US20100019451A1 - Game apparatus and method - Google Patents

Game apparatus and method Download PDF

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US20100019451A1
US20100019451A1 US12/575,075 US57507509A US2010019451A1 US 20100019451 A1 US20100019451 A1 US 20100019451A1 US 57507509 A US57507509 A US 57507509A US 2010019451 A1 US2010019451 A1 US 2010019451A1
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plurality
theme
indicator
game
emission
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US12/575,075
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Karen A. Kucharski
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Kucharski Karen A
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Priority to US12/322,166 priority patent/US20090189348A1/en
Application filed by Kucharski Karen A filed Critical Kucharski Karen A
Priority to US12/575,075 priority patent/US20100019451A1/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/06Patience; Other games for self-amusement
    • A63F9/10Two-dimensional jig-saw puzzles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/06Patience; Other games for self-amusement
    • A63F9/12Three-dimensional jig-saw puzzles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F2250/00Miscellaneous game characteristics
    • A63F2250/10Miscellaneous game characteristics with measuring devices
    • A63F2250/1063Timers
    • A63F2250/1068Sandglasses
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/04Dice; Dice-boxes; Mechanical dice-throwing devices
    • A63F9/0415Details of dice, e.g. non-cuboid dice

Abstract

A game apparatus and method using a plurality of game pieces in various shapes which can be combined to express a theme, and a plurality of theme indicators which are used to identify a theme to be expressed using the game pieces. A player chooses a theme indication using a theme indicator, then combines a plurality of the game pieces into a design illustrating the theme. The game may include a timing indicator, so the player must complete the design within a determined period, a turn indicator for choosing a manner of play, and a game piece indicator for indicating the number of game pieces used during play. A player may be required to accompany a design with an emission, such as rhythm, improvisation, movement, language, sound, light and title, optionally indicated by an emission indicator or using an emission container. A scoring indicator may be provided for keeping score.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation-in-part filed under 35 USC §120 of pending application Ser. No. 12/322,166, entitled “GAME APPARATUS AND METHOD”, filed Jan. 28, 2009, which claimed one or more inventions which were disclosed in provisional patent application for Festival Method, Apparatus, and Game: Ser. No. 61/062,806, filed Jan. 29, 2008. The benefit under 35 USC §19(e) of the U.S. provisional application is hereby claimed, and the aforementioned applications are hereby incorporated herein by reference.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to a design game and, more specifically, to a game involving creative investigation of shapes and themes.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • There are games available for building shapes into a complete whole but these are limited in their scope. Traditional puzzles provide shapes that fit together in only one combination of parts and rely on an interfitting system for play. Some variations include pieces fitting into recessed areas and pieces that emphasize three dimensions, while relying on similar methods of combination and connection. Tangrams limit playing pieces to simple geometric shapes and a specific number of pieces.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 4,298,200, issued to Maurice S. Kanbar, discloses a tangram game assembly citing the need for a game of creative adaptation, however the game is limited to geometric shapes and a certain number of playing pieces.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,027,117, issued to Melvin L. Goldberg, discloses a geometric and cryptographic puzzle citing the need for a hands-on puzzle combined with mental interaction, yet limited to predetermined shapes and sequences.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,067,714, issued to Leslie Rasberry, discloses a variable arrangement floral design jigsaw puzzle citing the need for a plurality of arrangements. However, the puzzle is limited to a system of inner and outer pieces.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,086,478, issued to Klitsner and Welch, discloses a hand-held voice game that cites the need for play with sound and interaction. However, the game operates without the benefit of game pieces and theme indicia. Therefore, a new approach is needed to offer more creative arrangements of shapes.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In accordance with the present invention, there is provided a game apparatus and method for creative investigation and fun. The invention provides a plurality of game pieces in various shapes and a plurality of theme indications on at least one theme indicator. A player chooses a theme indication on a theme indicator, then combines a plurality of the game pieces into a design which illustrates the theme indicated by the theme indication. The game may include a timing indicator, so that the player must complete the design within a determined period, a turn indicator for choosing a manner of play, and a game piece indicator for indicating the number of game pieces to be used during play.
