US20090179380A1 - Blackjack Game with Bingo Aspect - Google Patents

Blackjack Game with Bingo Aspect Download PDF

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Publication number
US20090179380A1
US20090179380A1 US12/334,092 US33409208A US2009179380A1 US 20090179380 A1 US20090179380 A1 US 20090179380A1 US 33409208 A US33409208 A US 33409208A US 2009179380 A1 US2009179380 A1 US 2009179380A1
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player
wager
recited
dealer
blackjack
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US12/334,092
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Geoff Hall
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Geoff Hall
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Priority to GB0507030A priority Critical patent/GB2427148A/en
Priority to GB0507030.5 priority
Priority to US11/754,283 priority patent/US20070284821A1/en
Application filed by Geoff Hall filed Critical Geoff Hall
Priority to US12/334,092 priority patent/US20090179380A1/en
Publication of US20090179380A1 publication Critical patent/US20090179380A1/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F1/00Card games
    • A63F1/06Card games appurtenances
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00157Casino or betting games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F1/00Card games
    • A63F2001/003Blackjack; Twenty one
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/06Lottos or bingo games; Systems, apparatus or devices for checking such games
    • A63F3/062Bingo games, e.g. Bingo card games

Abstract

A variation of casino blackjack that includes a bingo type side game. A scoreboard is prominently displayed to the players which comprise indicator lights representing conditions of either the dealer's hand or a player's hand. When each condition is satisfied, the respective indicator light on the scoreboard is lit. When a player plays the side wager and the scoreboard displays particular combinations, the player wins an award.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation in part (CIP) of application Ser. No. 11/754,283, filed in the USPTO on May 26, 2007, entitled, “Blackjack Game with Bingo Aspect” which claims benefit of priority under 35 U.S.C. § 119 to commonly owned UK Provisional Application No. 0507030.5, filed in the UK Patent Office on May 30, 2006, entitled, “Blackjack Bingo,” by inventor Geoff Hall, both applications of which are incorporated by reference herein their entireties for all purposes.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present inventive concept relates to a casino table game, and more particularly, to a variation of casino blackjack.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • The popularity of casino blackjack has been waning in recent years. Other games, such as poker variants and machine games have provided the standard blackjack game with some competition. Moreover, the standard blackjack game has become old and tiresome as gamblers have a limited attention span and like to see new and exciting games.
  • Therefore, what is needed is a new variation of blackjack which can provide a more enjoyable game than the standard version
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • It is an aspect of the present invention to provide an enjoyable variation of blackjack that can be played in a casino that some players may prefer over the standard game.
  • The above aspects can be obtained by a method that includes (a) providing an indicator display which can display occurrences of at least two conditions; (b) resolving a main wager by dealing dealt cards, completing a blackjack game, and updating the indicator display based on an occurrence derived from the dealt cards; and (c) determining if the indicator display displays a predetermined winning set, and if so, paying the player an award based on the winning set.
  • The above aspects can also be obtained by a method that includes (a) providing an indicator board which can display occurrences of at least two conditions; (b) receiving a first blackjack wager and a side wager from a player; (c) playing a first blackjack hand by dealing first dealt cards; (d) updating the indicator board based on at least one of the first dealt cards; (e) determining if the indicator board displays a predetermined set of conditions, and if so, then awarding the player an award for the side wager. (f) receiving a second blackjack wager from the player; (g) playing a second blackjack hand by dealing second dealt cards; (h) updating the indicator board based on at least one of the second dealt cards; (i) determining if the indicator board displays a predetermined set of conditions, and if so, then awarding the player an award for the side wager.
  • These together with other aspects and advantages which will be subsequently apparent, reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Further features and advantages of the present invention, as well as the structure and operation of various embodiments of the present invention, will become apparent and more readily appreciated from the following description of the preferred embodiments, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings of which:
  • FIG. 1 is a drawing illustrating one example of a table that can be used to implement an embodiment;
  • FIG. 2 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of implementing a blackjack wagering side game, according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 3 is a flowchart illustrating an alternative exemplary method of implementing a blackjack wagering side game, according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 4 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of implementing a blackjack wagering side game with the side bet made for each hand, and one payout to the player(s), according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 5 is a flowchart illustrating an alternative exemplary method of implementing a blackjack wagering side game with the side bet made for each hand, and multiple payouts can be made to the player(s), according to an embodiment;
  • FIGS. 6A-6D illustrate an exemplary progression of an indicator board, according to embodiments;
  • FIGS. 6E-6H illustrate another indicator board and possible winning patterns, according to embodiments;
  • FIGS. 6I-6K illustrates more examples of indicator boards, according to embodiments;
  • FIG. 7 is an exemplary block diagram of hardware that can be used to implement an electronic version, according to an embodiment.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • Reference will now be made in detail to the presently preferred embodiments of the invention, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference numerals refer to like elements throughout.
