US20090212012A1 - Critical dimension control during template formation - Google Patents

Critical dimension control during template formation Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20090212012A1
US20090212012A1 US12392685 US39268509A US2009212012A1 US 20090212012 A1 US20090212012 A1 US 20090212012A1 US 12392685 US12392685 US 12392685 US 39268509 A US39268509 A US 39268509A US 2009212012 A1 US2009212012 A1 US 2009212012A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
substrate
critical dimension
features
method
polymerizable material
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12392685
Inventor
Cynthia B. Brooks
Dwayne L. LaBrake
Niyaz Khusnatdinov
Michael N. Miller
Sidlgata V. Sreenivasan
David James Lentz
Frank Y. Xu
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Canon Nanotechnologies Inc
Original Assignee
Canon Nanotechnologies Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G03PHOTOGRAPHY; CINEMATOGRAPHY; ELECTROGRAPHY; HOLOGRAPHY
    • G03FPHOTOMECHANICAL PRODUCTION OF TEXTURED OR PATTERNED SURFACES, e.g. FOR PRINTING, FOR PROCESSING OF SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; MATERIALS THEREFOR; ORIGINALS THEREFOR; APPARATUS SPECIALLY ADAPTED THEREFOR
    • G03F7/00Photomechanical, e.g. photolithographic, production of textured or patterned surfaces, e.g. printing surfaces; Materials therefor, e.g. comprising photoresists; Apparatus specially adapted therefor
    • G03F7/0002Lithographic processes using patterning methods other than those involving the exposure to radiation, e.g. by stamping
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B82NANOTECHNOLOGY
    • B82YSPECIFIC USES OR APPLICATIONS OF NANOSTRUCTURES; MEASUREMENT OR ANALYSIS OF NANOSTRUCTURES; MANUFACTURE OR TREATMENT OF NANOSTRUCTURES
    • B82Y10/00Nanotechnology for information processing, storage or transmission, e.g. quantum computing or single electron logic
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B82NANOTECHNOLOGY
    • B82YSPECIFIC USES OR APPLICATIONS OF NANOSTRUCTURES; MEASUREMENT OR ANALYSIS OF NANOSTRUCTURES; MANUFACTURE OR TREATMENT OF NANOSTRUCTURES
    • B82Y40/00Manufacture or treatment of nanostructures