  • A player may be required to accompany a design with an emission, such as rhythm, improvisation, movement, language, sound, light and title, optionally indicated by an emission indicator, which may be emitted through an emission container. A scoring indicator may be provided for keeping score. A playing board may be used to provide a surface onto which the game pieces are placed to make the design.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a game apparatus of the invention.
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of two game indicators.
  • FIGS. 3 a and 3 b show theme indicators.
  • FIG. 4 is a top view of a turn indicator.
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of an emission indicator and emission container.
  • FIG. 6 is a top view of a scoring indicator.
  • FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a game apparatus of the invention, with the game pieces arranged in a design on a playing board.
  • FIG. 8 a-8 c illustrate an embodiment of the invention in the form of a computer game.
  • FIG. 9 shows a flowchart of a method of play of the invention
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • In operation, the invention offers a game apparatus and method for creating design combinations through creative investigation of visual design, and can offer other sensory participation opportunities. The invention is based on the concept of improvisation as something that is created in the moment rather than being pre-planned. The improvisational nature of jazz music, shapes, and colors are inspiration for the game.
  • The Game Apparatus
  • FIG. 1 shows a simple embodiment of the game. For purposes of clarity and brevity, like elements and components will bear the same designations and numberings (or similar numbers with appropriate prefixes) throughout the figures. The apparatus will first be described, with only enough detail on the method of play to give meaning to the parts of the apparatus. The method of play will be described in detail in a separate section below.
  • The game comprises a plurality of game pieces 15 having a plurality of shapes. In a preferred embodiment, the game can comprise a single group of mixed size, shape and/or color game pieces from which all players can draw. Alternatively, a number of sets of game pieces 15 could be provided, one for each player. The sets can be differentiated by color, and each set might have a different mix of shapes.
  • The game pieces 15 are in a variety of shapes, such as free-form or irregular shapes 5, 43, 45 or 47; geometric shapes such as triangles 1, squares 9, rectangles 10, circles 11, ovals 12, or spirals 13; representational shapes such as stars 19; natural shapes such as sun 6; letters such as “R” 3; numbers such as “4” 4; or symbols such as heart 7. A container 17 (such as a box, tray or bag) serves to hold the game pieces 15 when they are not in play. The game pieces 15 can be made in a range of sizes, colors and/or textures. Preferably, at least one free-form shape 5 is included.
  • A player combines a number of the game pieces 15 on a playing field to create a design illustrating a theme. The themes are indicated by a plurality of theme indications. The theme indications are provided on at least one theme indicator. The game might have a plurality of indicators, such as a deck of cards each bearing a theme indication such that a player pulls a card from a deck to determine the theme to be illustrated.
  • FIGS. 3 a and 3 b show examples of various card sets or decks or sheet 333 which might be used as theme indications. Each set 333 has a number of cards, six of which are shown as examples in each of the figures, although it will be understood that the deck could comprise any number of cards. It will also be understood that the sheet 333 could be structured as a single theme indicator, printed upon a large sheet of paper or a card or a book, having a plurality of theme indications, and the player would determine the theme by selecting one theme indication from the plurality of theme indications, for example by rolling a dice or spinning an arrow to determine a number or letter of the theme indication to be used, or chosen at random.
  • In FIG. 3 a, card 321 has the theme indication “Writing”. In FIG. 3 b, card 322 has the theme indication “Building”. Each of these theme indications is accompanied by a number of suggestions or ideas 327 and 328, to help the player in making up the design.
  • In still another embodiment, the theme could be indicated by a theme indication selected electronically, as on the digital embodiment of FIGS. 8 a-8 c, described below.
  • Theme indications can include a topic, subject, category, and sub-set, and examples can include, but are not limited to, nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, sentences, phrases, pictures or symbols expressing concepts which may be literal, figurative, symbolic, or mythological. Any number, category, and variation of themes can be offered. Themes can be offered together, separately, or combined with other information.
