portion; and
    said straps connecting to the back portion in an I shape.
  12. 12. The carrier of claim 1, wherein at least one of the at least two receivers is a stand-mounted hook.
  13. 13. The carrier of claim 13, wherein the legs of the stand-mounted hook are collapsible.
  14. 14. The carrier of claim 1, wherein the at least two receivers are at least three receivers.
  15. 15. A method for carrying and supporting an infant comprising the steps of:
    placing the infant in a sling comprising a tail portion and two arm portions such that the tail portion is positioned between the legs of the infant and the arm portions are positioned above the shoulders of the infant;
    connecting the tail portion to the two arm portions at a single point above the infant, in a position such that the sling is capable of supporting the infant;
    attaching the sling to a first receiver;
    removing the sling from the first receiver; and
    attaching the sling to a second receiver.
  16. 16. The method of claim 15, wherein the first and second receivers are selected from the group consisting of:
    a wall-mounted hook;
    a ceiling-mounted hook;
    a door-mounted hook;
    a furniture-mounted hook;
    a stand-mounted hook;
    an over-door hook;
    an item of clothing worn by an adult.
  17. 17. The method of claim 15, wherein the first receiver is an item of clothing worn by an adult.
  18. 18. The method of claim 15, wherein the steps of attaching the sling to a first receiver, removing the sling from the first receiver, and attaching the sling to a second receiver are performed with a single hand.
  19. 19. The method of claim 16, wherein the steps of attaching the sling to a first receiver, removing the sling from the first receiver, and attaching the sling to a second receiver are performed with a single hand.
  20. 20. The method of claim 17, wherein the steps of attaching the sling to a first receiver, removing the sling from the first receiver, and attaching the sling to a second receiver are performed with a single hand.
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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100257653A1 (en) * 2007-09-06 2010-10-14 Pitts Robert W Infant wrap including body padding
US20140137324A1 (en) * 2012-10-22 2014-05-22 Uwm Research Foundation, Inc. Infant sleep pod

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US20140137324A1 (en) * 2012-10-22 2014-05-22 Uwm Research Foundation, Inc. Infant sleep pod
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