Abstract

Thickness of a residual layer may be altered to control critical dimension of features in a patterned layer provided by an imprint lithography process. The thickness of the residual layer may be directly proportional or inversely proportional to the critical dimension of features. Dispensing techniques and material selection may also provide control of the critical dimension of features in the patterned layer.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. § 119(e)(1) of U.S. Provisional No. 61/031,759, filed on Feb. 27, 2008 and U.S. Provisional No. 61/108,914, filed on Oct. 28, 2008, both of which are hereby incorporated by reference herein.
  • BACKGROUND INFORMATION
  • Nano-fabrication includes the fabrication of very small structures that have features on the order of 100 nanometers or smaller. One application in which nano-fabrication has had a sizeable impact is in the processing of integrated circuits. The semiconductor processing industry continues to strive for larger production yields while increasing the circuits per unit area formed on a substrate, therefore nano-fabrication becomes increasingly important. Nano-fabrication provides greater process control while allowing continued reduction of the minimum feature dimensions of the structures formed. Other areas of development in which nano-fabrication has been employed include biotechnology, optical technology, mechanical systems, and the like.
  • An exemplary nano-fabrication technique in use today is commonly referred to as imprint lithography. Exemplary imprint lithography processes are described in detail in numerous publications, such as U.S. Patent Publication No. 2004/0065976, U.S. Patent Publication No. 2004/0065252, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,936,194, all of which are hereby incorporated by reference herein.
  • An imprint lithography technique disclosed in each of the aforementioned U.S. patent publications and patent includes formation of a relief pattern in a formable (polymerizable) layer and transferring a pattern corresponding to the relief pattern into an underlying substrate. The substrate may be coupled to a motion stage to obtain a desired positioning to facilitate the patterning process. The patterning process uses a template spaced apart from the substrate and a formable liquid applied between the template and the substrate. The formable liquid is solidified to form a rigid layer that has a pattern conforming to a shape of the surface of the template that contacts the formable liquid. After solidification, the template is separated from the rigid layer such that the template and the substrate are spaced apart. The substrate and the solidified layer are then subjected to additional processes to transfer a relief image into the substrate that corresponds to the pattern in the solidified layer.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • So that the present invention may be understood in more detail, a description of embodiments of the invention is provided with reference to the embodiments illustrated in the appended drawings. It is to be noted, however, that the appended drawings illustrate only typical embodiments of the invention, and are therefore not to be considered limiting of the scope.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a simplified side view of a lithographic system in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a simplified side view of the substrate shown in FIG. 1 having a patterned layer positioned thereon.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a flow chart for supplying replications of a template.
  • FIGS. 4A and 4B illustrate an exemplary field on a substrate during formation of a sub-master template.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a graphical representation of exemplary variations of average critical dimension across a substrate at a pre-etch stage and at a post post-etch stage.
  • FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate a top down view and simplified side views of exemplary variations in critical dimension between on edges and the center of a substrate.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a graphical representation of exemplary variations of average critical dimension in relation to residual layer thickness wherein average critical dimension is inversely proportional and directly proportional to residual layer thickness.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a graphical representation of exemplary variation of critical dimension after a descum etching process.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a graphical representation of exemplary variation of critical dimension after a polymerizing etching process.
  • FIG. 10 illustrates a flow chart of a method for controlling the magnitude of critical dimension of features using an etching process.
  • FIGS. 11A and 11B illustrate simplified side views of substrates having residual layers with different magnitudes of thickness.
  • FIG. 12 illustrates a flow chart of a method for controlling critical dimension of features using a dispensing technique.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Referring to the figures, and particularly to FIG. 1, illustrated therein is a lithographic system 10 used to form a relief pattern on substrate 12. Substrate 12 may be coupled to substrate chuck 14. As illustrated, substrate chuck 14 is a vacuum chuck. Substrate chuck 14, however, may be any chuck including, but not limited to, vacuum, pin-type, groove-type, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and/or the like. Exemplary chucks are described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,873,087, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein.
  • Substrate 12 and substrate chuck 14 may be further supported by stage 16. Stage 16 may provide motion along the x, y, and z axes. Stage 16, substrate 12, and substrate chuck 14 may also be positioned on a base (not shown).
  • Spaced-apart from substrate 12 is template 18. Template 18 may include mesa 20 extending therefrom towards substrate 12, mesa 20 having a patterning surface 22 thereon. Further, mesa 20 may be referred to as mold 20. Alternatively, template 18 may be formed without mesa 20.
  • Template 18 and/or mold 20 may be formed from such materials including, but not limited to, fused-silica, quartz, silicon, organic polymers, siloxane polymers, borosilicate glass, fluorocarbon polymers, metal, hardened sapphire, and/or the like. As illustrated, patterning surface 22 comprises features defined by a plurality of spaced-apart recesses 24 and/or protrusions 26, though embodiments of the present invention are not limited to such configurations. Patterning surface 22 may define any original pattern that forms the basis of a pattern to be formed on substrate 12.
  • Template 18 may be coupled to chuck 28. Chuck 28 may be configured as, but not limited to, vacuum, pin-type, groove-type, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and/or other similar chuck types. Exemplary chucks are further described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,873,087, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein. Further, chuck 28 may be coupled to imprint head 30 such that chuck 28 and/or imprint head 30 may be configured to facilitate movement of template 18.
  • System 10 may further comprise fluid dispense system 32. Fluid dispense system 32 may be used to deposit polymerizable material 34 on substrate 12. Polymerizable material 34 may be positioned upon substrate 12 using techniques such as drop dispense, spin-coating, dip coating, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), physical vapor deposition (PVD), thin film deposition, thick film deposition, and/or the like. For example, polymerizable material 34 may be positioned upon substrate 12 using techniques such as those described in U.S. Patent Publication No. 2005/0270312 and U.S. Patent Publication No. 2005/0106321, both of which are hereby incorporated by reference herein. Polymerizable material 34 may be disposed upon substrate 12 before and/or after a desired volume is defined between mold 20 and substrate 12 depending on design considerations. Polymerizable material 34 may comprise a monomer mixture as described in U.S. Pat. No. 7,157,036 and U.S. Patent Publication No. 2005/0187339, both of which are hereby incorporated by reference herein.
  • Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, system 10 may further comprise energy source 38 coupled to direct energy 40 along path 42. Imprint head 30 and stage 16 may be configured to position template 18 and substrate 12 in superimposition with path 42. System 10 may be regulated by processor 54 in communication with stage 16, imprint head 30, fluid dispense system 32, and/or source 38, and may operate on a computer readable program stored in memory 56.