  • The present general inventive concept relates to a method, system, and computer readable storage which allows a casino to offer to at least one player a blackjack game which can provide a player with increased winning opportunities. Casino blackjack is a game that is well known in the art, for a description see application Ser. No. 11/611,842, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. As the dealer deals hands of blackjack, an indicator board can be updated based on characteristics of hands that are dealt. For example, an indicator board, which is prominently displayed to all of the players at the table (and preferably visible to spectators as well in order to generate more excitement for the game) displays the possible point totals (indicators) of: 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, BJ (blackjack). The indicator board can start out with all of the indicators reset (not lit up). Each time the dealer achieves a particular final point total, that respective indicator light can be lit up on the indicator board. For example, if a blackjack game ends with the dealer receiving a final hand of 17, then 17 can be lit up on the indicator board. A participating player (who is playing the side bet) can be paid based on combinations that are lit up on the indicator board. For example, if all possible indicators are lit up, then each participating can win an award based on their side wager (e.g., 100 times their side wager). Each time a new game is played, depending on the dealer's final hand, the indicator board can be updated. If the dealer gets a particular hand (e.g., busts), then the indicator board can be reset (all indicator lights can be turned off), and the indicator board will have to start all over again.
  • The present general inventive concept is a side wager(s) that players can place during the game of blackjack. The side wager can preferably be optional on the part of the player, or in an alternative embodiment can be mandatory. The side wager can be a fixed amount (e.g., $1), or can alternatively be an amount of the player's choosing.
  • FIG. 1 is a drawing illustrating one example of a table that can be used to implement an embodiment.
  • A first player side betting circle 1 is used by the first player to place his or her side bet. Adjacent to the side betting circle 1 is a larger main betting circle used by the first player to place his or her main wager. Instead of using a betting circle, a “coin drop” mechanism (not pictured) can be used (as used in games such as Caribbean Stud Poker,” in which any player places their side bet wager (e.g., a $1 chip) in a respective slot, and the dealer releases a lever which drops all of the side bet wagers into a container and automatically indicates which players at the table have place the side wager and thus are eligible to receive side wager payouts. A second player side betting circle 2, a third player side betting circle 3, a fourth player side betting circle 4, a fifth player side betting circle 5, and a sixth player side betting circle 6 are also used to receive each player's respective side wager. The second through sixth players' betting area is typically identical (both in appearance and operation) to the first player's betting area (described above). Thus, each player has their own main betting circle to place the standard blackjack wager on the blackjack game and a smaller side betting circle to place their side wager.
  • A participant output 7 can be used to indicate which players have placed the side wager and thus are eligible to receive side wager payouts. A light can light up for each player that has placed the side wager.
  • An indicator input 8 can be used by the dealer to designate which (if any) indicator has occurred based on the cards dealt. For example, if the dealer has received a point total of 18, then the dealer can press 18 on the indicator input 8 (or switch a switch marked 18) in order for the 18 to light up on the indicator board 9 (or “scoreboard”). Not pictured is a reset button/switch in which the dealer can use when the cards dealt contain a reset trigger in which the board needs to be reset (all lights turned off). The indicator board 9 illustrated in FIG. 1 has lights (indicators) 17, 18, 20, 21 lit up (on, or set) while indicators 19 and BJ are not lit up (off, or reset). Each indicator on the indicator board can be switched on and off to indicate whether that particular indicator's occurrence has already occurred.
  • Note that instead of using the indicator input 8 in order for the dealer to indicate which occurrences have occurred, an automatic system can also be used. For example, an automatic card reader can be used to automatically input card values to a computer which can automatically determine which occurrences have occurred and automatically light the respective occurrence on the indicator board. A video camera which can employ optical character recognition in order to recognize card values/suits can be used for this purpose. Alternatively, the card values can be marked with barcodes or other machine readable identifiers in order for the computer to recognize occurrences automatically and automatically update the indicator board.
  • A simple example of an embodiment will now be presented in order to illustrate how one embodiment of the side bet can operate. This example can be used with the hardware/table illustrated in FIG. 1. In this example, the dealer must receive all possible point totals (e.g., 17-21 and a blackjack) in order for the player to win a 100:1 payout on the bingo wager. If the dealer busts, then the current bingo round is terminated, and a new bingo round can begin.
  • Two players are sitting at the table and a new bingo round is about to start. The first player decides to play the side bet by placing a $1 in his respective side betting circle for each new blackjack game, while the second player decides not to play the side bet. Player one and player two both bet $2 on the main blackjack game by placing their wagers in their respective main betting circles. The indicator board starts out with all indicators reset (turned off). In the first blackjack game, the dealer ends up with a point total of 17. Thus, the 17 indicator on the indicator board is now lit. Whether or not the players win their main blackjack wager is typically not relevant for purposes of resolving the side bet. The first blackjack game is completed, and a second blackjack game is played. Both players bet on the main blackjack game. Player one does need to make another side wager since player one has already made his side wager at the start of the bingo round to participate in the bingo game. Since player two did not make the side wager at the beginning of the bingo game, player two cannot now participate in the side wager (bingo game) and must wait for a new round to begin (after a reset trigger has occurred) for participating (placing the side wager). This time, the dealer gets a point total of 19, and thus the 19 indicator is now lit up on the indicator board. A third blackjack game is now completed, wherein the dealer busts. The current bingo round is now over. Player one did not win an award on the side wager since the indicator board did not display a predetermined winning combination. However, before the dealer busted, if the dealer received all possible hands (17-21 plus a blackjack), then player one would receive a $100 payout (100:1) because a winning combination (all lights on the indicator board) have been achieved. Since player two did not participate in the bingo round, player two would not win such an award.