  • FIG. 7 shows a more elaborate version of the game set, comprising a plurality of game pieces 745, which can be stored in a container such as box or tray 717. A physical playing board 719 is provided on which designs can be made by combining the game pieces 745. The playing board 719 and game pieces 745 could be manufactured so that the game pieces 745 adhere temporarily to the playing board 719. This could be accomplished by providing the game pieces 745 and the playing board 719 with mating halves of hook-and-loop fastener material such as Velcro®, or other similar systems as are commonly used in felt board applications. Similarly, magnetic material could be applied to the game pieces, so as to be attracted to a board of magnetic metal.
  • Players can build on their ideas quickly with relatively little time to review and “fix” their designs. A timing indicator such as hourglass 728, or a stopwatch or any other timer known to the art, can time each turn. Each player can have a theme indicator sheet 733, each sheet having a number of theme indications which can be chosen by rolling a dice 735 or other selector. An emission container 743 may be provided, as will be explained in greater detail below.
  • Score may be kept on a scoring indicator such as score sheet 641. FIG. 6 shows an example of a score sheet 641 which might be used. The sheet has indications 627 of numbers of points to be awarded for various conditions (using all the game pieces, finishing first, etc), and a scoring grid 622 having columns 623 for each player and rows 624 to account for score in each round. A list 630 of emission ideas can be provided on the score sheet 641 for reminding players of emission options/inspiring players on ways to share their emissions with others. Score could also be kept by other methods commonly used in the game field, such as moving markers along a scale, putting markers in a container, etc.
  • FIG. 4 is a top view of a turn indicator 428, which can be used to control a player's chance to play and to help determine a manner of play. Players take turns activating a turn indicator 428, and the lead player is the one who has the current move. A “round” refers to all players getting a chance to play. The preferable manner of play includes every player (or team, if the game is being played by teams) having a turn in a round to choose theme and approach, based on use of a turn indicator 428, and for each player to use all of his or her game pieces 15 per turn.
  • In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the turn indicator 428 is shown as a spinner, mounted upon a card. A mark 427 can relate manner of play information, shown here as “Same”, “Different”, “Story”, “Lead Choice” and “Switch”. In alternate embodiments, the turn indicator 428 can be of any convenient form, such as a deck of cards bearing indications, a polygonal multiple-choice device such as a die, a digital or audio indicator, or other multiple-choice indicators known to the art.
  • FIG. 2 shows several possible forms of game indicators, for example a numeric indicator such as cubic die 251 bearing numbers 227 on each face, or a fourteen-sided die 231 (a cubic die with the corners cut off), also with numbers 221. A spinner, deck of cards, or other indicator known to the art could also be used. The game indicators can be used to determine how many game pieces 15 each player will use in a turn to form the design. The game indicators could also be used to select one theme indication from a plurality of theme indications on a theme indicator, and for other purposes.
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of an emission indicator 539 and emission container 543.
  • An “emission” is something, preferably intangible, that is put forth with an action and object, such as a rhythm, improvisation, movement, language, sound, light, and title. An emission can represent an aspect of a design. Emissions can be pre-stored, prepared, selected, altered, improvised, studied, rehearsed, or chosen from an existing source.
  • An emission indicator 539 can be used by a player to choose one of a plurality of emissions to be associated with a design. In FIG. 5, this is shown as a fourteen-sided die 539 bearing indications 529 such as “title”, “sound”, “improv” and so on. The indications could be code marks rather than the words shown in the figure, and could be provided as a deck of cards bearing indicia, a digital or audio indicator, or other indicators known to the art.
  • For a simple level of play, an emission indicator 539 can offer emission indications regarding a basic act, such as clapping hands, stomping feet, rolling fingers on a surface to make a noise, or offering a favorite word for a design. For variations or more advanced levels, emission can get more complex, and can include a plurality of suggestions.