  • Either imprint head 30, stage 16, or both vary a distance between mold 20 and substrate 12 to define a desired volume therebetween that is filled by polymerizable material 34. For example, imprint head 30 may apply a force to template 18 such that mold 20 contacts polymerizable material 34. After the desired volume is filled with polymerizable material 34, source 38 produces energy 40, e.g., ultraviolet radiation, causing polymerizable material 34 to solidify and/or cross-link conforming to a shape of surface 44 of substrate 12 and patterning surface 22, defining patterned layer 46 on substrate 12. Patterned layer 46 may comprise a residual layer 48 and a plurality of features shown as protrusions 50 and recessions 52, with protrusions 50 having a thickness t1 and residual layer having a thickness t2.
  • The above-mentioned system and process may be further employed in imprint lithography processes and systems referred to in U.S. Pat. No. 6,932,934, U.S. Patent Publication No. 2004/0124566, U.S. Patent Publication No. 2004/0188381, and U.S. Patent Publication No. 2004/0211754, all of which are hereby incorporated by reference herein.
  • As template 18 may be expensive to manufacture, replications of a template 18 may aid in reducing manufacturing costs. FIG. 3 illustrates a flow diagram for supplying such replications. Generally, template 18, hereinafter referred to as master template 18, may be replicated to form a plurality of sub-master templates 60. These sub-master templates 60 may then form working templates 62 and/or patterned wafers for device fabrication. Additionally, master template 18 may form working templates 62 and/or patterned wafers for device fabrication. The device wafers may be patterned as a whole substrate or in a step and repeat manner described in further detail in S. V. Sreenivasan, “Nano-Scale Manufacturing Enabled by Imprint Lithography,” MRS Bulletin, Special Issue on Nanostructured Materials in Information Storage, Vol. 33, September 2008, pp. 854-863, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein. For simplicity in description, the systems and methods described herein below refer to formation of sub-master template 60. However, one skilled in the art will appreciate that the techniques described herein may be used in formation of working template 62, master template 18, patterned wafers and/or generally formation of a structure on substrate 12 using imprint lithography. It should be noted that although patterned wafers are illustrated in FIG. 3, the systems and methods described herein may be applied to other imprint lithography processes (e.g., whole wafer imprinting, CMOS imprinting, and the like).
  • Referring to FIGS. 4A and 4B, using the step and repeat process, sub-master template 60 may be formed by patterning multiple fields 80 a-801 across substrate 12. A portion of field 801 is illustrated in FIG. 4B. Features 50 a and/or 52 a formed on substrate 12 may have a critical dimension 70. For example, critical dimension 70 may be a width of feature 50 a.
  • During formation of sub-master template 60, patterned layer 46 a may have non-uniform critical dimension 70 across substrate 12 resulting from e-beam patterning, etching of master template 18, replicate etching, and/or the like. For example, as etching rates may vary at the edges of substrate 12 and/or transition points between materials, patterned layer 46 a may have non-uniform critical dimension 70 resulting from relative loading of materials (e.g., resist, chrome, and/or the like). In this situation, a uniform thickness t1 of residual layer 48 a may exacerbate this non-uniformity.
  • Additionally, any non-uniformity of features 24 and/or 26 in master template 18 (shown in FIG. 3) may result in non-uniform critical dimensions 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a during formation of sub-master template 62. FIG. 5 is a graphical representation of exemplary variations of average critical dimension 70 across substrate 12 a at a pre-etch stage and at a post post-etch stage. At the pre-etch stage, the average critical dimension 70 across a pattern may vary based on non-uniformity of master template 18 by which it may be formed. Additionally, at the post-etch stage, variation of the average critical dimension 70 may be further exacerbated.
  • Critical dimension 70 may also be varied across patterned layer 48 a due to processing and/or other similar conditions. For example, as illustrated in FIGS. 6A and 6B, critical dimension 70 at the inner edge 90 and the outer edge 92 of a pattern may be different than critical dimension 70 at the center 94 of the pattern.
  • As illustrated in FIGS. 4B and 7, the magnitude of critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a may be determined as a function of thickness t3 of residual layer 48 a. As such, thickness t3 of residual layer 48 a may be altered to control critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a. Thickness t3 of residual layer 48 a may be directly proportional or inversely proportional to critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a. For example, thickness t3 of residual layer 48 a may be altered to be directly proportional and as such provide substantially uniform critical dimension 70 across substrate 12, shown by Process A in FIG. 7. Alternatively, thickness t3 of residual layer 48 a may be altered to be inversely proportional and as such provide variations in magnitude of critical dimension 70 across substrate 12, shown as Processes B and C in FIG. 7.
  • Etching Processes
  • Referring to FIGS. 4B, 8 and 9, an etching process may be used to alter thickness t3 of residual layer 48 a to provide control of critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a. For example, a descum etching process (e.g., O2/Ar composition) may be used to alter thickness t3 of residual layer 48 a. FIG. 8 illustrates a graphical representation of exemplary variation of critical dimension 70 after a descum etching process. As shown, an approximate 3 nm variation in thickness t3 may provide an approximate 1 nm variation of critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a. Alternatively, a polymerizing etch process (e.g., CF4/CHF3/Ar composition) may be used to alter thickness t3 of residual layer 48 a. Additionally, the timing of the etch process may be used to control the variation in thickness t3. For example, a longer etching time may be used to further reduce the critical dimension 70.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a graphical representation of exemplary variation of critical dimension 70 after a polymerizing etch process. As shown, an approximate 1 nm variation among critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a may be expected from approximately 4.5 nm of thickness t1.
  • FIG. 10 illustrates a flow chart of a method 100 for controlling the magnitude of critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a using an etching process. In a step 102, mold 20 and substrate 12 may be positioned to define a desired volume therebetween capable of being filled by polymerizable material 34. In a step 104, desired volume may be filled with polymerizable material 34. In a step 106, source 38 may produce energy 40, e.g., ultraviolet radiation, causing polymerizable material 34 to solidify and/or cross-link conforming to a shape of surface 44 of substrate 12 and patterning surface 22, defining patterned layer 46 on substrate 12. Patterned layer 46 may comprise residual layer 48 a and a plurality of features shown as protrusions 50 a and recessions 52 a, with residual layer having thickness t3. In a step 108, thickness t3 of residual layer 48 a may be determined and a desired critical dimension may be determined. In a step 110, a first etching composition may be applied to patterned layer 46 based on thickness t3 of residual layer 48 a alter the critical dimension of features 70 to the desired critical dimension. The first etching composition may thus be provided to control magnitude of critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a. It should be noted that the desired critical dimension and the critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a may be similar. In a step 112, a second etching composition may be applied to patterned layer 46 to etch features 50 a and/or 52 a into substrate 12.
  • Dispense Techniques
  • Thickness t3 of residual layer 48 a may also be altered by adjusting dispensing of polymerizable material 34 on substrate 12. For example, FIG. 11A illustrates substrate 12 a having residual layer 48 b with thickness t4 and FIG. 11B illustrates substrate 12 b having residual layer 48 c with thickness t5. The additional thickness t4 of residual layer 48 b formed in FIG. 11A, as compared to FIG. 11B, may provide etching that is relatively more protective of the sidewall. This may result in less variation in critical dimension 70 than the thinner residual layer 48 c in FIG. 10B.