  • In a further embodiment, player one would have to continuously make the side wager at the start of each hand to continue receives potential awards based on the indicator board. If he fails to make the side wager, then if the indicator board changes status based on a last hand and now contains a pattern which awards a prize, in this embodiment, player one would not receive the prize since he had not make the side wager on the last hand.
  • FIG. 2 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of implementing a blackjack wagering side game, according to an embodiment.
  • The method can begin with operation 200, which receives a bingo bet (side bet) and begins a new bingo round (side bet round). The side bet received in operation 200 pays for the entire side bet round without requiring the player to make additional side wager bet(s) during the side bet round. However, once the side bet round has ended, then the player would need to make a new side bet to participate in the side bet game again.
  • From operation 200, the method can proceed to operation 202, which deals a new blackjack hand(s) to player(s) at the table. This includes receiving blackjack wager(s) from respective player(s), as known in the art. Note that the side bet wager was received in operation 200 and in this embodiment, is it not necessary for the player to keep making the side wager for each hand.
  • From operation 202, the method can proceed to operation 204, which resolves the blackjack hand and pays out the blackjack wagers, as known in the art. For information on how to play blackjack, see US patent publication no. 2003/0155715, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.
  • From operation 204, the method can proceed to operation 206, which determines whether cards dealt on the table in operations 200 and/or 204 trigger a new indicator. For example, if the indicator display (or board) has the numbers 18-21 for possible dealer final totals, and the dealer's total is a 17 (in operation 204 when the game is completed), then no change in status on the indicator display need be made. If the dealer's total is 18, then the 18 can be lighted (set) (or start flashing) on the indicator display. Thus, if the cards dealt are such that, depending on the conditions on the indicator, cause a change in status on the indicator board, then the method can proceed to operation 208, which updates the indicator board to reflect the latest occurrence. If the latest occurrence has already been reflected on the indicator board, then the method can proceed to operation 208 or 210, as it should not make any difference. Thus, for example, if the dealer's total is 18 and 18 has already been achieved by the dealer (during the current bingo round), then 18 can remain set on the indicator board. Alternatively, in this situation, the 18 can become reset (off) on the indicator board, requiring the 18 to once again occur to become set in order for the 18 to be used to form a winning combination on the indicator board.
  • In operation 208, the indicator board is updated to reflect the latest occurrence. For example, using the indicator board illustrated in FIG. 1, if the dealer's final hand is a 19, then the 19 would be set (lit up).
  • From operations 206 or 208, the method continues at operation 210, wherein it is determined whether cards dealt comprise a reset trigger. For example, one reset trigger is whether the dealer busts (has busted on the last blackjack game/round). A reset trigger might also comprise if the indicator display displays a jackpot (e.g., all indicator lights are set or a particular set of lights are set that comprise a jackpot). If the player(s) have won the jackpot on the side game, then the side game can start anew. If the reset trigger does not occur, then the method can return to operation 202 which plays a new blackjack hand. The reset trigger can be based on cards dealt during a most recent (last) blackjack round (for example what occurred during last time operations 202 and/or 204 occurred).
  • If the reset trigger is determined to occur in operation 210, then the bonus round is over and the method can proceed to operation 212. In operation 212, it is determined whether there is a winning combination(s) on the indicator board. If so, then the method can proceed to operation 214, which pays the player(s) who have participated in the side game by placing the side wager in operation 200. If more than one winning combination is displayed on the indicator board, then the players can either receive the highest paying winning combination, or alternatively payouts for some (or all) of the winning combinations.
  • From operation 212 or 214, the method can proceed to operation 216, which resets the indicator board by resetting all of the indicators. In an alternative embodiment, some of the indicators can still remain on, such as a free square or a random indicator which would make it easier for the players. From operation 216, the method returns to operation 200. Note that the player(s) can choose whether to play a new bingo round (side bet round) or not by placing their optional side bet wager.
  • Note that the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 2 embodies a side bet game wherein each player can pay a single entry fee to play and does not need to pay again until the side bet round has ended (e.g., a reset trigger has occurred). In this embodiment, the player(s) participating in the side bet are paid once, at the end of the side bet round.
  • It is noted that other embodiments of the game can be implemented as well. The operations in FIG. 2 (and any of the other figures as well) can be performed in any order and any operation can be optional.
  • In a further embodiment, the player(s) can be paid each time the indicator board is updated that displays a new winning combination. This is in contrast to the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 2, wherein the player's are paid only once at the end of each side bet round.