  • An emission container 543 is used by a player to emit an emission, by, for example, transmitting, recording, translating, storing, and interpreting an emission. Preferably, for standard and more advanced levels, each player can record his or her choice of emission on an emission container 543 for later use. In such a case, the emission container 543 could be a digital recorder which could record an emission on pressing a button 527, and then, on a second button press, play it back through a speaker or screen 521. A card reader slot 528 could be provided to allow the emission container 543 to play back a selection of a sound, video or music clip provided on an appropriate recorded medium.
  • Digital Embodiment of the Apparatus
  • FIGS. 8 a-8 c show how the apparatus of the invention could be implemented in digital form, as would appear on the screen 80 of a computer. The figures show an implementation as computer software on a programmed general-purpose computer, but it will be understood that the invention could also be implemented on a hand-held game device, personal digital assistant (PDA), portable phone, or other similar digital device.
  • Referring first to FIG. 8 a, which shows the game at the beginning of play, a playing board for placing game pieces is provided as screen area 81. A variable content area 83 provides a space to display information such as theme indications, turn indications and game instructions, and a blank area 82 provides room for game pieces, as will be explained below. A scoring indicator 84 and time indicator 85 are provided on the screen 80, as well as “buttons” to start a turn 86 and indicate a turn is done 87. As is common in graphical user interfaces, a cursor 88 allows a player to “click” on a desired screen area. As shown in FIG. 8 a, as the game begins, the player is instructed to click on the variable content area 83 to start the game—the cursor 88 is shown in position to do so.
  • FIG. 8 b shows the screen 80 after the player has clicked as indicated. The function of the variable content area 83 is now as a theme indicator. A theme indication has been chosen and displayed in area 83, indicating that the theme which the player must display is “Animals”. Various ideas or suggestions for this theme are also provided in area 83—several animal names (cat, dog, rabbit), as well as concepts connected with the theme (“in the jungle”, “on the farm”, “whiskers”).
  • The game piece storage area 82 is populated with a plurality of simulated game pieces. The number of pieces can be randomly assigned, or predetermined, or selected in an earlier step (not shown) by having a player activate a random choice element or select a number from a list. The game pieces can be geometric shapes such as squares or rectangles 89, 90, triangle 91, circles or ovals 92, 100, or straight or curved lines 94. The pieces can also be symbolic or representational, as in burst 93, sun 96, star 99 or heart 97, or free form such as shapes 95 and 98. If desired, a feature could be offered which would allow a player to draw one or more simulated game piece.
  • As play begins, the time indicator 85 is set to a chosen turn time, here shown as two minutes. The player moves the cursor 88 and clicks the “go” button 86 to start playing. The player can then “drag and drop” the various simulated game pieces from the storage area 82 onto the playing area 81 to form the design. The “drag and drop” procedure is well known to the art of graphical user interfaces and need not be explained here.
  • In FIG. 8 c, the player has completed a turn and indicated the turn is over by moving the cursor 88 to the “done” button 88 and clicking. The time indicator 85 shows that thirty-six seconds are left from the allotted time, and only one game piece, star 99, is left unplayed. All of the other game pieces have been dragged onto simulated playing board 81, and arranged into the design of a rabbit, eating from a box of food under the sun 96.
  • Based on predetermined scoring rules, which may, for example, factor in the elapsed time remaining and the number of remaining pieces, the game has given the player a score, shown in scoring indicator 84.
  • The next turn can be initiated by appropriate “clicks”, such as moving the cursor back to “go” 86 or to the theme in variable area 83, or by other methods well known to the art. The game could provide for more than one player, such as by calling for a new player at the end of a turn, with tracking scores for more than one player, and so on, in any form known to the art.
  • It will be understood that the screens shown in FIGS. 8 a-8 c are only provided as examples, and more or fewer screen areas or variations on the screen layout or content are possible within the teachings of the invention.