  • Referring to FIGS. 1 and 4B, dispensing techniques may be used to control critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a. For example, dispensing techniques may be used to provide residual layer 48 a with thickness t3. Thickness t3 of residual layer 48 a may be selected by the dispensing and positioning of polymerizable material 34 on substrate 12. The magnitude of critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a may be a function of the thickness t3 of residual layer 48 a. As such, dispensing and positioning of polymerizable material 34 on substrate 12 may control critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a. Exemplary dispensing techniques may include, but are not limited to, techniques further described in U.S. Ser. No. 11/143,092, U.S. Ser. No. 10/868,683, U.S. Ser. No. 10/858,566, U.S. Ser. No. 10/714,088, U.S. Ser. No. 11/142,808, U.S. Ser. No. 10/191,749, and the like.
  • FIG. 12 illustrates a flow chart of a method 120 for controlling critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a using a dispensing technique. In a step 122, mold 20 and substrate 12 may be positioned to define a desired volume therebetween capable of being filled by polymerizable material 34. In a step 124, a dispense pattern of polymerizable material 34 for filling the desired volume may be determined. In a step 126, the dispense pattern may be adjusted to provide varying thickness t2 of residual layer 48 a. For example, the dispense pattern may be adjusted for dispensing a greater amount of polymerizable material 34 at the edges of field 80. In a step 128, polymerizable material 34 may be dispensed based on the dispense pattern. In a step 130, source 38 may produce energy 40, e.g., ultraviolet radiation, causing polymerizable material 34 to solidify and/or cross-link conforming to a shape of surface 44 of substrate 12 and patterning surface 22, defining patterned layer 46 on substrate 12. Patterned layer 46 may comprise residual layer 48 a and a plurality of features shown as protrusions 50 a and recessions 52 a, with protrusions 50 a having thickness t1 and residual layer having thickness t3. In a step 132, thickness t2 of residual layer 48 a may be determined. In a step 134, a first etching composition may be applied to patterned layer 46 based on thickness t3 of residual layer 48 a to control magnitude of critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a. In a step 136, a second etching composition may be applied to patterned layer 46 to etch features 50 a and/or 52 a into substrate 12.
  • Erosion Rate
  • Differing polymerizable material 34 may have different erosion rates under the same etching process. As such, polymerizable material 34 with slower erosion rates may retain substantially uniform critical dimension 70 during an etching process than polymerizable material 34 having a faster erosion rate. By including different types of polymerizable material 34 having different erosion rates, critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a may be varied and/or controlled. For example, regions having a faster etch rate in an etch chamber may be imprinted using a slower-eroding polymerizable material 34. The slower-eroding polymerizable material 34 may minimize variations in critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a. In a similar fashion, regions that etch slower in an etch chamber may be imprinted using a faster-eroding polymerizable material 34. By varying the type of polymerizable material 34 dispensed on substrate 12, critical dimension 70 of features 50 a and/or 52 a may be controlled and/or be substantially uniform.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A method comprising:
    positioning an imprint lithography mold in superimposition with a substrate to define a volume;
    dispensing polymerizable material within the volume;
    solidifying the polymerizable material to form a patterned layer having a residual layer and a plurality of features, the features having a critical dimension;
    determining a magnitude of thickness of the residual layer and a desired critical dimension for the features;
    applying a first etching composition to the patterned layer based on the magnitude of the thickness of the residual layer to alter the critical dimension of the features to the desired critical dimension; and,
    applying a second etching composition to the patterned layer to transfer the features into the substrate.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1, wherein the first etching composition is a descum etching composition.
  3. 3. The method of claim 1, wherein the first etching composition is a polymerizing etching composition.
  4. 4. The method of claim 1, where in the first etching composition and the second etching composition are the same.
  5. 5. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
    determining a dispense pattern for dispensing polymerizable material within the volume; and,
    adjusting the dispense pattern to vary the thickness of the resulting residual layer.
  6. 6. The method of claim 5, wherein the thickness of the residual layer is greater at the edges of the substrate than at the center of the substrate.
  7. 7. The method of claim 5, wherein the thickness of the residual layer is greater at the center of the substrate than at least one edge of the substrate.
  8. 8. The method of claim 1, wherein applying a second etching composition to the patterned layer to transfer the features into the substrate forms a sub-master template.
  9. 9. The method of claim 1, wherein the imprint mold is included in a sub-master template and applying a second etching composition to the patterned layer to transfer the features into the substrate forms a working template.
  10. 10. The method of claim 1, wherein the imprint mold is included in a master template and applying a second etching composition to the patterned layer to transfer the features into the substrate form a working template.
  11. 11. The method of claim 1, wherein the polymerizable material comprises a first polymerizable material and a second polymerizable material, the first polymerizable material having a first erosion rate that is greater than the second polymerizable material.
  12. 12. The method of claim 1, wherein the residual layer thickness is proportional to the desired critical dimension.
  13. 13. The method of claim 12, wherein the residual layer thickness is inversely proportional to the desired critical dimension.
  14. 14. The method of claim 12, wherein the residual layer thickness is directly proportional to the desired critical dimension.
  15. 15. A method comprising:
    positioning an imprint lithography mold and a substrate in superimposition to define a volume therebetween;
    dispensing a first polymerizable material on the substrate;
    dispensing a second polymerizable material on the substrate, the first polymerizable material having a first erosion rate that is greater than the second polymerizable material;
    solidifying the first polymerizable material and the second polymerizable material to form a patterned layer having a residual layer and a plurality of features, wherein a critical dimension of features is substantially uniform.
  16. 16. The method of claim 15, further comprising:
    determining a dispense pattern for dispensing polymerizable material within the volume; and,
    adjusting the dispense pattern to vary the thickness of the resulting residual layer to be proportional to the critical dimension of features.
  17. 17. A method comprising,
    positioning an imprint lithography mold in superimposition with a substrate to define a volume;
    dispensing polymerizable material within the volume;
    solidifying the polymerizable material to form a patterned layer having a residual layer and a plurality of features, the features having a critical dimension;
    determining a magnitude of thickness of the residual layer; and,
    applying a first etching composition to the patterned layer based on the magnitude of the thickness of the residual layer such that the residual layer thickness is proportional to the critical dimension.
  18. 18. The method of claim 17, wherein the residual layer thickness is directly proportional to the critical dimension.
  19. 19. The method of claim 17, wherein the residual layer thickness is indirectly proportional to the critical dimension.
  20. 20. The method of claim 17, further comprising applying a second etching composition to the patterned layer to transfer the features into the substrate.
US12392685 2008-02-27 2009-02-25 Critical dimension control during template formation Abandoned US20090212012A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3175908 true 2008-02-27 2008-02-27
US10891408 true 2008-10-28 2008-10-28
US12392685 US20090212012A1 (en) 2008-02-27 2009-02-25 Critical dimension control during template formation