  • FIG. 3 is a flowchart illustrating an alternative exemplary method of implementing a blackjack wagering side game, according to an embodiment.
  • The embodiment illustrated in FIG. 3 is similar to the side bet game illustrated in FIG. 2, but the players can be paid for side bet winning combinations displayed on the indicator board at each time the indicator board is updated which displays a new winning combination entitled the player(s) to receive an award. For example, if the player is to receive $1 payout if the indicator board has five outcomes set (lit up), and is to receive a $2 payout if the indicator board has six outcomes set (lit up), then the participating players can receive the $1 as soon as the fifth outcome has been set, and on a subsequent hand, can receive the $2 payout when the sixth outcome has been set (before the reset trigger has occurred).
  • The descriptions of the operations in FIG. 3 are typically the same as the description of the corresponding operation in FIG. 2.
  • It is noted that the embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3 require the player to pay only once to participate in the side bet round. In an alternative embodiment, the player(s) can be required to place a side wager at the start of each new blackjack hand in order to continue to be able to win side bet awards based on the indicator board. A casino may prefer this embodiment since it would typically require more side bet action from the player(s) than if the player(s) were to make only a single side bet which may last for a number of hands before the reset trigger occurs.
  • It is noted that players should typically not be allowed to join a side bet game already in progress by placing the side bet wager if there are indicator lights set (or the indicator lights set are more favorable to the player than a default condition of the indicator board when a new bonus game is initiated). This is because if the indicator board is close to winning a jackpot, then of course it would be to the player's advantage to start playing the side bet game at such time. Thus, a player can participate in the side bet game only if the player had participated in the side bet game (by making the side bet wager) when the bonus round had begun. Alternatively, a player may be allowed to start participating in the side bet game even after the first hand of the bonus game if there is no favorable change in status to the player on the indicator board.
  • FIG. 4 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of implementing a blackjack wagering side game with the side bet made for each hand, and one payout to the player(s), according to an embodiment.
  • Note that FIG. 4 is similar to FIG. 2, but in FIG. 4, the player must make a separate side bet for each hand the player wishes to participate in the side bet (bingo) round.
  • The method can begin in operation 400, which begins a new bingo round. This can include resetting the indicator board to a reset position (e.g., all lights for each occurrence off).
  • From operation 400, the method can proceed to operation 420, which determines whether each player is eligible to make a side bet. If operation 420 follows directly from operation 400, then the side bet round has just begun and the player would be eligible to make the side bet. If the side bet round has already begun on a prior hand, then the player would typically not be eligible to make the side bet. An exception to this can be if the indicator board has not improved to the player's advantage (e.g., a new occurrence has lit up) since the reset position form operation 400. If the player is eligible to make the side bet, then the method can proceed to operation 422, which receives the side bet. If the player has made the side bet in operation 422, then the player is eligible to receive a side bet payment when the method reaches operation 414 for the next blackjack hand (dealt in operation 402) and its affect on the indicator board. Note that in operation 422, the player is not required to make the side bet but can do so at the player's option. Of course, if the player chooses not to make the side bet, then the player would not win any award (a side bet award) when the next blackjack hand is dealt, the indicator board is updated, and awards are potentially distributed in operation 414.
  • If the player is determined in operation 420 not to be eligible to make the side bet, then the method can proceed to operation 424, wherein the player cannot make the side bet (e.g., the house will not allow the player to place the side bet or will not accept it). Thus, the player that does not make the side bet will not be eligible for any awards that can be awarded in operation 414 for the upcoming hand and its affect on the indicator board.
  • From operations 422 and 424, the method can proceed to operation 402, which receives the standard blackjack wager and blackjack game (as known in the art). The blackjack game and the wager(s) places in operation 402 can be resolved in operation 404, as known in the art.
  • The remaining operations in FIG. 4 operate the same (or similar to) the operations as described with regard to FIG. 2. In operation 414, each player is only paid on winning combinations on the indicator board if each respective player had made the side bet at the prior opportunity (in operation 422). If a player was not eligible to make the side bet (operation 424) or was eligible but chose not to make it, then the player would not receive an award in operation 424.
  • FIG. 5 is a flowchart illustrating an alternative exemplary method of implementing a blackjack wagering side game with the side bet made for each hand, and multiple payouts can be made to the player(s), according to an embodiment.
  • FIG. 5 is a combination of FIG. 3 and FIG. 4, that is, the player must make the side bet each hand the player wishes to receive a side bet award and the player can also receive multiple awards on each hand based on the indicator display.
  • The operations in FIG. 5 operate the same or similarly to their counterpart operations described herein. FIG. 5 operates similarly to FIG. 4, but for each new indicator lit up on the indicator board, then operations 508 updates the indicator board. If a winning combination is determined to be on the indicator board (operation 510), then the method can proceed to operation 512, which pays the player (if the player made the side bet in operation 522 on the most recent possible opportunity to do so), which then pays the participating player (player that made the side bet in operation 522). Of course, players that have not made the side bet in operation 522 (either because they chose not to or were not eligible), then would not get paid in operation 512 for the last hand dealt.