  • Method of Play
  • In the following description, the step numbers refer to the flowchart of FIG. 9. References to elements of the game apparatus refer to FIGS. 1-7, as appropriate. It will be understood that if the game is being played by teams of players instead of individual players, the term “player” used in the description below would refer to a team, as appropriate.
  • 120—Prepare for Play
  • In preparation for the game, players are each provided with a plurality of game pieces 15. Each player receives an equal number of game pieces 15, preferably at least five per player. The exact number of pieces 15 can be determined by agreement between the players, or by use of a game indicator such as dice 231 or 251.
  • Variations can occur for alternate play. Some players may prefer using more game pieces to create more elaborate designs. Some players, such as younger ages, may want to select more or different game pieces 15 to create their designs without regard to how many were used and what game pieces 15 were first chosen. Game pieces 15 can be exchanged between players, and from the container 17.
  • If a playing board 719 is provided, the board is laid out in a convenient location in a playing area. It is preferable for each player to have a playing area to be able to play simultaneously, although players can share a playing area if desired. The theme indicators 733, turn indictor 428, timing indicator 728, emission indicators 539, emission container 543, and other game parts are removed from the box 717 and placed as needed. Game pieces 15 are positioned on playing area in any suitably acceptable manner as deemed by user.
  • 121—Determine Play Order
  • Play can begin in any manner determined, such as with youngest player or name beginning closest to “Z” first, and can proceed clockwise, age-wise, or in any suitable fashion determined by the players.
  • 122—A Player Begins a Turn 123—Choose a Manner of Play
  • Optionally, the player can use a turn indicator to choose one of a plurality of manners of play for the turn. The manners of play, as shown in the embodiment of the turn indicator 428 shown in FIG. 4, could include “Same Theme” (All players use same theme chosen by a first or lead player, with each player choosing an idea within the theme), “Different Theme” (a different theme for each player, with each player choosing a theme indicator and idea), “Switch” (Players switch by choosing a theme indicator and idea for another player), “Lead Choice” (lead player chooses theme and idea for each of the players), or “Story” (each player's design follows a sequence that relate to each other based on a theme chosen by the first player in the turn). A story, poem, and related literary manner of play suggest designs follow a related line of thought. An example of a story is an all-terrain vehicle designed by one player, its driver designed by another player, and the driver's pet designed by a third player. Improvisation can be included, such as by having a “guessing” round or choosing what to add based on theme of another player.
  • 124—Choose a Theme—A Theme is Chosen by use of a Theme Indicator to Select a Theme Indication from a Plurality of Theme Indications.
  • If the optional turn indicator was used, this step might be modified by the manner of play chosen by the turn indicator. For example, the player might choose a new theme indication, or use the theme indication chosen by the preceeding player in the turn, or to follow the story started by the theme chosen by the first player, etc.
  • 125—Start a Timing Indicator—the Player is Optionally Given a Time Within Which the Design Must be Completed.
  • This can be done by starting a stopwatch, turning over an hourglass 728, etc. One to three minutes would be an appropriate time for completing a design, although other times could be used within the teachings of the invention for more complex designs, more or fewer pieces, teamwork, etc.
  • 126—Combine the Game Pieces to Form a Design Illustrating the Theme
  • The player takes the game pieces 15 and combines them into a design by placing the game pieces 15 in the playing area or on the playing board 719, as appropriate.
  • If the optional timing indicator is used, the player must stop when the time runs out. Preferably, the player must use all of the game pieces 15 in making the design.
  • 127—If all Players have not yet Made Designs, Play Passes to the Next Player
  • The description above is for an embodiment of the method in which each player makes a design, one at a time, and each player is given a separate time within which to complete their design. The same method could be used in an embodiment where all players create their designs at the same time, and all stop on the first to occur of a player completing his or her design, or the end of the time period.
  • Alternatively, the game could be played such that all of the players start their designs at the same time (step 126), and the timing indicator is started (step 125) when the first player finishes the design. Each of the other players continues to work on their designs, and must finish within the additional time provided by the timing indicator. Thirty to ninety seconds would be an appropriate time for the timing indicator in this case.