Applications Claiming Priority (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12392685 US20090212012A1 (en) 2008-02-27 2009-02-25 Critical dimension control during template formation
JP2010548716A JP5404654B2 (en) 2008-02-27 2009-02-26 Critical dimension control during template formation
PCT/US2009/001202 WO2009108322A3 (en) 2008-02-27 2009-02-26 Critical dimension control during template formation
EP20090716103 EP2250020A4 (en) 2008-02-27 2009-02-26 Critical dimension control during template formation
US13441500 US8545709B2 (en) 2008-02-27 2012-04-06 Critical dimension control during template formation

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13441500 Continuation US8545709B2 (en) 2008-02-27 2012-04-06 Critical dimension control during template formation

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20090212012A1 true true US20090212012A1 (en) 2009-08-27

Family

ID=40997300

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12392685 Abandoned US20090212012A1 (en) 2008-02-27 2009-02-25 Critical dimension control during template formation
US13441500 Active US8545709B2 (en) 2008-02-27 2012-04-06 Critical dimension control during template formation

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13441500 Active US8545709B2 (en) 2008-02-27 2012-04-06 Critical dimension control during template formation

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (2) US20090212012A1 (en)
EP (1) EP2250020A4 (en)
JP (1) JP5404654B2 (en)
WO (1) WO2009108322A3 (en)

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100015270A1 (en) * 2008-07-15 2010-01-21 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Inner cavity system for nano-imprint lithography
US20100078846A1 (en) * 2008-09-30 2010-04-01 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Particle Mitigation for Imprint Lithography
US20100095862A1 (en) * 2008-10-22 2010-04-22 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Double Sidewall Angle Nano-Imprint Template
US20100102029A1 (en) * 2008-10-27 2010-04-29 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Imprint Lithography Template
US20100109194A1 (en) * 2008-11-03 2010-05-06 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Master Template Replication
US20100120251A1 (en) * 2008-11-13 2010-05-13 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Large Area Patterning of Nano-Sized Shapes
US20110049097A1 (en) * 2009-08-28 2011-03-03 Asml Netherlands B.V. Imprint lithography method and apparatus
US20110171340A1 (en) * 2002-07-08 2011-07-14 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Template Having a Varying Thickness to Facilitate Expelling a Gas Positioned Between a Substrate and the Template
US20110226735A1 (en) * 2010-03-22 2011-09-22 Asml Netherlands B.V. Imprint lithography
WO2012133932A1 (en) * 2011-03-29 2012-10-04 Fujifilm Corporation Method for forming resist patterns and method for producing patterend substrates employing the resist patterns
US8828297B2 (en) 2010-11-05 2014-09-09 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Patterning of non-convex shaped nanostructures
US20160351409A1 (en) * 2015-05-25 2016-12-01 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Substrate planarizing method and dropping amount calculating method
US20180107110A1 (en) * 2016-10-18 2018-04-19 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Microlithographic fabrication of structures
US9993962B2 (en) 2016-05-23 2018-06-12 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Method of imprinting to correct for a distortion within an imprint system