  • Also note that from operation 500, as in Figure, the method proceeds to operation 520, which determines whether the player is eligible to make the side bet. Operations 520-524 can be performed as described above with regard to operations 420-424. From operation 522 or 524, the method can proceed to operation 502, wherein the method continues. Any operation in FIG. 5 can be implemented as any other operation described herein included in the other figures.
  • In a further embodiment, after the indicator displays any winning combination, the bingo round can end. Thus, for example, in operations 312 and 512, the method can proceed to operations 316 and 516, respectively. Thus, in this embodiment, getting a winning combination on the indicator board can also be considered a reset trigger and ends the bonus round.
  • FIGS. 6A-6D illustrate an exemplary progression of an indicator board, according to embodiments.
  • FIG. 6A illustrates an exemplary initial position of an 3 by 3 indicator board with point totals representing the dealer's final two card hand (note in an alternate embodiment, the dealer's initial two card hand can be used). Note the initial position includes the center square being lit up which is a “free” square (already awarded to player by default).
  • Assuming on a first hand of the bingo round, the dealer's final point total is an 18. Thus, the indicator board will now have 18 lit up as illustrated in FIG. 6B. Then assume that the dealer's next point total in the next blackjack hand is a 21. The indicator board will then have the 21 square lit up as illustrated in FIG. 6C. Then assume that the dealer's next point total in the next blackjack hand is another 18. Thus, the second 18 on the indicator board is lit up.
  • Winning combination(s) can be any combination of the occurrences (the point totals, e.g., 17, 18, 19, etc.) lit up. For example, having all occurrences lit up can award a jackpot prize. Three in a row (bingo) can also award a prize. If there are nine possible occurrences, there can be 2 ̂9 possible combinations, of which any one or more can be predetermined to award awards. In the example illustrated in FIG. 6A, since the middle square is always lit, there would be 2 ̂8 possible combinations.
  • FIGS. 6E-6H illustrate another indicator board and possible winning patterns, according to embodiments.
  • FIG. 6E illustrates a 4 by 4 indicator board which illustrates dealer up-cards as occurrences. When a dealer up-card (the initial card dealt to the dealer face up) matches one of the occurrences, then that occurrence lights up.
  • FIG. 6F illustrates one possible winning combination, a diagonal. The other diagonal can also be a winning combination. FIG. 6G illustrates another possible winning combination, an “X” shape. FIG. 6H illustrates another possible winning combination, a “perimeter.”
  • FIGS. 6I-6K illustrates more examples of indicator boards, according to embodiments. FIG. 6I illustrates a 3 by 3 indicator board that mixes dealer final point totals (the numbers from 17-21) with dealer up cards (the numbers that follow with ‘up.’) Thus, different types of occurrences can be mixed on the same indicator board. FIG. 6J illustrates a 4 by 3 indicator board which uses dealer up cards as occurrences.
  • FIG. 6K illustrates a linear indicator board. This linear board can be used as any of the other boards described herein. This liner board can also be used for an in-order sequence. For example, in an embodiment, the dealer's final point totals of 17, 18, 19, and 20 need to be reached in that exact order, before the dealer busts, in order to win a jackpot. Thus, if the dealer's first point total is an 18, then nothing would light up. But if the dealer's first point total is a 17, then the 17 would light up. Now the 18 would be eligible to light up if the next dealer's point total is 18, and so one. Once the entire board is lit up, a jackpot can be awarded.
  • Note pictured in the examples illustrated in FIGS. 6A-6K are other occurrences as well that can be used on the indicator board. For example, if the dealer is dealt a pair (e.g., a pair of 2's), then this can be an occurrence on the indicator board as well.
  • Also, any of the occurrences described with respect to the dealer's hand can also be applied to one or more player's hands as well. For example, if a player's hand has a particular point total, this can be an occurrence on the indicator board. If the first (or second) card dealt to a player is a certain card, this can also be an occurrence on the indicator board (e.g., the first card dealt to a player is a 3).
  • Payouts can be awarded according to paytables. Table I below illustrates an exemplary paytable based solely on the number of lights (occurrences) that have been set (lit up) on the indicator board (scoreboard). Table I can apply, for example, to an indicator board with 9 occurrences (or any other number).
  • TABLE I
    Lights payout
    5 2:1
    6 3:1
    7 5:1
    8 10:1 
    9 100:1 
  • Table II below illustrates an exemplary paytable based on patterns on the indicator board. Table II can apply to a 3 by 3 indicator board (or any other dimensions). Note the “everything” pattern is where every occurrence has occurred (i.e., every light is on).