  • 128—Choose an Emission
  • Optionally, once the design is formed by combination of the game pieces 15, the player can use an emission indicator 539 to choose an emission to associate with the design. The emission is performed when the design is presented in step 129.
  • If the simultaneous alternative was chosen, as players finish and wait for everyone to complete their designs, players can plan titles and other emissions. Alternatively, this step could be done by all players after all designs are completed.
  • 129—Share the Designs and Emissions.
  • The players share their designs (and emissions, if the method is being played with emissions). The order of presentation can be determined by the players or by rule. For example, the first player in the turn, or the player who finished first can share his or her design first, and sharing can continue until all players have shared. Sharing can be done individually and in groups.
  • If emissions are used in the game, the emissions can be presented at the time that each player shares their design. The emission might consist of a rhythm, an improvisation, a movement, language, a sound, a light or a title. Emissions can be presented using an emission container 543.
  • Emission can be a sound created by a player and repeated, such as a rumbling sound, as in what a vehicle might make. Sounds can be turned into a musical score (song or instrumental), movements into dance, and words into poems, stories and songs. Light can accompany such activity. Instruments and equipment can be used to create the emission.
  • Emission can be generated, created, and activated by any player, and can be shared at any time, at random, signaled, and planned moment. Players can take turns sharing emissions individually, collectively in groups, to a rhythm or melody, as instructed, or inspired. Players can take turns conducting, choreographing, leading, and performing emissions.
  • Emissions can be created by, or recorded, with a device and repeated. Such manner of play can be chosen at beginning of game or indicated during play, such as indicated on a card, spinner, or polygonal form. For advanced and extreme levels, emission can involve more complex use of the arts. Disabilities are considered, and emissions can have any sensory-related form most suitable for participation.
  • Emissions can be guessed, chosen, or selected at random in whole or part, such as a collection of music stored and emitted, to surprise players with a sound to accompany their designs. An improvisation can be shared without a specified leader. Players can guess design themes/ideas and choose emissions for other players. Emissions can be the same for all players, such as naming a title and/or sound for each design, and players can offer emissions for another player.
  • Examples of performing emissions can include each player sharing his or her design with the group, then stating the title and his/her sound or movement associated with the design. At the end of each play, for instance, the player who finished first in constructing his/her design can act as leader in conducting the players to share their sounds and/or movements in a group performance. This can be done by the leader pointing to other players, and to him or herself, to share emissions. The rhythm of the performance can match the manner in which the leader points to the other players, signaling individuals or groups when to share their emissions, and changing the pace of their emissions through the speed and repetition of pointing. A more complex performance, such as a big band finale, can include a compilation of sounds or other emissions from the game, and can be performed at the end of the game. Players can offer improvisations with other sounds and actions arising out of initial emissions. Players can take turns performing, leading and improvising.
  • 130—Keep Score with a Scoring Indicator
  • Points can be awarded on any aspect of the game and in any suitably coordinated approach. Scoring and bonus points can be based on a number of factors, such as:
      • number of game pieces used, or number of game pieces remaining unused
      • which player finishes first
      • number or form of emissions accompanying the design.
      • which player finishes first the most number of times
      • which player is first to conduct or choreograph a performance at the end of a turn, round or game,
      • especially creative designs or emissions such as a “big band finale,” poetry, song, story, dance, or collaborative mix.
  • Scoring can use any suitable tallying system. An example: each player gets five points for finishing design in time, ten points if all game pieces are used, an extra five points for the player who finishes first, and ten points for including an emission. Alternately, markers can be given for scoring different activities, such as one for each activity achieved, and the player with the most markers at the end of the game can be the big winner.
  • 131—Move on to Next Turn
  • Accordingly, it is to be understood that the embodiments of the invention herein described are merely illustrative of the application of the principles of the invention. Reference herein to details of the illustrated embodiments is not intended to limit the scope of the claims, which themselves recite those features regarded as essential to the invention.