Citations (32)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6207570B1 (en) * 1999-08-20 2001-03-27 Lucent Technologies, Inc. Method of manufacturing integrated circuit devices
US6284653B1 (en) * 2000-10-30 2001-09-04 Vanguard International Semiconductor Corp. Method of selectively forming a barrier layer from a directionally deposited metal layer
US6334960B1 (en) * 1999-03-11 2002-01-01 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Step and flash imprint lithography
US20030232252A1 (en) * 2002-06-18 2003-12-18 Mancini David P. Multi-tiered lithographic template and method of formation and use
US20040009673A1 (en) * 2002-07-11 2004-01-15 Sreenivasan Sidlgata V. Method and system for imprint lithography using an electric field
US6696220B2 (en) * 2000-10-12 2004-02-24 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Template for room temperature, low pressure micro-and nano-imprint lithography
US20040065976A1 (en) * 2002-10-04 2004-04-08 Sreenivasan Sidlgata V. Method and a mold to arrange features on a substrate to replicate features having minimal dimensional variability
US20050064344A1 (en) * 2003-09-18 2005-03-24 University Of Texas System Board Of Regents Imprint lithography templates having alignment marks
US20050084804A1 (en) * 2003-10-16 2005-04-21 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Low surface energy templates
US6900881B2 (en) * 2002-07-11 2005-05-31 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Step and repeat imprint lithography systems
US6916584B2 (en) * 2002-08-01 2005-07-12 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Alignment methods for imprint lithography
US6919152B2 (en) * 2000-07-16 2005-07-19 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System High resolution overlay alignment systems for imprint lithography
US20050158900A1 (en) * 2004-01-16 2005-07-21 Shih-Wei Lee Fabrication method for liquid crystal display
US20050189676A1 (en) * 2004-02-27 2005-09-01 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Full-wafer or large area imprinting with multiple separated sub-fields for high throughput lithography
US20050230882A1 (en) * 2004-04-19 2005-10-20 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Method of forming a deep-featured template employed in imprint lithography
US20060019183A1 (en) * 2004-07-20 2006-01-26 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Imprint alignment method, system, and template
US20060067650A1 (en) * 2004-09-27 2006-03-30 Clarence Chui Method of making a reflective display device using thin film transistor production techniques
US7027156B2 (en) * 2002-08-01 2006-04-11 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Scatterometry alignment for imprint lithography
US7037639B2 (en) * 2002-05-01 2006-05-02 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Methods of manufacturing a lithography template
US20060113697A1 (en) * 2004-12-01 2006-06-01 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Eliminating printability of sub-resolution defects in imprint lithography
US7070405B2 (en) * 2002-08-01 2006-07-04 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Alignment systems for imprint lithography
US20060144275A1 (en) * 2004-12-30 2006-07-06 Asml Netherlands B.V. Imprint lithography
US7077992B2 (en) * 2002-07-11 2006-07-18 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Step and repeat imprint lithography processes
US7136150B2 (en) * 2003-09-25 2006-11-14 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Imprint lithography template having opaque alignment marks
US20070026324A1 (en) * 2005-07-28 2007-02-01 Mitsubishi Electric Corporation Substrate with light-shielding film, color filter substrate, method of manufacture of both, and display device having substrate with light-shielding film
US20070122942A1 (en) * 2002-07-08 2007-05-31 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Conforming Template for Patterning Liquids Disposed on Substrates
US20070228610A1 (en) * 2006-04-03 2007-10-04 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Method of Concurrently Patterning a Substrate Having a Plurality of Fields and a Plurality of Alignment Marks
US20070231981A1 (en) * 2006-04-03 2007-10-04 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Patterning a Plurality of Fields on a Substrate to Compensate for Differing Evaporation Times
US7309225B2 (en) * 2004-08-13 2007-12-18 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Moat system for an imprint lithography template
US20080070165A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-03-20 Mark Fischer Efficient pitch multiplication process
US7431859B2 (en) * 2006-04-28 2008-10-07 Applied Materials, Inc. Plasma etch process using polymerizing etch gases with different etch and polymer-deposition rates in different radial gas injection zones with time modulation
US20090035665A1 (en) * 2007-07-31 2009-02-05 Micron Technology, Inc. Process of semiconductor fabrication with mask overlay on pitch multiplied features and associated structures

Family Cites Families (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6890688B2 (en) * 2001-12-18 2005-05-10 Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. Lithographic template and method of formation and use
US6900126B2 (en) * 2002-11-20 2005-05-31 International Business Machines Corporation Method of forming metallized pattern
US7179396B2 (en) 2003-03-25 2007-02-20 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Positive tone bi-layer imprint lithography method
KR101121017B1 (en) 2003-03-25 2012-04-17 몰레큘러 임프린츠 인코퍼레이티드 Positive tone bi-layer imprint lithography method and compositions therefor
US20040209123A1 (en) * 2003-04-17 2004-10-21 Bajorek Christopher H. Method of fabricating a discrete track recording disk using a bilayer resist for metal lift-off
JP2007516862A (en) * 2003-11-12 2007-06-28 モレキュラー・インプリンツ・インコーポレーテッド Geometry and conductivity template distribution for fast filling and throughput
US20050106321A1 (en) * 2003-11-14 2005-05-19 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Dispense geometery to achieve high-speed filling and throughput
US8025831B2 (en) 2004-05-24 2011-09-27 Agency For Science, Technology And Research Imprinting of supported and free-standing 3-D micro- or nano-structures
CN100570445C (en) * 2004-06-03 2009-12-16 分子制模股份有限公司 Fluid dispensing and drop-on-demand dispensing for nano-scale manufacturing
US20050270516A1 (en) * 2004-06-03 2005-12-08 Molecular Imprints, Inc. System for magnification and distortion correction during nano-scale manufacturing
JP5020079B2 (en) * 2004-08-16 2012-09-05 モレキュラー・インプリンツ・インコーポレーテッド The methods and compositions for providing a layer having a uniform etching characteristics
US20060144814A1 (en) 2004-12-30 2006-07-06 Asml Netherlands B.V. Imprint lithography
US20070138699A1 (en) 2005-12-21 2007-06-21 Asml Netherlands B.V. Imprint lithography
US7862756B2 (en) * 2006-03-30 2011-01-04 Asml Netherland B.V. Imprint lithography
US8001924B2 (en) * 2006-03-31 2011-08-23 Asml Netherlands B.V. Imprint lithography
US20080160129A1 (en) * 2006-05-11 2008-07-03 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Template Having a Varying Thickness to Facilitate Expelling a Gas Positioned Between a Substrate and the Template
EP1906236B1 (en) 2006-08-01 2012-09-19 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Imprinting apparatus and method for forming residual film on a substrate
KR100804734B1 (en) * 2007-02-22 2008-02-19 연세대학교 산학협력단 Continuous lithography apparatus and method using ultraviolet roll nanoimprinting