  • TABLE II
    Pattern Payout
    Straight line (bingo) 3:1
    X 5:1
    Perimeter 7:1
    Everything 10:1 
  • Note that any paytable can be applied to any embodiments described herein. For example, the paytable in table II can be applied to any of the methods illustrated in any of the figures. For example, applying Table II to the method illustrated in FIG. 2, wherein the player pays for the side bet once (at the start of the side bet round), and gets paid at the end of the side bet round based on the best pattern on the indicator board when the reset trigger occurs (or alternatively gets paid immediately when the highest paying pattern has been displayed which also can end the side bet round and thus can be considered a reset trigger). Table II can also be used with FIG. 2, which receives a single side bet wager from the player and thereafter pays each time a new winning pattern has been formed (until a reset trigger occurs). Table II can also be used with FIG. 3, wherein the player pays for the side bet wager on each hand and gets paid at the end of the side bet round based on the best pattern on the indicator board. Table II can also be used with FIG. 4, wherein the player pays for the side bet wager on each hand and gets paid thereafter each time a new winning pattern has been formed (until a reset trigger occurs).
  • In a further embodiment, having occurrences occur and lit up on the indicator board in a predetermined order (sequence) can be required or can be optional but can pay an additional bonus. For example, on the indicator board illustrated in FIG. 6A, if the dealer (or in an alternate embodiment the player) receives a point total of 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 in that order then the side bet can award a bonus (either on its on (e.g., pays an individual award of $10) or in conjunction with another award). For example, if the latter sequence has occurred, then any additional award to be paid can now pay double.
  • A reset trigger triggers an end to the bingo (or side bet) round so that the indicator board can be reset to a default position and a new round can begin. The reset trigger can be a number of different conditions. For example, after a predetermined number of hands (e.g., 5), the bingo round can end. Thus, in FIGS. 2-6, operations 210, 314, 410, and 514 can be modified such that instead of using the cards to end the bonus round, a counter can be used such that after (or on) a predetermined number of hands have been played after a start of the side bet round, the side bet round can then be terminated. This operates as a reset trigger as described herein.
  • Another reset trigger described herein is when the dealer busts (achieves a point total over 21). Other reset triggers based on cards dealt can be used as well. For example, if the dealer achieves a particular point total (or a range of point totals), either the dealer's initial two cards or on the dealer's final point total (after possible draws), then this can comprise a reset trigger. For example, if the dealer is dealt a point total of 20 (or from 12-16 or any other range) using the dealer's two initial cards, this can comprise a reset trigger.
  • A reset trigger can also be when the dealer shows a particular up-card (or has a particular face down card). For example, if the dealer is dealt an ace as the dealer's up card (or a ten valued card or any combination of cards), then this can serve as a reset trigger which ends the bonus round.
  • Reset triggers can also be based on the player's (or players') card(s) as well. Any of the reset triggers described herein can also be applied to the player's (or players') cards as well (and vice versa). For example, if a player's first two cards total 12-16 (or fall below 12), this can comprise a reset trigger.
  • In a further embodiment, a particular reset trigger can pay a bonus. For example, if the bonus trigger being used is if the dealer's initial point total is a 20 or blackjack, and the dealer gets blackjack (or a suited blackjack in another embodiment, or any other predetermined occurrence), then the players that are participating in the side bet can either receive a special award for this event and/or any award that the new blackjack triggers on the indicator board to be awarded can pay a bonus (e.g., double). If the special bonus trigger (e.g., a suited blackjack) does not occur, then the game plays normally (e.g., no additional bonus is paid aside from any additional award that the blackjack may cause the player(s) to win).
  • In a further embodiment, “wild” occurrences can be used. For example, if a particular predetermined occurrence occurs (e.g., the dealer's up card is a 2), then a wild occurrence on the indicator board can be lit up. The wild occurrence can be (depending on the embodiment): a random occurrence to light up, or one needed to cause the indicator board to trigger an award (e.g., if there are two lights/occurrences in a row and the player needs three to win an award, the wild occurrence can be the third occurrence), or any other occurrence that the house selects at their option according to predetermined rules.
  • In a further embodiment, the house can offer to settle the player's wager, at pre-designated odds, if the player lights up a square or certain number of squares. For example, if a winning line contains 3 squares and pays 5/1, the casino can offer to pay the player a settlement if they only have, say, 2 squares lit. This offer would typically be reduced, say 2/1, and would depend on the house edge that the casino required on the game.
  • It is further noted that all of the embodiments and features described herein can be applied to any other wagering game as well in addition to blackjack. For example, poker, three card poker, baccarat, Pai Gow, etc. In every game there will be game occurrences which will correspond to positions on an indicator board (display), a terminating condition (occurrence) which resets the board to an initial position (typically all indicators off), and a paytable for awarding prizes based on predetermined patterns lit up on the indicator display.
  • Thus, the indicator display (bingo style board) can be used in other games in order to record particular events and pay out according to specific conditions being met.
  • For example, in Pai-Gow Poker, the indicator board could be used to represent the 2-card hand formed by the player or dealer. The indicator board would exhibit certain occurrences that would result in a light being lit on the board. In Pai-Gow Poker, for example, the board could show Pair, Ace high, King high, Queen high, Jack high, 10 high, 9 high, 8 high and 7 high for the 9 requirements on a 3×3 board, where each event, either by dealer or player depending on the version used, would result in a light being lit. In order to finish the bingo-style round then this could be set either as 6 high, or lower, or pair of 10's or higher, although any 2-card combination could be used to determine the end of the game. Furthermore, the Bingo-style board could also use any number of combinations of any particular 2-card hand in its requirements to be lit.