Claims (28)

1. A game apparatus comprising:
a) a plurality of game pieces having a plurality of shapes; and
b) a plurality of theme indications identifying themes, the theme indications being indicated on at least one theme indicator;
such that upon selection of a theme indication through use of a theme indicator, a player combines the plurality of game pieces into a design illustrating the theme identified by the theme indication.
2. The game apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a timing indicator for measuring a period of time, such that a player is given a period of time to combine the game pieces into a design.
3. The game apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a turn indicator having a plurality of indications for choosing one of a plurality of manners of play, such that upon actuating the turn indicator, a player is provided with one of the manners of play.
4. The game apparatus of claim 3, in which the plurality of manners of play are selected from the group consisting of same theme, different theme, switch, lead choice, guess, improvisation and story.
5. The game apparatus of claim 1, further comprising an emission indicator having a plurality of indications for choosing one of a plurality of emissions, such that upon actuating the emission indicator, a player is provided with an emission to associate with the design.
6. The game apparatus of claim 5, further comprising an emission container for emitting an emission chosen by the emission indicator.
7. The game apparatus of claim 5, in which the plurality of emissions are selected from the group consisting of rhythm, improvisation, movement, language, sound, light and title.
8. The game apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a scoring indicator.
9. The game apparatus of claim 1, in which the plurality of shapes of the game pieces are selected from the group consisting of free-form shapes, geometric shapes, representational shapes, irregular shapes, natural shapes, letters, numbers and symbols.
10. The game apparatus of claim 1, in which the plurality of shapes are formed in a plurality of colors.
11. The game apparatus of claim 1, in which the plurality of shapes are formed in a plurality of sizes.
12. The game apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a playing board upon which the plurality of shapes may be combined into a design.
13. The game apparatus of claim 12, in which the plurality of shapes adhere to the playing board.
14. The game apparatus of claim 13, in which the plurality of shapes are magnetically attracted to the playing board.
15. The game apparatus of claim 13, in which the plurality of shapes adhere to the playing board through hook-and-loop fastener material.
16. The game apparatus of claim 1, further comprising at least one game indicator.
17. The game apparatus of claim 16, in which the game indicator comprises a numeric selector for indicating a number of game pieces to be combined into the design.
18. The game apparatus of claim 8, in which the game apparatus is implemented in digital form on the screen of a computer.
19. A method of playing a game using a plurality of game pieces having a plurality of shapes, and a plurality of theme indications identifying themes, the theme indications being indicated on at least one theme indicator, comprising the steps of:
using a theme indicator to select a theme indication from the plurality of theme indications; and
combining the plurality of game pieces into a design illustrating the theme indicated by the selected theme indication.
20. The method of claim 19, further comprising the step of starting a timing indicator upon selection of the theme indicator, measuring a time within which the design must be completed.
21. The method of claim 19, further comprising the step of using a turn indicator having a plurality of indications for choosing one of a plurality of manners of play to select one of a plurality of manners of play.
22. The method of claim 21, in which the plurality of manners of play are selected from the group consisting of same theme, different theme, switch, lead choice, guess, improvisation and story.
23. The method of claim 19, further comprising the step of using an emission indicator having a plurality of indications for choosing one of a plurality of emissions to select an emission to associate with the design, and then performing the emission.
24. The method of claim 23, in which the emission is performed on an emission container.
25. The method of claim 23, in which the plurality of emissions are selected from the group consisting of rhythm, improvisation, movement, language, sound, light and title.
26. The method of claim 19 further comprising keeping score with a scoring indicator after the design has been completed.
27. The method of claim 19 further comprising using a game indicator to indicate a number of game pieces which are to be combined in the combining step.
28. The method of claim 19, in which the game pieces and at least one theme indicator are implemented in digital form on the screen of a computer.
US12/575,075 2008-01-29 2009-10-07 Game apparatus and method Abandoned US20100019451A1 (en)

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