Patent Citations (36)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6334960B1 (en) * 1999-03-11 2002-01-01 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Step and flash imprint lithography
US6207570B1 (en) * 1999-08-20 2001-03-27 Lucent Technologies, Inc. Method of manufacturing integrated circuit devices
US6986975B2 (en) * 2000-07-16 2006-01-17 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Method of aligning a template with a substrate employing moire patterns
US6919152B2 (en) * 2000-07-16 2005-07-19 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System High resolution overlay alignment systems for imprint lithography
US20080095878A1 (en) * 2000-10-12 2008-04-24 Board Of Regents, University Of Texas System Imprint Lithography Template Having a Feature Size Under 250 nm
US6696220B2 (en) * 2000-10-12 2004-02-24 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Template for room temperature, low pressure micro-and nano-imprint lithography
US7229273B2 (en) * 2000-10-12 2007-06-12 Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas System Imprint lithography template having a feature size under 250 nm
US6284653B1 (en) * 2000-10-30 2001-09-04 Vanguard International Semiconductor Corp. Method of selectively forming a barrier layer from a directionally deposited metal layer
US7037639B2 (en) * 2002-05-01 2006-05-02 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Methods of manufacturing a lithography template
US20030232252A1 (en) * 2002-06-18 2003-12-18 Mancini David P. Multi-tiered lithographic template and method of formation and use
US20070122942A1 (en) * 2002-07-08 2007-05-31 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Conforming Template for Patterning Liquids Disposed on Substrates
US7077992B2 (en) * 2002-07-11 2006-07-18 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Step and repeat imprint lithography processes
US20040009673A1 (en) * 2002-07-11 2004-01-15 Sreenivasan Sidlgata V. Method and system for imprint lithography using an electric field
US6900881B2 (en) * 2002-07-11 2005-05-31 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Step and repeat imprint lithography systems
US7281921B2 (en) * 2002-08-01 2007-10-16 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Scatterometry alignment for imprint lithography
US7070405B2 (en) * 2002-08-01 2006-07-04 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Alignment systems for imprint lithography
US6916584B2 (en) * 2002-08-01 2005-07-12 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Alignment methods for imprint lithography
US7027156B2 (en) * 2002-08-01 2006-04-11 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Scatterometry alignment for imprint lithography
US20040065976A1 (en) * 2002-10-04 2004-04-08 Sreenivasan Sidlgata V. Method and a mold to arrange features on a substrate to replicate features having minimal dimensional variability
US20050064344A1 (en) * 2003-09-18 2005-03-24 University Of Texas System Board Of Regents Imprint lithography templates having alignment marks
US7136150B2 (en) * 2003-09-25 2006-11-14 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Imprint lithography template having opaque alignment marks
US20050084804A1 (en) * 2003-10-16 2005-04-21 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Low surface energy templates
US20050158900A1 (en) * 2004-01-16 2005-07-21 Shih-Wei Lee Fabrication method for liquid crystal display
US20050189676A1 (en) * 2004-02-27 2005-09-01 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Full-wafer or large area imprinting with multiple separated sub-fields for high throughput lithography
US20050230882A1 (en) * 2004-04-19 2005-10-20 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Method of forming a deep-featured template employed in imprint lithography
US20060019183A1 (en) * 2004-07-20 2006-01-26 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Imprint alignment method, system, and template
US7309225B2 (en) * 2004-08-13 2007-12-18 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Moat system for an imprint lithography template
US20060067650A1 (en) * 2004-09-27 2006-03-30 Clarence Chui Method of making a reflective display device using thin film transistor production techniques
US20060113697A1 (en) * 2004-12-01 2006-06-01 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Eliminating printability of sub-resolution defects in imprint lithography
US20060144275A1 (en) * 2004-12-30 2006-07-06 Asml Netherlands B.V. Imprint lithography
US20070026324A1 (en) * 2005-07-28 2007-02-01 Mitsubishi Electric Corporation Substrate with light-shielding film, color filter substrate, method of manufacture of both, and display device having substrate with light-shielding film
US20070228610A1 (en) * 2006-04-03 2007-10-04 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Method of Concurrently Patterning a Substrate Having a Plurality of Fields and a Plurality of Alignment Marks
US20070231981A1 (en) * 2006-04-03 2007-10-04 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Patterning a Plurality of Fields on a Substrate to Compensate for Differing Evaporation Times
US7431859B2 (en) * 2006-04-28 2008-10-07 Applied Materials, Inc. Plasma etch process using polymerizing etch gases with different etch and polymer-deposition rates in different radial gas injection zones with time modulation
US20080070165A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-03-20 Mark Fischer Efficient pitch multiplication process
US20090035665A1 (en) * 2007-07-31 2009-02-05 Micron Technology, Inc. Process of semiconductor fabrication with mask overlay on pitch multiplied features and associated structures