  • This allocation of recording specific events in order to award pay-outs for a particular winning sequence can be extended to other games of chance. In 3-card poker the board could show a series of 3-card poker outcomes in order to make up the bingo-style board (for example see Table III for a sample indicator board for three card poker). Again, the requirements could be set to be met by either the player or the dealer in order to light up the board.
  • TABLE III
    Pair A's pair K's Pair Q's
    K high three of a kind Q high
    Flush Straight pair 5's
  • Roulette has various outcomes that can be displayed on a bingo-style board. The numbers could even be placed in groups, for example, 1-6, 7-12 etc, or they could be split into red, black, odd, even, high low etc, in order to form the requirements needed to fill the board.
  • This method of displaying certain outcomes, or events, for games of chance, can be adapted and used by any game that provides multiple occurrences either by the player or dealer.
  • In a typical game of Bingo, numbers are picked from a total of 90 numbers and a standard Bingo card will consist of 3 rows of 5 numbers.
  • A standard version of Bingo is to draw numbers until someone has completed a line of 5 numbers (winning line). The drawing is then continued until someone completes 2 lines of winning numbers (winning 2 lines) and finally further numbers are drawn until someone completes their Bingo card (‘Full House’, ‘Coverall’ or ‘Bingo’).
  • Prizes, or cash, are awarded for each of the 3 winning positions above with the completely filled card generally receiving the largest share of the prize fund.
  • The same style card can be used in a Blackjack-Bingo style card game whereby instead of numbers being drawn, cards are drawn, or dealt from 1-8 decks. Infinite decks (electronic) or a continuous shuffling machine (CSM) could also be used.
  • The Blackjack-Bingo element can be derived by producing cards which consist of various 2-card totals. A 3×5 card is suggested although any dimensions could be used depending on requirements.
  • There are a total of 91 distinct 2-card hands that can be dealt from a single deck of cards. With 2 or more decks then additional 2-card hands can be created such as 3 of Spades, 3 of Spades. In a single deck, the 2-card possibilities can be listed and calculated as illustrated in Table IV:
  • TABLE IV
    A, 2 A, 3 A, 4 . . . A, K (13 possibilities)
    2, 3 2, 4 2, 5 . . . 2, K (12 possibilities)
    3, 4 3, 5 3, 6 . . . 3, K (11 possibilities)
    . . .
    . . .
    . . .
    Q, K (1 possibility)
  • Adding together 12+11+10+ . . . +1 gives 91 possibilities which is very close to the number of balls used in a regular Bingo game. If you ignore pairs then this reduces the total number of possibilities to 78.
  • Using infinite decks, or a CSM, then each of the 91 possibilities are equally likely. A typical Blackjack-Bingo style card is illustrated in Table V:
  • TABLE V
    A, 4 2, 7 4, 10 6, 6 8, 9
    3, 5 4, Q 5, K 7, K J, J
    A, Q 5, 8 10, K Q, K K, K
  • All of the players would have their own unique Blackjack-Bingo card comprising of different combinations of 2 cards and their aim would be to complete a winning combination before the other players involved.
  • The cards are dealt by a dealer in sets of 2 and each occurrence is crossed off by the player if it corresponds to one on his, or her, card. The dealt cards can be dealt in the context of a blackjack game, any other wagering game, or just for the purpose of resolving the bingo card wagers.
  • With the Blackjack-Bingo card as above, as an example, if the dealer dealt Jack, Jack then the player would cross, or mark, the corresponding square on his, or her, card.
  • Unlike regular Bingo, there is a possibility of repeating an occurrence. In this event it can either be ignored or could result in un-marking the square so that it needs to be crossed off again. Deciding what to do with a repeat occurrence would be the operators' choice.
  • Pairs could also be treated differently particularly as they are more difficult to achieve with 1-8 decks. To allow for this, and to keep each outcome as having equal chance, a slight variant would be to allow pairs to be split until 2 different cards make up the 2-card total. For example, the dealer deals 4,4 so splits them and deals a Jack on one and a 4 on the other. The dealer now splits the newly formed 4,4 and deals a 5 on one and a King on he other. The end result is that 3 occurrences are recorded—4,5 4,J and 4,K. Obviously, using this variant then only 78 possibilities are available as the cards would not contain any pairs on them.
  • In a further embodiment, a special variant could be introduced whereby a suited 2-card combination added a bonus if the player ended up with a winning combination. For example, using the previous Blackjack-Bingo card, let's assume that the player achieves a winning top line e.g., the player has crossed, or marked, A,4 2,7 4,10, 6,6 and 8,9. Depending on how many of these 5 combinations were suited, then either a bonus or multiplier could be used to determine the final payout. For example, if the prize money was generally $50 for a winning line then if 2 of the events on the winning line were suited then this could double the prize award, 3 suited could triple, 4 suited could quadruple and 5 suited could multiply by 100. Alternatively, a cash bonus could be awarded for 1,2,3,4 or 5 suited events on a winning line. Determining the bonus or multipliers would be the operators choice and would be dependent on the house edge required along with whether a separate ‘pool’ is formed specifically for suited payouts.
  • This could be extended further by applying the suited bonus to all types of winning combinations with large awards being paid to a ‘Full House’ that contained a certain number of suited combinations.
  • In a further embodiment, a game as described herein can be played on an electronic device, such as an electronic gaming machine (EGM). The game can also be played over a computer communications network, such as the Internet, and can also be offered at online casinos.
  • FIG. 7 is an exemplary block diagram of hardware that can be used to implement an electronic embodiment.
  • A processing unit 700 can be connected to an output unit 702 (e.g., LCD), an input unit 704 (e.g. a touch screen, keyboard, buttons, etc.), a network connection 406 (e.g. connection to a casino server or the Internet or other communication network), a ROM 708, a RAM 710, and any other hardware known in the art needed to implemented a digital version of the game (not pictured). The game can also be served to a remote client playing at an online casino over a computer communications network (such as the internet). A money collection unit 712 can be used to receive cash (or other payment from such as electronic payment) and credit the payment to the machine so that the player can play with the money deposited.
  • Any embodiments described herein can be played with a standard deck of cards or any type of special deck (e.g. a Spanish deck, etc.) The game can also be played with a single deck or multiple decks (e.g. 1-8 decks or more). Standard rules of blackjack can be used as well as any known variation of blackjack. Further, the order of any of the operations described herein can be performed in any order and wagers can be placed/resolved in any order. Any embodiments herein can also be played in electronic form and programs and/or data for such can be stored on any type of computer readable storage medium (e.g. CD-ROM, DVD, disk, etc.)
  • The many features and advantages of the invention are apparent from the detailed specification and, thus, it is intended by the appended claims to cover all such features and advantages of the invention that fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation illustrated and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

Claims (20)

1. A method to play a wagering side game between a player and a dealer for a casino, the method comprising:
providing an indicator display which can display occurrences of at least two conditions;
resolving a main wager by dealing dealt cards, completing a wagering game, and updating the indicator display based on an occurrence derived from the dealt cards; and
determining if the indicator display displays a predetermined winning set, and if so, paying the player an award based on the winning set.
2. The method as recited in claim 1, further comprising:
resolving a second main wager by dealing second dealt cards, completing a second wagering game, and updating the indicator display based on the second dealt cards;
determining if the indicator display displays a predetermined winning set, and if so, paying the player an award based on the winning set.
3. The method as recited in claim 1, further comprising repeating the resolving, completing, updating, and determining an indefinite number of times.
4. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the indicator display displays point totals corresponding to a dealer's final hand.
5. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the indicator display displays point totals corresponding to the dealer's upcard.
6. The method as recited in claim 1, further comprising repeating the resolving, completing, updating, and determining, until a reset condition occurs.
7. The method as recited in claim 6, wherein the wagering game is blackjack and the reset condition comprises when the dealer busts.
8. The method as recited in claim 6, wherein the reset condition comprises when a predetermined number of hands has been played after the side game has started.
9. The method as recited in claim 6, wherein whether the reset condition occurs is determined based on cards dealt during a last recent round of the wagering game.
10. The method as recited in claim 1, further comprising, receiving a side wager from the player.
11. The method as recited in claim 2, further comprising receiving a second side wager from the player.
12. The method as recited in claim 3, wherein the player places a new side wager for each new hand in order to be eligible for the award.
13. The method as recited in claim 2, further comprising receiving an initial wager from the player.
14. The method as recited in claim 6, further comprising receiving an initial wager from the player.
15. The method as recited in claim 14, wherein the player does not need to place additional side wager(s) in order to be eligible for the award until the reset condition occurs.
16. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the occurrence is based on a point total of the dealer's initial two cards.
17. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the occurrence is based on the dealer's up-card.
18. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the occurrence is based on the dealer's final point total after drawing.
19. The winning set is a predetermined pattern on the indicator display.
20. A method to play a blackjack variation between a player and a dealer for a casino, the method comprising:
providing an indicator board which can display occurrences of at least two conditions;
receiving a first blackjack wager and a side wager from a player;
playing a first blackjack hand by dealing first dealt cards;
updating the indicator board based on at least one of the first dealt cards;
determining if the indicator board displays a predetermined set of conditions, and if so, then awarding the player an award for the side wager.
receiving a second blackjack wager from the player;
playing a second blackjack hand by dealing second dealt cards;
updating the indicator board based on at least one of the second dealt cards;
determining if the indicator board displays a predetermined set of conditions, and if so, then awarding the player an award for the side wager.
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US8500538B2 (en) 2009-07-30 2013-08-06 Igt Bingo gaming system and method for providing multiple outcomes from single bingo pattern
US20110165927A1 (en) * 2009-12-19 2011-07-07 Geoff Hall Video Poker Game with a Hedging Operation
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