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110171340A1 (en) * 2002-07-08 2011-07-14 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Template Having a Varying Thickness to Facilitate Expelling a Gas Positioned Between a Substrate and the Template
US8556616B2 (en) 2002-07-08 2013-10-15 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Template having a varying thickness to facilitate expelling a gas positioned between a substrate and the template
US20100015270A1 (en) * 2008-07-15 2010-01-21 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Inner cavity system for nano-imprint lithography
US20100078846A1 (en) * 2008-09-30 2010-04-01 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Particle Mitigation for Imprint Lithography
US20100095862A1 (en) * 2008-10-22 2010-04-22 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Double Sidewall Angle Nano-Imprint Template
US20100102029A1 (en) * 2008-10-27 2010-04-29 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Imprint Lithography Template
US8877073B2 (en) 2008-10-27 2014-11-04 Canon Nanotechnologies, Inc. Imprint lithography template
US20100109194A1 (en) * 2008-11-03 2010-05-06 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Master Template Replication
US9122148B2 (en) 2008-11-03 2015-09-01 Canon Nanotechnologies, Inc. Master template replication
US20100120251A1 (en) * 2008-11-13 2010-05-13 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Large Area Patterning of Nano-Sized Shapes
US8529778B2 (en) 2008-11-13 2013-09-10 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Large area patterning of nano-sized shapes
US8961801B2 (en) 2009-08-28 2015-02-24 Asml Netherlands B.V. Imprint lithography method and apparatus
US9278466B2 (en) 2009-08-28 2016-03-08 Asml Netherlands B.V. Imprint lithography method and apparatus
US20110049097A1 (en) * 2009-08-28 2011-03-03 Asml Netherlands B.V. Imprint lithography method and apparatus
US20110226735A1 (en) * 2010-03-22 2011-09-22 Asml Netherlands B.V. Imprint lithography
US8454849B2 (en) 2010-03-22 2013-06-04 Asml Netherlands B.V. Imprint lithography
US8828297B2 (en) 2010-11-05 2014-09-09 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Patterning of non-convex shaped nanostructures
US20140024217A1 (en) * 2011-03-29 2014-01-23 Fujifilm Corporation Method for forming resist patterns and method for producing patterend substrates employing the resist patterns
KR101512262B1 (en) 2011-03-29 2015-04-14 후지필름 가부시키가이샤 Method for forming resist patterns and method for producing patterned substrates employing the resist patterns
WO2012133932A1 (en) * 2011-03-29 2012-10-04 Fujifilm Corporation Method for forming resist patterns and method for producing patterend substrates employing the resist patterns
US20160351409A1 (en) * 2015-05-25 2016-12-01 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Substrate planarizing method and dropping amount calculating method
US9941137B2 (en) * 2015-05-25 2018-04-10 Toshiba Memory Corporation Substrate planarizing method and dropping amount calculating method
US9993962B2 (en) 2016-05-23 2018-06-12 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Method of imprinting to correct for a distortion within an imprint system
US20180107110A1 (en) * 2016-10-18 2018-04-19 Molecular Imprints, Inc. Microlithographic fabrication of structures

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
WO2009108322A3 (en) 2009-12-30 application
WO2009108322A2 (en) 2009-09-03 application
EP2250020A2 (en) 2010-11-17 application
EP2250020A4 (en) 2012-07-11 application
US20120187085A1 (en) 2012-07-26 application
US8545709B2 (en) 2013-10-01 grant
JP5404654B2 (en) 2014-02-05 grant
JP2011513972A (en) 2011-04-28 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US7090716B2 (en) Single phase fluid imprint lithography method
US6964793B2 (en) Method for fabricating nanoscale patterns in light curable compositions using an electric field
US20050270312A1 (en) Fluid dispensing and drop-on-demand dispensing for nano-scale manufacturing
US7140861B2 (en) Compliant hard template for UV imprinting
US20060145398A1 (en) Release layer comprising diamond-like carbon (DLC) or doped DLC with tunable composition for imprint lithography templates and contact masks
US7244386B2 (en) Method of compensating for a volumetric shrinkage of a material disposed upon a substrate to form a substantially planar structure therefrom
US7462028B2 (en) Partial vacuum environment imprinting
US20060062922A1 (en) Polymerization technique to attenuate oxygen inhibition of solidification of liquids and composition therefor
US7338275B2 (en) Formation of discontinuous films during an imprint lithography process
US20060035029A1 (en) Method to provide a layer with uniform etch characteristics
US6900881B2 (en) Step and repeat imprint lithography systems
US7077992B2 (en) Step and repeat imprint lithography processes
US20060144275A1 (en) Imprint lithography
US20080141862A1 (en) Single Phase Fluid Imprint Lithography Method
US20070228610A1 (en) Method of Concurrently Patterning a Substrate Having a Plurality of Fields and a Plurality of Alignment Marks
US20060115999A1 (en) Methods of exposure for the purpose of thermal management for imprint lithography processes
US6908861B2 (en) Method for imprint lithography using an electric field
US20040065976A1 (en) Method and a mold to arrange features on a substrate to replicate features having minimal dimensional variability
US20060113697A1 (en) Eliminating printability of sub-resolution defects in imprint lithography
JP2009536591A (en) Template thickness changes
WO2004016406A1 (en) Imprint lithography processes and systems
US7691313B2 (en) Method for expelling gas positioned between a substrate and a mold
US20060121728A1 (en) Method for fast filling of templates for imprint lithography using on template dispense
US20050061773A1 (en) Capillary imprinting technique
Bender et al. Status and prospects of UV-nanoimprint technology

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: MOLECULAR IMPRINTS, INC., TEXAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BROOKS, CYNTHIA B.;LABRAKE, DWAYNE L.;KHUSNATDINOV, NIYAZ;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:022571/0735;SIGNING DATES FROM 20090406 TO 20090417